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State Route 198

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 198 Seg 1From Route 101 near San Lucas to Route 33 at Coalinga.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    In 1965, the California Highway Commission adopted a freeway location for 1.1 miles of Route 198 near San Lucas to provide a connection with the future US 101 Freeway. The new routing leaves the existing highway northeast of Cemetery Road, proceeds southwesterly to southwest of existing US 101, then turns more westerly to future US 101.

    The portion of Route 198 between US 101 and San Lucas was the original routing of US 101. The bypass of King City, San Lucas, and San Ardo was adopted in 1962.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was all LRN 10. The portion between Hanford and Route 99 was defined in 1909. The portion from US 101 to Hanford was defined in 1915, and the remainder (Route 99 to Sequoia National Park) was defined in 1919. In 1934, Route 198 was signed from Jct. US 101 at San Lucas to Sequoia National Park via Coalinga.

    The 1918 State Highway Map shows LRN 10 completed between Goshen west to Hanford but only a proposed highway west to San Lucas. As LRN 10 west of Hanford was unconstructedm the implied route of the highway west to San Lucas had to traverse the marsh lands of Tulare Lake. The 1917 California State Automobile Association map indicates that implied route west of Lemoore to Coalinga was as follows:
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "California State Route 198", snapshotted 11/11/2019)

    • From Hanford-Armona Road south on Lemoore Avenue/18th Avenue.
    • From 18th Avenue west on Jackson Avenue.
    • Jackson Avenue west to 21st 1/2 Avenue.
    • 21st 1/2 Avenue over the Kings River via the Chisholm's Ferry Bridge (constructed some time between 1885 and 1892) to Murphy's Ranch Road.
    • From Murphy's Ranch Road southwesterly jog on roadways that appear to no longer exist to Huron.
    • From Huron the right of way took an unclear path southwest to Jayne Avenue.
    • From Jayne Avenue west to Polk Street in Coalinga.

    The 1920 State Highway Map shows the planned alignment of LRN 10 between Lemoore and Coalinga as only partially constructed. The route of LRN 10 west from Lemoore was planned to be aligned completely west of Lemoore on Jackson Avenue into the Diablo Range where it would have turned south from the Oilfields to Coalinga.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "California State Route 198", snapshotted 11/11/2019)

    Naming Naming

    John McVeigh, Jr. Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 198 from the junction with Route 101 (~ MON R0.209) to the County of Fresno (~ MON 25.726/FRE 0.0) is officially designated the "John McVeigh, Jr. Memorial Highway". Officer John N. McVeigh, Jr. was responding to an injury accident on Route 198 in the area of King City, in the County of Monterey on April 17, 1993 when he lost control of his patrol car as it rounded a curve. McVeigh’s patrol car spun into the opposing lane of traffic where it was struck broadside by an oncoming pick-up. Although McVeigh was securely belted in his seat and his air bag deployed, the force of the impact killed the 38-year-old officer instantly. Officer McVeigh was a 13-year veteran of the CHP and a 1992 King City Officer of the Year. During that year he made more than 2,500 enforcement contacts, most of which were for violations identified as primary reasons why collisions occur. Officer McVeigh was raised in Daly City, attended St. Ignatius High School in San Francisco and graduated from Santa Clara University where he studied accounting.  cVeigh began his career with the CHP in 1980 after graduating from the CHP academy in Sacramento. He served in Westminster, Redwood City, and Monterey before joining the King City office at the end of 1991. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 119, Chapter 147, in 1994.
    (Image source: Gribblenation; California Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.8] Entire portion.


  2. Rte 198 Seg 2From Route 33 near Oilfields to Route 99 via Hanford.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was all LRN 10. The portion between Hanford and Route 99 was defined in 1909. The portion from US 101 to Hanford was defined in 1915, and the remainder (Route 99 to Sequoia National Park) was defined in 1919. In 1934, Route 198 was signed from Jct. US 101 at San Lucas to Sequoia National Park via Coalinga.

    Tom Fearer investigated the original routing of Route 198 in Kings County. He noted:
    (Source: Tom Fearer (Max Rockatansky) on AARoads, March 2017)

    The original 1934 alignment westbound followed the modern expressway from the Tulare County line to approximately 7th Avenue. Route 198 used East Lacey Blvd to reach Hanford, 7th Street west, Irwin Street north to downtown, and west on West Lacey Blvd to exit the city. West of Hanford, Route 198 used West Lacey Blvd and south on 14th Avenue to reach Armona. From downtown Armona, Route 198 took Front Street west to Hanford-Armona Road to exit the city. Route 198 continued west on Hanford-Armona bypassing Lemoore to the north to reach Route 41 on 19½th Avenue. Route 198 multiplexed Route 41 south on 19½th Avenue to Jackson Avenue where it split west over the Kings River to roughly where the old alignment dead ends at the modern Route 198 expressway. It would appear the above alignment largely stayed the same with the expection of a minor realignment in Hanford on 7th Street to Garner Avenue to reach West Lacey Blvd. It appears that the Route 198 expressway was partially completed west of Lemoore by 1964, with additional segments opened between Lemoore to 10th Avenue in Hanford in 1966, and the full modern alignment by 1967. The modern alignment was gradually improved over the years to almost a full freeway between 7th Avenue and 25th Avenue."

    The original alignment of Route 198 wasn't so much in the way substantially different than the modern route when it was plotted out in 1934, but lacked the modern easement of the modern bypass curves. Most of the Route 198 freeway from Route 99 roughly follows the initial alignment of Route 198 to Visalia. The initial 1934 route of Route 198 in the City of Visalia ran on Main Street east/west into downtown before cutting south on Court Street. Route 198 was routed south via Court Street to Mineral King Avenue where it resume heading in an east/west direction. East out of Visalia to modern Route 65 and Route 245 much of the route of Route 198 freeway/expressway still occupies the general alignment of the original Route 198 design.

    In 1937 there may have been a change of Route 198 to take Coyner Street from Main to reach Mineral King Avenue. A 1940 document seems to suggest that Route 198 continued east from Court to Bridge Street from which it reached Mineral King Avenue. At some point in time prior the freeway construction through Visalia it is likely that westbound Route 198 was shifted onto Center Avenue and eastbound continued one-way on Main Street like the modern traffic configuration does today, but I can't prove it. Likewise Route 198 may at some point been one-way south on Locust Avenue to Mineral King Avenue and one-way northbound much like the modern alignment of Route 63 through downtown Visalia. The freeway alignment of Route 198 was approved in 1961 and was gradually built over the next couple years with completion in 1965. There was some variations with sections between Route 99 and Visalia being an expressway as opposed to the freeway it is today,

    East of Route 65 and Route 245 (originally Route 65) the alignment to the Terminus Dam is very much in the same general area but very different than the 1934 alignment. Route 198 turned north off the modern Route 198 alignment in Yokohl on Road 220 north, Avenue 312 east, Road 228 north, 7th Avenue/Moffet Drive/Road 236 northeast, and Avenue 324 back to the modern alignment in Lemon Cove. Route 198 appears to have zig-zagged through Lemon Cove on Road 244, Pogue Avenue, modern CA 198, Lemon Road, Avenue 330, and modern Route 198 to make it through the town.

    North of Lemon Cove, Route 198 would have passed modern Route 216, likely using Road 248 north, Avenue 338 east, Road 249 north, and Avenue 340 east to reach the site of the modern Terminus Dam. The alignment I just described is not on the 1935 Tulare County Map but there is a very obvious concrete road bed leading up to the Terminus Dam, The 1938 State Highway Map appears to have it however. At some point Route 198 may have used Long Drive. Route 198 was realigned to the south from 1961 to 1962 due to the construction of the Terminus Dam and opening of the Lake Kaweah Reservoir.

    Tom Fearer also noted: During the 1919 Third State Highway Bond Act, LRN 10 was extended east from Visalia to the Colony Mill Road of Sequoia National Park. The original route of LRN 10 in Tulare County split from LRN 4 at Main Street and Mooney Boulevard in Visalia. It appears that LRN 10 east of downtown Visalia traversed southeast to Visalia Road through Farmersville and Exeter before swinging back north on Kaweah Avenue (current CA 65) to the current surface alignment of CA 198 east of CA 245. This early alignment of LRN 10 can be seen on the 1920 State Highway Map. The southeast jog of LRN 10 from downtown Visalia to Visalia Road doesn't align to any current existing roadways and likely was on rail frontage facilities. as East of current Route 245 the alignment of LRN 10 to the site of the Terminus Dam was very different than modern Route 198. LRN 10 turned north off the modern Route 198 alignment in Yokohl on Road 220 north, Avenue 312 east, Road 228 north, 7th Avenue/Moffet Drive/Road 236 northeast, and Avenue 324 back to the modern alignment in Lemon Cove. LRN 10 appears to have zig-zagged through Lemon Cove on Road 244, Pogue Avenue, modern Route 198, Lemon Road, Avenue 330, and modern Route 198 to make it through the town. East of Lemon Cove LRN 10 would have passed modern CA 216 and used Road 248 north, Avenue 338 east, Road 249 north, and Avenue 340 east to reach the site of the modern Terminus Dam. At some point LRN 10 was moved onto what is now Long Drive (which was probably when the 1922 Pumpkin Hollow Bridge was built) approaching the Terminus Dam site.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "California State Route 198", snapshotted 11/11/2019)

    Tom's blog post on Gribblenation Blog "California State Route 198" has loads of details on how the routing changed over time.

    Status Status

    Route 33 to Route 41

    In March 2016. it was reported that Kings County had a 20-year wish list totaling approximately $1.2 billion to transition a number of highways to four lanes: Route 43 from Selma to Corcoran; Route 41 from Lemoore to Kettleman City and Route 198 from I-5 (~ FRE 26.908) to Naval Air Station Lemoore (~ KIN 2.678). However, Kings County is only expected to get $3.5 million from the State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) designed for capacity increasing projects in the 2013-2014 period.
    (Source: Andy3175 @ AAroad, March 2016; HartfordSentinal, 9/7/2013).

    In July 2005, the CTC considered vacation of right of way in the County of Kings, at Avenue 25, consisting of highway right of way easement no longer needed for State highway purposes (6-Kin-198-PM 3.03).

    In September 2005, the CTC considered a project for Route 198 in Kings County to convert at-grade intersection to partial interchange and upgrade from urban expressway to freeway between Route 41 (~ KIN 8.761) and Vine St. in Lemoore (~ KIN R10.035).

    In January 2019, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Lemoore (City) along Route 198 on 19th Avenue and Iona Avenue (06-Kin-198-PM R9.47), consisting of local street improvements. The City by relinquishment agreement dated October 18, 2018, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.
    (Source: January 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    Route 41 to Route 99 through Hanford

    Hanford-Armona Road Roundabout (06-Kin-198 R15.5)

    Rte 198 Hanford ArmonaIn May 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a roundabout at the intersection of Hanford-Armona Road and 13th Avenue near the city of Hanford (~ KIN R15.776). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total programmed amount is $6,434,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will result in less than significant impacts to the environment after mitigation. The following resource area may be impacted by the project: biological resources. Avoidance and minimization measures will reduce any potential effects on the environment. These measures include, but are not limited to, environmentally sensitive areas will be established for nesting birds, burrowing owl, and San Joaquin kit fox, tree and vegetation removal will be done outside nesting season, and replacement planting of any disturbed Heritage oak trees.

    In January 2017, the CTC received an information report on 06-Kin-198 R15.5 Near Hanford, at the Hanford-Armona Road Undercrossing. Outcome/Output: Construct roundabout to reduce the number and severity of traffic collisions. There was a change in the CON ENG budget from $806,000 to $875,000. The original allocation of $4,688,000 was 12/18/2017.

    In September 2018, Caltrans District 6 tweeted that there would be a seven week closure at the Hanford-Armona Road Undercrossing for construction of a roundabout. The intersection was scheduled to be reopened on 11/16/2018. The closure would include the WB Route 198 on-ramp.
    (Source: Caltrans District 4 on Facebook, 9/27/2018)

    In March 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Hanford along Route 198 at 12th Avenue and Hayden Avenue, consisting of a reconstructed city street (06-Kin-198-PM R16.9). The City, by letter dated December 10, 2013, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In December 2017, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Hanford along Route 198 on 12th Avenue (06-Kin-198-PM R16.91), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by Relinquishment Agreement dated August 12, 2016 and Amendment No. 1 to Agreement 06-1602 dated July 12, 2017, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    Hanford to Route 99 Expressway (~ KIN R21.449 to ~ TUL R3.448R)

    Hanford ExpresswayIn May 2001, the CTC considered TCRP Project #111, which will build 10mi of 4-lane expressway from Route 99 to Hanford in Kings and Tulare counties. The basic approach will be to widen the two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane expressway on Route 198 from east of Route 43 near Hanford to west of Route 99 near Visalia. The project is estimated to cost a total of $55.3 million. The regional transportation planning agencies in both Kings and Tulare Counties and the State have already funded $17.5 million for environmental review, design and right of way phases. The project will be funded with $14.0 million in the Governor’s Transportation Congestion Relief Program (TCRP). In 2007, the CTC authorized an additional $22.912 million in funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account, out of $28.640 million requested) [for the Tulare County portion] and $48.688 million (ouf of $60.860 million requested) [for the Kings County portion].

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2116: Route 198 Expansion, from Route 99 to Route 43. $2,400,000.

    In 2007, the CTC did not recommend funding the 19th Ave. interchange and freeway conversion in Kings County ($27,770K requested) from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA).

    In October 2008, the CTC received a mitigated negative declaration regarding the widening of Route 198 in Kings and Tulare Counties from 0.5 miles east of Route 43 near Hanford to 0.4 miles west of Route 99 near Visalia. The project is programmed with Corridor Mobility Improvement Account, Regional Improvement Program, Interregional Improvement Program, Traffic Congestion Relief Program, and federal demonstration funds. The total estimated project cost, capital and support, is $124.5 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The project will involve construction activities resulting in a reduction in prime farmland and visual impacts that will be mitigated to less than significant levels.

    In April 2010 the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Kings County that will construct improvements to the interchange of 12th Avenue and Route 198 in the city of Hanford, including the widening of the existing overpass and ramps on Route 198. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local funds. Total estimated project cost is $23,300,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The project will involve construction activities resulting in impacts to the habitat of the San Joaquin kit fox, a Federally listed threatened species. In addition visual impacts in the form of tree removal are associated with the project.

    In December 2012, Caltrans celebrated the ceremonial completion of the Hanford Expressway project. The $60 million project converted 10 miles of Route 198 from a two-lane highway to a four-lane divided expressway, extending from Route 43 to Route 99 in Kings and Tulare counties. Construction began in November 2009.

    In May 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Kings along Route 198 between 1st Avenue and 8th Avenue (Route 43), consisting of reconstructed county roads and newly constructed frontage roads (06-Kings-198-PM T21.65/28.32). This is along the portion E Hanford between Route 43 and Route 99. and Route 99. It also authorized the vacation of right of way in the county of Kings along Route 198 between 2nd Avenue and 7th Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes (06-Kings-198-PM 22.73/27.34).

    In March 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Tulare along Route 198 from the Kings and Tulare County line to Route 99 (06-Tul-198-PM 0.00/R3.27), consisting of intersection improvements and newly constructed frontage roads.

    In March 2014, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Tulare along Route 198 from the Kings and Tulare County line to Route 99 (06-Tul-198-PM 0.00/3.02), consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The County, was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate, without protesting such action.

    In September 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Tulare, at Avenue 296, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county road. (6-Tul-198-PM 21.9 (KP 35.23))

    Naming Naming

    United States Navy Lieutenant Commander Otis Vincent TolbertThe portion between 25th Avenue and 18th Avenue (~ KIN 3.022 to KIN R10.553) near Lemoore is named the "United States Navy Lieutenant Commander Otis Vincent Tolbert Memorial Highway". Named in honor of the United States Navy Lieutenant Commander Otis Vincent Tolbert, a long-time Lemoore resident who was killed during the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. The segment of highway named, from 18th Avenue to 25th Avenue in Lemoore, directly correlates to his life, starting at Lemoore High School, his alma mater, and ending at the Lemoore Naval Air Station. LTC Tolbert graduated from Lemoore High School in 1990, where he was a track and field star. He was awarded a football scholarship to California State University, Fresno (CSUF), where he played defensive end for the Fresno State Bulldogs football team. He graduated in 1985 with a degree in criminal justice, and joined the United States Navy, where he advanced to the rank of Lieutenant Commander for the Defense Intelligence Agency. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 35, Chapter 51, May 5, 2004.
    (Image source: Tom Uribes on Twitter)

    Specialist 4th Class George Alan IngallsThe portion that passes through the City of Hanford between Twelfth Avenue and Seventh Avenue (~ KIN R16.901 to KIN 22.315) in Hanford is named the "George Alan Ingalls Memorial Highway". George Alan Ingalls was born on March 9, 1946, in Hanford, California. He entered the United States Army at Los Angeles, California, obtained the rank of Specialist Fourth Class, and was assigned to Company A, Second Battalion, Fifth Calvary, First Calvary Division (Airmobile). He served in Vietnam, and on April 16, 1967, near Duc Pho, Republic of Vietnam, George Alan Ingalls, in a spontaneous act of great courage, which cost him his own life, threw himself on top of a hand grenade, thereby abating the grenade's full blast and saving the lives of the members of his squad. He was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously on January 30, 1969; on November 11, 2000, American Legion Post 3 of Hanford appropriately honored George Alan Ingalls' mother and family members at the tank memorial in the Hanford Cemetery. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 47, Resolution Chapter 60, filed June 4, 2001.
    (Image source: VVMF Wall of Faces)

    Keith M. Giles Memorial InterchangeThe interchange at Route 43 and Route 198 (~ KIN R21.449) in the County of Kings is named the "CHP Officer Keith M. Giles Memorial Interchange". Keith Melvin Giles was born in July 1940, to Melvin and Thelma Giles, in Tulare, California. Keith Giles had three siblings: Gary, who was Keith’s twin brother, Linda, and Greg. Keith Giles graduated from Corcoran High School in 1957, graduated from the College of the Sequoias shortly thereafter, and also attended Fresno State College. Keith Giles proudly served in the United States Army from 1963 to 1965 and achieved the rank of corporal. Prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol officer, Keith Giles worked as a farmer and was actively involved in the community. Officer Giles graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy on May 28, 1970, with CTC I-70 and, upon graduation, he was assigned to the Santa Fe Springs Area where he proudly served for approximately four years. Officer Giles, badge number 7403, was killed in the line of duty on August 25, 1974, while making a traffic stop shortly after 2:00 a.m. He was standing on the left side of the stopped vehicle when a passing car drifted over the edge of the roadway and struck him, killing him almost instantly. The errant driver apparently dozed off and may have been under the influence of alcohol. Officer Giles was a hardworking, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people he worked with. He was known for his devotion to his family and his love of law enforcement. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 159, Res. Chapter 123, Statutes of 2016, on August 16, 2016.
    (Image sources: Hanford Sentinel)

    LCpl Christian VasquezThe portion of Route 198 between Sixth Avenue and the Kings County line (~ KIN 23.32 to KIN 28.32) in the Kings County is named the "Christian Vasquez Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Lance Corporal Christian Vasquez, who was born in the City of Hanford on July 11, 1987, and grew up in the City of Coalinga. Lance Corporal Vasquez attended Dawson Elementary School, Coalinga Middle School, and Coalinga High School, class of 2006. Lance Corporal Vasquez, like his brother Danny, always wanted to become a Marine and, enlisted in the United States Marine Corps one week after his high school graduation. Lance Corporal Vasquez joined the Marine Corps to enable his mother to stay at home and care for his baby brother. Lance Corporal Vasquez aspired to become a doctor, as others in his family had, and hoped to attend medical school in Texas. Lance Corporal Vasquez was killed in action in the province of Al Anbar, Iraq on August 2, 2007. It was named in recognition of Lance Corporal Vasquez’s service and sacrifice. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image source: Iraq/Afghanistan War Heroes)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Officer Jonathan DiazThe 19th Avenue overcrossing on Route 198 in the City of Lemoore (~ KIN R9.474) in the County of Kings is named the "Officer Jonathan Diaz Memorial Overcrossing". It was named in memory of Officer Jonathan Diaz, who was a graduate of Coalinga High School and West Hills College, where he earned an associate’s degree in criminal justice. Officer Jonathan Diaz began his law enforcement career in his hometown of Huron, California, as a reserve police officer with the Huron Police Department where he investigated numerous complex cases and earned Officer of the Year in 2015. Diaz was hired by the Lemoore Police Department in August 2016 and was an asset to the community. Diaz received numerous commendations from the Lemoore Police Department, including being selected to be the Recruit Training Officer for the Tulare-Kings Counties Basic Peace Officer Academy and a Field Training Officer for the Lemoore Police Department. Diaz displayed an eagerness to go above and beyond on his assigned calls and his thoroughness and outstanding investigative skills resulted in arrests for possession of loaded firearms and controlled substances. In addition to helping to keep the City of Lemoore safe, Officer Jonathan Diaz mentored at-promise youth of Lemoore through the Youth Adult Awareness Program and other programs. Officer Jonathan Diaz’s actions, professionalism, and dedication to his duties and to the citizens of Lemoore never went unnoticed. In September 2018, Officer Jonathan Diaz was awarded Lemoore Police Department’s Public Safety Officer of the Year and a couple months later he earned the position of Gang Investigator for the Kings County Major Crimes Task Force. Sadly, Officer Jonathan Diaz was fatally shot while off-duty after he intervened to stop an act of domestic violence. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 86, Res. Chapter 33, 09/11/20.
    (Image source: Lemoore Leader)

    CHP Officer Dean Esquibel Memorial BridgeThe Cross Creek Bridge, Bridge No. 45-0006 (~ KIN 25.171), on Route 198, in the County of Kings, is officially named the "CHP Officer Dean Esquibel Memorial Bridge". It was named on 9/27/13 by ACR 69, Res. Chapter 143, Statutes of 2013. It was named in memory of CHP Officer Dean Jose Esquibel, who was born in July 1962 in Greensboro, North Carolina. Officer Esquibel graduated from Orosi High School in 1980, joined the Police Academy through the College of the Sequoias shortly thereafter, and was assigned to the Orange Cove Police Department upon graduation. Officer Esquibel worked as an Orange Cove Police Officer and did undercover work for the Dinuba Police Department prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Dean Esquibel married in June 1981. Officer Esquibel entered the Department of the California Highway Patrol Academy on April 2, 1984, and upon graduation was assigned to the Hanford Area Office, where he proudly served the department for approximately one year. While providing backup in a high-speed pursuit of a fleeing motorcyclist on Route 198, Officer Esquibel was forced to veer off the road, causing his patrol car to burst into flames. The impact of the collision pinned Officer Esquibel inside his patrol car, and, although he was rescued by fellow CHP Officer De La Cruz shortly thereafter, Officer Esquibel succumbed to his injuries two weeks later on August 21, 1985.
    (Image source: My Lemoore Leader; CHP - Hanford Officer Dean Esquibel Memorial Page (Facebook))

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 33 near Oilfields to Route 5.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] From Route 5 near Oilfields to Route 99. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. Rte 198 Seg 3From Route 99 to the Sequoia National Park line via Visalia.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    Despite what Google thinks on their map images, The Generals Highway is a 46 mile National Park highway, and is not part of Route 198 but more or less acts as a continuation of it. The Generals Highway lies entirely within Tulare County and crosses through portions of the Giant Sequoia National Monument within Sequoia National Forest. For more information on The Generals Highway, see the Gribblenation Blog: The Generals Highway; connecting Kings Canyon National Park and Sequoia National Park

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was all LRN 10. The portion between Hanford and Route 99 was defined in 1909. The portion from US 101 to Hanford was defined in 1915, and the remainder (Route 99 to Sequoia National Park) was defined in 1919. In 1934, Route 198 was signed from Jct. US 101 at San Lucas to Sequoia National Park via Coalinga.

    Status Status

    The portion between Route 99 (~ TUL R4.246L) and Mooney Blvd. (~ TUL R8.749) has been upgraded to freeway standards.
    (Source: Gary Araki)

    Freeway completion now goes from Route 99 (~ TUL R4.246L) to Road 168 (~ TUL R15.253) near Farmersville.

    In July 2002, the CTC considered relinquishing the segment from PM TUL R4.8 to TUL R8.8 in the City of Visalia

    Route 198/Route 216 Junction Widening (TUL R11.71)

    In September 2020, it was reported that CalTrans plans to improve the interchange between Route 216 and Route 198. In May 2016, Visalia and CalTrans staff held a joint public hearing to discuss improvements to the interchange. In order to solve congestion at the Lovers Lane interchange of Route 198, the city and (CalTrans) are proposing improvements and changes at the intersections of Lovers Lane and Noble Avenue, Lovers Lane and Route 198 eastbound ramp, Mineral King Ave and Route 198 westbound ramp and Lovers Lane and Mineral King. Originally proposed with a $60 million price tag in 2016 to close a portion of Mineral King Ave affecting both homes and businesses, the current project relies on a future planned highway interchange at Tower Road (Road 148), less than a mile east of Lovers Lane to relieve congestion at the Lovers Lane interchange. The new project is estimated to cost $21.5 million. The California Transportation Commission approved for the design and environmental phase of the project to be funded through the State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) fund. It is anticipated the design and right-of-way for the project could be completed by early 2023, with bidding and construction complete by the middle of 2025. The proposed improvements include:
    (Source: Sun Gazette, 9/16/2020)

    • Lovers Lane/Noble: Remove the raised median; add a second left-turn lane to the southbound and northbound approaches on Lovers Lane; construct a second eastbound lane; construct a westbound right-turn lane on Noble; reconstruct signals; upgrade existing ramps to current standards.
    • Lovers Lane/Route 198: remove the raised median on Lovers Lane; construct a right-turn lane on the eastbound off-ramp; construct a right-turn lane on Lovers Lane for the eastbound on-ramp; reconstruct the signals; upgrade existing ramps to current standards.
    • Lovers Lane Undercrossing: Remove raised median; extend existing left-turn lanes in both directions; remove existing return walls and sidewalks behind a curtain wall; add bike lanes; install dedicated right turn lane on Lovers Lane to Mineral King Ave.
    • Lovers Lane/Mineral King Ave: Remove raised median on Lovers Lane; add a second southbound left-turn lane on Lovers Lane; construct a second eastbound receiving lane; reconstruct a northbound right-turn lane on Mineral King Ave; reconstruct signals and upgrade ramps to current standards.
    • Mineral King Ave/Route 198: Add a westbound left-turn lane; construct a continuous right-turn lane from Mineral King Ave to the highway westbound on-ramp.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $508,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Lemon Cove, at the Lemon Cove Maintenance Station (~ TUL 26.257), that will excavate contaminated soil at one location to improve ground water quality and comply with local regulations.

    Naming Naming

    Officer James RapozoThe portion of Route 198 between Route 99 and Route 245 near Lindcove (~ TUL R4.246L to TUL T19.779) is named the "Officer James Rapozo Memorial Freeway". Jim Rapozo began his law enforcement career with the Hanford Police Department in April 1986 and worked there until March 1990 when he became a Kings County Deputy Sheriff. Less than a year later he joined the Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement before he became a member of the Visalia Police Department in April 1992. On Christmas Eve, 1997, a sixteen-year-old gang member shot and wounded five people. He purported bragged to a number of people he did the shooting and insisted he would not be taken alive. On January 9, the suspect was located hiding in an apartment and a search warrant obtained by the Visalia Police Department. Officer James J. Rapozo was one of the first SWAT team members to enter the apartment. The suspect immediately opened fire on the officers with a .9mm semi-automatic handgun. A hail of gunfire met his assault, killing him. But one his bullets struck Officer Rapozo’s left side in an area not covered by his vest penetrating his heart. He was rushed to Kaweah Delta District Hospital where he died in surgery. Officer Rapoza was the first Visalia officer to die in the line of fire since 1946. Both of his children have continued in law enforcement: Megan Rapozo started working fulltime as the public information officer for the Tulare County Sheriff's Office in 2014; his son Max is an officer with the Corcoran Police Department as of 2018. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 84, Chapter 118, on 9/20/1999.
    (Image source: Visalia Police Department on Facebook; Information sources: ABC7; ODMP; ABC30; CATO)

    The portion from Visalia to Route 65 (~ TUL 8.208R to TUL R18.7) is historically named the "Orange Belt Highway".

    Detective Monty L. Conley and Detective Joe R. LandinThe portion of Route 198 between Road 204 and Mehrten Drive (~ TUL T19.77 to TUL 23.761) in the County of Tulare is officially designated as the “Detective Monty L. Conley and Detective Joe R. Landin Memorial Highway”. It was named in memory of Detective Monty L. Conley and Detective Joe R. Landin of the Tulare County Sheriff's Department, who were killed on August 5, 1985, while performing their duties on behalf of the citizens they swore to protect. Detective Monty L. Conley was born in Shamrock, Texas. He lived there until 1955, when he moved to Woodlake, California. He attended Woodlake High School and the College of the Sequoias. At 19 years of age, he became Woodlake's youngest police officer. In 1973, he joined the Tulare County Sheriff's Department, where he worked in the jail and patrol divisions and later as a detective in the narcotics units. Detective Joe R. Landin was born in La Mesa, Texas, where he lived until the eighth grade. He then moved to Woodlake, California, where he attended high school. After joining the United States Marine Corps, and serving in Vietnam, he returned to Woodlake in 1972 and attended the College of the Sequoias. He became a Woodlake Police Officer in 1974. Upon joining the Tulare County Sheriff's Department in 1981, Detective Landin worked in the jail and patrol divisions. As a detective, he was assigned to the Sheriff's Tactical Enforcement Patrol and the narcotics unit. On August 5, 1985, Detective Conley and his partner, Detective Landin, were investigating a narcotics case near the town of Pixley, California, in southern Tulare County. While the two were traveling in Detective Conley's vehicle, they collided with another motorist who ran a stop sign at over 85 miles per hour. Both detectives lost their lives as a result of this tragic incident. The other motorist was tried and convicted of vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence and served a prison term of five years and four months. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 15, Resolution Chapter 51, on July 13, 2011.
    (Image source: Tulare County Fallen Officers)

    Colonel Charles Young Memorial HighwayThe portion of Route 198 from the postmile marker starting at Salt Creek Road (TUL 41.226, which is near Salt Creek at TUL 41.247) to the end at Sequoia National Park (TUL 44.163) in the County of Tulare, in the County of Tulare as the "Colonel Charles Young Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Colonel Charles Young, who was born into slavery in March 1864, in Mays Lick, Kentucky, to Gabriel Young and Arminta Bruen. After his father, Gabriel Young, escaped from slavery and enlisted in the Fifth Regiment of Colored Artillery, his service earned Gabriel and his wife their freedom. Young attended the all-white high school in Ripley, Kentucky, and graduated at the top of his class. In 1883, Charles Young took an examination for appointment as a cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and was admitted in 1884. Having graduated from West Point in 1889 with a commission as a second lieutenant, the third African American to do so at the time, he served with the Ninth U.S. Cavalry Regiment for 28 years. Lieutenant Young served as a professor for four years at Wilberforce College, where he led the new military sciences department. When the Spanish-American War broke out, Young was promoted to the temporary rank of Major of Volunteers on May 14, 1898, where he commanded the 9th Ohio Infantry Regiment. In 1903, Young was then appointed acting superintendent of Sequoia and General Grant National Parks, becoming the first black superintendent of a national park. Young, in one summer, accomplished more than the previous three officers assigned to the park through the management of extensive road construction, along with the improvement of the underdeveloped park, which allowed more visitors to enjoy the park than ever before. In his final report on the Sequoia Park to the Secretary of the Interior, Young recommended the acquisition of privately held lands there to secure more park area for future generations, from which legislation was introduced in the House of Representatives. In 1904, Young married Ada Mills in Oakland, California, and later became the father of two children, Charles Noel and Marie Aurelia. Because of his exceptional leadership of the 10th Cavalry, Young was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in September 1916, the first African American to achieve the rank of colonel in the United States Army. Colonel Young died on January 8, 1922, from a kidney infection while on a reconnaissance mission in Nigeria, and was given a full military funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 142, Res. Chapter 143, 8/17/2018
    (Image source: 3R News; National Park Service)

    The segment from Sequoia National Park (~ TUL 44.163 and beyond, although technically not maintained by the state) to Kings Canyon National Park has historically been named the "Generals Highway".

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Private First Class (PFC) Keith M. Williams Memorial OverpassThe Akers Street overpass at TUL 6.765 on Route 198 in the County of Tulare, is named the "Private First Class Keith M. Williams Memorial Overpass". It was named in memory of Private First Class Keith M. Williams, the youngest of three children, born to Debbie and Frankie Williams. While Keith was only six years old when 9/11/2001 occurred; in the years following, he was drawn to military service by a strong sense of patriotism and a family tradition of military service. Keith’s father served in the United States Navy for 20 years, both his grandfathers served in the military, and many of his other relatives served and currently serve in various branches of the United States Armed Forces, the New Zealand Army, and the Australian Army. Keith was a Native American of the Yokut tribe from the Tule River, having participated in powwows and Sweat Lodge Ceremonies. Keith was an avid skateboarder, surfer, snowboarder, a lover of all types of music and the drums, and a talented musician, self-taught in piano. Keith loved to sing, though he was a terrible singer, and loved junk food, which he was known for having at all times. During high school, Keith was a bright, easygoing young man who participated in band, drum line, football, and link crew to assist incoming freshman students, and was a member of the homecoming court during his senior year. Following his graduation from El Diamante High School in 2013, Keith chose to dedicate his life to serving his country and enlisted in the United States Army, graduating from basic training at Fort Benning in December 2013 from the 198th Infantry Brigade, 2-54th Infantry Battalion, Charlie Company, 4th Platoon, Red Company Mavericks. Keith was a regular American kid who appreciated the freedoms that were made possible by those who sacrificed before him, and wrote on the back of his basic training picture that freedom was not free. The proudest day of Keith’s life was the day he marched off the field as a United States Army Infantryman, willing to die for his battle buddies and for his country. Keith was stationed in Fort Carson, Colorado, with the 4th Infantry Division before he was deployed to Afghanistan in March 2014. On July 24, 2014, while on a mission near Mirugol Kalay, Keith, an M249 SAW gunner, was the driver of the lead vehicle and was critically wounded after his vehicle was hit by an improvised explosive device, at which time Staff Sergeant Benjamin Prange, who was seated next to him, died. Following the explosion, Keith was airlifted to the Role 3 Multinational Hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan, where, at the age of 19, Keith died with a chaplain from his unit holding his hand. Private First Class Keith M. Williams received various awards and decorations for his service in the United States Army, including the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart, the Army Commendation Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with bronze service star, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the Overseas Service Ribbon, the NATO Medal, and the Combat Infantryman Badge. Private First Class Keith M. Williams made the ultimate sacrifice while performing his sworn duty, and it is fitting that we pay tribute to him and recall his devotion to duty and honor his service to his country. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 220, Res. Chapter 154, 8/17/2018.
    (Image source: YourCentralValley.Com; Me.Me)

    Corporal Jared Verbeek Memorial BridgeThe South Giddings Avenue overcrossing of Route 198 (~ TUL R9.239) in the City of Visalia is named the "Corporal Jared Verbeek Memorial Overcrossing" (signed as "Corporal Jared Verbeek Memorial Bridge"). It was named in memory of Corporal Jared Verbeek, who was born in 1989, in Visalia, California, to Travis and Rosalia Verbeek. Corporal Verbeek's father served in the United States Marine Corps until his retirement and his example of dedication impressed upon his son the need to also serve his country. From an early age, Corporal Verbeek sought the opportunity to wear a uniform in service of his country, including joining the Boy Scouts of America and earning 13 merit badges within his first month. Always striving to do more, and be more, than an average person, Corporal Verbeek participated in many team sports in high school, including baseball, basketball, football, track and field, and cross country. Corporal Verbeek maintained a high GPA in high school while working with the Tulare County Sheriff, where he assisted in background and training documentation, and attended Congressman Devin Nunes' military academy at night to learn more about obtaining a commission as a military officer. Corporal Verbeek was selected for a congressional appointment to Annapolis Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, but instead chose to enlist with the United States Marine Corps and went to Marine Corps recruit training in San Diego, California, immediately after his graduation from high school. Corporal Verbeek graduated recruit training on February 1, 2008, and was assigned as a recruiter assistant at the Visalia recruiting substation, which pleased Corporal Verbeek because he could stay near his family longer. Corporal Verbeek was assigned to Marine combat training at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in Santa Margarita, California, followed by an order to Fort Lenard Wood, Missouri, where he went through his military occupational speciality training for military police, his chosen field. He then received his first duty assignment with the Military Police (MP) Company at Camp Pendleton. Corporal Verbeek volunteered to be an MP liaison for the First Battalion of the Fifth Marine Regiment, which was deployed on March 17, 2011, to Afghanistan. Corporal Verbeek gave the ultimate sacrifice for our security and died on June 21, 2011, from wounds sustained while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Corporal Verbeek's family and friends recall his thoughtfulness, selfless acts, laughter, brutal honesty, love for his family, and determination to serve his country. Corporal Verbeek's service awards include the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the National Defense Service Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, and the Afghanistan Campaign Medal, and a nomination for a posthumous Purple Heart. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 129, Resolution Chapter 65, on July 5, 2012.
    (Image source: Recorder Online; Find a Grave)

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.8] Entire portion.

    Freeway Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Tulare 198 4.22 5.00
Tulare 198 5.00 10.97
Kings 198 R10.29 R11.18
Kings 198 R16.82 R20.98

Exit Information Exit Information

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Between Route 5 and the Sequoia National Park.

Status Status

The following sections of this route are constructed to freeway standards: (1) from Lemoore Naval Air Station to Ave 16 near Armona; (2) from Ave 14 to Ave 9 east of Hanford; (3) from Ave 9 to Jct 43; (4) from 1 mile W of Route 99 to Plaza Blvd (1 mi E of Route 99); (5) from Mooney Blvd (downtown Visalia) to Rd 168.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 198:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the routes from "San Diego-Campo Road near Spring Valley to [LRN 12] near La Mesa", "[LRN 12] near El Cajon to the Descanso-Temecula Road near Santa Ysabel", and "Julian to [LRN 26] near Kane Springs" as part of the highway system. In 1935, these routes were added to the highway code as LRN 198 with the definition:

  1. [LRN 200] near Spring Valley to [LRN 12] near La Mesa
  2. [LRN 12] near El Cajon to [LRN 78] near Santa Ysabel
  3. Julian to [LRN 26] near Kane Springs

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 200 (Route 94) near Spring Valley to LRN 12 (US 80; later I-8) near La Mesa.

    This was signed as Route 67.

  2. From LRN 12 (US 80; later I-8) near El Cajon to LRN 78 (Route 79) near Santa Ysabel.

    This was signed as Route 67 and Route 78.

  3. From Julian to LRN 26 (US 99) near Kane Springs.

    This was signed as Route 78.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 197 Forward Arrow Route 199

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Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.