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State Route 11

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

Rte 11From the northerly border of the new Federal Port of Entry and east of the Otay Mesa Port of Entry to near the junction of Route 125 and Route 905.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

1964-1981 Routing

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic Interstate Shield In 1963, Route 11 was defined to run from San Pedro to Route 248 (Colorado Blvd) in Pasadena.


In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "Route 248" to "Colorado Blvd".

In 1978, the portion of Route 11 between Route 10 and San Pedro was approved as chargable interstate, and was assigned the number I-110, although the route was not signed as interstate at that time.

In 1981, Chapter 292 renumbered the entire routing as Route 110 for continuity of numbering purposes, with the portion S of Route 10 using an interstate shield, and the portion N of Route 10 using a state highway shield.

Route 11 was the first route to have "Call Boxes". The system included 80 boxes spaced at quarter-mile intervals. The telephones were connected to the police switchboard. They were first proposed in 1959 by Los Angeles County director of communications Maurice E. Kennedy. In 1962, the Federal Communications Commission approved the $92,000 cost. On July 10, 1965, highway officials inaugurated the emergency call box system on the Harbor Freeway between the interchange of the Santa Monica and Harbor freeways and El Segundo Boulevard.

1994-Present Routing

State Shield The current routing was defined in 1994 by Chapter 409. No specific routing was identified at that time. This will connect up with a new Mexican freeway called Tijuana 2000, which will be a bypass connecting the new port of entry with Rosarito. According to the Caltrans Photolog, Route 11 is not planned to begin at the 905/125 junction, but rather at Route 125 north of the current intersection of Lone Star and Harvest Roads east of Brown Field.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 11 was signed from San Pedro to Jct. Route 118 near La Cañada. This was a surface street routing along Gaffey, Figueroa St, Ave 22, and Linda Vista to Route 118. It appears to have had a connection with the pre-Foothill freeway freeway segment of Route 118.

The original routing was LRN 165, and was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933.

In 1935, a new route was defined for the planned Arroyo Seco Parkway. This route was LRN 205, and corresponds to the present routing. When LRN 205 was defined, the roughly parallel LRN 165 portion was signed as Route 11 and Alt US-66.

At one point after the completion of the Pasadena Freeway, US 66 was the freeway, whereas Route 11 ran along Figueroa from San Fernando Road N. This reflected Figueroa's status as Alternate US 66. Circa 1940, the route was co-signed with federal routes: Route 66 (US 66) between Pasadena and Downtown Los Angeles, and Route 6 (US 6) between downtown and San Pedro. On July 1, 1964, the routings for US 6 and US 66 were truncated, and the route was signed only as Route 11. Figueroa Street was named for Jose Figueroa, a governor of California under Mexico.

Around 1957, the freeway had been constructed only as far as Santa Barbara Ave. From this point S, Route 11/US 6 ran along Figueroa.

Prior to the completion of Figueroa street in Gardena, the route from Gardena to Wilmington involved 190th Street, Main Street, and Wilmington Boulevard, with Route 11 continuing south on Wilmington and B to reconnect with the Figueroa routing.

The Arroyo Seco Parkway was California's first freeway. The innermost part was originally called North Figueroa, as it was an extension of that street. The first "phase" involved the four tunnels, with their art deco facades and bracketed streetlight sconces. If you look at the bridges over the river you can see the earlier bridge style too. The Arroyo Seco parkway ended northeast of the four Figueroa tunnels across the Los Angeles river. Then both directions of travel fed into the tunnels which contained Figueroa St. From there the route followed Figueroa into downtown. On the first day, speeds reached an unprecedented 35 mph, without a single stop from Pasadena all the way into Los Angeles. When the Four Level interchange with US 101 was built, in the late 1940s, new lanes were built for southbound traffic, and the original became northbound only. Both sets of lanes then were connected to the Hollywood Fwy via the Four Level. The sharp jog in the southbound lanes of the freeway east of the Los Angeles river is where the new southbound lanes begin.
(Historical Information on the Arroyo Seco routing is from postings on m.t.r by Tom Cockle, Harry Marnell and James Stewart)

In March 1954, a 1.1-mile section of the Harbor Freeway between 3rd Street and Olympic Boulevard opened to traffic. The Los Angeles Times described it as "a modern maze of 'on' and 'off' ramps for almost all of the east-west streets feeding into — or out of — the downtown district" and said it was "expected to do much to alleviate traffic congestion in the business district." The elaborate ribbon-cutting ceremony included an appearance by model Ann Bradford as Miss Freeway Link.

Status Status

Toll Road This is planned to connect with the Mexican Tijuana Loop Road at the East Otay Mesa border crossing. This will be a toll road.

Route 11/Route 905 Connectors Project

In December 2012, the CTC updated the description of the Route 905/Route 11 connectors project to be: "In San Diego County near San Diego on Route 905 from 0.1 mile west of Britannia Boulevard overcrossing to 1.6 miles east of La Media Road undercrossing. Route 11 from Route 11/Route 905 Separation to Enrico Fermi Drive and on Route 905 from 0.1 mile East of La Media Road Undercrossing to 0.2 mile West of Airway Road Undercrossing.

In May 2013, the CTC amended the TCIF Baseline Agreement for Segment 1 of Project 68 – Route 11/Route 905 Freeway to Freeway Connectors project (PPNO 0999A) in San Diego County to update the project funding plan. The CTC also approved $79,700,000 to fund construction.

In July 2013, Caltrans put out a bid for construction of a freeway connection to Route 905: In San Diego County In And Near San Diego On Route 11 From Route 11/Route 905 Separation To Enrico Fermi Drive And On Route 905 From 0.1 Mile East Of La Media Road Undercrossing To 0.2 Mile West Of Airway Road Undercrossing. Groundbreaking occured in December 2013.

125 - 905 - 11 ConnectorsIn October 2015, it was reported that work had begun on construction of the connectors between Route 125, Route 905, and Route 11. Officials said over the past two decades, trade between the U.S. and Mexico has grown by an average of 10 percent a year — an increase that exceeds that of U.S. trade with the rest of the world. Last year, more than 800,000 northbound trucks and $39 billion in goods passed through the Otay Mesa Port of Entry. The $21.5 million project is expected to be completed in late 2016. Funding sources include a $15.9 million chunk from Proposition 1B Trade Corridors Improvement Fund and $2.7 million from the TransNet half-cent sales tax for transportation uses approved by San Diego County voters, among other funding sources. Caltrans officials said the project is designed to remedy one of the last missing links in the overall border road network. Currently, truckers congest city streets and local roads to access Route 125. The new connectors will create a seamless highway system, greatly reducing wait times at the border, according to Caltrans.
(Source: KPBS, 10/26/2015)

In November 2016, it was reported that construction crews just wrapped up a year-long project that will help reduce congestion at the Otay Mesa Port of Entry. Three freeway connectors that link Route 905 and Route 11 to the northbound South Bay Expressway (Route 125) opened to traffic. More than 7,000 trucks travel across the Otay Mesa Border Crossing every day. The heavy traffic here during rush hour has caused major headaches for anyone trying to get to toll road Route 125 from Route 905 and Route 11. Before the connectors, vehicles exiting the Otay Mesa Port of Entry had no direct access to northbound 125 and drivers were forced to use local streets just to get there. Now, the new access will provide another option of travel for people living in southern San Diego and eastern Chula Vista. Drivers can avoid congestion on I-805 and I-5 by going east on Route 905 and north on Route 125. Now that the northbound connectors are complete, officials with SANDAG say they are hard at work finishing up designs on the southbound connectors. That project expected to begin construction in 2018.
(Source: CW 6, 11/30/2016)

In December 2017, the CTC also approved the following financial allocation: San Diego 11-SD-905 9.6/11.4 In and near San Diego, at the Route 11/Route 125/Route 905 Separation. Outcome/Output: Construct southbound freeway to freeway connectors from Route 125 to eastbound Route 905 and Route 11. $49,747,000.With respect to the Southbound Connectors: In June 2019, it was reported that Skanska has won the construction contract for Route 905 in San Diego, California. The $101 Million contract with California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is for a four-lane highway with freeway connectors on Route 905, located at Otay Mesa, one of three ports of entry in the San Diego-Tijuana Mexico metropolitan region. Construction work includes two freeway-to-freeway flyover bridges that will connect three highways (Route 125, Route 11 and Route 905), as well as a 1.25-mile greenfield extension of Route 11 to the east toward a future port-of-entry. The project will involve more than 15,000m3 of structural concrete, 30,000m3 of concrete paving, 35,000 tons of asphalt, and about 840,000 m3 of earthworks. Construction is scheduled for completion in September 2021.
(Source: Construction Index, 6/10/2019)

In June 2019, the CTC amended the TCEP Project Baseline Agreement and established it as the basis for project delivery and monitoring. The amendment programmed $1,708,000 in savings from the TCIF program for construction on the Route 125/Route 905 Connector project (PPNO 1036) in San Diego County. This project is one of six projects included in the Baseline Agreement for the California-Mexico Border System Network Improvements. The Route 125/Route 905 Connector project will construct a freeway to freeway South-West connector, thereby completing the remaining connector needed to integrate three major state roads serving the border region just north of the Otay Mesa Port of Entry at the United States/Mexico border. In May 2018, the project received $21,980,000 in TCEP funding. In August 2018, the California-Mexico Border System Network Improvements Baseline Agreement was approved, including this Route 125/905 Connector project. In February 2019, bid results from an adjacent project along the same corridor reflected a 10 percent increase in project costs. Upon review of those bid results, the project development team prepared a revised cost estimate for the Route 125/905 Connector project using the updated unit prices from the adjacent project. The revised estimate indicated a cost increase of approximately $1,708,000. Therefore, the Department and SANDAG propose to program $1,708,000 in TCIF savings from other projects to this connector project. A construction allocation of the programmed TCEP and TCIF funds is expected to be requested in Fall 2019.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.1s.(1))

In June 2019, the CTC amended the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Program to add the Route 125/Route 905 Connector Project in San Diego County as Project 133, at a cost of $1,708,000. The Route 125/Route 905 Connector Project will construct a southbound Route 125 freeway connector to the westbound Route 905 freeway to integrate three major state roads serving the border region just north of the Otay Mesa Port of Entry. This project will contribute to a safer and more efficient border highway network that will alleviate congestion while providing more reliability for cross border international freight movements. The Trade Corridors Enhancement Program Baseline Agreement, approved in August 2018 will be amended to include the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund, thereby eliminating the need to adopt a stand-alone Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Baseline Agreement. The recently refined engineer’s estimate identified a cost increase of $1,708,000 in construction to bring the total estimated construction cost to $33,108,000. The need for the additional funds is due to updated unit pricing based on recently opened bids on nearby projects. The funding for this amendment is made available through savings generated from other projects programmed in the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund and is consistent with the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Program Close-Out Policy approved at the May 2019 Commission.
(Source: June 2019 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 4.27)

In March 2020, the CTC approved an allocation of $23,636,000 for the State-Administered Multi-Funded TCEP/TCIF Route 125/Route 905  Connector (PPNO 1036) project, on the State Highway System, in San Diego County. Specifically, the resolution was that $18,636,000 be allocated from the Budget Act of 2017 and 2019, Budget Act Items 2660-301-3291 and 2660-304-6056 for construction and $5,000,000 for construction engineering for the State-Administered Multi-Funded TCEP/TCIF project: 11-SD-905 PM 9.8/9.8: Route 125/Route 905 Connector. In and near San Diego at Route 125/Route 905 separation. Construct freeway to freeway South-West connector.
(Source: March 2020 CTC Minutes, Agenda Item 2.5s.(6))

In April 2020, it was reported that crews from Skanska US Civil were constructing the final segment of the future Toll Route 11 and the southbound connector ramps, linking southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 11 and eastbound state Route 905. Construction began on Skanska's contract ($103M) began in July 2019 and will be completed August 2021. Roadway and connector ramp construction currently underway will ultimately provide a direct connection to the new Otay Mesa East Port of Entry and a California Highway Patrol Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility, helping to enable fast, predictable, and secure border crossings. Since construction began last summer, crews have focused their efforts on building 1.2 new mi. of Route 11 and setting up falsework for the construction of the two connector bridges at the Route 11/Route 905/Route 125 interchange. This work includes roadway and connector ramp construction, earth work, site preparation, and drainage infrastructure installation. Six bridges (cast-in-place box tube girder types) are being constructed for the interchange — two connector and four smaller underpass ones and the paving of Route 11 (east-west) that will connect with the new POE, three lanes in direction, will start in October and be finished in March 2021. One unique aspect of this project is the inclusion of a divergent diamond interchange, one of the first to be built in California. There are two connector bridges at the interchange, one that will connect southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 11 and the other will connect southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 905.
(Source: Construction Equipment Guide, 4/7/2020)

Otay Mesa Point of Entry/Freeway and Bypass Route

According to Don Hagstrom in October 2002, the planned Route 11 Freeway, connecting the proposed Route 905 / Route 125 interchange with a planned new third San Diego / Tijuana Port of Entry (Otay Mesa II) could be completed by 2007. It would be 4.3 miles long.

[Project Map]In August 2007, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR for this route. The proposed project is to conduct a corridor study and construct a four-lane freeway and truck bypass road in San Diego County at the proposed Otay Mesa East Point of Entry (POE). The project is not fully funded. The project is fully funded for Project Approval/Environmental Document in the amount of $13 million in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program - Interregional Improvement Program funds. Total estimated project cost is $361.4 million. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2012-13. In April 2008, the CTC received notice that the current environmental document is for Phase I and will identify the location of potential corridors. Phase II will be project level analysis and environmental approval for the Route 11 and the POE components. The overall project is not fully funded. The project is only funded for Project Approval/Environmental Document in the amount of $13,000,000 in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program – Interregional Improvement Program funds. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $715,220,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13, depending on the availability of funds. The following alternatives are being considered, both of which would be entirely new facilities:

In October 2008, the CTC received notice of the mitigated negative declaration. There were issues with the construction permanently removing paleontological resources, sensitive upland vegetative communities, hazardous waste, growth inducement, as well as public controversy regarding the project. With the completion of the EIR, the impacts related to growth and cumulative biological resources such as impacts to native and non-native grasslands, disturbed mule fat scrub and non-wetland Waters of the United States (WUS) / streambed, sensitive plants, and sensitive animals including burrowing owl and the Quino Checkerspot Butterfly are anticipated to be significant and unmitigable for Phase II (project level). As a result, a Statement of Overriding Consideration was adopted.

[011 Tier II]In February 2009, the CTC received another notice of preparation for this route. The project would construct a new four-lane highway and port of entry (POE) at the United States-Mexico border from east of Route 905/Otay Mesa border crossing to the future Route 125/905 junction. Tier 1 (PPNO 1000) was programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program for approximately $6.0 million in interregional improvement program shares for environmental. The Tier 1 Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) [see the paragraph above] was prepared to inform the public and decision-makers about the potential environmental effects of the proposed program and the preferred corridor. The Tier 1 Final EIR/EIS was presented to the Commission at its October 2008 meeting. The new NOP is for the project level environmental document, Tier II (PPNO 0999). Tier II is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund program for approximately $709 million and includes interregional improvement program funds, federal demonstration funds, and local funds/public toll financing. The total estimated cost of both Tier I and Tier II is $715 million. Construction of the project is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13.

The Western Corridor alignment for the Route 11 and the Otay Mesa East POE was selected as the preferred alternative during the Tier I/Program level environmental analysis. The Tier II environmental analysis will consider the following preliminary alternatives/design variations:

  1. No Build/No Action Alternative.
  2. Transportation System/Demand Alternative: Implement pedestrian, cyclist, transit, and other transportation systems/demand management measures alone, without implementation of Route 11 and the new POE No Build/No Action Alternative.
  3. Toll Alternative: Construct Route 11 using toll implementation options.
  4. Two Interchange Option: Building two interchanges between Route 11 and local roadways, or one interchange only, with the exact locations of the interchanges to be determined after consideration of public input.
  5. Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility Alternative: Utilize the existing commercial vehicle enforcement facility (CVEF) at the existing Otay Mesa POE to also serve the proposed Otay Mesa East POE, versus accommodating the construction of a new CVEF adjacent to the new POE.

What's interesting about this is the CTC minutes, which put the entry for this as "construct a new segment of Route 905/Route 125, to be called Route 11", even though the routing doesn't fit the definition of either Route 905 or Route 125.

In December 2009, the CTC received notice of a proposed amendment to the project that would amend the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for the Route 11 and Otay Mesa Port of Entry (POE) project (PPNO 0999) in the city of San Diego, community of San Ysidro as follows:

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

In December 2011, the CTC approved amending the TCIF baseline agreement for the TCIF Project 68-Route 11 and Otay Mesa Port of Entry (POE) (PPNO 0999) in San Diego, in the community of Otay Mesa East, to program $45,500,000 of Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Border Infrastructure Program (BIP) funds to Design (PS&E) and Right of Way (R/W) Support in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13, and to split the project into three separate segments for staged construction. The original (parent) segment (PPNO 0999) was "In East Otay Mesa, from Route 905 and future Route 125/Route 905 junction to the U.S./Mexico Border. Construct new 4 lane highway and POE. Route 11 and Otay Mesa POE — Environmental Only." The three segments approved are:

  1. Segment 1 (PPNO 0999A): In San Diego County near San Diego on Route 905 from 0.1 mile west of the Britannia Boulevard overcrossing to 1.6 miles east of the La Media Road undercrossing. Construct Route 905/Route 11 freeway to freeway connectors.
  2. Segment 2 (PPNO 0999B): In San Diego County near San Diego on Route 11 from 0.1 mile east of the Sanyo Avenue undercrossing to 1.9 miles east of the Sanyo Avenue undercrossing. Construct a new 4 lane highway and commercial vehicle enforcement facility.
  3. Segment 3 (PPNO 0999C): In San Diego County near San Diego on Route 11 from 2.4 miles east of the Sanyo Avenue undercrossing to the Mexico border. Construct land port of entry.

Route 11 FEIRIn June 2012, the CTC approved the project for future consideration of funding, as the final EIR had been completed. This project will construct a new toll highway, Route 11, with connectors to Route 905 and associated modifications to Route 905; the new Otay Mesa East Port of Entry; and a Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF). The total estimated project cost is $704,200,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The preferred alternative for the route is a refinement of the Two Interchange approach that also incorporates the Route 125 connector variation and a connection associated with the Siempre Viva Road Full Interchange Variation. Based on the FEIR, it looks like there will be a single interchage at Enrico Fermi.

Adopted Route 11In December 2012, the CTC approved a route adoption to establish a new four-lane toll freeway alignment for Route 11 that would extend from the future Route 905/Route 125 interchange approximately 2.8 miles east to the proposed Otay Mesa East Port of Entry. The adoption resolution notes that a number of alternatives were considered for this project. The rejected alternatives considered two alignments that extended further east than the proposed alternative and also considered variations on which and how many interchanges would be built. The Preferred Alternative includes two interchanges that would be constructed along Route 11 at Enrico Fermi Drive and Siempre Viva Road, as well as an undercrossing at Sanyo Avenue and an overcrossing at Alta Road. Overcrossings would also be constructed at the Enrico Fermi Drive and Siempre Viva Road interchanges. The proposed interchange at Enrico Fermi Drive, located approximately one mile east of the future Route 905/Route 125/Route 11 Interchange, would be a full interchange and have on and off ramps to and from both eastbound and westbound Route 11. The proposed interchanges at Enrico Fermi Drive and Siempre Viva Road would be located approximately one mile apart. The Siempre Viva Road interchange would be a half interchange providing eastbound off-ramp and westbound on-ramp access for both commercial and non-commercial vehicles. No access is provided between Siempre Viva Road and the POE for non-commercial vehicles, and only northbound commercial vehicles exiting the CVEF will have access to Siempre Viva Road.

In May 2015, the CTC received a notice of a future STIP amendment realted to the Route 11 and Otay Mesa East POE project. The project will construct a new 4-lane highway to the Mexico border, freeway-to-freeway connectors and a POE. The project will increase capacity to the regional border-crossing infrastructure and create a link between the United States regional highway system and the Mexico free-and-toll road system. In 2008, the Commission approved $75 million of Proposition 1B Trade Corridor Investment Funds (TCIF) for construction of the Route 11 and Otay Mesa East POE project. In January 2012, the Commission approved segmenting the project into three distinct project segments to facilitate delivery: (•) Segment 1 (PPNO 0999A) - Construct the Route 905/Route 11 freeway-to-freeway connectors up to Enrico Fermi Drive; (•)Segment 2 (PPNO 0999B) - Construct Route 11 from Enrico Fermi to the POE and the Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility; and (•) Segment 3 (PPNO 0999C) - Construct the POE. The $75 million of Proposition 1B TCIF funds were programmed on the construction phase of Segment 1, and then reduced upon award of the construction contract to $71.625 million. The overall project includes $70.6 million in SAFETEA-LU BIP funding. The SAFETEA-LU, enacted in August 2005, authorizes funding through the BIP to improve transportation at international borders and ports of entry, and within trade corridors. The notice pointed out that currently, local funds programmed on Segments 2 and 3 include funds from innovative financing methods, such as the sale of bonds backed by future toll revenues, loans, grants, and private sector sources. The Right of Way (R/W) components for Segments 2 and 3 are currently programmed with these future local sources. However, the local funding has been unavailable due to significant delays in completing an Investment Grade Traffic and Revenue (T&R) Study. It pointed out that Caltrans had the opportunity to begin early acquisition of a significant portion of the right of way needed for Segments 2 and 3. In order to move forward with early R/Wacquisition on Segment 2, it proposed that locally generated toll revenues (backed by bonds) would be replaced with BIP funds.

In December 2015, it was noted that Caltrans plans to open a 1½-mile stretch of Route 11 in January 2016 that connects to Route 905, which connects Otay Mesa to I-5 and I-805 interstates. A second stretch of Route 11, connecting to the future Otay East port of entry, would not be built without knowing that the port of entry is coming.
(Source: LA Times, 12/29/2015)

In March 2016, it was reported that Segment 1 of Route 11 – a new four-lane highway in Otay Mesa – will open to traffic Saturday, March 19, 2016 in the afternoon helping to facilitate crossborder commerce and ease congestion along the San Diego-Tijuana border. The 1.7 mile segment, including connectors to Route 905, extends east from Route 905 to Enrico Fermi Drive. This new facility provides trucks departing the Otay Mesa Port of Entry direct access to the state highway system. The Route 11 segment also connects cross border trucking and industrial facilities on the eastern end of Otay Mesa directly to the highway system. To date, trucks have relied heavily on local roads, such as La Media Road and Airway Road, to get around. Segment 1 of Route 11 is part of a larger project to build a new port of entry (POE) connecting San Diego and Tijuana. Future phases will extend the highway about one mile to the border and create a new state-of-the-art POE that will provide fast, predictable, and secure crossings. The goal is to operate the future Otay Mesa East/Mesa de Otay II POE with a 20-minute border wait time. Caltrans and SANDAG are spearheading the development of both the Otay Mesa East project and the border roadway network. In addition to Route 11, the two agencies are working to build three freeway-to-freeway connectors linking Route 905 and Route 11 with northbound Route 125. Construction on the connectors started in November 2015 and is expected to be complete by the end of 2016.
(Source: District 11 News, 3/18/2016, via Rschen7754@ AAroads)

Rte11 Phase 2In July 2016, it was reported that SANDAG and Caltrans were expecting to receive money from the Department of Transportation to build a one-mile portion of Route 11 in Otay Mesa. The funding will also go toward building southbound connectors for Route 905, Route 125 and Route 11 (see below). A 1.7-mile portion of Route 11 from Route 905 east to Enrico Fermi Drive opened in March 2016, and the new one-mile span that just received funding will continue the four-lane toll highway to the border. A third round of funding will pay for the port of entry. SANDAG said the crossing will change the cost of the toll based on demand as a way to manage the number of vehicles attempting to cross at any given time. Caltrans and SANDAG received the federal funds through a competitive grant program for projects that improve freight shipping and highways. Trade between California and Mexico has expanded since 1993’s North American Free Trade Agreement.
(Source: San Diego U-T, 7/7/2016. Fullsize image.)

In December 2017, the CTC reviewed a STIP amendment to amend the Route 11 Highway and Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility (CVEF) project – Segment 2 (PPNO 0999B) in San Diego County to: replace a portion of the programmed local funds with a federal grant from the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act); split the project into Segment 2 (PPNO 0999B) and Segment 2A (PPNO 0999D); and deliver Segment 2A in Fiscal Year (FY) 2017-18. The Department also proposes to program $3,350,000 of Federal Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Border Infrastructure Program (BIP) funds to the new Segment 2A project. The San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) concurs with this request. The Route 11 CVEF project – Segment 2 scope consists of constructing a four-lane highway, including the Siempre Viva Interchange, the CVEF and the tolling and border wait time systems. When completed (along with the new Otay Mesa Port of Entry), the project will increase capacity to the regional border-crossing infrastructure and also create a link between the United States regional highway system and the Mexico free-and-toll road system. The total construction need for Segment 2 is close to $167 million. Currently, the local funds programmed for construction on Segment 2 include funds from innovative financing methods, such as the sale of bonds backed by future toll revenues, loans, grants, and private sector sources. This is allowed through Senate Bill 1486, which established San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) as the Toll Authority for Route 11, authorizing SANDAG to, among other things, solicit and accept grants of funds and to enter into contracts and agreements for the purpose of establishing highway toll projects to facilitate the movement of goods and people along the Route 11 corridor in the County of San Diego or at the Otay Mesa East Port of Entry. The bill also authorizes SANDAG to issue bonds for the acquisition, construction, and completion of transportation facilities and to impose tolls and user fees for the use of the corridor. Until solutions are developed to finance the entire project, the Department proposes to expedite delivery of a portion of the Segment 2 project (Segment 2A) with funding from a FAST Act grant, as well as program savings from the SAFETEA-LU BIP and Proposition 1B Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) funding. Segment 2A includes the four-lane highway portion of Segment 2 at a construction cost estimate of $60,453,000. The Plans, Specifications and Estimate phase is currently being developed with previously programmed and allocated BIP funding under Segment 2. Location Finder: 011 SD 1.2 - 011 SD 2.7, Route 11 - Enrico Fermi Drive to Otay Mesa Port of Entry.
(Source: December 2017 CTC Agenda Item 2.1b.(3))

In January 2018, the CTC proposed to amend the Route 11 Highway and Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility (CVEF) project – Segment 2 (PPNO 0999B) in San Diego County to: replace a portion of the programmed local funds with a federal grant from the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act); split the project into Segment 2 (PPNO 0999B) and Segment 2A (PPNO 0999D); and deliver Segment 2A in Fiscal Year (FY) 2018-19. The Department also proposes to program $3,350,000 of Federal Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Border Infrastructure Program (BIP) funds to the new Segment 2A project. The Route 11 CVEF project – Segment 2 scope consists of constructing a four-lane highway, including the Siempre Viva Interchange, the CVEF and the tolling and border wait time systems. When completed (along with the new Otay Mesa Port of Entry), the project will increase capacity to the regional border-crossing infrastructure and also create a link between the United States regional highway system and the Mexico free-and-toll road system. The total construction need for Segment 2 is close to $167 million. Currently, the local funds programmed for construction on Segment 2 include funds from innovative financing methods, such as the sale of bonds backed by future toll revenues, loans, grants, and private sector sources. An Investment Grade Traffic and Revenue (T&R) Study is necessary to determine the financial leveraging power of this border project for the sale of bonds. The T&R Study was completed in 2015, but revealed an overall shortfall in revenue versus cost. Additional studies to address the shortfall are currently being conducted and should be completed by May 2018. Until solutions are developed to finance the entire project, the Department proposes to expedite delivery of a portion of the Segment 2 project (Segment 2A) with funding from a FAST Act grant, as well as program savings from the SAFETEA-LU BIP and Proposition 1B Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) funding. Segment 2A includes the four-lane highway portion of Segment 2 at a construction cost estimate of $60,453,000. The Plans, Specifications and Estimate phase is currently being developed with previously programmed and allocated BIP funding under Segment 2.
(Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.1a.(3))

In August 2018, it was reported that the CTC approved a $4.8 million budget (entirely funded by SB 1) for the Route 11 design for new Otay Mesa East Port of Entry: , which will design the last southbound interchange for the new Otay Mesa Port of Entry and the first northbound interchange for vehicles entering the U.S. from Mexico.
(Source: Times of San Diego, 8/21/2018)

Planned construction map for Rte 11In December 2018, it was reported that the CTC allocated $60.4 million for the Segment 2A project at 1.9 miles east of Sanyo Avenue Undercrossing to construct the new Siempre Viva Road Interchange and begin site preparation design for California Highway Patrol Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility, which includes drainage and utilities. Note that none of this has postmiles yet in the postmile system. This shows up in the CTC minutes as follows: Request of $60,453,000 for the multi-funded Route 11 – Enrico Fermi Drive to Otay Mesa East Port of Entry Proposition 1B TCIF/BIP/FASTLANE project, on the State Highway System, in San Diego County. (PPNO 11-0999D) San Diego 11-SD-11 1.2/2.7. Route 11 - Enrico Fermi Drive to Otay Mesa East Port of Entry. On Route 11 from 0.1 mile west of Enrico Fermi Drive to 1.2 mile east of Enrico Fermi Drive. Construct 4-lane highway. (This is a Design Sequencing Project.) Outcome/Output: The project will construct 6 lane-miles of a 4-lane highway, including a new interchange and a new bridge.
(Source: Times of San Diego, 12/7/2018; December 2018 CTC Minutes Agenda Item 2.5g.(5a))

In June 2019, it was reported that Skanska has won the construction contract for Route 905 in San Diego, California. The $101 Million contract with California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is for a four-lane highway with freeway connectors on Route 905, located at Otay Mesa, one of three ports of entry in the San Diego-Tijuana Mexico metropolitan region. Construction work includes two freeway-to-freeway flyover bridges that will connect three highways (Route 125, Route 11 and Route 905), as well as a 1.25-mile greenfield extension of Route 11 to the east toward a future port-of-entry. The project will involve more than 15,000m3 of structural concrete, 30,000m3 of concrete paving, 35,000 tons of asphalt, and about 840,000 m3 of earthworks. Construction is scheduled for completion in September 2021.
(Source: Construction Index, 6/10/2019)

In August 2019, it was reported that officials had broken ground on the final segment of Route 11, which will connect the San Diego region’s highway system to the future Otay Mesa East Port of Entry. Sections of Route 11 have been completed since 2016, but as of August 2019 the highway ended at Enrico Fermi Drive in Otay Mesa. This final leg of construction, which includes several highway interchanges, would complete the connection of Route 905 and Route 125 to the envisioned port of entry. The highway project, a joint venture between Caltrans and the San Diego Assn. of Governments, is slated for completion by 2021. Construction of the new Otay Mesa crossing is planned to begin that same year and completed by 2023. The $100-million highway project includes a four-lane toll road connecting to the site of the future U.S. Customs and Border Protection crossing as well as a California Highway Patrol commercial vehicle enforcement facility.
(Source: Los Angeles Times, 7/31/2019)

In June 2020, the CTC approved the following allocation amendment for a State-Administered TCEP project: $32,285,000. 11-SD-11 0.6/2.7. PPNO 11-0999E ProjID 1117000087 EA 05637. Siempre Viva Interchange and Site Preparation Design for Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility - Segment 2B. Route 11 near San Diego at 1.9 miles east of Sanyo Avenue Undercrossing. Construct new interchange and begin site preparation design for Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility, which includes drainage and utilities. CON ENG $5,096,000 CONST $27,212,000 $27,189,000. The decrease in cost is due to updated cost estimates that incorporate fluctuations in contract item prices. The reduction is a cost savings and will be returned for redistribution in the next cycle.
(Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.5s.(6) #3)

National Trails National Trails

See Route 110 for pre-1994 trails information.

Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

The current routing of Route 11 is not in the Interstate system. The number I-11 was proposed in November 1957 for current I-5, but was rejected.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Defined in 1999 by Chapter 724.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for post-1994 Route 11:

Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Current Route 11:

Historic Route 11 (now Route 110):

Status Status

The current routing is unconstructed.

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

This is one of the oldest routes in the state highway system, having been first defined as a route in 1895 with a law that provided "[authorization to secure the title and right of way of] that certain wagon road situated and being in the county of El Dorado ... commencing at the junction of the Lake Tahoe Wagon Road with the wagon road leading from Placerville to the town of Newtown, a short distance E-ly from the village of Smith's Flat ... and running thence from the junction of said roads to Lake Tahoe." In 1897, Chapter 176 stated "A public highway or wagon road shall be built from a point on the E limits of the city of Sacramento, to Folsom in Sacramento Cty as near as practicable along the route of the present most direct line of county roads between these two points...". The 1909 First Bond Act included funding for a road from Sacramento to Placerville as part of this route. In the 1915 statutes, Chapter 32 adopted "the wagon road extending from the W end of the Lake Tahoe State Wagon Road to the E limits of the city of Placerville" as a state highway. The 1919 Third Bond Issue provided funding to extend the route from "Placerville to Sportsman's Hall". The 1933 statutes extended the route on the other end, adding mileage from "Walnut Creek-Stockton Road near Antioch to Sacramento".

When the 1935 law codified the definition of the route in the highway code, the definition was:

From [LRN 75] near Antioch to the Nevada State Line near Lake Tahoe, via Sacramento, Folsom, Placerville, and Sportsman's Hall

The portion from Sacramento to Placerville was a primary route.

In 1947, Chapter 1233 relaxed the description of the route to be “from [LRN 75] near Antioch to the Nevada line near Lake Tahoe via Sacramento and Placerville.”

This routing started near Antioch at signed Route 4 (LRN 75), and ran to 16th in Sacramento signed as Route 24. This is present-day Route 160. The portion from Freeport Blvd to 16th St along Broadway, and along 15th/16th Street to N Street appears to also have been part of LRN 4.

In downtown Sacramento, LRN 11 diverged from signed Route 24 at 16th S, and ran N to Capitol Ave (signed as Route 16).

LRN 11 then ran along Capitol Ave to 30th Street, where it intersected signed US 50/US 99. This latter segment is present-day Business Loop 80 (real Route 50), and was once planned to be part of the first incarnation of I-305.

LRN 11 then continued E out of Sacramento along Folsom Blvd as US 50, and remained signed as US 50 to the Nevada state line. In 1963, there was an alternate routing for LRN 11 from Sacramento that approximated the future freeway routing.


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 10 Forward Arrow Route 12

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Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.