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State Route 19

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

Rte 19(a) Route 19 is from the northern city limit of the City of Lakewood to Gardendale Street/Foster Road in the Cities of Bellflower and Downey.

(b) If the commission determines it is in the state's best interests to do so, it may do the following, pursuant to a cooperative agreement between the respective city and the department:

(1) Relinquish to the City of Bellflower the portion of Route 19 between the city's southerly city limit near Rose Avenue and Gardendale Street/Foster Road.

(2) Relinquish to the City of Downey the portion of Route 19 between the city's southerly city limit at Century Boulevard and Gardendale Street.

(c) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective when the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution containing the commissioner's approval of the relinquishment's terms and conditions.

(d) Any portion of Route 19 relinquished pursuant to this section shall cease to be a state highway on the effective date of the relinquishment.

(e) The relinquished former portions of Route 19 within the Cities of Downey, Lakewood, Long Beach, and Pico Rivera are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portions of Route 19, the Cities of Downey, Lakewood, Long Beach, and Pico Rivera shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 19. The City of Lakewood shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished former portion of Route 19, including any traffic signal progression.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Route 19 was defined in 1963 to run "from Route 1 near Long Beach to Route 164 near Pico Rivera." Route 164 near Pico Rivera was where Rosemead met Gallatin Road (a few block N of Beverly Blvd).

Note: The portion of the highway in the City of Long Beach ceased to be a state highway pursuant to the terms of a cooperative agreement in 1998 between the City of Long Beach and the department providing for the relinquishment of that portion of the highway to that city. The Long Beach relinquishment was authorized by AB 2132, Chapter 877, signed September 26, 1998. The authorization for relinquishment of the portion in the City of Downey came from Senate Bill 803, Chapter 172, signed 7/23/1999.

In 2003, the legislative definition was changed by AB 535 (8/4/2003, Chapter 177) to acknowledge various relinquishments, and to permit some additional ones. The pre-2003 definition was:

From Route 1 near Long Beach to Route 164 near Pico Rivera, excepting the following portions once they have been relinquished by appropriate agreements:

  1. The portion of Route 19 that is between Del Amo Boulevard in the City of Long Beach and Route 1. Reliquished by cooperative agreement.
  2. The portion of Route 19 between Gardendale Street and Telegraph Boulevard with the City of Downey, upon approval of the California Transportation Commission.

Upon reliquishment, the definition of Route 19 will be:

  1. Del Amo Boulevard near Long Beach to Gardendale Street in Downey.
  2. The Downey city limit at Telegraph Road to Route 164 (Galatin Road) near Pico Rivera.

In 2010, the legislative definition was changed by SB 1381 (9/29/10, Chapter 421) and SB 993 (9/29/2010, Chapter 499). The latter change was the one that took, as it was the later chapter. This modification changed the definition to not mention the portion relinquished in Pico Rivera (which was up for relinquishment in 2004) and to add the portion relinquished in Lakewood. Specifically, (a) was changed as follows: "From Del Amo Boulevard near Long Beach to Gardendale Street/Foster Road in the Cities of Bellflower and Downey, and then, with an interruption of already relinquished route, from Telegraph Road at the Downey City limit to Route 164 (Galatin Road) at the northerly city limit of Pico Rivera.". (b) was added, and the 2003-2010 item (3) "To the City of Pico Rivera: The portion of Route 19 between Telegraph Road and Gallatin Road. (This was up for relinquishment in May 2004)" was deleted and replaced with the Lakewood wording, and (c)-(e) were added. The portion of the route in Lakewood was relinquished in March 2012.

In 2013, SB 788 (Ch. 525, 10/9/13) changed the definition again:

(a) Route 19 is from Del Amo Boulevard near Long Beach the northern city limit of the City of Lakewood to Gardendale Street/Foster Road in the Cities of Bellflower and Downey.

(b) If the commission determines it is in the state's best interests to do so, it may do the following, pursuant to a cooperative agreement between the respective city and the department:

(1) Relinquish to the City of Bellflower the portion of Route 19 between the city's southerly city limit near Rose Avenue and Gardendale Street/Foster Road.

(2) Relinquish to the City of Downey the portion of Route 19 between the city's southerly city limit at Century Boulevard and Gardendale Street.

(3) Relinquish to the City of Lakewood the portion of Route 19 that is within the city limits or the sphere of influence of the city.

(c) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective when the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution containing the commissioner's approval of the relinquishment's terms and conditions.

(d) (1) Any portion of Route 19 relinquished pursuant to this section shall cease to be a state highway on the effective date of the relinquishment.

(2) The portion of Route 19 relinquished under paragraph (3) of subdivision (b) may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

(3) For the portion of Route 19 relinquished under paragraph (3) of subdivision (b), the city shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow, including any traffic signal progression, and shall maintain signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 19.

(e) The relinquished former portions of Route 19 within the Cities of Downey, Lakewood, Long Beach, and Pico Rivera are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portions of Route 19, the Cities of Downey, Lakewood, Long Beach, and Pico Rivera shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 19. The City of Lakewood shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished former portion of Route 19, including any traffic signal progression.

In May 2017, the CTC actually relinquished right of way in the city of Bellflower on Route 19 from the south city limits near Rose Street to the north city limits at Gardendale Street (07-LA-19 PM 5.5/8.4), under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement, determined to be in the best interest of the State. The City is expected to approve the relinquishment agreement at their April 24, 2017 council meeting. Authorized by Chapter 499, Statutes of 2010, which amended Section 319 of the Streets and Highways Code. This relinquishment included a financial contribution of $4,500,000.

In December 2019, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Downey (City) on Route 19 (Lakewood Boulevard), under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated September 10, 2019, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 597, Statutes of 2001, which amended Section 319 of the Streets and Highways Code.
(Source: December 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.3c)

This routing runs along Rosemead and Lakewood Blvds. Note: Route 164 from Route 19 to Route 210 is signed as Route 19. The designation as Route 19 is older, and by the 1950s was along Rosemead until Colorado Blvd.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 19 was signed from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) near Long Beach to Jct. US 66 near Lamanda Park. This was LRN 168 (defined as a state highway route in 1933). Route 19 ran from the traffic circle in Long Beach, N along Cerritos Avenue and San Gabriel Blvd to Foothill Blvd. in Sierra Madre.

The portion of Route 19 between Telegraph and Firestone was part of Bypass US 101 in 1942.

Status Status

In March 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Lakewood on Route 19 between the city limits of Long Beach and Bellflower, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated March 1, 2012, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 499, Statutes of 2010, which amended Section 319 of the Streets and Highways Code.

In May 2017, the CTC actually relinquished right of way in the city of Bellflower on Route 19 from the south city limits near Rose Street to the north city limits at Gardendale Street (07-LA-19 PM 5.5/8.4), under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement, determined to be in the best interest of the State. The City is expected to approve the relinquishment agreement at their April 24, 2017 council meeting. Authorized by Chapter 499, Statutes of 2010, which amended Section 319 of the Streets and Highways Code. This relinquishment included a financial contribution of $4,500,000.

In December 2019, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Downey (City) on Route 19 (Lakewood Boulevard), under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated September 10, 2019, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 597, Statutes of 2001, which amended Section 319 of the Streets and Highways Code. In the January 2020 CTC Agenda, there an informational report on an allocation of $738,000 for relinquishment of 07-LA-19 7.8/8.4, which appears to be the right of way in the City of Downey.
(Source: December 2019 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.3c, January 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5f.(4) #2)

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

Note: Much work that seems to be on Route 19 is really either on a relinquished portion, or on Route 164.

Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1945; not accepted.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 19:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 19 was defined to run:

  1. From LRN 9 W of Claremont to Riverside. This segment was defined as part of the original 1909 bond act. In 1931, it was extended to Beaumont. Originally, this route ran along Garey Ave from LRN 9 to the present Route 60/Route 71 junction. This was signed as Route 71 between US 66 (LRN 9) near Claremont and the cosigned US 60/US 70/US 99 (LRN 26; now I-10), and then continued as cosigned Route 71/US 60 to the present Route 60/Route 71 junction. The portion along Garey Ave is no longer part of the state highway system; it was supplanted by the new routing for Route 60 and the new routing for Route 71.

    LRN 19 then ran E signed as US 60 (later near the alignment of Route 60) to Beaumont. The portion from Pomona to Riverside was added in 1909; in Riverside, the route was cosigned as US 60/US 91. The route was extended from Riverside to Beaumont in 1931. This extension was a former county highway commonly referred to as the Jackrabbit Trail. It was used as a bypass of LRN 26 in breaking across the country. It was also anticipated to be significant for truck traffic, and the deflection of truck traffic was felt to be significant.

  2. From Pomona to LRN 2 near Santa Ana. This segment was added in 1931 as running from Pomona to Fullerton via Brea Canyon. It represented the route between 5th and Garey in Pomona and Brea Canyon (eventually part of the Route 60 freeway). At this point, what was to become the Route 60 Freeway diverged as LRN 172. LRN 19 continued SW down Brea Canyon to Orangethorpe (Pre-1963 Route 14 (LRN 175)). This route was approximately that of the future Route 57 between the LRN 19/LRN 175 split and Tonner Canyon Road. This was originally a county highway running from Pomona to Fullerton by way of Brea Canyon that provided a cross-connection between the inland areas near Pomona and the coast territory in Orange County (similar to the Santa Ana Canyon route of LRN 43 and US 91). The Brea Canyon road joins LRN 19 (US 60) and LRN 2 (US 101) by a lateral at right angles to the course of those routes. It is geographically located about equidistant between the Santa Ana Canyon lateral and the thoroughfare to the coast. It and the Santa Ana Canyon road are the two laterals southeast of Los Angeles that must carry cross traffic inland from coast, a state function not supplied by the state system of 1930. The specific signage of this segment of the LRN 19 route before 1964 is unclear (post 1964, it was Route 57 and Route 60).

Acronyms and Explanations:


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© 1996-2020 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.