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Interstate Shield

Interstate 10

Click here for a key to the symbols used. An explanation of acronyms may be found at the bottom of the page.


Routing Routing

  1. Rte 10 Seg 1From Route 1 in Santa Monica to Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    (105-110)In 1963, this segment was defined as "Route 1 in Santa Monica to Route 105 near Soto Street."

    In 1968, Chapter 385 changed the definitions of Route 105 ("from Route 5 to the junction of Route 110 (now part of Route 10) and US-101") and Route 110 ("from Route 105 to the junction of Routes 5 and 10") from their former stub routes in downtown, creating the present day I-105 routing. At this point, the definition of Route 10 was changed to "Route 1 in Santa Monica to Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles", and US 101 was changed to start at "Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles".

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield Interstate Shield The segment was LRN 173, and was defined as part of the state highway system since 1933; however, it was signed as Route 26 prior to the freeway designation. Route 26 ran along Olympic Blvd. For information on the route that was signed as Route 10, see below.

    The McClure Tunnel opened on February 1, 1936, and originally connected the Roosevelt Highway (later, Pacific Coast Highway) with Lincoln Boulevard as part of US 101A. At one point, this was part of signed Route 6. Note that technically the McClure tunnel (actually, the portion to the west of Lincoln Blvd) is part of Route 1, not Route 10.

    The various state highway routes around this time (signed Route 2 along Santa Monica, signed Route 26 along Olympic, signed Route 42 along Manchester) demonstrate that state was unsure what was the best route for the freeway. In a 1953 article on the Los Angeles freeway system, CHPW addressed this:

    "One of the glaring defects indicated by the construction progress map is that it shows no activity upon a freeway extending westerly from the central business area of Los Angeles. We have long recognized the need for such freeway, but the overloaded condition of the Hollywood Freeway during its brief life of service has made it necessary that we reappraise the situation to determine whether a Santa Monica Freeway extending to the west, or a Venice-Olympic Freeway farther to the south, should be given priority, or whether it would be possible to determine upon some compromise route giving equal or better service. We have recently completed the initial phases of a traffic study for the entire western area, and are at the present time supplementing this by a vehicle use survey which will give us origin and destination data having a direct bearing upon the problem. Additional finances, if provided by the Legislature, should permit us to crystallize our thinking into action in providing the best facility possible for this very important area in this metropolitan district."

    As history bore out, the choice was closer to the Venice-Olympic routing (but even a little S of that).

    The first portion of I-10 (signed pre-1964 Route 26, LRN 175) to be adopted as freeway was a 9.6 mi segment between US 101 (Santa Ana Freeway) and La Cienega Blvd. This occured on 5/21/1954. The remainder of the route, from LaCienega to Lincoln Blvd (Route 1, LRN 60), was adopted as a freeway on November 15, 1956. The route recognized that one east-west freeway would have to serve West Los Angeles for many years, and the route chosen was one that provided the maximum traffic service. Work on the route was expected to start in 1957.

    I-10 Under ConstructionThe KCET website has a nice article on the construction of I-10, with lots of nice pictures (including a larger version of the one to the right, which shows the I-10 under construction in West Los Angeles. The article notes how the original routes were planned along Santa Monica Blvd or Olympic (and later Venice, with a onetime proposal for a raised freeway along the median of Venice). It noted the current route was developed to avoid protesting neighborhoods. The articles notes that construction crews broke ground on the first segment of the newly renamed Santa Monica Freeway over the Los Angeles River on June 17, 1957. Land acquisition for the freeway's right-of-way began in 1958, and by 1961 families -- living in houses the state had purchased and then rented back to their occupants -- received orders to move. On December 4, 1961, Governor Edmund "Pat" Brown dedicated the first, easternmost segment of the freeway as crews began work on the route's West Los Angeles and Santa Monica portions. At its western extreme, the freeway required a 7,000-foot-long, 20-foot-deep cut before reaching the Pacific Coast Highway's McClure Tunnel. By October 1964,it had been extended west to La Cienega Boulevard, and on January 29, 1965--several years after residents in the freeway's path were displaced--the 4.5-mile segment between La Cienega and Bundy Drive opened. The final segment through Santa Monica opened on January 5, 1965. The article does not, alas, explain the design decision to build the freeway as a raised structure as opposed to a depressed freeway (which might have been less expensive).

    [Reece at 405-10]The I-405/I-10 interchange was designed by Marilyn Jorgenson Reece, who was the first woman in California to be registered as a civil engineer, and the first woman to serve as an associate highway engineer for the state. She died in May 2004. A South Dakota native who earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1948, Reece moved to Los Angeles with her parents shortly after graduation. The same year, she went to work for the State Division of Highways, which later became Caltrans, as a junior civil engineer in Los Angeles. In 1954, after six years of required experience to sit for the Professional Engineer's Exam, Reece became the state's first fully licensed female civil engineer. In 1962, she received the Governor's Design Excellence Award from Gov. Pat Brown for the San Diego-Santa Monica freeway interchange. Shortly after, Reece became the Division of Highway's first woman resident engineer for construction projects. The three-level San Diego-Santa Monica freeway interchange, which opened in 1964, was the first interchange designed in California by a woman engineer. With the aid of an early computer program, Reece plotted the curves of its ramps and soaring, 75-foot-tall bridges to allow automobiles to transition between freeways at 55 miles per hour -- a significant speed increase over the tolerance of earlier interchanges, like downtown's Four Level, which required cars to slow to 35 miles per hour. Reece told The Los Angeles Times in 1995 that she put her "heart and soul into it" and that she designed the interchange with aesthetics in mind. "It is very airy. It isn't a cluttered, loopy thing," she said, adding that specifications to keep traffic moving at high speeds necessitated the long, sweeping curves. The image to the right, excerpted from One Hundred Years of Progress, shows Reece and Thomas McKinley. However, the book referred to Reece as an Associate Engineer, with McKinley as a Resident Engineer, but did indicate that Reece supervised the I-405/I-10 interchange project. The view in the photo is looking N from what is roughly the National offramp on the I-405; you can see a sign for the Route 26 Olympic Blvd NB offramp that was removed as part of the project (likewise, the SB National offramp was removed)

    Some nice pictures of the construction of this route may be found on the KCET website. Additional pictures may be found in theUSC Digital Archives.

    Construction on the Santa Monica Freeway portion of I-10 was completed in January 1966.

    Status Status

    Technically Route 1 Portion (W of 7th Street)

    In January 2017, it was reported that the City of Santa Monica was considering the Gateway Master Plan, which will address planning in the area “adjacent to the I-10 Freeway that links Downtown to the Civic Center” and to Santa Monica High School, and it could include covering the freeway with decking that could create new space for a park (this appears to include the portion of the freeway that, although considered I-10, is really Route 1). Previous reports on capping the park had explored extending the McClure Tunnel and covering the 10 freeway from Fourth Street (001 LA 35.037) to Ocean Avenue (001 LA 35.11). The new staff report says the Gateway Master Plan offers “a unique opportunity for strengthening connections over the freeway right of way.” It also says the cap park would be a way to offer “an enlarged green space for outdoor enjoyment” where there previously was none. By removing the visual and physical barrier between the city’s downtown and its civic center area, the park could create a new link between the two sections of the city. The report also notes that by providing access to “peripheral parking opportunities,” the park might be able to reduce car congestion in the city’s downtown.
    (Source: CurbedLA, 1/8/2018)

    A (temporary) installation of a statue of Mario of the Mario Brothers has been installed atop a column on I-10 freeway (actually, Route 1, as the visible location is ~ 001 LA R34.812) in Santa Monica. The character is visible from the corner of Olympic and 5th Street and to vehicles entering the freeway at that intersection. It is the work of Bohemia Incorporated and the arts duo said the location had been on their radar for years but it took some time to figure out what to put there. The Styrofoam sculpture is about 32 inches tall and is painted to match the concrete it sits atop.
    (Source: Santa Monica Daily Press, 7/22/17)

    I-10 Portion (E of 7th Street, Santa Monica)

    In June 2017, there was a report on the artists that have installed a lone mermaid, casually swimming along a retaining wall on WB I-10 in the vicinity of Cheviot Hills (approximately 010 LA R6.612). The mermaid (she has no official title) turns out to be the work of a street art collective known as Bohemia Incorporated. For a couple of years, the group has been illicitly installing three-dimensional sculptures around Los Angeles — in the dead public spaces at freeway intersections and on freeway retaining walls. Some last for hours (such as one that featured a paint brush and the phrase “Don’t worry I pay taxes”), others run for months (such as the sculpture of a woman taking a selfie on the 5 Freeway in Silver Lake). But the mermaid has been in place for more than two years. One of the artists for Bohemia Incorporated, also known as #binc, says the group’s sculptures are generally made from Styrofoam, then painted to resemble concrete.
    (Source: LA Times, 6/20/2017)

    Robertson/National Interchange

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3805: Planning, design, and preliminary engineering of on/off ramp system at intersection of I-10 and Roberston/National Blvds. (~ 010 LA R7.96) in Culver City. $2,000,000.

    In March 2018, it was reported that LADOT is partering with the City of Culver City and Caltrans to improve the confusing on-ramps and off-ramps near Robertson and National Blvds. The goal will be to hopefully make commuting easier for people choosing to take the train to avoid it. According to an LADOT release, the I-10/Robertson/National Area Circulation Improvement Project will upgrade the Robertson and National onramps and offramps in a way that will improve the experience for drivers and transit users. The goal is to “simplify traffic movements, and minimize traffic impacts from the Culver City Expo Station and other new developments in the area.” In addition, the crossings will make streets much safer for pedestrians and cyclists, who are using these same poorly designed connections to walk to the Culver City Expo line stop and access the Expo bike path. The project team has been conducting outreach since the fall of 2016, according to a presentation posted by LADOT. The project site shows four potential design alternatives that reconfigure the offramps to smooth congestion and redesign streets to give people who live north of I-10 more pleasant walks to the train.
    (Source: Curbed LA, 3/7/2018)

    In June 2017, there was an interesting article on the "Crenshaw Cowboy of the Wild West", an itinerant artist living on the WB onramp of I-10 at Crenshaw (approx. 010 LA R11.371). The artist, Kenneth Lovell Moore, or just Lovell, constructs sculptures from discarded script. When Moore isn’t creating these galactic sculptures or asking drivers for donations so he can buy art supplies, he’s dancing like his favorite performer: Michael Jackson.
    (Source: KPCC, 6/9/2017)

    Naming Naming

    Santa Monica FreewayThis portion is named the "Santa Monica Freeway"; the first segment opened in 1961 and the freeway was completed in 1966. It was named by the State Highway Commission on April 25, 1957. The name derives from the western terminus of the segment in the City of Santa Monica. The name Santa Monica may have been applied by the second Portolá expedition on May 4, 1770, the day of holy Monica, mother of Saint Augustine. It appears in 1839 in the land grant San Vicente y Santa Monica, on which the modern city was founded in the early 1870s. Sierra de Santa Monica was recorded in 1822.
    (Image source: Quora)

    The route was originally to have been named the "Olympic Freeway"; that name was changed during planning in 1958. That probably came from the original Route 26 routing along Olympic Blvd, which itself was renamed from 10th Street in honor of the 1932 Olympics.

    Christopher Columbus Transcontinental HwyIn additional to the other designations noted, Route 10 (in its entirety) has been officially designated the "Christopher Columbus Transcontinental Highway", although on the east coast, the corresponding sign is not on I-10 (it is on I-40). It acquired this name in Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 106, Chapter 71, in 1976. According to reports in 2003, the sign on I-10 has disappeared.
    (Image source: Wikipedia)

    Ricardo A. CrockerThe portion of I-10 within the city limits of Santa Monica (~ 010 LA 0.0/R4.334) is named the "Ricardo A. Crocker Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Santa Monica Police Officer Ricardo A. Crocker, a Major in the United States Marine Corps, who was killed by a rocket propelled grenade explosion on May 26, 2005 while conducting combat operations against enemy forces in Iraq. Ricardo A. Crocker was assigned to Detachment D, Third Civil Affairs Group, attached to the Fifth Provisional Civil Affairs Group II MEF and had previously served in Operation Iraqi Freedom II with the Third Civil Affairs Group from February through September 2004, and was redeployed to Iraq with the Fifth Provisional Civil Affairs Group in February 2005. At the time of his death, Ricardo A. Crocker, known as "Rick," was 39 years of age and a 10-year veteran of the Santa Monica Police Department. Ricardo A. Crocker held the rank of Captain in the United States Marine Corps when he was hired by the Santa Monica Police Department on July 21, 1995, subsequently being promoted to the rank of Major in the Marine Corps. As an Officer for the Santa Monica Police Department, Ricardo A. Crocker served in uniform patrol and was a member of the Crime Impact Team and Special Entry Team, serving as the primary emergency medical technician for the Special Entry Team, and was a rifle team member and rifle instructor. While in his final assignment to the Police Activities League, Officer Crocker made an indelible impression on the youth of Santa Monica by teaching preparatory courses for the Scholastic Aptitude Test, leading the book club, and implementing hiking and camping programs that exposed these youth to his two passions: education and nature. Ricardo A. Crocker was an excellent officer and ambassador for the Santa Monica Police Department as well as an excellent protector of the community; was a consummate caring professional who represented the highest standards and traditions of law enforcement and the Santa Monica Police Department. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 20, Resolution Chapter 94, on 7/12/2007.
    (Image source: SMPD on Twitter)

    Rosa Parks FreewayThe segment between I-405 and Route 110 (~ 010 LA R5.455/LA 14.82) is named the "Rosa Parks Freeway". Rosa Parks (born February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama) is considered the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement". This fame started when she was arrested on December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Her arrest was the impetus for a boycott of Montgomery buses, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and joined by approximately 42,000 African Americans for 381 days. On November 13, 1956, the United States Supreme Court ruled that Montgomery's segregation law was unconstitutional, and on December 20, 1956, Montgomery officials were ordered to desegregate buses. Rosa Parks refusal to surrender her seat in compliance with Montgomery's segregation law inspired the civil rights movement, which has resulted in the breakdown of numerous legal barriers and the lessening of profound discrimination against African Americans in this country. Her courage and conviction laid the foundation for equal rights for all Americans and for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Rosa Parks was the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was an active volunteer for the Montgomery Voters League. She cofounded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 1987 with Elaine Easton Steele to motivate and direct youth to achieve their highest potential through the "Pathways to Freedom" program. She is the recipient of many awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian, and the first International Freedom Conductor Award from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. The naming was on the occation of Rosa Park's 89th birthday. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 134, Chapter 2, 28 January 2002.
    (Image source: Councilman Nate Holden; TheNegro Woman in History Blog)

    El Salvador Community CorridorIn September 2019, it was noted that signs have been installed near Vermont Avenue (~ LA R13.82) to direct drivers to the El Salvador Community Corridor. This comes six years after the 2013 designation of the 12 blocks of Vermont Avenue from 11th Street to Adams Street as the corridor. Even though the Salvadoran community has largely settled in Pico-Union and Westlake, around 30 years ago Vermont Avenue became attractive to Salvadorans for one reason alone: banks. Banks like Banco Agricola, Banco Cuscatlan, and Banco American Central were crucial for Salvadorans who wanted to send funds back to family in El Salvador. Over the decades, parts of Vermont Avenue became a center for the Salvadoran community when street vendors, meat markets, and restaurants followed the crowds of expats. Oscar Dominguez, founder and president of El Salvador Community Corridor believes that the corridor has given Salvadorans a place in the city and that the new signage will motivate Angelenos to visit the artery and support one (or more) of the 150 Salvadoran businesses located there.
    (Source: LA Magazine, 9/17/2019; Image source: El Salvador Community Corridor Facebook Page)

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Marilyn Jorgenson ReeceThe I-405/I-10 Interchange (~ 010 LA R5.455) is named the "Marilyn Jorgenson Reece Memorial Interchange". It was named in honor of Marilyn Jorgenson Reece, who was born and raised in North Dakota and earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1948. Ms. Reece moved to Los Angeles with her parents shortly after graduation in 1948, and went to work for the State Division of Highways, which later became the Department of Transportation, as a junior civil engineer in Los Angeles. After six years of experience required to sit for the Professional Engineers Exam, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece became the state's first fully licensed female civil engineer in 1954. In 1962, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece received the Governor's Design Excellence Award from Governor Pat Brown for designing the I-10/I-405 interchange. Ms. Reece became the Division of Highway's first woman resident engineer for construction projects shortly after receiving that award. The three-level I-10/I-405 interchange designed by Marilyn Jorgenson Reece opened in 1964 and was the first interchange designed in California by a woman engineer. Urban critic Reyner Banham, author of Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies, admired the wide-swinging curved ramps connecting the two freeways, and wrote that the I-10/I-405 interchange "is a work of art, both as a pattern on the map, as a monument against the sky, and as a kinetic experience as one sweeps through it". During her 35-year career, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece's projects included serving as senior engineer for the completion of Route 210 through Sunland in 1975—at the time, the largest construction project the Department of Transportation had ever awarded—at $40 million. After retiring in 1983, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece taught engineering classes at Cal State Long Beach; and during Women's History Month in 1983, the Los Angeles City Council honored Marilyn Jorgenson Reece for making significant contributions to the city. In 1991, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece received life membership in the American Society of Civil Engineers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 72, Resolution Chapter 96, on 8/15/2006.
    (Image source: PBWorks)

    Lt Curtis MasseyThe eastbound portion of the National Boulevard overpass (~ 010 LA R006.40, although it coule be R007.21) is named the "Culver City Police Lieutenant Curtis Massey Memorial Overpass". This segment was named in honor of Lieutenant Curtis Massey of the Culver City Police Department, who died on January 28, 2009 when his unmarked vehicle was struck head-on by a vehicle driven the wrong way on I-10 near National Boulevard in the City of Los Angeles. Massey was born on June 1, 1967, the son of Stephen Massey and Padric Davis of Pacific Palisades. Massey attended Saint Matthews School and Palisades High School, graduating as part of the class of 1985. In those early years, Massey was a role model to many and was instrumental in the lives of young children through his job as a summer camp counselor at St. Matthews Day Camp. Massey furthered his education at Northern Arizona University where he received his bachelor's degree. In addition to his collegiate work, Massey devoted himself, again, to helping others as part of the Flagstaff EMT unit. That devotion to helping others led Massey to a career in law enforcement. Accordingly, Massey graduated from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Academy in 1992. Massey devoted his life to his family and the public, particularly at-risk youths. Beginning as a patrol officer, Lieutenant Massey served with distinction during his 17-year career in a variety of assignments within the Culver City Police Department; most notably with the juvenile section of the detective bureau, specifically the juvenile diversion program. During that time, Massey's admirable drive to protect and serve the public, and his dedication to duty, led Massey to be honored as "Officer of the Year" three times within the Culver City Police Department. Massey was also a recipient of the "Medal of Valor," the department's highest honor. Lieutenant Massey had recently been assigned as the supervisor of the juvenile detective section, and spent a lot of his own free time working with at-risk children. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 124, 8/30/2010, Resolution Chapter 109.
    (Image source: Culver City Observer)

    Rev Cecil Chip MurrayThe Western Avenue overcrossing at I-10 (~ 010 LA R12.825), in the City of Los Angeles, is officially named the Reverend Cecil "Chip" Murray Overcrossing. It was named in honor of the Reverend Cecil "Chip" Murray, who has generously and successfully served the community and congregation of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles since 1977, when the congregation counted 300 active members and those members received his vision to ignite a fire in their hearts to be a church that extends beyond its walls. As of 2004, the congregation numbered over 17,300 members, and works through more than 40 task forces, including task forces related to health, substance abuse, homelessness, emergency food and clothing, general and specialized housing, tutoring, entrepreneurial training, and employment services. These task forces and programs provide notable assistance and services that include assistance and services for the physically handicapped, dwelling assistance for low-income individuals and those with HIV/AIDS, transportation for the elderly and handicapped, education, health care and AIDS/tobacco ministries, tutoring, legal aid, computer training, job training and placement, economic development and loan programs, a business incubator for multimedia production, a prison ministry, environmental programs, food programs, youth programs, choir and music programs, and other activities. Reverend Murray served 10 years on active duty in the United States Air Force as a jet radar intercept officer in the Air Defense Command and as a navigator in the Air Transport Command, was decorated in 1958 with the Soldier's Medal of Valor following an explosion in his two-seated fighter, and retired as a reserve major in the United States Air Force. He is a native of Florida and has received an undergraduate degree from Florida A&M University, has received a doctorate in religion from the School of Theology at Claremont, and has lectured and been an adjunct professor at Iliff University, Seattle University, the School of Theology at Claremont, Fuller Seminary, and Northwest Theological Seminary. Reverend Murray retired as Senior Pastor of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church on September 25, 2004. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 152, chaptered September 1, 2004. Resolution Chapter 175.
    (Image source: LA Sentinal, 10/26/2011)

    Dosan Ahn Chang HoThe I-10/I-110 interchange (~ 010 LA 14.83) is officially named the "Dosan Ahn Chang Ho Memorial Interchange". Dosan Ahn Chang Ho was born in a small village in Korea in 1878. He arrived in America in 1902 with his newlywed wife, Lee Hae Ryon (Helen Ahn). As the steamship approached Hawaii, Ahn Chang Ho resolved to stand tall above the sea of turmoil existing at that time in Korea, and resolved to call himself "Dosan," which means Island Mountain. While living in San Francisco, Dosan organized the San Francisco Social Meeting on September 23, 1903, and initiated a social reform movement that was in desperate need in the Korean American society. As an accomplished orator and leader at the age of 24, Dosan guided his countrymen to form a respectable community for Koreans in the United States. He and his family settled in Riverside, California, in March 1904 and worked tirelessly to unite Korean Americans and to revive the patriotic spirit of the Korean people. He moved to Los Angeles in 1913, where the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion now stands, and played a significant role in the growth of the Korean American community in the City of Los Angeles. Together with his friends, he formed the Gonglip-Hyuphoe, or Cooperative Association, which would become the basis for the Korean National Association, which Dosan later led as president. This association maintained structure within the Korean American community, both to build character of individuals and to enhance the image of Koreans within the mainstream community. Dosan also established one of the first English schools for Koreans so that his fellow Korean Americans could learn English and the Bible. He helped to relieve blighted living conditions for his fellow Korean Americans in the Greater Los Angeles area, and became the spiritual leader of the Korean Independence Movement. Following Japan's annexation of Korea in 1910, Dosan formulated the basis for the Provisional Government of Korea, and conceived Hung Sa Dahn (Young Korean Academy), an organization to develop leaders for the independence movement, in 1913. In 1915, Dosan promoted the development of the Korean language program for second generation Korean Americans as an opportunity to pass on Korean traditions, values, and identity to younger generations. Through his work, Dosan Ahn Chang Ho had an enormously beneficial impact and significance on the history of modern Korea and Korean Americans. Dosan's philosophy and teachings serve as a model for Korean American youths. The interchange was named in honor of the 100th Year Centennial Immigration for Korean Americans to the United States. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 104, Chapter 160, September 11, 2002.
    (Image source: Dosan Ahn Chang Ho Official Site)

    Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

    Approved as chargeable Interstate on 9/15/1955. At one time, Caltrans proposed this as I-12, with I-10 being assigned to what is currently I-8.


  2. Rte 10 Seg 2From Route 101 near Mission Road in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River via the vicinity of Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Indio, and Chiriaco Summit, and via Blythe.

    Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this routing was defined as "Route 110 in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River via the vicinity of Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Indio, and Shaver's Summit (later renamed Chiriaco Summit), and via Blythe, and includes that portion of the Colorado River highway bridge (near Ehrenburg, Arizona) which is within the State of California. The department may contract with the State of Arizona, for and on behalf of the State of California, for the maintenance of such bridge." Route 110 referred to a stub route downtown (in particular, the portion between the two segments of Route 10).

    Some history of the East LA interchange, including the connection between the two segments of I-10, may be found in the discussion of US 101.

    Scott Parker on AARoads noted the following about the early days of this end of I-10:
    (Source: Sparker on AARoads, "Re: Interstate 5", 6/23/2019)

    Until the widening of the San Bernardino Freeway/I-10 east of the I-5 (Golden State) interchange, the signage on WB I-10 originally only referenced West I-10 on the ramp to the SB Golden State Freeway -- no mention of SB I-5; traffic to SB I-5 (essentially a "backwards" movement regarding the trajectory of the Santa Ana Freeway) was expected to remain on the western "stub" of the San Bernardino Freeway (original I-110 and briefly BGS-signed as such from WB I-10) to the "San Bernardino Split", where it would take the single-lane flyover to the SB Santa Ana Freeway (originally I-105 but never signed -- although prominently featured on Gousha L.A. maps in the early '60's), aka US 101 at that point. That ramp, signed for SB I-5 after signage was applied to that freeway in 1961-62 and featuring substandard clearance beneath it, was dismantled at the same time of the San Bernardino Freeway upgrades; at which point the ramp carrying WB I-10 was signed as access to both I-10 and SB I-5 as it is today.

    (105-110)In 1968, the stub Route 105 and Route 110 were eliminated, and the portion from Route 101 to Route 5 was transferred from former Route 110. This changed the routing to "(b) Route 101 near Mission Road in Los Angeles to Route 5. (c) Route 5 in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River...", reflecting the slight discontinuity at Route 5.

    In 1984, the two segments were combined, and the text about Arizona was removed, giving the definition of "(b) Route 101 near Mission Road in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River via the vicinity of Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Indio, and Chiriaco Summit and via Blythe."

    Note that the El Monte Busway, a special transit (and at times, HOV+3) lane, running from Union Station in Downtown Los Angeles to just E of Route 710, is in the postmile system as Route 10S.

    Near the intersection of I-10 and former Route 31, Ontario had a racetrack. Between 1971 and 1980, this track hosted Indycar/CART, NHRA, and NASCAR events; this racetrack was designed in a similar shape to the more famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway and was intended to bring a second venue of major auto racing into the Los Angeles area (the first was the now-defunct Riverside International Raceway, which is located at the I-215/Route 60 junction). This track also hosted the "Questor Grand Prix", an allstar event attempting to prove whether American formula racers were superior to those from Europe. After Ontario Motor Speedway went bankrupt in 1980, the track was demolished and the land is now owned by ChevronTexaco. It was near where Ontario Mills now stands, and might explain the car-named streets between Haven Avenue and old Route 31: Dusenberg Drive, Ferrari, Mercedes Lane, Porsche Way, and Concours, and the car named streets west of Haven Avenue: Triumph Lane, Shelby Street, Shelby Lane, Lotus Avenue, Jaguar Way.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield Interstate Shield This segment was made up of four distinct parts:

    1. Between Route 5 and San Bernardino, this was LRN 26. The initial portion of the route, from Colton to Route 86 near Indio, was added in the Second Bond Act of 1916. The route was extended between the eastern border of Los Angeles and Colton (utilizing Garvey and Holt Ave) in 1931. In 1933, LRN 26 was formally extended into Los Angeles to meet US 101; this extension was likely along Ramona Blvd (see below). This portion was signed as US 60/US 70/US 99. In 1935, a routing was added that ran along Valley Blvd between the eastern city limits of Los Angeles and El Monte; this was later added to LRN 77. It appears that the Valley Blvd routing was used for US 70, and the Ramona Blvd routing was used for US 60, although they may have been co-signed... and either might have been cosigned with US 99. This segment starts at the San Bernardino Split, which was the end of US 60 and US 70, and junction with US 99 and US 101. The grade separated interchange was originally completed in 1943; it was later modified by the addition of the flyover in 1954. In 1996, the flyover was removed due to earthquake safety. Note: By 1953, it was noted that the Ramona Freeway name was used in Los Angeles County; in San Bernardino County, it was the "US 70-99 Freeway".
    2. Between San Bernardino and Indio, this was also part of LRN 26. This portion of LRN 26 was defined in 1916, and was signed as US 60/US 70/US 99.
    3. Between Indio and Mecca, this was part of LRN 64. This segment of LRN 64 was defined in 1931. This portion was signed as US 60/US 70.
    4. Between Mecca and the Arizona state line, this was LRN 64. The portion between Mecca and Blythe was defined in 1919, and the extension to the Arizona State Line in 1931. It was also signed as US 60/US 70. Originally, the routing ran through Box Canyon between Mecca and Shavers Summer (Chiriaco Summit). In 1935, the Indio Cutoff opened running directly from Shaver Summit (Chiriaco Summit) to Indio (eliminating the canyon route and saving almost 10 miles). This was a rerouting of LRN 64. The Box Canyon Routing was once Route 195 (1963-1972).

      In Blythe, this was Hobsonway, and used a different bridge to cross the Colorado. The current bridge was built in 1960, with improvements in 1974. No remnants of the original bridge remain.

    The Ramona Expressway portion of I-10 started its development shortly after the US Highway system was adopted in 1926. At this time, California began development of US 99. In Monterey Park, Garvey Avenue was designated as part of the link of US 99. However, westerly of Atlantic Boulevard, the roadway ended. The six-mile gap would be filled by a new roadway that would connect Garvey Avenue near Atlantic Boulevard with Aliso Street at Mission Road to be named Ramona Boulevard. Ramona Boulevard was along terrain that was suitable for grade separations, with the Pacific Electric Railroad tracks to the north and a hillside to the south. In order to accommodate the new highway, six bridges that already spanned the tracks were extended or reconstructed and two new grade separations were constructed near Monterey Pass Road. Near the west end of the project, the Macy Street (now Cesar E. Chavez Avenue) bridge, which had been built in 1910, provided another grade separation over the tracks and could accommodate a roadway without reconstruction. Thus, there were nine bridges in all with no at-grade crossings and virtually no local property access. It was opened to traffic on April 20, 1935 and was called an “airline” route by the State because motorists could “fly” without intersectional conflict at 50 miles per hour. In 1944, Aliso Street, the westerly extension of Ramona Boulevard was widened and reconstructed. This project, which was undertaken by the City, included a grade separation at Mission Road. In coordination with this project, the State widened Ramona Boulevard easterly to the East City Limit and constructed a four-foot wide median. Upon the completion of these projects, Ramona Boulevard was renamed Ramona Parkway. In 1954, shortly after Ramona Parkway was extended easterly of the City, it was renamed the San Bernardino Freeway. In 1970, most of the 1935 and 1944 improvements were demolished to make way for the San Bernardino Freeway and Express Busway.
    (The historical information above on the Ramona Expressway was derived from "Transportation Topics and Tales: Milestones in Transportation History in Southern California" by John E. Fisher, P.E. PTOE, available at http://ladot.lacity.org/pdf/PDF100.pdf)

    In October 2019, more information was published on the Ramona Expressway. Leaving downtown LA in City Terrace, it was called Ramona Boulevard before it merged with Garvey Avenue. East of Monterey Park, the route was a straight line — sometimes called an “air line” — to the San Jose Hills and Pomona’s Holt Avenue. A good share of it today lies under I-10. The main remnant of the route is on Garvey between I-710 and where it merges into I-10 on the east end of El Monte. A few links of frontage road along I-10 in Covina and West Covina are still called Garvey Avenue. A small portion of Holt Avenue exists in Covina, though a connection with Pomona’s Holt has since been sliced and diced by freeway expansion over Kellogg Hill. The route itself was adopted by the state in 1931. The first stretch of the new highway construction for the project was from Pomona through W.J. Kellogg’s ranch (the future Cal Poly Pomona) and over the San Jose Hills to Barranca Street in West Covina. News accounts said the entire paved route would finally be ready for travel on April 4, 1935, though some portions of it had opened earlier. However, the Pomona Progress-Bulletin said on April 8 that heavy rains delayed completing the work, and the full route didn’t open for another few days. The article also said that the state had approved a $12,000 contract to plant 25,000 ground-cover plants as well as two dozen types of trees and shrubs along the highway. The new Pomona-LA road helped spawn additional construction in the Inland Empire. Improvement programs were begun on segments of Holt in Pomona and A Street in Ontario and farther east when the route became Valley Boulevard in Fontana.
    (Source: Daily Bulletin, 10/7/2019)

    On July 15, 1952, the California Highway Commission adopted I-10 as a freeway. I-10 became part of the Freeway & Expressway System in 1959 and is also part of the Interstate Highway System. I-10 is included in the State Interregional Road Systems and is further classified as a “High Emphasis” and “Gateway” route. The entire length of I-10 is included in the National Highway System, the Department of Defense Priority Network, and the Strategic Highway Corridor Network. The 1990 Federal Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) identifies I-10 as a “National Network” route for STAA trucks. The Federal Functional Classifications for I-10 are Rural Principal Arterial and extension of a Rural Principal Arterial into an urban area.

    The history of the East LA Interchange, where US 101, I-10, I-5, and Route 60 come together, is discussed with US 101.

    According to the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, the first segment of the "Ramona Freeway" opened on Nov. 16, 1954, with a segment running 13.4 miles from Kellogg Hill in Pomona to Archibald Avenue in Ontario. The freeway to the west between El Monte and Covina was still being built, and work hadn't even started east of Ontario. The routing was contentious. Pomona fought the route for five years, wanting it to go north around the San Jose Hills in the vicinity of Arrow Highway. Ontario and Upland also battled over their part of the highway, finally agreeing on a route that tight-roped their joint boundary. Farther west, El Monte was involved in a bitter dispute over the route that cut the city in half. As for the naming, "San Bernardino Freeway" was bestowed on November 24, 1954, just eight days after the opening ceremonies. Originally called the Ramona Freeway, Pomona interests had pushed for the route to be named for their city, which it bisected. Instead, the State Highway Commission announced the route would be known as the San Bernardino Freeway, even though the completed freeway wouldn't even go to downtown San Bernardino, unless you made a left turn on US 395 (now Route 15) just east of Colton. They suggested that the future "foothills" route (I-210 Freeway) would be better named for San Bernardino.

    The portion of the route E of San Gorgonio dates back to the Bradshaw Trail. The Bradshaw Trail was a wagon road through the Sonoran Desert east to the Colorado River. During the California Gold Rush the Bradshaw Trail was plotted through the Sonoran Desert by William D. Bradshaw. The Bradshaw Trail despite it's elongated path essentially was the forerunner of what would become modern I-10 from Palm Springs to the City of Blythe. During the 1916 Second State Highway Bond Act LRN 26 was added to the State Highway System as a route from San Bernardino southeast to El Centro. LRN 26 was essentially a forerunner of what would become the earliest alignments of US 99. By 1924, the stretch beween Mecca and the Arizona Border was part of the Atlantic and Pacific Highway. This would become LRN 64.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog "Califoooornia! (Interstate 10 west from CA 86 through Coachella Valley and San Gorgonio Pass to CA 60 in the Moreno Valley Badlands)")

    The 1934 State Highway Map shows a fully graded LRN 64 carrying US 60. The 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Riverside County shows the entire routing of LRN 64 in far more detail. LRN 64/US 60/US 70 originally diverged significantly from I-10 using alignments on Chuckwalla Valley Road and Box Canyon Road. A September 1934 Department of Public Works Guide describes the construction of what was known as the "Indio Cut-Off" route of US 60 bypassing Box Canyon Road. Chiraco Summit at the time was referred to has "Shaver's Summit" and the Guide states that Box Canyon Road was oiled in 1933. The Indio Cut-Off is described as having a 6.3% grade and an anticipated opening of July 1935. By late 1935 the modern grade used by I-10 descending westward from Chiriaco Summit into Coachella Valley in proximity to Coachella was completed. US 60/US 70 were moved to the new grade by 1936. By 1940 US 95 was routed into California via what was Route 195. After US 95 was extended to California, a second Route 195 was created along LRN 64 on Box Canyon Road. LRN 64 was actually a split route carrying US 60/US 70 on the north segment and Route 195 on Box Canyon Road, according to the 1940 State Highway Map. By the 1966 State Highway Map edition the planned bypass of Chuckwalla Valley Road appears. By the 1967 State Highway Map I-10 appears co-signed with US 60 from Coachella to Chiriaco Summit. By 1969, I-10 bypassed Chuckwalla Valley and was nearly completed through the Sonoran Desert. West of Chuckwalla Valley Road the former routing of US 60/US 70 in Desert Center was on Ragsdale Road just north of I-10.
    (Source: Gribblenation Blog Old US Route 60/70 through Hell (Chuckwall Valley Road and Ragsdale Road), Califoooornia!(Interstate 10 west from CA 86 through Coachella Valley and San Gorgonio Pass to CA 60 in the Moreno Valley Badlands))

    In Blythe, the first bridge to cross the Colorado replaced an existing cable ferry, established in 1870 between Ehrenberg AZ and Blythe CA. The new bridge, opened in 1928, was a toll bridge constructed by Riverside County, and was not part of the state highway system (although it was an extension of LRN 64). It had five steel truss spans each 190' long, for a total length of 950'. The roadbed was 20' wide, and it was 30' above the water. In 1931, the state purchased the toll bridge.

    Status Status

    Note: See the HOV discussion below for the details on HOV/HOT lane additions on this segment of this route. This includes the El Monte Busway.

    Downtown Los Angeles (I-5) (~ 010 LA 18.433) to El Monte (I-605) (~ 010 LA 31.078)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #881: Pedestrian Bridge for North Atlantic Blvd., Monterey Park. $480,000. (~ LA 23.336)

    I-10/I-605 Interchange

    According to an article in the San Gabriel Tribune, the I-10/I-605 interchange (~ 010 LA 31.078) was designed in 1964 and was supposed to accommodate traffic until 1984. No major changes have been undertaken there since it was built. An average of 438,000 cars use the interchange each day, making the intersection the 19th busiest in the state. According to a 1999 study by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the area directly around the interchange has one of the highest air-pollution- related cancer risk factors in the San Gabriel Valley. One of the main problems with the intersection is what engineers call "the weave,", where vehicles transferring from the I-10 west to the I-605 south have to weave across cars getting on the I-605 south from the I-10 east. Cars from both directions have only about 150 feet to change places with each other. Additionally, drivers who want to transfer from the southbound I-605 to the eastbound I-10 east have to take a left turn when leaving the I-605. According to Caltrans, the prospects for improvements are bleak. Caltrans is considering building a flyover from the I-605 south to the I-10 east, which would eliminate the weaving-in section. The current budget crisis rules out state funding for the immediate future, and it was not appoved for funding in the 2007 CMIA allocations.

    2007 CMIA. A number of projects on I-10 in Los Angeles County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects included the I-10/I-605 transition connector ($70.5 million) (~ 010 LA 31.078). None were recommended for funding.

    In March 2016, the Los Angeles MTA presented its full proposal for what transit lines could be built -- and when -- if Los Angeles County voters approve a half-cent sales tax increase in November 2016. This proposal included funding for the I-605/I-10 Interchange project that will improve interchanges from Eastbound I-10 to Southbound I-605, Westbound I-10 to Southbound I-605, Northbound I-605 to Eastbound I-10, and Northbound I-605 to Westbound I-10.
    (Source: Los Angeles Times 3/18/2016; Metro Board Report 3/24/2016)

    Note: See the HOV discussion below for the details on HOV/HOT lane additions on this segment of this route.

    010 HOV 605 to 57In August 2016, it was reported that the new soundwalls in West Covina weren't making everyone happy. For almost 60 years, the stretch of freeway between the border with Baldwin Park and Route 57 atop Kellogg Hill has shaped the history of the largest city in the east San Gabriel Valley. It’s not just the automobiles that travel the freeway,but the swatch of retail stores lining both sides of the freeway. With an addition of 18 miles of carpool lanes and more importantly, stone soundwalls towering 12 feet to 16 feet above the small, ranch-style homes nearby, the freeway’s look is changing, along with the city of 111,000 people. In particular, although the walls keep the car noise in, they also keep views of kitschy landmarks and the San Gabriel Mountains hidden. The view of restaurant signs, rolling hills, even mid-century modern apartment buildings painted baby blue or aqua are at times shrouded by the soundwalls. Some say the familiar sites of hillside graves along the south side of the freeway, part of Forest Lawn Cemetery, will be a lost sight from the vantage point of eastbound freeway riders. The walls block the resident's view of the mountains, and most importantly, the freeway. Many who drive down Lark Ellen or Hollenbeck would eye the traffic on the 10 Freeway and if it was heavy, detour to the Route 60 Freeway or surface streets. The soundwalls block their view. Caltrans is required to reduce traffic noise by 5 decibels, a change that is considered readily noticeable. Although the walls reduce the noise near the freeway, some residents who live farther away from the freeway said the noise has traveled higher, into the hillside communities. Stores, restaurants and auto dealerships also fought not to have high soundwalls blocking views from the freeway. Eastland Center, home to Walmart, Target, Ross, Dick’s Sporting Goods and other stores and restaurants worked a deal with Caltrans, as did Plaza West Covina, the indoor shopping mall on the south side of the 10, formerly called Westfield West Covina until it was sold to Starwood Capital Group in 2013. These centers have only 6-foot high walls with 2-feet of strong, mesh fencing on top, as do the car dealerships, making them and their signage easily visible from freeway level. Essentially, the soundwalls, besides giving motorists a claustrophobic, underground feel, may hurt the economics of Baldwin Park and West Covina, cities reliant on sales tax dollars. Combined with an emphasis on residential, the post-2021 freeway may actually lower tax revenues. The current walls are part of the second phase of the project. The project is divided into three segments: from I-605 to Puente Avenue in Baldwin Park; from Puente Avenue to Citrus Street in West Covina; from Citrus Street to Route 57. Caltrans has completed the first segment and is working on segments two and three. The second segment will be completed in 2019 and the third and final segment may be finished in summer of 2021. Once done, the gap in the carpool lanes will be closed, creating 40 miles of High Occupancy Vehicle (carpool) lanes in each direction from downtown Los Angeles to I-15 Freeway in San Bernardino County. The added carpool lane in each direction is supposed to ease traffic. Gridlock on this stretch of the 10 is what Caltrans calls “exceeding capacity,” and runs every weekday from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. westbound and from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. eastbound.
    (Source: SGV Tribune 8/14/2016)

    In August 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Baldwin Park (City) along Route 10 on Francisquito Avenue and Garvey Avenue (07-LA-10-PM 32.7), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by freeway agreement dated April 10, 1958, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State, and by letter dated June 5, 2016, agreed to waive the 90-day notice requirement and accept the relinquishment.

    Pomona (Route 57/Route 71) to Ontario (I-15)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1680: Implement Grove Avenue Corridor/I-10 interchange improvements in Ontario. $2,400,000. (~ SBD 4.88)

    Ontario (I-15) to Colton (I-215)

    Cherry / Citrus / Cedar Improvements in Fontana

    In 2007, the CTC recommended using the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) to fund widening of the ramps and addition of aux. lanes at Cherry (~ SBD 13.175), Citrus (SBD 15.221) & Cedar (SBD R18.486) ($30,325K requested, $19,233 recommended) and a WB mixed flow lane from Live Oak Cyn to Ford St ($38,186K requested; $26,500K recommended).

    In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County is to reconstruct the Cherry Avenue Interchange (~ SBD 13.175), widen the overcrossing, and construct roadway improvements in the city of Fontana. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. Total estimated cost is $76,900,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12.

    In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County is to reconstruct the Citrus Avenue Interchange (SBD 15.221), widen the overcrossing, and construct roadway improvements in the city of Fontana. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. Total estimated cost is $54,458,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3098: Construct Cypress Avenue over-pass to separate I-10 and Union Pacific Railroad tracks in Fontana. $2,400,000. (~ SBD 15.742)

    In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will widen and improve the existing Cedar Avenue interchange on I-10 at Cedar Avenue (~ SBD R18.428) in the community of Bloomington. The project is fully funded with federal and local dollars. The total estimated cost is $62,730,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15.

    Riverside Avenue Interchange

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1387: Reconstruct interchange at I-10 and Riverside Avenue to improve traffic in Rialto. $1,600,000. (~ SBD 19.962)

    Riverside Ave InterchangeIn April 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to reconstruct the existing Riverside Avenue interchange (~010 SBD 19.977) at Route 10 to improve interchange and mainline operation and safety. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes federal and local funds. Total estimated project cost is $34,000,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

    In March 2011, it was reported that crews are scheduled to demolish the Riverside Avenue bridge in early May 2011. Once the five-lane bridge comes down, the contractor has a deadline to replace it with a nine-lane overpass, part of a plan to increase traffic flow in the area. The construction agreement includes a requirement that the contractor reopen the new bridge seven months after it closes the old one. A penalty will be assessed for opening late, and a bonus will be paid if the overpass opens earlier than expected. The larger bridge will give drivers two turn lanes in each direction from which to turn onto I-10. There will be three northbound lanes and two southbound lanes for through traffic. Entrance and exit ramps at Riverside Avenue and I-10 are also being widened, to accommodate more vehicles. Most of the money for the $32 million project is coming from the city's redevelopment agency and California's Prop. 1B transportation bond program.
    (Source: Press Enterprise, 3/20/11)

    In May 2015, the CTC approved a request to amend the TCIF Program by including the I-10 Pepper Avenue Interchange Project (~ 010 SBD 20.971) as Project 109 in the Los Angeles/Inland Corridor element of the TCIF Program and program $1.158 million of TCIF funds to the project. The proposed project would widen Pepper Avenue from three lanes to five lanes, lengthen turn lanes and improve intersection geometric design, replace the existing I-10 Pepper Avenue Bridge, correct features to meet Americans with Disabilities Act standards, provide sidewalks, shoulders and other pedestrian features. The proposed improvements will address increases in vehicular and truck traffic as a result of growth and development in the area. Since award savings in TCIF funds were realized in the Los Angeles/Inland Corridor, the SCCG and SANBAG propose to place TCIF savings on this project (see attached letters). The total cost of the project is estimated at $10.111 million.

    In May 2016, the CTC approved $1,000,000 for a minor SHOPP project in Colton, at the Rancho Avenue Overcrossing on I-10 (~ 010 SBD R21.962), widen ramp from one lane to two lanes at the eastbound on-ramp. Outcome/Output: Widen ramp to improve the State Highway System (SHS).

    Colton (I-215) to Eastern Edge of Redlands (just E of Route 210)

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2051: Improve interstates and roads part of the Inland Empire Goods Movement Gateway project in and around the former Norton Air Force Base. $20,000,000. (~ SBD 26.335)

    Tippecanoe Avenue Interchange Improvements

    [Tippicanoe Interchange]In May 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the I-10/Tippecanoe Avenue Interchange (~ 010 SBD 26.295), construct auxiliary lanes on Route 10, and improve local traffic operations. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes federal demonstration and local funds. The total estimated cost is $80,021,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to paleontological resources and community character and cohesion to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to paleontological resources in the project area will be mitigated by preparing and implementing a Paleontological Mitigation Plan.

    In April 2012, the CTC amended the CMIA funding: On I-10, $10,000,000 to the San Bernardino Association of Governments for 08-SBd-10 25.3/26.3 I-10/Tippecanoe Interchange Improvements-Phase 1. In the cities of Loma Linda and San Bernardino, from 1 mile west of Tippecanoe Avenue to Tippecanoe Avenue. Construct eastbound auxiliary lane, eastbound off ramp, retaining walls, reinforced concrete box culvert, and widen San Timoteo Bridge.

    In December 2012, the CTC amended the CMIA baseline agreement for the I-10 Tippecanoe Avenue Interchange Improvements (Phase 1) project (PPNO 0154F) to update the project funding plan to include additional local funds. The construction contract was advertised in June 2012. When bids were opened, the lowest bid came slightly over the Engineer’s Estimate. The contract was awarded in July 2012 with a total project allotment of $13,787,000, an increase of $787,000 over the approved budget. This shortfall was covered with a combination of local and federal funds. The revised funding plan reflects the addition of these funds.

    In April 2012, it was reported that construction is planned for I-10 at Tippecanoe Avenue and Anderson Street to improve traffic flow to Loma Linda. Specifically, the interchange is being reworked to improve access to key destinations, including Loma Linda University Medical Center, the San Bernardino International Airport and the Jerry Pettis Memorial Veterans Hospital. The Loma Linda Academy and retail centers on Harriman Place and Hospitality Lane would also be easier to reach. The actual construction would entail (a) widening the freeway eastbound off-ramp to a two-lane exit, expanding to four lanes at the intersection; (b) building new westbound ramps that enter and exit at Harriman Place; (c) eliminating the current traffic signal at the Tippecanoe westbound ramps; (d) widening the Anderson/Redlands Boulevard intersection to include two through-lanes, two left-turn lanes and one right-turn lane in each direction; and (e) creating an auxiliary lane on eastbound I-10 between Waterman and Tippecanoe to improve merging traffic. The environmental studies have been completed and the project is currently (as of April 2012) in the right-of-way acquisition phase. The work be completed by Spring 2014 and will mean traffic detours, closures and slowdowns. Funding for the work will come from federal, state and local governments, including Loma Linda. There will be $47.8 million in federal funds; $2.5 million in state funds and $26 million in local funds.
    (Source: Redlands Patch, April 1, 2012)

    In May 2016, it was reported that Officials with San Bernardino Associated Governments and other transportation agencies celebrated the completion of the multiyear project that will allow traffic to flow more smoothly through the interchange. All that remains is plants and landscaping on Tippecanoe Avenue and Anderson Street, which should be finished in 2017. SanBAG, in partnership with Caltrans, began the project in August 2012 with an estimated budget of $70.5 million. The five-year project was funded in part by federal, state and local sources. The first phase of the project improved the eastbound off-ramp from the 10 Freeway. The second phase incorporated a new westbound 10 loop on-ramp and a westbound off-ramp. Crews widened Tippecanoe Avenue between Redlands Boulevard and Harriman Place and integrated dedicated turn lanes, improved signage and a better drainage system.
    (Source: San Bernardino Sun, 5/17/2016)

    In January 2018, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Loma Linda along Route 10 on Anderson Street and Redlands Boulevard (08-SBd-10-PM 26.22/26.36), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by freeway agreement dated August 16, 2010, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired December 4, 2017.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    In January 2018, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Bernardino along Route 10 on Tippecanoe Avenue and Laurelwood Drive (08-SBd-10-PM 26.33/26.46), consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by freeway agreement dated August 16, 2010, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired December 4, 2017.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.3c)

    Alabama Street Interchange (~ 010 SBD 29.293)

    In February 2016, it was reported that, following up on the realignment of the Redlands Boulevard and Alabama Street intersection (~ 010 SBD 29.293), the city of Redlands was looking to improve the I-10 Freeway interchange at Alabama. The city indicated that it will enter into an agreement with San Bernardino Associated Governments, or SanBAG, to proceed with the design and funding arrangement for the project, which has been refined to cut costs. The project includes widening and expanding Alabama Street to the I-10 bridge as well as the on- and off-ramps to and from the freeway. Construction is estimated to cost $10.9 million, down from $36.1 million. The original plan called for the replacement of the Alabama Street bridge over the freeway. The new plan does not.
    (Source: Redlands Daily Facts, 2/18/2016)

    In February 2020, it was reported that a project to widen Alabama Street from Orange Tree Lane to Industrial Park Avenue is on the design table and ready to start construction, according to SanBAG. The $15.7 million I-10/Alabama Street Interchange project includes widening the eastbound and westbound offramps at the I-10/Alabama Street to reduce traffic congestion. Construction is expected to start in fall 2020 and it is expected to take at least a year to complete, said the Transportation Authority. Funding for the project comes entirely from Measure I.
    (Source: Highland News, 2/20/2020)

    Eastern Edge of Redlands (just E of Route 210) to Beaumont (Jct Route 60)

    [010 TCRP 58]There are plans to widen this route from Route 210 (~ 010 SBD 29.794) to Ford Street (~ 010 SBD 33.166) in Redlands (TCRP #58) [September 2002 Agenda Item 2.1c.(2)]. The overall project will add one mixed flow lane in the median in each direction on I-10 from Orange Street to Ford Street in the City of Redlands. The proposed widening will upgrade I-10 within the limits of the project from three lanes to four lanes in each direction. This is now scheduled for completion in August 2007. However, as of June 2008, PS&E for the project had been completed with $277,000 TCRP savings. SANBAG then requested to redistribute these funds to Construction in order to cover material and labor cost increases. Differing site conditions also contributed to an increase in construction costs. The project schedule and funding plan were updated.

    In December 2010, it was reported that there are plans to add an additional lane between Yucaipa and Redlands. San Bernardino Associated Governments officials approved an $18.7 million contract with Beador Construction Co. for the new eastbound lane, stretching from Live Oak Canyon Road in Yucaipa (~ 010 SBD R36.966) to Ford Street in Redlands (~ 010 SBD 33.166). When completed in 2013, I-10 in the county will have at least four lanes in both directions. The contract means construction of the new lane could start sometime in early 2011 and take about two years to finish. Engineers predicted the construction would cost around $33.5 million, but costs have dropped in recent years because of the economic recession, and like others, the I-10 project's bids came in lower than expected.

    Live Oak Canyon ProjectA project has been approved for future consideration of funding to construct the Live Oak Canyon Interchange in the City of Yucaipa (TCRP #59). [April 2002 Agenda Item 2.2c.(3)]. The overall project is to reconstruct the Live Oak Canyon Road Interchange on Route 10 (~ 010 SBD R36.966) and construct the 14th Street Bridge over Wilson Creek (~ 010 SBD R37.252). Construction of the 14th Street Bridge was completed in December 2003. In 2007, the CTC considered a request for modification of funding on this project, which would place the completion date in FY 2008/09

    In February 2020, it was reported that Measure I is also funding the I-10/University Street Interchange (~ SBD 31.915), scheduled to begin construction in spring 2020, according to SanBAG. The $5.5 million project will improve University Street at the I-10 interchange between Citrus Avenue and Central Avenue, and also implement minor ramp widening, add turning lanes, traffic signals and operational improvements within the existing right-of-way. The project will reduce congestion and improve traffic operations. The project is scheduled to be completed by the spring of 2021. The interchange serves the east end of Redlands, and provides access to the University of Redlands, Redlands High School and a large residential community. Additionally, and also funded by Measure I, last September the Redlands City Council approved a five-year capital project that includes intersection improvements at University Street and Colton Avenue, and new signals at Ford Street and I-10. The capital project also includes widening of Pioneer Avenue from Furlow Drive to Texas Street from two to four lanes, widening of Citrus Avenue from Dearborn Street to Wabash Avenue from two to four lanes and widening of San Bernardino Avenue from Church Street to Wabash Avenue from two to four lanes.
    (Source: Highland News, 2/20/2020)

    Route 10 Eastbound Truck Climbing Lane (SBD 36.44 to RIV 0.0)

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to allocate Advance Project Development Element (APDE) funds of $2.890M for PS&E for PPNO 3009Q Rt 10 Eastbound Truck Climbing Lane. Per the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority MAJORPROJECTS PROJECT STATUS REPORT, April– June 2017, this project will add a truck climbing lane from west of the 16th Street Bridge in the City of Yucaipa (SBD 036.44) to east of the County Line Road Bridge at the San Bernardino County and Riverside County line (RIV 0.0). Funding for the project is presently programmed only through the Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA/ED) phase. The amount is equal to the final design cost. Construction is expected in 2020.

    In February 2020, it was reported that a $30.2 million I-10 Truck Climbing Lane is on the drawing table and is expected to begin construction in winter of 2021. According to the Transportation Authority, the project will add a truck climbing lane from west of the 16th Street Bridge in Yucaipa to just east of the County Line Road Bridge at the San Bernardino County and Riverside County line. The project will separate slow-moving trucks that are climbing the steep grade along the project from the general traffic lanes, said the Transportation Authority. Funding for this project will come from the state and Measure I. It is expected to be completed by spring of 2022.
    (Source: Highland News, 2/20/2020)

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, continued the programmed funding of $2,890K for PPNO 3009Q "Rt 10 Eastbound Truck Climbing Lane (APDE)(ext 5-19)", but pushed the funds from a prior year to FY23-24.
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Beaumont (Jct Route 60) (~ 010 RIV 6.651) to near Whitewater (Jct Route 111) (~ 010 RIV R25.185)

    I-10 Tune Up (~ RIV 8.211 to RIV R24.822)

    I 10 TuneupIn December 2016, it was reported that the CTC approved a project on I-10 in Beaumont from Pennsylvania Avenue (~ 010 RIV 8.211) to the I-10/Route 111 separation to replace lanes 3 and 4 and outside shoulders with JPCP, overlay inside shoulder, concrete slab replacement Lane and upgrade curb ramps lanes 1 and 2. The cost will be $162,231,000, starting fall 2018 and completion winter 2019.
    (Source: Valley News, 12/2/2016)

    In February 2020, it was reported that Caltrans was launching a major $210 million pavement renovation project on I-10 from Beaumont to Palm Springs. The work to repair and replace brittle sections of decades-old concrete is spread 17 miles between Route 60 and Route 111. Drivers will have to factor the project into desert travel plans through 2022, when work is scheduled to wrap up. Crews will replace damaged concrete slabs in the freeway’s No. 1 and 2 lanes, and repave whole sections of the heavily damaged No. 3 and 4 outside lanes. Much of the pavement was built in the 1960s, and some of the slabs still date to the original construction. The existing slabs range from three-quarters of a foot to a foot thick, and they will be replaced by 1.3-feet-deep concrete. The initial work is focused on the area between 8th Street in Banning and Main Street in Cabazon. According to the project website, work will concentrate in Beaumont and Banning for several months, shift to the Cabazon area in the fall and then move to the area east of Cabazon to Route 111 in fall 2021. Most of the time three of four lanes on the side of the freeway being worked on will remain open. However, drivers will have to navigate places where temporary lanes cross over to the other side. More than half the cost — $116 million — will be paid out of proceeds from the recent Senate Bill 1 gas tax increase.
    (Source (and image source): Press Enterprise, 2/5/2020)

    Apache Trail Interchange

    TCRP Project #61 will reconstruct the Apache Trail Interchange E of Banning in Riverside County (~ 010 RIV R17.678). As of September 2005, this project is inactive.

    In June 2017, the CTC was informed RCTC will be unable to utilize $2,678,000 of TCRP funding on TCRP Project 61 (Apache Trail Interchange) by the June 30, 2017 deadline. RCTC would like to transfer the unused savings in TCRP funding to Kern COG for TCRP Project 113 – Route 46 Expressway, Segment 4A.

    Cabazon Movable Barrier Project / Banning-Cabazon Bypass Road

    In May 2011, Caltrans replaced standard median near Cabazon with removable K-rails. The new barriers were installed 1.2 miles east of Main Street (~ 010 RIV R20.605) in Cabazon and 1.7 miles west of Haugen-Lehmann Way (~ 010 RIV R22.847), in Whitewater. The new medians allow CHP officers to redirect traffic to opposite lanes or onto side streets where they can re-enter the freeway at a point past a crash. Riverside County and state officials are also planning two bypass roads through Cabazon and Banning that could serve as alternate routes. Caltrans is also planning addition median breaks in 2012 with more K-rail barriers.

    Additional information was provided in October 2012. The plan is for a series of street improvements and additions would form the backbone of an I-10 bypass system in the San Gorgonio Pass that could ease crippling traffic jams when the freeway has to be shut down. Caltrans will install gates in the freeway medians in case crews need to shift east- and westbound traffic to one side of the freeway. Also, Caltrans and CHP will partner with the county on message signs and other improvements that will help police redirect traffic and give drivers accurate knowledge of traffic jams when they happen. The County agreed to work on four separate road connections in the Pass and contribute other resources during traffic jams. South of I-10, the county would oversee the most critical link — connecting Hathaway Street in Banning (~ 010 RIV 14.388) to Apache Trail near Cabazon (~ 010 RIV R17.678) via a two-lane road. The project, commonly called the Westward Avenue extension because one option would bring Westward eastward to Apache, will cost about $20 million because of the terrain. South of the freeway, the county will work to find the money to extend Garnet Road (~ 010 RIV 29.061) to Whitewater Cutoff Road. North of the freeway, the county will look for the money to extend Tamarack Road from Mesquite Road (~ 010 RIV R24.797) to Whitewater Cutoff Road northeast of Route 111 (~ 010 RIV 27.4). Lastly, it will partner with Morongo tribe officials to extend Seminole Road eastward to Rushmore Avenue. Combined, the road extensions, freeway median improvements and adding changeable message signs, video cameras and other systems to the freeway are estimated to cost $40 million.
    (Source: Press-Enterprise, 10/15/12)

    In June 2014, it was reported that construction was scheduled to start near the end of 2014 on the extension of a road that runs parallel to I-10 in Cabazon. Once Seminole Drive (near ~ 010 RIV R19.324) is connected to Rushmore Avenue (~ 010 RIV R22.761) — a process expected to finish in March 2015 — drivers will have an alternate route in case of emergency lane closures on westbound I-10. Construction costs about $800,000 and funding will come from a portion of tax revenue from the Desert Hills Premium Outlets’ expansion. Officials also plan to build a bypass between Cabazon and Banning, but that portion of the project is in its early stages. In May 2014, workers finished installing five gates in I-10’s center median. The gates — two west and three east of Cabazon — serve as access points to opposite lanes along I-10 between Banning and Palm Springs. It will be up to California Highway Patrol officers to open the gates and direct traffic onto the opposite lanes whenever necessary.
    (Source: The Desert Sun, 6/21/14)

    In August 2014, it was reported that five median gates have been completed. The gates are located along a 19-mile stretch that has experienced several incidents in the past that have caused lengthy traffic delays, stranding motorists because there is no alternate route if the freeway is closed. Gates are located near the Hargrave Street under-crossing in Banning; west of Malki Road in Cabazon; east of Main Street in Cabazon; west of Haugen-Lehmann Way in Whitewater and west of the I-10/Route 62 separation near Palm Springs. These gates will only be used for major incidents (over an hour). The decision on when to open the gates will be made jointly by the California Highway Patrol, Caltrans and, if necessary, other public safety agencies. The 60-foot steel median gate barriers are the first of their kind in the state.

    In January 2018, it was reported that an environmental report on the project to construct a bypass road between Banning and Cabazon has been created and will be discussed at a meeting in late January 2018. The Riverside County Transportation Department wants to build a road between Banning and Cabazon that will link the communities and offer an alternate route in case of a freeway closure. The proposal is to build a two-lane road extending approximately 3.3 miles from the intersection of Hathaway Street and Westward Avenue in Banning east to the intersection of Bonita Avenue and Apache Trail in Cabazon. The project includes bridges over Smith Creek and the San Gorgonio River, paving of two lanes, a median, paved shoulders, drainages, a shared use path and sidewalks. Talks of an alternate route have been underway for at least a decade and 14 alternatives were considered before the final two were chosen. The public has until Feb. 13 to comment on the project before a preferred alternative is selected and the document is finalized. The final environmental document is expected to be approved by the end of 2018. Then, the design and other phases of the project could begin.
    (Source: Press Enterprise, 1/23/2018)

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,826,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Cabazon at East Channel Stubby Wash Bridge (#56- 0168L) (010 RIV R024.24) that will widen and rehabilitate two bridges to extend the service life of the structures.

    Route 111 (Whitewater) (~ 010 RIV R25.185) to Indio (Route 86) (~ 010 RIV R57.397)

    Rte 10 Whitewater BridgesIn August 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Negative Declaration (ND) has been completed: I-10 in Riverside County (08-Riv-10, PM 27.69). Rehabilitate two existing bridges on I-10 near the city of Palm Springs. (PPNO 3002F) This project is located on I-10, west of the city of Palm Springs in Riverside County. The project proposes to rehabilitate the Whitewater River Bridges (No. 56-004L and No. 56-004R). The project proposes to strengthen existing bridge footings with additional piles, pile caps and permanent grouted Rock Slope Protection. The proposed project is currently estimated to cost $11.1 million in capital and right of way. The project is fully funded and is currently programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for approximately $17.3 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). The project is estimated to begin construction in 2020. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.
    (Source: August 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    Indian Canyon Drive Interchange

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #391: Interchange improvements at the I-10 and Indian Canyon Drive Interchange in Palm Springs. $2,200,000. (~ RIV 33.107)

    In April 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Riverside County will reconstruct the Indian Canyon Drive/I-10 interchange (~ 010 RIV 33.123) and construct roadway improvements, including a sidewalk on the west side, a bike lane in each direction, realignment of the eastbound and westbound direct on- and off-ramps, and widening of 20th Avenue and Garnet Avenue. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local and federal funds. Total estimated cost is $35,098,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

    In August 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Palm Springs at Indian Canyon Drive and 20th Avenue, consisting of reconstructed city streets (08-Riv-10-PM 33.1).

    In June 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Desert Hot Springs along Route 10 at Indian Canyon Drive and 20th Avenue (08-Riv-10-PM 33.1), consisting of a collateral facility. The City, by freeway agreement dated December 9, 2015, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired May 8, 2016.

    Date Palm Drive Interchanges

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1369: Interchange improvements at Date Palm Drive and I-10. $2,200,000. (~ RIV 39.506)

    In April 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Riverside County will reconstruct the Date Palm Drive/Gene Autry Trail interchange (~ 010 RIV 36.153) and construct roadway improvements, including a sidewalk and bike lane in each direction. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local and federal funds. Total estimated cost is $38,603,000 capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. In July 2009, the CTC approved an amendment regarding reconstruction of the interchange. The project will modify the existing Route 10/Palm Drive Interchange from diamond configuration to a partial cloverleaf configuration with east and westbound loop entrance ramps and will construct a bridge structure over Route 10 to accommodate additional lanes. This is TCRP Project #146.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to reconstruct an existing interchange at I-10 and Date Palm Drive in Cathedral City. Additional improvements will include widening the existing overcrossing from two to six lanes and the addition of bike lanes and sidewalks. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project cost is $31,721,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. A Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed; the project will involve construction activities resulting in visual effects that will be addressed by aesthetic treatments. Construction activities will also occur in an area containing the Coachella Valley milk-vetch, a federally listed plant species of concern.

    In June 2017, the CTC was informed that Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) will be unable to utilize $1,648,000 of TCRP funding on TCRP Project 146 (Palm Drive Interchange) by the June 30, 2017 deadline. RCTC would like to transfer the unused savings in TCRP funding to Kern COG for TCRP Project 113 – Route 46 Expressway, Segment 4A.

    [Bob Hope Interchange]In November 2006, the CTC considered a route adoption to construct a roadway extension and a new eight lane overcrossing over I-10, near Bob Hope Drive (~ 010 RIV 42.979). In the vicinity of the proposed Bob Hope Drive interchange, I-10 is an eight-lane divided freeway. The existing Ramon Road interchange was constructed in 1961. The proposed project will construct a new spread diamond interchange with Bob Hope Drive. The interchange will be located approximately 0.4 miles west of the existing Ramon Road interchange and will be a new six-lane overhead structure over the Union Pacific Railroad and an eight-lane overcrossing structure over I-10. The existing Ramon Road eastbound on-ramp will remain operational while the other four ramps at Ramon Road will be removed. Keeping the eastbound on-ramp at Ramon Road will improve the operating conditions at the local street intersections. The proposed improvements will increase the capacity of the existing interchange and improve interchange operations. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project cost is $53,700,000. This project requires full oversight by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) since it is a federally-funded project on the interstate system that involves the reconstruction of an interchange and is greater than $1.0 million. A FHWA field operations engineer reviewed the project on April 12, 2006. A Modified Access Report was approved by FHWA on February 15, 2002. This project is consistent with the Regional Transportation Plan and the Riverside County General Western Coachella Circulation Plan. As a “Gateway Interchange” to Rancho Mirage, all improvements, including aesthetic treatment, landscaping, and restoration of natural areas will be based on the conceptual plans provided by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians. A public information meeting was held in November 2001 to solicit public input. It is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2007-2008.

    In March 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Riverside at Bob Hope Drive, consisting of a reconstructed county road (08-Riv-10-PM 43.0). They also authorized relinqishment of right of way in the city of Rancho Mirage at Bob Hope Drive, Varner Road, and Rio del Sol Road, consisting of a reconstructed city street (08-Riv-10-PM 43.0). The County of Riverside, by freeway agreement dated August 29, 2006, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State to roads which on that date were within an unincorporated area of the county and have since been annexed by the City.

    In June 2015, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Cathedral City on Bob Hope Drive, Varner Road, and Rio Del Sol Road, consisting of reconstructed city streets. The county of Riverside, by freeway agreement dated August 29, 2006, agreed to accept title to highway right of way that now lies within Cathedral City, upon relinquishment by the State.

    In March 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the westbound ramps at the I-10/Monterey Avenue Interchange (~ 010 RIV 44.496) in the community of Thousand Palms. The project is programmed in the Proposition 1B State-Local Partnership Program. The total estimated cost is $12,699,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. In May 2013, the CTC allocated $2,800,000 for this project.

    Portola Road Interchange (08-Riv-10, PM 44.8/46.6)

    Rte 10 Portola Rd. In October 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Negative Declaration (ND) has been completed: I-10 in Riverside County (08-Riv-10, PM 44.8/46.6). Construct a new interchange on I-10 at Portola Rd in the city of Palm Desert. (EA 08-0F1200) This project is located on I-10 in the city of Palm Desert. The project proposes a new interchange at Portola Rd. The proposed project will include a new structure crossing the I-10 and the Union Pacific Railroad, on and off ramps, and realignment of the adjacent frontage road, Varner Road. In addition, the proposed project will construct auxiliary lanes in each direction on I-10 between the new Portola Rd ramps and adjacent Cook Street/Monterey Avenue Interchanges. The proposed project is needed to address increased forecasted travel demand and growing congestion on I-10. The proposed project is fully funded from Local and city funds and estimated to cost approximately $79.8 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20.
    (Source: October 2018 CTC Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In May 2020, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the I-10/Portola Avenue New Interchange Project (08-Riv-10, PM 44.8/46.6), which will construct a new interchange in Riverside County (EA 0F1200). The project is located in Riverside County in the City of Palm Desert on I-10 and proposes to construct a new interchange at Portola Avenue (sic). The purpose of the project is to reduce existing and forecasted traffic congestion on Monterey Avenue and Cook Street intersections near I-10, to improve traffic operations, and provide a balanced circulation system. This project is fully funded through the construction phase and is funded through local funds. The total estimated project cost is $81,148,000. Construction is estimated to begin Fiscal Year 2020-2021.
    (Source: May 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1))

    In June 2020, the CTC approved a new Public Road Connection to I-10 at Portola Avenue (08- RIV-10- PM 45.8) in the City of Palm Desert, in Riverside County. The proposed project will extend Portola Avenue, a north-to-south arterial, northerly from Dinah Shore Drive to Varner Road and construct a new interchange at I-10 (PM 45.8). The new interchange will be approximately 1.2 miles east of the Monterey Avenue interchange and 1.2 miles west of the Cook Street interchange. Auxiliary lanes on I-10 will also be constructed between the new Portola Avenue and the adjacent interchanges. The I-10/Portola Avenue Interchange project originated in the planning stages (2002-2003) as developments within the City of Palm Desert pushed toward the I-10 corridor, taking advantage of the available vacant land along the northern city limits. In July 2002, the Coachella Valley Association of Governments Executive Committee approved the inclusion of the interchange project in the Transportation Project Prioritization Study. The Project Study Report for the I-10/Portola Avenue interchange in the City of Palm Desert was approved by the Department on April 28, 2005. The interchange and associated improvements address both current and future traffic demands in the region. The construction of a new interchange at Portola Avenue will improve the operations of the adjacent interchanges and arterial roads by providing a new point of direct access to I-10. Traffic studies indicate that the new connection will not adversely impact the safety and operations of I-10, and no other measures need to be considered in addition to the proposed auxiliary lanes. The interchange should operate at an acceptable level of service through 2040. Furthermore, traffic operations at the neighboring arterial intersections are expected to improve. The current cost for construction, construction support, and right-of-way acquisition is $60.7, $7.2 and $5.2 million, respectively. The project is anticipated to be funded through a combination of local funds and federal funding sources, such as Surface Transportation Program funds. A freeway agreement between the Department and Riverside County was signed by the Riverside County Board of Supervisors on October 1, 2019. The freeway agreement will be executed by the Department after the Commission’s approval of the new public road connection.
    (Source: June 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.3b)

    In August 2014, the CTC authorized $33,310,000 for the Jefferson Street Interchange (~ 010 RIV R52.492) in the city of Indio. This project includes construction of a new partial cloverleaf interchange with standard diamond ramps, hook entrance ramps, and a new eight-lane overcrossing over the I-10.

    Indio (Route 86) (~ 010 RIV R57.397) to the Arizona Border

    Coachella Climbing Lanes (08-Riv-10 R60.9/R74.0)

    In October 2017, the CTC added the following into the SHOPP: 08-Riv-10 R60.9/R74.0: On I-10 in Riverside County: In and near Coachella, from 0.5 mile east of Coachella Canal to Hazy Gulch Bridge. Cold plane pavement and overlay with Portland Cement Concrete (PCC). Construct eastbound truck climbing lane. A one-lane temporary detour will be constructed in the median for traffic handling.

    In January 2020, there was a technical amendment to this SHOPP item: 08-Riv-10 R60.9/R74.0. PPNO 3008A. ProjID 0816000086. EA 1C081. I-10 in and near Coachella, from 0.5 mile east of Coachella Canal to Hazy Gulch Bridge. Cold plane pavement and overlay with Portland Cement Concrete (PCC). Construct eastbound truck climbing lane. A one-lane one lane temporary detour will be constructed in the median for traffic handling. Construction is not yet programmed. The amendment was an adjustment in the project support and engineering costs.
    (January 2020 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1a.(1d), Item 22)

    The 2020 SHOPP, approved in May 2020, included the following Roadway Rehabilitation item of interest (carried over from the 2018 SHOPP): 08-Riverside-10 PM R60.9/R74.0 PPNO 3008A Proj ID 0816000086 EA 1C081. I-10 in and near Coachella, from 0.5 mile east of Coachella Canal to Hazy Gulch Bridge. Cold plane pavement and overlay with Portland Cement Concrete (PCC). Construct eastbound truck climbing lane. A one lane temporary detour will be constructed in the median for traffic handling. Programmed in FY21-22, with construction scheduled to start in July 2022. Construction capital and construction support phases are not yet programmed/funded. Total project cost is $196,100K, with $157,010K being capital (const and right of way) and $39,090K being support (engineering, environmental, etc.).
    (Source: 2020 Approved SHOPP a/o May 2020)

    Avenue 50 Interchange (08-Riv-10, PM R62.3/R63.7)

    In January 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: I-10 (08-Riv-10, PM R62.3/R63.7) in Riverside County: Construct a new interchange on I-10 at Avenue 50 in the city of Coachella. (EA 08-45210). The project is located in the city of Coachella in Riverside County. The project proposes t o construct a new interchange at I-10 and Avenue 50. The new intersection will include a new bridge overcrossing with six standard lanes. This project will provide connection to a future extension of Avenue 50 and regional access to I-10. This project is currently programmed in the Federal Transportation Improvement Program and is fully funded from local funds for $60 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

    In March 2020, the CTC approved the 2020 STIP, which included new programming of $2,000K in FY23-24 for PPNO 3016S "Rt 10/Avenue 50 Interchange, construct"
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Desert Center Bridge Collapse (010 RIV R105.045)

    Desert Center DetourIn July 2015, unexpectedly heavy rains caused a bridge collapse near the town of Desert Center, California (010 RIV R105.045). The bridge collapse shut down all traffic for hours on I-10 freeway between Los Angeles and Phoenix. The EB bridge collapsed, and the WB roadway was intact but extremely undermined by flooding and could need just-as-extensive rebuilding. A few days later a temporary solution was developed to avoid the circuitous hundred-mile detour: running both directions over the undermined bridge. However, the structure was insuffient to support the trucking traffic, and trucks were still subject to multi-hour delays.
    (Source: Boing Boing, 7/20/2015)

    In April 2016, it was reported that a study by UC Berkeley of the I-10 bridge collapse near Desert Center has won a “best paper” award from an international engineering conference, lending credence to the claim that the bridge was felled by poor design, not an unstoppable flood. The study by engineers at UC Berkeley argues that the Tex Wash Bridge could have survived last summer's flood if the structure had not compressed and twisted the flow of the water, magnifying the pressure against the bridge foundation. The study was the basis for a special Desert Sun project – Doomed to Fail: The fatal flaws of the Tex Wash Bridge – published in January. Caltrans had no comment on the study. Although the flooding was epic, the paper argues that the Tex Wash Bridge could have survived if it had been built differently. It says that construction crews reshaped the wash when the bridge was built in 1967, squeezing a wide river delta into a narrow channel and forcing the flood path into a curve, which eroded the eastern base of the bridge.
    (Source: Desert Sun, 4/22/2016)

    In October 2015, the CTC approved the following SHOPP funding to repair the Desert Center bridge:

    • 8-Riv-10 R57.6/R127.0 I-10 Near Desert Center, from Route 86 to Arco Ditch Bridge at various locations. Repair storm damage erosion at four bridges, build a freeway cross-over, and demolish failed Tex Wash Bridge No. 56-0576R. $150K (Right of Way); $4,850 (Construction). Completion: FY15/16. Support costs: PA & ED $75K; PS & E $340K; RW Sup $10K; Con Sup $410K; Total $835K
    • 8-Riv-10 R57.6/R127.0 I-10 Near Desert Center, from Route 86 to Arco Ditch Bridge at various locations. Replace storm damaged Tex Wash Bridge No. 56-0576R. $75K (R/W) $8,000K (C) Completion FY15/16. Support: PA & ED $60; PS & E $500K; RW Sup $10K; Con Sup $600K; Total $1,170K

    Granite Construction Co., based in Watsonville, was hired as lead contractor the day after the collapse under time-saving emergency contracting procedures. Granite was paid for time and materials without added bonuses. Getting the westbound bridge open and demolishing the eastbound bridge, cost $5 million. An additional $6 million was needed to rebuild the eastbound bridge. The new bridge has a much deeper foundation than the 1967 original. Engineers included piles 48 inches in diameter extending 52 feet below ground for the footing. The existing westbound bridge received two 48-inch supports extending 23 feet deep. Engineers also redesigned the eastbound bridge to current standards, using one span. Using Accelerated Bridge Construction methods — meaning building many portions offsite to reduce time and minimize road closures and traffic disruptions -- 10 girders, each weighing 55 tons, were built offsite by Oldcastle Precast, 130 miles away in Perris, south of Riverside. Likewise, the abutments, made up of 240 cubic yards of concrete, were also made in Perris. Less than two months after the collapse, I-10 was fully back in business.
    (Source: Caltrans Mile Marker, 3Q16)

    In March 2019, it was reported that Granate Construction Co earned a 2018 Quality in Construction (QIC) Award for excellence in construction of an asphalt pavement along a 31.4-mile stretch of I-10 in Riverside County near the underpopulated Desert Center region (~ 010 RIV R105.045) back in May 2016 from the National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA). The I-10 pavement rehabilitation project was a collaborative effort between Granite Construction and Caltrans District 8. The rehabbed section of I-10 covered approximately 63 lane-miles traveling both eastbound and westbound along the two-lane highway. In the end, the contractor laid down a grand total of 698,348 tons of asphalt along the corridor. After the team worked to widen some of the existing slopes, paving work began in early July 2016 on the I-10 rehab. The corridor is a major thoroughfare for trucks and goods moving between Los Angeles and Phoenix, and approximately 13,000 vehicles traverse the roadway daily, 36% of which is truck traffic. As such, a majority of the paving work was carried out during nighttime hours in order to significantly decrease the traffic impacts to the traveling public. One reason for the I-10 pavement rehabilitation project receiving the NAPA QIC award was for its implementation of green/sustainable practices and materials in asphalt paving. This included using an asphalt mix composed of 15% reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), as called for by Caltrans specs, plus 20% recycled tire rubber. The large-scale project involved 1.6 million sq yd of asphalt cold planing. The lift specs for the new pavement included 521,000 tons of 25-mm Superpave dense-graded hot-mix asphalt for the base at a 0.2 ft to 0.8 ft thickness, plus 177,000 tons of 19-mm Superpave rubber gap-graded rubberized hot-mix asphalt at 0.2 ft thickness. The paving team averaged around 3,500 tons per day on the base mix, while the rubberized surface mix averaged closer to 2,500 tons per day. The western end of the project on I-10 was the closest side to the asphalt plant, roughly 35 to 40 minutes away for trucks to circle around with new batches. On that side of the corridor, about five to six loads of asphalt were delivered each night. On the farther end, trucks took closer to an hour to reach the paving crews with new asphalt, bringing in around three or four loads per night. As paving work made its way further from the plant, the contractor would add to the number of trucks making deliveries. Paving on I-10 was finished in September 2017. After paving was completed, final striping and guardrail throughout the 31 miles had to be replaced and upgraded, which occurred between September and December. After making some requested changes from Caltrans, all work on the I-10 rehab was completed by March 2018, two months ahead of schedule. Granite Construction was recognized with the NAPA QIC award in January 2019 for the completion of the I-10 pavement. “NAPA is proud to recognize I-10 in Riverside County, constructed by Granite, with a Quality in Construction Award,” Dr. Audrey Copeland, NAPA president & CEO, said. “After the rating of the project’s gradation, density, AC content and air voids by an independent engineer, this project had a very impressive overall score given its large scope of almost 700,000 tons of asphalt paved. Further, this project utilized sustainable practices such as reuse/recycling by reusing 78,000 tons of RAP and 35,000 tons of recycled tire rubber.”
    (Source: Roads and Bridges, 3/4/2019)

    In January 2013, it was reported that Caltrans completed installation of Changable Message Signs over I-10 just east of Blythe (~ 010 RIV R153.164) and just east of Desert Center. Crews have also installed 61 vehicle detection systems covering the entire roughly 133-mile stretch of freeway between Banning and Blythe. The detection systems monitor speed and traffic volume, processing the data and posting it on the the freeway message signs to give motorists' real- time estimates on how long it will take to travel a route. The total cost of the systems and signs was just over $2.1 million. The freeway additions were made as part of the state's obligations under the "Interstate 10 Lifeline Emergency Action Plan," which Riverside County is directing. The Board of Supervisors unanimously agreed in October to partner with the state and tribal governments on implementing the plan, inspired by a series of massive traffic jams on I-10 that left motorists' stranded in the last several years, most recently on Feb. 12, 2012.
    (Source: Palm Desert Patch, 1/25/13)

    Commuter Lanes Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes were planned/are constructed as follows:

    1. from I-405 to I-110 (but there are no space for these)
    2. from Baldwin to I-605
    3. from I-605 to Puente Avenue
    4. from Puente Avenue to Citrus Avenue
    5. from Citrus Avenue to Route 57
    6. from Route 57 to the San Bernardino County line.

    HOT Lanes: Los Angeles to I-710 / El Monte Busway

    HOV lanes have been constructed from Hewitt Street in downtown Los Angeles to I-710 in El Monte (10S LA 17.083 to 10S LA 21.635). This is called the "El Monte Busway". It opened in January 1973, and originally for buses only, with very limited ingress and egress.

    Groundbreaking for the busway occurred on January 21, 1972. The first 8 of 11 total miles were anticipated to be open by Fall 1972. The busway ran from Mission Blvd to a terminal at Santa Anita Avenue in El Monte. The lanes took over former Southern Pacific Right of Way. After leaving El Monte, buses stopped only at California State College, Los Angeles (now CSULA) and Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center before arriving in downtown Los Angeles. The project, made possible through federal, state and SCRTD funding, aimed to determine the feasibility of new concepts of joint highway-bus operations and to increase the overall people-carrying capacity of freeway corridors with the least possible adverse impact on communities and the environment.The busway was first conceived in 1969 and was California’s first example of a multi-modal transportation system at a cost of $53 million. At the El Monte end of the line, a new $945,000 terminal was planned. The station’s opening was scheduled to coincide with that of the busway, but was not dedicated until July, 1973. In 1976, the busway was opened up to three-person carpools to further reduce congestion on the freeway. However, a brief experiment with two-person carpools in 2000 was soon cancelled after speeds on the busway plunged from 65 mph to 20mph and travel times increased by 20-30 minutes.
    (Source: Metro Primary Resources, 1/23/2012)

    The carpool lanes of the El Monte Busway can only be entered and exited at a few points. The segment from El Monte to I-710 is demarcated not only with two 'double yellow' lines which are typical of Southern California HOV lanes, but also an approximately 12-foot-wide (3.7 m) asphalt median. The segment west of I-710 into Downtown Los Angeles is on an alignment separate from the regular lanes of the I-10 As part of the ExpressLanes project, this buffer zone was restriped into a travel lane. Westbound entrances are at I-605, Baldwin Ave. in El Monte, El Monte Bus Station (for buses only), Del Mar Ave. (where motorists take a ramp from street level), and I-710 (for buses only). Westbound exits are at Baldwin Ave., Fremont Ave., I-710, I-5, Vignes St., and Alameda St. Eastbound entrances are at Alameda St., Patsaouras Transit Plaza at Union Station, I-710, and Baldwin Ave. Eastbound exits are at Patsaouras Transit Plaza, I-710 (for buses only), Del Mar Ave. (where motorists take a ramp to street level), Baldwin Ave., and I-605.
    (Source: Wikipedia)

    The busway is in operation 24 hours a day. In April 2008, the federal government offered Los Angeles County $213 million to convert these lanes to special, congestion-pricing toll lanes. In the proposed deal, the federal money would go toward the purchase of about 60 high-volume buses that would use the new toll lanes. That would free up MTA funds for creating the toll lanes. CTC approval would be required. The busway was upgraded from high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes to high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes as part of the Metro ExpressLanes project in February 2013 (see below).

    Due to its history and grade separation, as well as the fact that it continues W beyond the end of this segment of I-10 along US 101 to Union Station, the Busway is technically I-10S.

    HOT Lanes: I-710 to I-605

    In June 2009, it was reported that Los Angeles County transportation officials were considering charging solo motorists 25 cents to $1.40 a mile to use the high occupancy toll lanes proposed for the Harbor and San Bernardino freeways. Officials plan to use congestion-based pricing, which means that tolls will rise and fall in direct relation with the flow of traffic — a formula designed to keep individual motorists, carpools, van pools and buses in the high occupancy lanes at a minimum of 45 mph, even during rush hour. Under the proposed pricing schedule, 25 cents a mile would be charged when demand is lowest for the lanes, while the maximum, $1.40 a mile, would be the toll during the busiest part of the day. Before the toll schedule is finalized in late July 2009, the public will be allowed to comment on the prices at five community hearings this month in Los Angeles, Torrance, Carson, El Monte and West Covina. The yearlong demonstration project has received $210.6 million in federal funds to help reduce traffic and improve bus service along the two freeways -- the largest congestion-easing grant awarded to any city to date, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Caltrans and the MTA will use the money to convert existing carpool lanes to high-occupancy toll lanes on 14 miles of the San Bernardino Freeway from Alameda Street to the 605 Freeway interchange and on 11 miles of the Harbor Freeway from Adams Boulevard to the Artesia Transit Center at 182nd Street. A second high-occupancy toll lane will be added in both directions to the San Bernardino Freeway. The project also calls for automated toll plazas, road improvements and additional transit services, including 57 clean-fuel buses for both freeway corridors. The entire project is expected to be completed by December 2010.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Los Angeles County will convert High Occupancy Vehicle lanes to High Occupancy Toll lanes. The project was covered environmentally with two separate environmental documents, one document for the Route 110 and Route 105 portion of the project and one document for the Route 10 and Route 10S portion of the project (Route 10S is the El Monte Busway). The project is programmed in the State-Local Partnership Program and includes federal and local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $69,300,000 for capital and support. The project will not involve a substantial amount of construction activities but due to public interest and controversy associated with toll lanes and the large amount of public outreach and education involved with the project it was decided to prepare a higher level of environmental document.

    The specific plan is to convert the HOV lanes on the 14-mile stretch of the I-10 between Alameda Street and the I-605 for a one-year pilot project. In March 2011, it was reported that the HOT lanes are expected to be complete in 2012. They will allow solitary drivers to enjoy the perks of car-pool lanes by paying a minimum of 25 cents per mile and a maximum $1.40 per mile. Tolls will be adjusted according to traffic conditions to maintain a free-flowing level of traffic. Buses, motorcycles, vanpools and carpools that currently use the car-pool lanes will not be charged a toll. General purpose lanes will continue to remain toll-free. Construction for the project, which is funded with a $210 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, will begin in summer 2011.

    In July 2011, ground was officially broken on the ExpressLanes project that will convert existing carpool (HOV) lanes along the Harbor Freeway (I-110) and the San Bernardino Freeway (I-10) to High-Occupancy Toll (HOT) lanes. The one-year demonstration program will covert 11 miles of existing carpool lanes on the I-110 (Harbor Freeway Transitway) between the Artesia Transit Center/182nd Street and Adams Boulevard near downtown Los Angeles and 14 miles on the I-10 (El Monte Busway) between Union Station/Alameda Street and the I-605 to toll lanes. During the construction phase of the program, workers will be installing a host of power and utility support units needed for the operation of 27 dynamic message signs (DMS) along the two freeway corridors as well as the installation of 22 toll transponder readers and approximately 145 signs to provide commuters information on the ExpressLanes and the tolls being charged to use the lanes. In addition, along the I-10 (San Bernardino Freeway) an additional toll lane will be constructed in each direction between the I-605 and the I-710 freeways to add capacity along that heavily traveled corridor. Currently, there is only one carpool lane operating in each direction along the El Monte Busway. None of the general purpose lanes will be taken away to covert the lanes and make the improvements. Construction crews also will widen Adams Boulevard off-ramp, add a right turn lane on Adams Boulevard, construct a pedestrian bridge, and re-stripe Figueroa Way in Los Angeles in support of the ExpressLanes project.

    Portions of I-10 are being converted to have HOT (High Occupancy/Toll) lanes--specifically, the I-10 El Monte Busway HOV lanes (I-605 to Alameda St). In June 2012, it was reported that drivers (even HOV drivers) will require a transponder for those routes. The so-called “suggestion pricing” ranges between a minimum toll per mile of $0.25 and a maximum of $1.40 and will debut first in on I-110 in November, followed by I-10 early in 2013. Caltrans said the toll prices will fluctuate according to traffic levels in the carpool lane. Information on the project and the transponders can be found at the Metro ExpressLanes website.

    The HOT lanes on I-10 opened for traffic on 2/23/13. Fastrak transponders are required. Fees for noncarpoolers will be assessed between 25 cents and $1.40 a mile, depending on the volume of traffic, according to Metro. The average toll is expected to be around $6, Metro said. Motorists riding the regular lanes are not charged.

    In June 2014, LA Metro voted to make the HOT lanes permanent (they had previously been a demonstration project). The agency expected to distribute 100,000 of the transponders required to use the lanes, but ended up handing out more than 260,000.

    In September 2016, the legislature passed a bill requiring LACMTA to take additional steps, beyond the previous implementation of a low-income assistance program, to increase enrollment and participation in the low-income assistance program, as specified, through advertising and work with community organizations and social service agencies. The bill would also require LACMTA and the Department of Transportation to report to the Legislature by December 31, 2018, on efforts to improve the HOT lane program, including efforts to increase participation in the low-income assistance program. (AB 620, Chapter 738, Statutes of 2016, 9/28/2016)

    HOV Lanes: I-605 to Route 57

    2007 CMIA. A number of projects on I-10 in Los Angeles County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects included HOV lanes, Puente Ave. (~ 010LA 33.342) to Citrus St. ($173 million) (~ 010 LA 37.492); HOV lanes, Citrus St. (~ 010 LA 37.492) to Route 57 ($191.5 million) (~ 010 LA 42.368) ; and the I-10/I-605 transition connector ($70.5 million) (~ 010 LA 31.078). In San Bernardino County, a request for bridge widenings in preparation for HOV lanes ($107,931K) was also non-recommended. None were recommended for funding. This has been a point of contention in the inland empire as there is significant congestion on the I-10.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing HOV lanes from Puente to Route 57 in LA County.

    [TCRP Project 40]In April 2006, it was noted that Segments (3) [I-605 to Puente Avenue], (4) [Puente Ave to Citrus Ave], and (5) [Citrus Ave to Route 57 (nee Route 210)] above are the subject of District 7 TCRP Project #40, which plans to add HOV lanes to this segment, for a total cost of $210 million. The estimated completion date is 1Q2008 for the segment from I-605 to Puente Ave, 1Q2010 for the segment from Puente to Citrus, and 1Q2012 for the segment from Citrus to Route 57. A negative EIR (a good thing) came back in February 2004. However, due to funding, the schedule has been pushed back. In April 2006, the CTC considered requests approval of a TCRP project application amendment for $56,900,000 in new TCRP funding that would program $56,900,000 in TCRP funds to Construction; redistribute $4,194,000 from Plans, Specifications, and Estimates (PS&E) to Construction; redistribute $757,000 from Right of Way to Construction; and update the project funding plan. The project will provide for approximately 11.2 miles of HOV lanes that will effectively double the people carrying capacity of a mixed flow lane thus alleviating some of the congestion by encouraging and supporting the use of shared ride modes. The project will be delivered in three segments, with Segment 1 (Route 605 to Puente Avenue) fully funded with TCRP, STIP-RIP, and Proposition C funds. The current schedule is: Phase 1: FY 2002/2003; Phase 2: FY 2010/2011; Phase 3: FY 2010/2011; Phase 4: FY 2013/2014. Some of these were submitted for funding from the 2007 CMIA allocations, but none were recommended for approval. In April 2008, CalTrans and LACMTA requested amending TCRP Project #40 to designate LACMTA as a co-applicant agency, to update the project schedule and funding plan, as well as approval of an Assembly Bill (AB) 1335 LONP to use $61,851,000 in Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds in lieu of TCRP funds for the Construction phase of this project. The amended schedule shows completion of phases 3 and 4 in FY 2011/2012.

    As of late 2007, there were some proposals to convert some future lanes E of I-605 into High-Occupancy Toll (HOT) lanes.

    In November 2010, the CTC approved transfer of CMIA funds allocated to the I-405 HOV project that were replaced with ARRA funds to be used for the Citrus St. to Route 57 HOV lanes.

    In January 2011, it was reported that land was being acquired in West Covina for the widening of the route for these lanes. This included some property at the West Covina Mall.

    In June 2011, it was reported that Caltrans completed the reconstruction of the Baldwin Park Boulevard Bridge in order to accommodate new carpool lanes that are being built on I-10. This is part of a project that is adding two miles of carpool lanes, east and west, on a portion of the I-10 freeway from the San Gabriel Valley Freeway (I-605) to Puente Avenue. Metro programmed $6.3 million to fund the reconstruction of the bridge, a component of the $169 million HOV lane project.

    In August 2012, the CTC accepted the environmental document, and Findings of Fact, and approved for future consideration of funding, a project that will add one High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction on I-10 from Puente Avenue to Route 57 in Los Angeles County. The overall project is being constructed as two smaller projects on adjoining segments of I-10. The I-10 HOV Lanes from Puente Avenue to Citrus Street project (PPNO 0309N) will construct HOV lanes from Post Mile (PM) 33.2 to PM 37.2. The total estimated cost is $137,657,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13. The I-10 HOV Lanes from Citrus Street to SR-57 project (PPNO 0310B) will construct HOV lanes from PM 37.5 to PM 42.4. The total estimated cost is $234,861,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2013-14. Both projects are programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The scope of the overall I-10 HOV Lane Project, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2012 STIP. Note: This is roughly Segments 2 and 3 in the map above.

    In August 2012, the CTC approved $10.3 million to fund the ongoing extension of a carpool lane on I-10 from I-605 to Route 57 through Baldwin Park, West Covina and Pomona. The extra allocation will help pay for the project's second phase, a $184 million extension of the carpool lanes from Puente Avenue in Baldwin Park to Citrus Avenue in West Covina. Construction on the second phase of the project should begin in the spring of 2013. The first phase of the carpool lane project is being constructed from the El Monte busway to about Puente Avenue in Baldwin Park. A third phase will take the carpool lane over Kellogg Hill, from Citrus Avenue to Route 57. That will cost about $192 million.

    In December 2013, Caltrans officially dedicated 2.2 miles of HOV lanes in both directions on I-10 between I-605 and Puente Avenue in Baldwin Park.

    In April 2015, it was reported that Caltrans officials broke ground on a construction project that will add 5.2 miles of carpool lanes in each direction of the San Bernardino (10) Freeway between West Covina (Citrus St.) and Pomona (Route 57). The project will also include the construction of soundwalls to reduce freeway noise in adjacent neighborhoods. Construction is expected to be completed by summer 2021.
    (Source: Baldwin Park Patch, 4/29/2016)

    In May 2015, the CTC allocated $17,715,000 towards the Route 10 HOV Lanes from Citrus Street to Route 57. This is on top of $154,720,000 from other sources.

    In June 2017, the CTC was informed that the authorized amount for TCRP Project 40 is $90 million, of which $28,149,000 was previously programmed and allocated. In April 2008, the Commission approved a Letter of No Prejudice for the remaining amount of $61,851,000, allowing the Department to spend Metro’s Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program funding for construction, with reimbursement of TCRP funds to Metro in the future. In September 2008, the Commission approved the TCRP Allocation Plan, placing this project on the Tier 1 list with a future payback to Metro in the amount of $61,851,000. Due to substantial savings at award of the contract, project expenditures amounted to approximately $41,233,000, leaving $20,618,000 in TCRP Tier 1 savings. The project is now substantially complete. The Department and Metro propose to amend Project 40 to de-program the $20,618,000 in TCRP project savings and update the project funding plan, and to transfer those funds to fund TCRP Project 38.2, Los Angeles -San Fernando Valley Transit Extension and TCRP 50, Route 71.

    In November 2017, it was reported that construction is ongoing for the second and third segments of the original three segments (I-605 to Puente was completed in 2013). Work on the second segment, which is from Puente Avenue in Baldwin Park to Citrus Street in West Covina, started in summer 2014, and is expected to be completed by Dec. 2018, months ahead of schedule. The final segment is from Citrus Street in Covina/West Covina to State Route 57, and once completed in summer 2021, will provide one continuous HOV lane in both directions of I-10 from Interstate 15 in San Bernardino County to downtown Los Angeles.
    (Source: District 7 Blog, 11/28/2017)

    In July 2019, the LA Metro board approved reallocation of $10,910,051 in Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program (CMAQ) Funds savings in the I-10 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lanes Project from I-605 to Puente Avenue (Segment 1) to be programmed to pay for the cost increase in the I-10 HOV Lanes Project from Puente Avenue to Citrus Avenue (Segment 2); and also approved an additional $836,000 in CMAQ Funds for the cost increase in Segment 2.
    (Source: Metro Board Recap, 7/25/2019)

    HOV Lanes: Route 57 to I-15

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized $1,000,000 for the locally administered State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) I-10 HOV Lane Extension (PPNO 0134K) project, plus $10,560,000 from other sources. The funding is to complete planning and engineering activities. The project will add an HOV lane from Haven Avenue to Ford Street in Ontario and Redlands.

    Inst 10 HOV San Berdoo to RedlandsIn March 2013, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR for a project that would improve and widen a 24-mile segment of I-10 from two miles west of the Los Angeles/San Bernardino County Line in the city of Pomona to Ford Street in the city of Redlands. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $539,817,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Three alternatives are being considered: (1) No-build; (2) One High Occupancy Vehicle Lane in each direction; (3) Two Express Lanes in each direction.

    In April 2017, it was reported that after years of study, the San Bernardino planning agency is getting ready to complete plans for 33 miles of toll lanes. The $1.4 billion project would add two toll lanes and one general lane from the Los Angeles County line in Upland east to Redlands. It will be the first use of tolls in San Bernardino County. The route is one of the region’s most widely used, with about 263,000 vehicles and more than 20,000 commercial trucks a day, the agency reports. By 2045, the number of vehicles is expected to grow to 350,000 a day. The agency – formerly called the San Bernardino Associated Governments – is completing an environmental study for the project and hopes to get approval from Caltrans in summer. The agency expects to hire a firm by mid-2018 that will handle design and construction of the project, said Paula Beauchamp, project delivery director for the authority. It also hopes to have an agreement with a toll service company to oversee the lanes by then. Construction would be split into two stages, the first beginning in late 2018 that would cover a 10-mile section from the Los Angeles County line to I-15 and be completed in 2022, Beauchamp said. Crews would then move to the remaining section, from I-15 to Redlands. Construction on this stretch would continue through 2026. Officials are considering three options: no improvements, adding a carpool lane or adding toll lanes. The carpool lane option would extend an existing one that now ends at Haven Avenue in Ontario and take it to Ford Street in eastern Redlands – about 25 miles. A toll lanes project would feature two toll lanes plus one general purpose lane over 33 miles and across 13 cities. The board still must vote on its choice, but agency officials suggest the toll lanes. That choice would increase freeway lanes by 50 percent and free up traffic on general lanes as well.
    (Source: Press-Enterprise, 4/19/2017)

    In July 2017, it was reported that San Bernardino County will make its first foray into toll lanes. A 33-mile corridor will be built on I-10 and span much of the county, transportation officials decided Wednesday, July 12. The $1.8-billion project would add two toll lanes from the Los Angeles County line near Montclair east to Redlands. An auxiliary lane for traffic to weave in and out at ramps also will be added at various points along the general-purpose lanes. Construction, which would be split into two stages, is expected to start in late 2018. The first segment, from the county line to I-15, is expected to be finished by 2022. The rest would begin in 2021 and take three years to complete. Transportation officials say the project will bring a faster alternative for commuters who choose to pay the new tolls. And, by diverting that traffic onto two new lanes, it would also ease congestion on the general lanes, said Ontario Councilman Alan Wapner, president of the transportation board. The agency’s next steps will be to begin buying property along the freeway needed for its widening and to choose a contractor to handle final design and construction. The agency expects to rebuild or modify several ramps, bridges and interchanges along the route. The project encompasses I-10 from the Monte Vista Avenue exit in Montclair to Ford Street in Redlands. A small portion — from California Street to Ford Street in Redlands — would only have one toll lane in each direction, though the majority of the project would have two.
    (Source: Press Enterprise, 7/12/2017)

    In October 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been completed: I-10 in San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties. Construct roadway improvements including additional lanes on a portion of I-10 in and near the city of Redlands. (07-LA-10, 44.9/48.3, 08-SBd-10, PM 0.0/R37.0) (PPNO 0134K). This project in San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties will construct one to two express lanes along I-10 from the Los Angeles/San Bernardino County line to Ford Street in the city of Redlands. The project is not fully funded. The estimated project cost is $1.7 to $1.9 billion. Funding is anticipated from local measure funds, the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality program, and State and Federal funds. The project is programmed in the 2017 Federal Transportation Improvement Plan and 2016 State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP). Construction is estimated to begin in 2018. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 STIP.
    (Source: CTC October 2017 Agenda Item 2.2c.(2))

    The 2018 STIP, approved at the CTC March 2018 meeting, appears to close out PPNO 0134K, transferring the remaining $39.745M to PPNO 3009P Rt 10 Express Lanes, San Antonio Av-Rt 15 (~ SBD 2.917 to SBD 9.828), Contract 1 (D/B). It also allocated $112.019M for PPNO 3010N Rt 10 Express Lanes, Rt 15-Ford St (~ SBD 9.828 to SBD 33.139), Contract 2 (D/B)

    In June 2018, the CTC approved amending the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Program to add the I-10 Corridor Express Lanes Contract 1 Project, from the White Avenue overcrossing to the Los Angeles/San Bernardino County line in Los Angeles County, and from the Los Angeles/San Bernardino County line to the I-15 interchange in San Bernardino County, as Trade Corridors Improvement Fund Project 128 at a cost of $4,973,000 to the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund. The proposed multi-funded project will widen the I-10 freeway to allow the construction of two express lanes in each direction. Auxiliary lanes will also be added at strategic locations. The express lanes would be managed through congestion pricing to maintain free flow conditions in the lanes during peak travel times. The complete I-10 Corridor Project extends 33 miles and entails construction of two tolled express lanes in each direction, plus auxiliary lanes where warranted, between the Los Angeles County line and Route 210, including a transition to a single tolled express lane in each direction from Route 210 to Ford Street in the City of Redlands. The complete I-10 Corridor Project, including both Contract 1 and 2, is estimated at $1.8 billion.
    (Source: CTC Agenda, June 2018 Agenda Item 4.9 and AgendaItem 4.10)

    In February 2020, it was reported that the first of three phases of the $929.9 million project I-10 Corridor Project, also known as toll lanes project, is expected to begin in spring 2020. The project will provide approximately 33 miles of Express Lanes in San Bernardino County from the Los Angeles County line to Ford Street in Redlands. Phase one will add 10 miles of Express Lanes from the Los Angeles County line to I-15. The project will have two toll express lanes in each direction. Lanes to assist drivers getting on and off the freeway will be constructed in selected locations. Estimated completion of the project, funded in part by Measure I, is spring of 2023. Toll pricing will vary based on demand and distance. Exact pricing will be determined when the Express Lanes open and will be advertised at each point of entry within the corridor. Vehicles with a Clean Air Vehicle decal can use Express Lanes with exceptions. The High Occupancy Vehicle of three passengers or more can use the toll roads free of charge. Those vehicles with less than three passengers will be charged.
    (Source: Highland News, 2/20/2020)

    The 2020 STIP, approved at the March 2020 CTC meeting, deleted the programmed funding for PPNO 3010N "Rt 10 Express Lanes, Rt 15-Ford St, Contract 2 (D/B)", but appeared to divide them into two projects: PPNO 3016P "Rt 10 Express Lanes, Rt 15-Sierra Av, Contract 2A (D/B)" (with 22,065K allocated in FY24-25) and PPNO 0167M "Rt 15 Express Lanes, Cantu Galeano-Foothill, Contract 1 (SB1)" (with 72,274K allocated in FY22-23).
    (Source: March 2020 CTC Agenda, Item 4.7, 2020 STIP Adopted 3/25/2020)

    Business Routes Business Routes

    • Montclair and Ontario: Holt Blvd (former business route)
    • E of I-15 along Valley Blvd through Colton (marked at least once).
    • Indio: Indio Blvd. This doesn't dump you easily back onto I-10 on the E side; you end up on Route 111 and then take the Route 86S expressway. This routing is old US 99.
    • Blythe: Hobsonway. This ends on the AZ side with an odd loop under I-10 at the AZ border for E bound traffic.

    Naming Naming

    Pearl Harbor Memorial HighwayThe portion of I-10 located in California is designated the "Pearl Harbor Memorial Highway". This segment was named in remembrance of approximately 2000 brave and patriotic survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor. On December 7, 1941, just before 8 a.m. on a Sunday morning, the first wave of bombers began the attack on Pearl Harbor that led the United States into World War II. It was an unforgettable day for those who lived through it and one that called America forth to defend itself. In so doing, it inspired a generation of Americans to rise and lead the defense of freedom around the world. Overall, on December 7th, 1941, 2,335 people were killed in action and 1,178 were wounded; the majority of the Pacific Fleet that was damaged and sunk in the attack was at one time home ported in California. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 8, Resolution Chapter 72, on 7/12/2005.

    San Bernardino FreewayThe portion of this freeway from US 101 to Route 215 (~ LA S0.094 to SBD R24.146) is named the "San Bernardino Freeway"; the first segment opened in 1943 and the last segment in 1957. It was named by the State Highway Commission, based on its primary destination of San Bernardino. San Bernardino was first recorded as a place name in 1810, and derives from the name of the Italian saint of the 15th century. In 1842 it was applied to a land grant, on a part of which Mormons in 1851 started a settlement, the nucleus for the present city. The mountains are mentioned before 1850, the county was named in 1853, and the national forest in 1893.
    (Image source: AARoads)

    Ramona FreewayOriginally, the segment that opened in 1943 (from US 101 to Route 215, originally signed as US 60 / US 70 / US 99) was named the "Ramona Freeway". Ramona was the central character in the Helen Hunt Jackson novel Ramona, which was a seminal novel in the early 20th century in creating the romance of California.
    (Image source: Forgotten Highway)

    Gatto UnveilingThe portion of I-10 between I-5 and I-710 in the County of Los Angeles (~ LA 18.48 to LA 21.308) is officially designated the "Joe Gatto Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Joseph “Joe” Gatto, born in 1934 in Pueblo, Colorado. Gatto served in the United States Army, and became the first in his family to attend college, graduating with a bachelor’s degree from California State University, Los Angeles; a master’s in education from Pepperdine University; and a master’s in design from California State University, Los Angeles. Gatto began traveling the world in the 1960s, visiting western Europe, Russia, Egypt, and Japan. He married in 1968 and subsequently chose to return to California, the place of his education, with his wife and three children. Gatto settled his family in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles in 1978. Mr. Gatto exhibited an extraordinary commitment to hard work and a dedication to his family by working three jobs at times, teaching on Saturdays, and working night shifts at Dodger Stadium. Mr. Gatto, a beloved teacher full of life and with so much talent to share, retired after over 47 years in the classroom as an art and design teacher at the primary, secondary, and postsecondary levels. He helped found the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, where he served as Dean of the Visual Arts Department. He also taught at other educational institutions, including Granada Hills High School; Pierce College; California State University, Northridge; California State University, Los Angeles; the Otis Art Institute; and the Art Center in Pasadena. Mr. Gatto’s work ethic and commitment to his pupils and students were represented by his 100 percent attendance record at school and work since he was in the fourth grade. Mr. Gatto inspired thousands of pupils and students with a unique philosophy on teaching. He was awarded the Bravo Award as the California Arts Teacher of the Year in 1986; was a recipient of the National Distinguished Teacher Award; was honored at the White House in 1988, 1989, and 1998; received the California and Pacific Region Art Educator of the Year award in 1990; and received a distinguished teacher award from the City of Los Angeles in 2003. Mr. Gatto exhibited his love for the earth and passion for art through his hand-crafted jewelry line, Wear Art Now. He traveled to exhibit Wear Art Now at shows and in museums, including the Los Angeles Museum of Art, the Craft and Folk Art Museum, and the Museum of Science and Industry. Gatto, a retired teacher and jewelry maker who was well-known in his community, was found inside his Bright Lane home on the night of Nov. 13, 2013. He was slumped over a desk with a gunshot wound to the abdomen. His death rattled the quiet Silver Lake neighborhood he had long called home, marking the neighborhood's first homicide in more than a year. As of November 2014, the case was still unsolved. At that time, Deputy Chief Kirk Albanese told reporters that detectives had recovered physical evidence connected with the unsolved case, but declined to say what the evidence was. He said investigators had not identified any suspects but believed whoever was responsible for the killing had fled the Los Angeles area. The city was urging anyone with information, no matter how small, to contact police at (213) 486-6890 or anonymously at (800) 222-TIPS. The city has also offered a $50,000 reward for information in Gatto's death. Gatto's son, Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles), said his father's death "rocked my family" and that "This is one of the rare times where the public's help in solving a murder is crucial. In fact, it might be the only thing that can solve this case at this point. Please, please come forward. Help my family." The dedication ceremony for the designated freeway section was held in front of a mural of Gatto at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, which he helped found, in November 2014 (the picture, which is from the LA Times, shows Assemblymen Ian Calderon, left, and Mike Gatto, who is joined by his wife, Danielle). It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 173, Resolution Chapter 184, 9/11/2014.
    (Source: ACR 173, LATimes 11/12/14; Image Source: KTLA; LA Times Homicide Report)

    Johnny R. MartinezThe portion of I-10 from eastbound PM LA 22.31 to westbound PM LA 22.33 (basically, the two pieces of South Fremont Avenue) in the City of Alhambra is officially named the "CHP Officer Johnny R. Martinez Memorial Highway". This segment was named in honor of Officer Johnny Ramirez Martinez, who was born June 14, 1948, to Bill and Vera Martinez, in Fayette, North Carolina. Officer Martinez graduated from Chaffey High School in 1966, and joined the United States Marine Corps shortly after graduation. He proudly served the Marine Corps for four years and achieved the rank of sergeant as a Vietnam veteran. Prior to becoming a patrol officer for the Department of the California Highway Patrol (CHP), Officer Martinez was employed by Alcoa Aluminum of Corona as an X-ray technician. Officer Martinez graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy on December 1, 1977, and upon graduation, was assigned to the East Los Angeles area, where he proudly served for four years. Officer Martinez, badge number 8813, was killed in the line of duty on October 2, 1981. While clearing debris from the San Bernardino Freeway, he and his partner were gunned down by two paranoid robbery suspects. Although he was rushed to the hospital, Officer Martinez succumbed to his injuries and died at Alhambra Community Hospital. Officer Martinez was known for being a man of principle and integrity. He was a loyal family man, a wonderful father and husband , and a dedicated officer. His greatest joys were his wife, his children, and riding motorcycles. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 159, 8/23/2010, Resolution Chapter 104.
    (Image Source: California Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

    Ryan StringerThe portion of I-10 between South Marguerita Avenue and South Almansor Street (LA 23.12 to LA 24.31), in the City of Alhambra, is named the "Officer Ryan Stringer Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Ryan Stringer, who was born in the City of Los Angeles and grew up in the City of Whittier, graduating from Whittier Christian High School. Officer Stringer attended Fullerton College and Rio Hondo Community College after working for his father's construction business for several years. Officer Stringer entered the Police Academy at Rio Hondo and graduated in February of 2009 and was sworn in as an Alhambra Police Officer on February 26, 2009. During his two-year tenure with the Alhambra Police Department, Officer Stringer worked in the Field Services Division, Patrol Section. Officer Stringer showed his friendship, camaraderie, teamwork, and competitive drive as a member of the Alhambra Police Department's Baker-to-Vegas Challenge Cup Relay Team. Officer Stringer displayed his determination and will to succeed during his recovery from a life-threatening motorcycle accident that occurred in July 2010. After spending several weeks in a coma and being temporarily disabled, Officer Stringer made a full recovery within six months and returned to active duty as a police officer in January 2011. Unfortunately, on July 10, 2011, at approximately 2:30 a.m., Officer Ryan Stringer was killed in a tragic accident at the age of 26 while responding to a possible robbery in the rear parking lot of 100 North First Street in the City of Alhambra. Coworkers, friends, and family recall Officer Stringer's good-natured disposition, healthy sense of humor, strong sense of adventure, and desire to excel at whatever he set out to do. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image source: Alhambra PD Facebook Page)

    Donald Ralph JohnstonThe portion of this freeway between the intersection with Route 19 in the City of Rosemead and the intersection with I-605 in the City of Baldwin Park (~ LA 26.908 to LA 31.048) is officially named the "El Monte Police Officer Donald Ralph Johnston Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of El Monte Police Officer Donald Ralph Johnston. Officer Donald Ralph Johnston was born in Wichita, Kansas, on November 11, 1954. When he was four, his parents moved the family to La Puente, California where his father Corky joined ranks of the El Monte Police Department. Officer Johnston graduated from La Puente High School in 1972, and became the proud father of a son Eric who later continued the Johnston legacy with the El Monte Police Department (3rd generation). In 1985, Officer Johnston became a reserve officer for the City of El Monte until he became a full-time officer in 1988. Officer Johnston volunteered in the Adopt-a-Cop program at Wilkerson School. On January 9, 1990, Officer Johnston responded to a call of a person trying to pass a bad check at a bank, and was shot and paralyzed by the suspect after selflessly pushing a bystander out of harm's way. He was awarded the City of El Monte Medals of Valor, Distinguished Service, and Purple Heart, received commendations and awards from the United States Congress, Governor Deukmejian, Governor Wilson, the California State Legislature, the Office of Attorney General, the County of Los Angeles, the American Police Hall of Fame, and numerous other local and national organizations. On January 29, 1991, Officer Johnston returned to work at the El Monte Police Department in a wheelchair, and was assigned to the Community Relations Unit as a detective handling missing persons investigations, all the while continuing his community involvement by mentoring disabled students. In 1993, Officer Johnston secured a position as the first regular police helicopter observer, and was able to experience the excitement of street patrol once again. Officer Johnston's work was so exceptional that he received many accolades for his service; and in 1997, Officer Johnston developed the S.T.R.I.V.E (Success Through Recognizing Individual Volition and Excellence) program, and visited schools to tell his story and inspire students to overcome their own obstacles. After retiring from active duty on September 1, 2001, Officer Johnston refused to quit, and with his letter of retirement, submitted a request to stay with the El Monte Police Department as a reserve officer, despite his declining health and chronic pain. Officer Johnston passed away on November 22, 2002. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 71, Resolution Chapter 115, 8/25/2003.
    (Image source: The Friday Flyer; OfficerDown Memorial Page)

    Harold E Horine / Bill LeiphardtThe portion of I-10 from the Baldwin Park Blvd Overcrossing to the Sunset Avenue Undercrossing in the County of Los Angeles (~ LA 32.186 to LA 34.856) is officially named the CHP Officers Harold E. Horine and Bill Leiphardt Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officers Harold Horine and Bill Leiphardt, who made the ultimate sacrifice while performing their sworn duty. Specifically, on May 13, 1978, California Highway Patrol Officers Harold Horine and Bill Leiphardt were struck by a drunk driver while investigating a roadside crash involving an abandoned vehicle. Officer Harold Eugene Horine was born in 1939 in El Monte, California. Officer Horine, badge number 6686, graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1968 and, upon graduation, was assigned to the Baldwin Park Area Office, where he proudly served for approximately 10 years. Officer William Ferris Leiphardt, Jr. was born in 1939 in La Junta, Colorado. Officer Leiphardt served in the United States Air Force from 1958 to 1964 before deciding to join the Department of the California Highway Patrol. Officer Leiphardt, badge number 4911, was assigned to the Baldwin Park Area Office, where he proudly served for approximately 12 years. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 57, Resolution Chapter 5, 2/3/2014.
    (Image source: California Assn of Highway Patrolmen - Horine - Leipthardt)

    Kenneth WredeThe portion of I-10 between Vincent Avenue and Grand Avenue in the City of West Covina (~ LA 35.398 to LA 38.522) is officially named the "West Covina Police Officer Kenneth Wrede Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Kenneth Wrede of the City of West Covina Police Department, who was killed in the line of duty on August 31, 1983, in the City of West Covina while responding to a call regarding a suspicious person. Officer Wrede was a longtime resident of Southern California and a 1975 graduate of Katella High School in Anaheim. He received his associates degree in criminal justice from Fullerton College and was pursuing a bachelor's degree at the time of his death. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 104, Resolution Chapter 102, on 8/16/2006.
    (Image source: LA County Police Officers Memorial FB Page; KennethScott Wrede Memorial FB Page)

    Shaun DiamondThe portion of Route 10 from the Route 57 Interchange near Pomona to the North Towne Avenue exit near Pomona in the County of Los Angeles (~ LA 42.506 to LA 46.43) is officially named the "Pomona Police Officer Shaun Diamond Memorial Highway." It was named in memory of Officer Shaun Richard Diamond of the Pomona Police Department. On October 29, 2014, Officer Diamond, age 45, succumbed to a gunshot wound he sustained the previous day while performing his sworn duty with the department’s SWAT unit. A 16-year veteran of the law enforcement community, having worked for police departments in Los Angeles and Montebello prior to joining the Pomona Police Department (PPD) in 2006, Officer Diamond had a passion for working SWAT, and as a member of the PPD’s SWAT unit for the past six years, he had served on dozens of SWAT operations and shared his expertise as a field training officer, in which capacity he was responsible for training new recruits. In his most recent assignment to the Pomona Downtown District Enforcement Team, Officer Diamond worked as a law enforcement liaison with the business community and the community at large, giving generously of his time to such local events and organizations as the Special Olympics and Tip-A-Cop. His community outreach efforts also included K-9 and SWAT demonstrations for local schoolchildren. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 104, Resolution Chapter 53, on 6/1/2016.
    (Image Source: Daily Bulletin, 5/27/2016; Twitter)

    Greggory CasillasThe portion of I-10 between the North San Antonio Avenue undercrossing (LA 46.718) in the County of Los Angeles, to the Mountain Avenue undercrossing (SBD 2.37) in the County of San Bernardino, is named the "Pomona Police Officer Greggory Casillas Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Greggory Jonathan Casillas of the Pomona Police Department, who on March 9, 2018 died while serving in the line of duty; his untimely death in the pursuit of the highest ideals of public safety has brought immense sorrow and loss to the people of the local community and throughout the state and the countless individuals whose lives he touched. Born in April 1987, in Glendale, Officer Greggory Casillas began his career in public safety in March 2015, serving as a Pomona Police Records Specialist until November of that year, at which time he became a Pomona Police Jailer and served in that capacity for one year, later entering the police academy on March 19, 2017, and being sworn as a Pomona Police Officer on September 7, 2017. Officer Casillas was a true gentleman in every sense of the word, and will be remembered by his coworkers for his dedication to details and his honesty and by his siblings as a calm and collected individual who always thought ahead and was committed to accomplishing his goals. Throughout his tenure with the Pomona Police Department, Officer Casillas, a mature, stable, and responsible man, exemplified the true character of the brave men and women who devote their time and energy to the perilous duties of law enforcement, and he was renowned among his fellow officers for loving, honoring, and being dedicated to his family, the uniform, and the law enforcement community, all of which were indelible and inseparable in his life. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 236, Res. Chapter 157, 8/17/2018.
    (Image Source: Twitter, Officer Down Memorial Page)

    The portion of this freeway in San Bernardino and Riverside counties is named the "Redlands Freeway". This is because the route traverses the City of Redlands.

    Richard HycheThe portion of I-10 in the City of Ontario between the intersection of Euclid Avenue and the 6th Street overcrossing (~ SBD 3.532 to SBD 4.329) as the "Officer Richard Hyche Memorial Freeway". It was named in honor of Officer Richard Hyche, a four-year veteran of the Ontario Police Department. Officer Hyche was fatally wounded on October 15, 1975, and at the time was the first Ontario police officer killed in the line of duty since 1957. Officer Hyche was born on April 27, 1944, in Long Beach; served in the United States Marine Corps; attended the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Academy; worked at the Glenn Helen Maximum and Minimum County Jail Facility for two years; and was hired as a police officer by the Ontario Police Department on July 23, 1971. Officer Hyche was killed by a single gunshot by a suspect being sought in connection with a murder that had occurred the previous day at the Pepper Tree Motel. The suspect was later convicted and sentenced to life in state prison, and subsequently escaped from prison, fled to Montana, and was eventually killed after a deadly crime spree. Officer Hyche is still remembered today by former supervisors and colleagues as an excellent officer who was always outgoing and friendly, who enjoyed his work as a police officer, and who had a strong commitment to his fellow officers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 95, Resolution Chapter 93, on 8/11/2006.
    (Image source: Ontario Police Museum - Lest We Forget)

    Frank M. PribbleThe portion of Route 10 from ~ Mulberry Ave, E of Commerce Drive to ~ Citrus Ave (SBD 12.25 to SBD 15.25) in the City of Fontana is named the “Deputy Frank M. Pribble Memorial Highway”. This segment was named in memory of San Bernardino County Sheriff Deputy Frank Marion Pribble. Deputy Pribble joined the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department in March 1965 and was assigned to the Fontana Station. Deputy Pribble was very well respected and well known throughout the department in this large county, particularly in Fontana where he worked for 10 years and served as a deputy sheriff. Deputy Pribble was a mentor to the new deputies assigned to the Fontana Station and many deputies would wait after their shifts for a chance to ride with Pribble, who would take the new officers around the perimeter of the Fontana beat and carefully instruct them on the hazards of the area. On July 6, 1975, Deputy Pribble was on patrol in a rest area on Route 10 for a suspect wanted in a drive-by shooting when he was fatally shot in the line of duty. Even during the last moments of his life, Deputy Pribble exhibited selfless regard for life when he told a woman who was trying to assist the wounded officer to "Get out of the way; I don't want you people to get hurt." Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 96, Resolution Chapter 72, on 7/3/2008.
    (Image source: SBD County Frank Bland Memorial)

    Darrell Keith Lee / Gary Wayne Wolfley / Sergio Carrera Jr.The portion of I-10 between Cedar Avenue and Pepper Avenue in the City of Rialto (~ SBD R18.453 to SBD 20.96) is named the "Sergeant Darrell Keith Lee, Sergeant Gary Wayne Wolfley, and Officer Sergio Carrera Jr. Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Sergeant Darrell Keith Lee, Sergeant Gary Wayne Wolfley, and Officer Sergio Carrera Jr., the only three officers lost in the line of duty between the founding of the Rialto Police Department in 1911 and 2012. All three police officers died from injuries sustained during violent confrontations while performing their respective duties as California police officers. Sergeant Darrell Keith Lee, of the City of Rialto, passed away on July 24, 1970, when he suffered a heart attack as a result of an injury sustained in the line of duty. Sergeant Lee was born to Minnie Price (Lee) of Texas and Glenn Lee of Oklahoma on February 7, 1932, in Southard, Oklahoma. Sergeant Lee attended Rialto Junior High and San Bernardino High School in the cities of Rialto and San Bernardino, respectively. Sergeant Lee served in the United States Marine Corps in Japan and Korea. He joined the Rialto Police Department in 1958, and was promoted to sergeant in 1963. Sergeant Lee was a lifelong resident of Rialto, California, and was a great public speaker who enjoyed speaking with all the local groups. Sergeant Gary Wayne Wolfley, of the City of Rialto, passed away on March 3, 1986, when he was shot while handling a call for service in the City of Rialto. Sergeant Wolfley was born to William and Patricia Wolfley on September 22, 1955, in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Sergeant Wolfley attended Eisenhower High School in the City of Rialto. During his teenage years, he was a Rialto Police Cadet and a member of the Civil Air Patrol. Sergeant Wolfley worked for the City of Rialto as a police dispatcher until he realized his dream of becoming a police officer in 1977. In March 1985, he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant. Sergeant Wolfley was well-known in the community and was always there to help his friends and family. Sergio Carrera Jr., of the City of Rialto, passed away on October 18, 2007, when he was shot and killed during a raid for illegal drugs. Officer Carrera was born to Sergio Carrera Sr. and Aurora Lopez on March 5, 1978, in Lynwood, California. Officer Carrera attended Valley View High School in Moreno Valley, California, and San Bernardino Valley College, where he completed his police academy training in 2003. Officer Carrera was a four-year veteran of the Rialto Police Department and a member of the SWAT team. Officer Carrera was a loving husband and wonderful father, was well-known for his contagious sense of humor and laughter, and was uncomplicated and straightforward in his relationships, which allowed him to accept people for who they were. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image source: Find a Grave; OfficerDown Memorial Page; Officer Down Memorial Page; Find a Grave)

    James M GoodmanThe portion of I-10 in San Bernardino County between S. Waterman Ave and Tennessee St in Redlands (SBD 25.26 to SBD 29.82) is named the "Officer James M. Goodman Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer James M. Goodman, who was killed in the line of duty on June 3, 2004. He was traveling west on his department motorcycle in the City of Redlands, attempting to overtake a vehicle he believed to be involved in a hit and run accident, when a van, traveling north on Nevada Street, entered the intersection from the south directly in the path of Officer Goodman. Officer Goodman was unable to avoid a collision and broadsided the van, and thereafter succumbed to the injuries he received from the traffic collision. He was born on September 11, 1955, in Martinez, California, was raised in the Bay Area, and graduated in 1973 from Pinole High School. He honorably served in the United States Army for nearly eight years and dedicated four years to reserve duty, ultimately achieving the rank of sergeant. Officer Goodman joined the California Highway Patrol on January 9, 1984. After successfully completing his training at the California Highway Patrol Academy, he reported to the Redwood City area on May 24, 1984. On August 20, 1985, Officer Goodman was awarded a California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training Basic Certificate; and on April 1, 1987, Officer Goodman transferred to the San Jose area. On May 2, 1989, he was assigned to the Oakland area; on October 1, 1993, he was assigned to the Golden Gate Division; on June 26, 2000, he was assigned to the Oakland area; and on March 1, 2001, he was assigned to the San Bernardino area. Over the years, Officer Goodman earned numerous certificates of achievement in the field of law enforcement. While stationed in the Oakland area, Officer Goodman was the first officer to arrive on scene after the Loma Prieta Earthquake occurred on October 17, 1989; and on the day of the earthquake, Officer Goodman helped to release a driver trapped under a collapsed portion of I-880 by crawling through a small space only accessible by removing several pieces of his safety equipment. For three hours, while the highway continued to settle from aftershocks, he and his colleagues worked to free the driver. In honor of this heroic act, he and two other officers were awarded the Medal of Valor by Former Governor Pete Wilson. Additionally, on November 25, 1989, Officer Goodman received a Meritorious Award from the office of the Mayor of the City of Oakland for his valor, gallantry, and courage during the 1989 earthquake. Officer Goodman made significant contributions to traffic safety and to the motoring public while serving at each assigned area and served for 20 years as a sworn peace officer for the California Highway Patrol. He was known by his fellow officers for his outstanding dedication to the department and to the protection of the citizens of our state. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 41, Resolution Chapter 72, on 7/3/2007.
    (Image source: California Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

    Thomas P ColemanThe portion of Route 10 in the vicinity of Texas Street to South Wabash Avenue (SBD 30.377 to SBD 34.288), in the County of San Bernardino, is named the "CHP Officer Thomas P. Coleman Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of CHP Officer Thomas Philip Coleman, who was born October 6, 1976, in West Covina, California, to Robert and Janice Coleman. He was one of five children that included two boys, Thomas and Joseph, and three girls, Jennifer, Kathleen and Mary. He graduated from Damien High School in 1994 and joined the United States Marine Corps in September of 1996. Prior to joining the California Highway Patrol (CHP), Thomas P. Coleman served as a Marine Security Guard for the United States Marine Corps. In 2003, CHP Officer Thomas P. Coleman, badge number 17338, graduated from the CHP Academy and was assigned to the Altadena Area Office. After 60 months of service in the Altadena area, Officer Thomas P. Coleman was transferred to the San Bernardino area and was assigned to motorcycle duty on June 12, 2008. On June 11, 2010, Officer Thomas P. Coleman was in pursuit of a traffic violator when his motorcycle collided with a semitrailer truck. Shortly after the accident, Officer Thomas P. Coleman succumbed to his injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene. Officer Coleman was a hard-working, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people he worked with. He was known for being a loyal family man and a wonderful father and husband. His greatest joys were playing with his children, riding his motorcycle, hiking, and watching football and movies. Officer Thomas P. Coleman was admired for his passion for his career, his "smirk," his sense of humor, and his hugs. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Resolution Chapter 89, on September 15, 2011.
    (Image source: Officer Tom Coleman Memorial FB Page)

    Chris KantonThe portion of this freeway from the Beaumont Avenue/Route 79 exit to the Sunset Avenue Exit, in the County of Riverside (~ RIV 7.608 to RIV 11.353) is named the "CDF Firefighter Chris Kanton Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) Firefighter Chris Kanton, at 23 years of age, who died in the line of duty on Saturday, August 6, 2005, in the County of Riverside. While responding to storm-related accidents, CDF Firefighter Chris Kanton was traveling in a CDF fire engine on I-10 east of Route 60 when the engine left the highway and traveled down a steep embankment, struck several trees, and came to rest on the roadway below. CDF Firefighter Chris Kanton, graduated from high school in 2000 in Paso Robles, California; attended and graduated from the Allan Hancock Fire Academy in Santa Maria, California; and subsequently completed HAZMAT training and served on the HAZMAT team at Station 81 in Bermuda Dunes and other locations as a full-time firefighter. He later transferred to Station 58 in Moreno Valley, where he served as a Firefighter II. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 10, Resolution Chapter 64, on 7/3/2007.
    (Image source: National Fallen Firefighters Foundation)

    Christopher Lee DouglasThe five-mile portion of I-10 from the 22nd Street undercrossing to the Malki Road undercrossing in Banning, California, County of Riverside (~ RIV R11.984 to RIV R16.407), is named the "CAL FIRE Firefighter Christopher Lee Douglas Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) Firefighter Christopher Lee Douglas, who passed away in the line of duty on July 5, 2013, at 41 years of age, while responding to a traffic accident in Riverside County. Firefighter Douglas was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and attended Widefield High School. He later attended Palomar College in Vista, California, graduating at the top of his class and earning his paramedic license. Firefighter Douglas was an 11-year veteran of the United States Air Force, enlisting in 1992. While stationed at Vandenberg Air Force Base, he earned the rank of Staff Sergeant, attended Airman Leadership School, and was a Missile and Space Systems Maintenance Apprentice. During his Air Force career, he earned the Air Force Achievement Medal, the Air Force Commendation Medal, the Air Force Longevity Service Award with 1 device, the Air Force Training Ribbon, and the National Defense Service Medal. Firefighter Douglas had a passion for firefighting, beginning his career as a volunteer firefighter paramedic in 1999. At his graduation ceremony from the Company Officer’s Academy, he received the Carpe Diem Award for leadership. In 2004, Firefighter Douglas began his career with CAL FIRE at La Quinta Fire Station #32 as a Firefighter II/Paramedic and was promoted to Fire Apparatus Engineer/Paramedic on June 4, 2013. In his spare time, Firefighter Douglas enjoyed surfing, playing the guitar, cooking, working on cars, traveling, and spending time with his friends. Above all else, he valued spending time with his family. On July 5, 2013, Firefighter Douglas was leaving the scene of a medical emergency when his fire engine was dispatched to another call, a traffic accident. While preparing to respond to the traffic accident, Firefighter Douglas was struck by a pickup truck while he was along the side of his fire engine, and succumbed to his injuries a few hours later. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 22, Res. Chapter 107, Statutes of 2015, on July 16, 2015.
    (Image source: Find a Grave)

    Ambers O. (Sonny) ShewmakerThe portion of I-10 between Main Street and Verbenia Avenue (renamed Haugen-Lehmann Way in April 2018) in Cabazon (~ RIV R19.379 to RIV R24.534), in the unincorporated area of the County of Riverside as the "CHP Officer Ambers O. “Sonny” Shewmaker Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Ambers O’Neal “Sonny” Shewmaker, who was born October 10, 1941, to Earl and Eva Shewmaker in Santa Maria, California. California Highway Patrol Cadet A.O. “Sonny” Shewmaker entered the Department of the California Highway Patrol Academy on March 3, 1969, and upon graduation was assigned to the Riverside area office and was later transferred to the Banning area office where he spent the remainder of his career. On November 23, 1969, Officer “Sonny” Shewmaker, stopped a vehicle for speeding. Unbeknownst to him, the car was stolen and the driver was wanted for an earlier robbery in Riverside, California. As Officer Shewmaker was using his radio, the suspect shot him point blank in the head. Officer Shewmaker was taken to a hospital, but succumbed to his injuries on the morning of November 24, 1969. In 1970, the Yucaipa Valley Little League created the “Sonny Shewmaker Award for Best Sportsmanship” in honor of Officer Shewmaker’s dedication to helping the youth of Yucaipa Valley. Oddly enough, in 1973, the recipient of this award was a 12-year-old Brian Rezendes, who many years later married Officer Shewmaker’s sister-in-law, Kim. It was named in recognition of Officer Shewmaker’s contributions and sacrifice in serving and protecting the citizens of California. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image source: Press Enterprise 11/20/2013; RedlandsPatch 11/13/2013)

    Sonny BonoThe portion of this freeway from a point just west of the Route 111 cutoff in the Palm Springs area to a point at the bottom of the grade east of the City of Coachella (~ RIV R23.937 to RIV R60.368) is named the "Sonny Bono Memorial Freeway". As if you didn't know the story, Sonny Bono left his boyhood home in Detroit, Michigan for Hollywood, California at a young age to become a star in show business. His quest led him to a laborer's job as a meat truck driver and deliveryman and then in promotions for a record company. Sonny Bono parlayed those jobs into an opportunity to showcase his ability as a showman and entertainer. Those talents eventually led to a career of fame as a recording and television star as part of the duo Sonny and Cher. Later, Sonny Bono pursued another dream as a restaurant owner in Palm Springs. His concern on behalf of his community as a businessman led him to public service eventually leading to his election as Mayor of Palm Springs in 1988. Sonny Bono's public service career eventually led him to the halls of the Congress of the United States in 1994 as the Representative from the Coachella Valley and Western Riverside County areas of southern California. Sonny Bono's achievements as a Congressman brought needed national attention to the environmental needs of the Salton Sea; he also worked on behalf of bringing the needed federal funding for transportation and infrastructure projects for the Coachella Valley, leading to funding for significant highway improvements throughout the Coachella Valley and Riverside County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 25, Resolution Chapter 58, June 4, 2001.
    (Image sources: Flikr; Wikipedia)

    Dr. June McCarrollThe portion of this freeway near Indio in Riverside County between the Jefferson Street and Indio Boulevard interchange and the junction with Route 86 (~RIV R52.423 to RIV R57.73) is officially named the "Doctor June McCarroll Memorial Freeway." Doctor June McCarroll arrived in California in 1904, when she moved to Indio in order to place her ailing husband in a health camp for persons infected with tuberculosis. In Indio, she traveled, at first by horse and buggy and later by horseback, to practice medicine on five Indian reservations. She later became the doctor retained by the Southern Pacific Railroad to treat its employees in the Coachella Valley. In later life, she expressed regrets that younger doctors were seemingly unable to function without modern hospitals and other conveniences when she had sometimes operated on kitchen tables, explaining "I would clear off the table, tie the patient down, and administer the anesthetic". She is also credited with starting the first library in the Coachella Valley. She is also known for her role in initiating the painting of centerlines upon streets and highways. The Riverside County physician, who was known as Dr. June, was driving home one day in 1917 when a truck forced her car off the road. Convinced that lines would help drivers stay safely on the correct sides of the road, McCarroll took her idea to Riverside County's Board of Supervisors and Chamber of Commerce. When they didn't do anything, she set an example by painting a mile-long, 4-inch-wide white stripe down the center of Indio Boulevard, near her home. In 1924, after she and the Indio Women's Club and the California Federation of Women's Clubs proposed it, the idea of painting a centerline on state highways was adopted by the California Highway Commission. The credit for painting white traffic arrows on pavement, incidentally, apparently belongs to George S. Hinckley, a traffic engineer who first used them in the plaza in front of Redlands City Hall in 1910. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 58, Chapter 105, August 17, 2000.
    (Image source: Waymarking)

    The portion of this freeway extending five miles to the east and five miles to the west of mile marker number 84 (~ RIV 79.000 to 89.000, near Bee Canyon Road at RIV 81.557) in Riverside County, located east of the Chiriaco Summit, is officially designated the "Veterans' Memorial Freeway". This is in honor of the veterans that have served the United States from the state of California. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 137, Chapter 104, in 1994.

    Christopher Columbus Transcontinental HwyIn additional to the other designations noted, Route 10 (in its entirety) has been officially designated the "Christopher Columbus Transcontinental Highway", although on the east coast, the corresponding sign is not on I-10 (it is on I-40). It acquired this name in Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 106, Chapter 71, in 1976. Christopher Columbus was... oh well, just read Wikipedia. According to reports in 2003, the sign on I-10 has disappeared.

    Named Structures Named Structures

    Eugene A. Obregon, USMCThe I-5/I-10/Route 60/U 101 interchange (~ 10 LA S0.15), commonly referred to as the East Los Angeles Interchange, is named the “Medal of Honor Recipient , Eugene A. Obregon, USMC, Memorial Interchange” (it was originally named the “Marine Private First Class Eugene A. Obregon Interchange”). This interchange was named in memory of Medal of Honor Recipient Eugene A. Obregon, USMC. While serving as an ammunition carrier with Golf Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during the Korean War, PFC Obregon was killed in action on September 26, 1950. The machine-gun squad of Private Obregon was temporarily pinned down by hostile fire; and during this time, he observed a fellow marine fall wounded in the line of fire. Armed only with a pistol, Private Obregon unhesitantly dashed from his cover position to the side of the fallen marine. Firing his pistol with one hand as he ran, Private Obregon grasped his comrade by the arm, and despite the great peril to himself, dragged the marine to the side of the road. Still under enemy fire, Private Obregon was bandaging the marine's wounds when hostile troops began approaching their position. Quickly seizing the wounded marine's rifle, Private Obregon placed his own body as a shield in front of the wounded marine and lay there firing accurately and effectively into the approaching enemy troops until he, himself, was fatally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. By his courageous fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty, Private Obregon enabled his fellow marines to rescue the wounded marine. By fate and courage, Private Obregon is one of the valiant Mexican Americans to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor for bravery. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 109, Resolution Chapter 66, on 6/26/2008.
    (Image source: Flikr; Alchetron)

    Thomas H. PohlmanThe interchange of I-10 and I-710 in the County of Los Angeles (~ LA 21.319) is named the "Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriff Thomas H. Pohlman Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Thomas H. Pohlman,a sheriff’s deputy with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. Deputy Sheriff Pohlman was born in July 1950, and was appointed as a sheriff’s deputy on May 29, 1973. On April 19, 1978, Deputy Sheriff Pohlman was on patrol when he smelled ether, used in the manufacture of the drug PCP, coming from a nearby house. As Deputy Sheriff Pohlman and his partner approached the house, a man bolted from the home. Deputy Sheriff Pohlman pursued the suspect on foot, while his partner went back to the squad car to radio for assistance. Deputy Sheriff Pohlman caught the suspect, and, while the suspect was being handcuffed, the suspect gained control of Deputy Sheriff Pohlman’s revolver and shot him. Deputy Sheriff Pohlman died at the scene. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 121, Res. Chapter 192, Statutes of 2016, 9/9/2016
    (Image source: Twitter; Find a Grave)

    William B Wolff IIIThe I-10 interchange with I-605 at LA 31.151 in the County of Los Angeles is named the "CHP Officer William B. Wolff III Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of CHP Officer William B. Wolff III, who was born in January 1946, in Akron, Ohio. Officer Wolff graduated from Upper Darby High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1964, and attended Cal Poly Pomona shortly thereafter, where he received a degree in kinesiology. Officer Wolff was a licensed vocational nurse and also served our country as a member of the United States Navy prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol officer. Officer Wolff is remembered as a proud father and grandfather. Officer Wolff, badge number 8342, entered the California Highway Patrol Academy on August 13, 1973, and, upon graduation, was assigned to the Baldwin Park area, where he served for approximately five years. Officer Wolff was killed in the line of duty on December 30, 1977, while making a traffic stop along the I-10 freeway in Baldwin Park, when he was struck by a drunk driver. The motorist who killed Officer Wolff was charged with felony drunk driving. Officer Wolff was a hard working, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people he worked with. He was known for being a loyal family man and a wonderful father. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 86, Resolution Chapter 185, on 09/21/15.
    (Image sources: CBS2, California Assn of Highway Patrolmen)

    Daniel D. MikesellBridge 54-0909 on I-15, the I-15/I-10 separation in San Bernardino County near Ontario (SBD 009.94), is named the "Daniel D. Mikesell Interchange". It was built in 1975, and was named in Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, Chapter 84, in 1980. Daniel D. Mikesell was born on March 1910 in Shawnee, Oklahoma. He attended UCLA and married Gabrielle Lucas, a former Miss Ontario in 1936. He joined the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors in 1954 and served until he was elected Mayor of Ontario in 1960. Re-elected to the Board of Supervisors in 1962, he remained there until his retirement in 1974. He died on November 12, 2007 in Ontario. Known as a consummate politician, he was considered an authority on aviation and transportation. He was instrumental in the transfer of the Ontario Airport to the County of Los Angeles and the I-10/I-15 freeway interchange is named in his honor for his decades-long effort to construct the link between Ontario and Fontana. In particular, Mikesell exerted exceptional effort beginning in 1955 to have the Devore Cutoff included in the California Freeway and Expressway System.
    (Image source: UCR California Digital Newspaper Collection, SB Sun, 5/24/1974, Page 17)

    Douglas Stephen FrancoBridge Number 54-1324 EA 08-1E030, SBD 20.96, the Pepper Avenue overcrossing on I-10 in the City of Colton is named the "Douglas Stephen Franco Memorial Bridge". It was named in memory of Douglas Stephen Franco, who served with the utmost distinction as a resident engineer for projects conducted for the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) between 1995 and 2017. Mr. Franco earned the respect of the public, elected officials, and colleagues for his problem solving abilities, his willingness to listen and take action, his sensible and creative approaches to construction challenges, his fair and kind treatment of staff and coworkers, and his quick wit and pleasant disposition in the work environment. During his accomplished tenure as a resident engineer, Mr. Franco made tremendous contributions to the San Bernardino Valley through major improvements to the I-215 Widening Projects, the 5th Street Overcrossing, and the I- 10 and I-210 Freeways. Mr. Franco began his career working as an engineer for the California Department of Transportation, Division of Structures, launching more than 25 years of service, including 22 years with a construction management consulting firm, dedicated to improving the quality of life for the residents of southern California through enhancing the transportation system. Mr. Franco earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering from the Loyola Marymount University. Mr. Franco passed away too soon on June 12, 2017, at 48 years of age. Mr. Franco’s long-standing service and stalwart commitment to transportation in the Inland Empire makes it truly appropriate for the I-10 Pepper Avenue overcrossing, Bridge Number 54-1324 EA 08-1E030, Post Mile 20.96, in the City of Colton to be named in his honor. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 111, Res. Chapter 226, 9/11/2018.
    (Image source: LA Funeral)

    James A. GuthrieBridge 53-1367 (now 54-0479, at SBD R24.23, rebuilt in 1972), the I-10/I-215 separation in San Bernardino County, is named the "James A. Guthrie Memorial Interchange". It was built in 1960, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 57, Chapter 193, in 1970. James A. Guthrie was a presidential elector from California in 1956. He served from 1943 to 1967 as a member of the California Highway Commission. Guthrie, a Republican, was reappointed twice to the CHC by Governor "Pat" Brown in 1961 and 1965, serving a total of three terms. He was born in San Bernardino in 1988, and was editor and president of the San Bernardino Sun and Telegram for many years. Through his paper, he was a leader in the Good Roads program for San Bernadino County. He pioneered the development of the roads later known as US 66, US 91, and US 99 (which became I-10). Guthrie was Past President of the San Bernadino Chamber of Commerce, and a former director of the California Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of the advisory board of the Automobile Club of Southern California, the California Club of Los Angeles, and the Sutter Club of Sacramento. He is in the Hall of Fame of the California Press Foundation.
    (Image source: California Highways and Public Works, Nov/Dec 1966)

    Chresten KnudsenBridge 54-0592, the I-10/Route 210 interchange in San Bernardino County (SBD 029.82), is designated the "Chresten Knudsen Interchange". It was built in 1962, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 21, Chapter 47, in 1991. Chresten Knudsen served as a member of the Redlands City Council and in the 1960's was appointed by Governor Ronald Reagan to the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board. When he retired from the Redlands City Council after three terms, he cited increasing responsibilities for his civil engineering business as the major factor in his decision. A Redlands native, Knudsen said he will "continue to be keenly interested in the politics of the city and county." As a councilman, Knudsen has represented Redlands and the council on many boards and commissions. Among them are the city Redevelopment Commission, Recreation Commission. Public Works Commission and San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAGl, which he served as chairman in 1978-79 and as a member of the executive committee. He has also served on the Regional Water Quality Control Board, Redlands Highland Yucaipa Resource Conservation District, National Forest Recreation Association, Redlands YMCA, Barton Flats Cabin Owners' Association. East Valley Planning Agency and East Valley Airport Land Use Commission."
    (Image/biography source: UCR Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, California Digital Newspaper Collection, SB Sun, 2/3/1980, Page 26)

    Mark Thomas TaylorThe I-10 and Date Palm Drive Memorial Overcrossing in the County of Riverside (~ RIV 39.47) is named the "CHP Officer Mark Thomas Taylor Memorial Overcrossing." It was named in memory of Officer Mark Thomas Taylor. who was born on May 17, 1959, to Thomas Claude and Lola Dee, in Benton Harbor, Michigan. Officer Taylor graduated from Benton Harbor High School in 1977 and joined the United States Marine Corps shortly thereafter. Officer Taylor served in the United States Marine Corps from 1977 to 1984 and achieved the rank of sergeant (E-5). After an honorable discharge, he applied to the CHP. On March 18, 1985, Officer Taylor graduated from the CHP Academy and was assigned to the Indio area. Officer Taylor married in 1977, and had a daughter in 1978. Officer Taylor was killed in the line of duty on November 26, 1987, during a routine traffic stop. While issuing a citation, the offender's car was struck by another vehicle. The impact propelled Officer Taylor onto the highway, where he was struck by the same vehicle that had originally collided with the offender’s car. Officer Taylor was a dedicated officer, family man, and a best friend to many. He was known for his sense of humor and for making people smile. In his spare time, he enjoyed spending time with family and friends, being outdoors, running, traveling, and playing ping pong. Officer Taylor was admired for his honesty, loyalty, and determination. He always accomplished what he set out to do and never gave up. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.
    (Image source: Twitter; Officer Down Memorial Page)

    The following is a list of all the named ditches, gulches, arroyos, and washes along I-10 in Riverside County. The origin of most of these names is unknown.

    • Itta Wash (RIV R015.79)
    • San Gorgonio Wash (RIV R016.14)
    • East Cabazon Ditch (RIV R019.41)
    • San Jack Ditch (RIV R019.79)
    • Millard Canyon Wash (RIV R020.15)
    • Fornat Wash (RIV R021.67)
    • West Channel Stubby Wash (RIV R024.20)
    • East Channel Stubby Wash (RIV R024.24)
    • South Garnet Wash (RIV 032.70)
    • Ramon Wash (RIV 035.61)
    • Salvia Wash (RIV 036.49)
    • Edom Wash (RIV 036.82)
    • Willow Wash (RIV 037.14)
    • Thousand Palms Wash (RIV R053.80)
    • Polaris Wash (RIV R062.03)
    • Echo Ditch (RIV R062.62)
    • Smoky Gulch (RIV R063.65)
    • Sunny Gulch (RIV R066.18)
    • Brown Arroyo (RIV R068.29)
    • West Cactus Wash (RIV R072.93)
    • Cactus Wash (RIV R073.20)
    • East Cactus Wash (RIV R073.45)
    • Hazy Gulch (RIV R074.10)
    • Aqueduct Wash (RIV R075.04)
    • Happy Gulch (RIV R075.67)
    • Sad Gulch (RIV R076.55)
    • Desparation Arroyo (RIV R077.09)
    • Hope Arroyo (RIV R077.66)
    • West Buried Mountain Wash (RIV R077.97)
    • Buried Mountain Wash (RIV R078.54)
    • Resurrection Wash (RIV R078.94)
    • West Saddle Gulch (RIV R079.25)
    • Saddle Gulch (RIV R079.5)
    • West Cotton Gulch (RIV R079.94)
    • Cotton Gulch (RIV R080.33)
    • East Cotton Gulch (RIV R080.65)
    • Paul Gulch (RIV R081.21)
    • Pinto Gulch (RIV R082.59)
    • Three Star Ditch (RIV R087.96)
    • Determination Ditch (RIV R090.98)
    • Orris Ditch (RIV R091.92)
    • Krume Ditch (RIV R092.90)
    • Beta Ditch (RIV R093.63)
    • Teckta Ditch (RIV R094.75)
    • Irolo Ditch (RIV R096.50)
    • Ajax Ditch (RIV R096.85)
    • Shanty Ditch (RIV R097.33)
    • Union Ditch (RIV R097.81)
    • Bula Ditch (RIV R098.78)
    • Taro Ditch (RIV R099.06)
    • Adair Ditch (RIV R100.38)
    • Hillock Ditch (RIV R100.68)
    • Wide Ditch (RIV R101.14)
    • Tex Wash (RIV R102.63)
    • Desert Center Ditch (RIV R104.43)
    • Larry Ditch (RIV R104.72)
    • Airport Ditch (RIV R106.16)
    • Coxcomb Ditch (RIV R106.63)
    • Quartz Ditch (RIV R108.28)
    • Ghost Ditch (RIV R109.26)
    • Rollie Ditch (RIV R109.72)
    • Palen Ditch (RIV R110.47)
    • Meta Ditch (RIV R110.99)
    • Oban Ditch (RIV R112.28)
    • Copa Ditch (R113.81)
    • Aztec Ditch (RIV R115.40)
    • Tarantula Ditch (RIV R116.78)
    • Sutro Ditch (RIV R118.50)
    • Alta Ditch (RIV R119.59)
    • Rubble Ditch (RIV R120.74)
    • Acari Ditch (RIV R122.15)
    • Beehive Ditch (RIV R124.23)
    • Esso Ditch (RIV R126.26)
    • Arco Ditch (RIV R126.97)
    • Mud Ditch (RIV R127.95)
    • Walla Ditch (RIV R129.51)
    • Calada Ditch (RIV R130.86)
    • Teed Ditch (RIV R133.99)
    • Gale Ditch (RIV R136.15)
    • McCoy Wash (RIV R138.29)
    • Isora Ditch (RIV R139.18)
    • Palowalla Ditch (RIV R142.62)

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Wildwood, in San Bernardino County 1 mi W of Calimesa. (~ SBD R38.191)
    • Brookside, in Riverside County, 3 mi. W of Beaumont. (~ RIV R4.209)
    • Whitewater, in Riverside County 1 mi W of Whitewater. (~ RIV 26.201)
    • Cactus City, in Riverside County 15 mi E of Indio. (~ RIV R71.981)
    • Wiley's Well, in Riverside County 15 mi W of Blythe. (~ RIV R135.159)

    Historical Route Historical Route

    This portion of this freeway from Route 86 near Indio to I-5 in Los Angeles is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

    National Trails National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.


    Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign Holt Boulevard in Ontario was part of the Pikes Peak Ocean-to-Ocean Highway, which stretched between New York and Los Angeles, running along Holt Blvd in Ontario. In 1920, Holt Blvd was the main route linking Los Angeles to Palm Springs, according to the city of Ontario. At that time Holt Blvd was a 4-lane highway, and it was long before the 10 or 60 freeways were built. Also during the time of the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway, (about 1912) paved roads were rare and driving in a car for more than 10 miles was considered to be a great adventure .

    Atlantic-Pacific Highway Sign The portion between Los Angeles and the Arizona Border appears to have been part of the Atlantic and Pacific Trail.

    The portion between Los Angeles and Thermal appears to have been part of the Southern National Highway (SNH continued along US 99)

    The portion of this segment between Indio (via Mecca) and Blythe was part of the "Hassayamph Trail". This portion is also named the "Sunkist Trail".

    Scenic Route Scenic Route

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 38 near Redlands to Route 62 near Whitewater. [Deleted by Senate Bill 169, August 26, 2013. Chapter 173.]

    Blue Star Memorial Highway Blue Star Memorial Highway

    The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

    Interregional Route Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.10] Between the east urban limits of San Bernardino-Riverside and the Arizona state line.


Classified Landcaped Freeway Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 10 R2.16 8.90
Los Angeles 10 8.96 9.32
Los Angeles 10 9.39 14.36
Los Angeles 10 14.57 14.94
Los Angeles 10 17.98 18.39
Los Angeles 10 S0.00 18.39
Los Angeles 10 18.39 19.71
Los Angeles 10 20.03 20.95
Los Angeles 10 21.01 21.68
Los Angeles 10 24.05 24.50
Los Angeles 10 24.80 25.90
Los Angeles 10 26.71 28.18
Los Angeles 10 28.25 30.74
Los Angeles 10 30.99 31.28
Los Angeles 10 31.28 31.65
Los Angeles 10 31.65 32.04
Los Angeles 10 32.04 32.08
Los Angeles 10 32.08 32.73
Los Angeles 10 32.73 32.77
Los Angeles 10 32.77 34.55
Los Angeles 10 35.04 38.15
Los Angeles 10 38.52 38.85
Los Angeles 10 41.58 42.34
Los Angeles 10 43.33 43.93
Los Angeles 10 43.97 45.74
Los Angeles 10 45.86 47.73
Los Angeles 10 47.92 48.27
San Bernardino 10 0.00 5.44
San Bernardino 10 5.63 6.30
San Bernardino 10 6.73 7.43
San Bernardino 10 11.74 19.73
San Bernardino 10 19.81 20.41
San Bernardino 10 20.48 R21.39
San Bernardino 10 R21.46 R22.40
San Bernardino 10 R22.44 R22.85
San Bernardino 10 R22.89 R23.56
San Bernardino 10 R23.97 30.06
San Bernardino 10 30.15 32.72
Riverside 10 6.98 8.21
Riverside 10 8.90 9.12
Riverside 10 9.60 9.83
Riverside 10 10.18 10.46
Riverside 10 10.75 12.98
Riverside 10 13.05 R14.81
Riverside 10 R151.88 R152.42
Riverside 10 R152.52 R153.50
Riverside 10 R153.93 R154.50
Riverside 10 R155.93 R156.35

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield Prior to the designation of this routing as Interstate 10 on July 1, 1964, a routing similar to the current Route 10 routing had the designation of US 70. US 70 began in downtown Los Angeles, followed Valley Blvd, San Bernardino Road, Garvey-Holt Blvd, and Holt Street into Ontario, and thence to points east. Between Los Angeles and Palm Springs, the routing was cosigned with US 99. Portions were also cosigned with US 60.

For those looking for old US 60/US 70 off of I-10, look for several small exits on I-10 between Indio and Blythe. There is a portion of US 60 between Corn Springs Rd. and Ford Dry Lake Rd.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 10 was signed along the routing from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) south of Venice to Jct. US 101 at Santa Ana, via Manchester Avenue and Santa Ana Blvd. This routing was LRN 174 from US 101A (Route 1, Lincoln Blvd) in Los Angeles along Manchester and Firestone Blvds to US 101 in Norwalk. Sometime between 1934 and 1963, the routing was resigned as Route 42. Specifics are not available, but the guess is that the resignage occurred in the late 1950s in preparation for the interstate. (1956 and 1960 maps shows it as Route 10; the 1963 state map (pre-renumbering) shows it as Route 42). Before signage as US-101, the routing (signed as Route 10, but LRN 174) continued on down to Orangethorpe, and then across Orangethorpe past Route 101 (Spadra Road, at that time) and E through Atwood, until joining the old surface route equivalent to US 101 (LRN 2). Some maps show Route 10 ending at the junction with Route 18 (later renumbered as Route 14, but cosigned with US 91; LRN 175 and LRN 178). It appears that, by 1942, Route 10 was also signed as Bypass US 101.

State Shield On July 1, 1964, LRN 174 (at one time signed as Route 10), between US 101A and US 101 in Norwalk, was officially designated Route 42, and has since been deleted from the state highway system.

Interstate Submissions Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947; the portion from Route 101 to Route 5 was originally to have been designated as I-110, with I-10 sharing a route with Route 5 between the San Bernardino and Santa Monica portions of Route 10. The I-110 designation was deleted as chargeable interstate in August 1965 and a designation of I-10 was used to the Route 101 interchange. At one time, the California Department of Highways, in response to a proposal from Arizona, proposed that current I-10 be numbered as I-12, and that the I-10 designation be used for current I-8.

Exit Information Exit Information

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. I-10 was adopted as a freeway by the California Highway Commission on July 15, 1952 and July 22, 1953. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 10:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 10 was defined in the 1909 First Highway Bond act as running from Goshen to Hanford. In 1915, Chapter 404 extended it from Hanford to San Lucas ("an extension connecting the San Joaquin valley trunk line in Tulare County with the coast trunk line in Monterey County by the continuation of the lateral between the cities of Visalia and Hanford through Coalinga by the most direct and practical route..."). The 1919 Third Bond Issue further extended the route from Visalia (note that Goshen changed its name to Visalia) to Sequoia National Park. By 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as:

From [LRN 2] near San Lucas to the Sequoia National Park line via Coalinga, Hanford, and Visalia

The portion from Hanford to the Sequoia National Park was considered a primary highway.

The route wording remained unchanged until the 1964 alignment. This routing was (and is) mostly signed as Route 198. The portion from Coalinga to Oilfields is signed as Route 33.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links


Acronyms and Explanations:


Back Arrow Route 9 Forward Arrow Route 11

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Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.