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California Highways

Chronology of California Highways

 
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Phase I: A Highway System is Established (1897-1914)


1895 and Earlier

The first roads in California were horse trails and wagon roads, developed by people coming to California. After statehood was granted in 1850, Californians began to pressure for improved roads. As a result, in 1850, the state created the Office of Surveyor General, with the duty to suggest roads. In 1855, there was public demand for a road from the Sacramento Valley to Carson Valley in Nevada, and the legislature passed a bill ordering the Surveyor General to survey a good wagon road over the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and authorized bids for construction of the Emigrant Wagon Road (one record actually shows this bill passing in April 1850). The bill authorized costs up to $105,000, but the legislature neglected to actually appropriate the funds. Instead, a policy of granting franchises for building toll roads evolved, resulting in a number of toll roads and bridges being constructed between 1850 and 1880. One of this was the authorized "Emigrant Wagon Road", also called the "Lake Tahoe Wagon Road", which was completed in November 1858. In 1864, the railroads (CP) completed the Dutch Flat and Donner Lake Wagon Road over the Sierra. This was also a toll facility.

[1896 State Highway Map]In 1895, the Bureau of Highways was created by the State Legislature. Three newly appointed officials, Marsden Manson of San Francisco, R. C. Irvine of Sacramento, and J. L. Maude of Riverside, purchased a buckboard and visited each county in 1895-1897 to form recommendations for a state highway system. Their first report indicated that "The conditions of highways in California today is the result of generations of neglect and apathy" (sound familiar?). The commission inventoried the existing road system, logging in excess of 16,500 miles. When they completed their survey, they issued a report to the Governor. This report, submitted November 25, 1896, recommended a system of state highways made up of 28 distinct routes, of approximately 4,500 miles, using existing roads when possible, connecting all county seats. This is illustrated in the map to the right (click on the map for a larger image)

The original proposal argued that the state should construct the routes, as the counties were too cash-strapped to construct and maintain the roads on their own. However, this was modified by the legislature, which feared the increasing power of the state capitol. They inserted provisions that permitted the counties greater control over the system, including the ability to add an unlimited amount of new routes.

Note: The actual LRNs were assigned after the 1916 bond act, and were codified in 1935


1895

The following highway was defined in the 1895 statutes (PDF, 27 MB):

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Signage Action Segment
Lake Tahoe Wagon Road
"An act to authorize the state of California to secure the title to and right of way for that certain wagon-road...commencing a short distance easterly from the village of Smith's Flat...and running thence to Lake Tahoe..."
(March 26, 1895, Chapter 128)
LRN 11 US 50   US 50 Define Placerville to Lake Tahoe: "[authorization to secure the title and right of way of] that certain wagon road situated and being in the county of El Dorado ... commencing at the junction of the Lake Tahoe Wagon Road with the wagon road leading from Placerville to the town of Newtown, a short distance E-ly from the village of Smith's Flat ... and running thence from the junction of said roads to Lake Tahoe."

With respect to the Lake Tahoe Wagon Road, there were a number of acts in later years that simply authorized funding or other financial aspects, and didn't change routing. These acts include:

  • 1897. “An act to create the office of Lake Tahoe Wagon Road Commissioner...”.
    (Chapter 245. Repealed in 1907 by Chapter 183)

  • 1905. “An act to provide for the construction of permanent bridge work on the Lake Tahoe wagon road, a state highway...”.
    (Chapter 596. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1907. “An act...for the general improvement and completion of survey of the Lake Tahoe wagon road, and for the construction of restraining walls, culverts, bridges and milestones thereon.”
    (Chapter 118. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1909. “An act...for the general improvement of Lake Tahoe wagon road...”
    (Chapter 523. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1911. “An act to make an appropriation for the general improvement of the Lake Tahoe wagon road; a state highway.”
    (Chapter 334. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1913. “An act to make an appropriation for maintenance of the Lake Tahoe wagon road.”
    (Chapter 117. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1915. “An act to make an appropriation for the purpose of purchasing additional rights of way, land and trees on and along the course of the Lake Tahoe wagon road.”
    (Chaper 762. Repealed in 1935)

Mariposa Wagon Road
"An act to appropriate money for the survey, location, construction of a free wagon road from the town of Mariposa in Mariposa County to the Yosemite Valley"
(March 26, 1895, Chapter 96)
LRN 18 Route 140   Route 140 Survey Only "...a free wagon road from the town of Mariposa in Mariposa County to the Yosemite Valley..."
Funding for this was transferred to the General Grant-Kings Cyn Road in 1905, but the route was included in the 1909 bond act.

Repealed by Chapter 598, March 22, 1905


1897

In 1897, the Legislature dissolved the Bureau of Highways, and established the Department of Highways, consisting of three commissioners appointed for two year terms, and a civil engineer appointed for a four year term. It was at this time that the state took over the toll road, then known as the Lake Tahoe Toll Road. This is the route of present-day US 50. However, the recommendations made by the new Department were often ignored, because of the fear of central state power by the legislators.

The following highway was defined in the 1897 statutes (PDF, 38.75 MB):

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Signage Action Segment
Folsom Highway (Extension)
"An act to provide for the construction of a state highway or wagon road from Sacramento City to Folsom..."
(March 29, 1897, Chapter 176)
LRN 11 CA 16   CA 51, Business Route 80 (Signed) Extend CA 51/Business Route 80: Route 160 to Route 99/Business Loop 80 (real Route 51) junction
US 50: Route 99 in Sacramento to Folsom

"A public highway or wagon road shall be built from a point on the E limits of the city of Sacramento, to Folsom in Sacramento Cty as near as practicable along the route of the present most direct line of county roads between these two points..."

US 50   US 50 Extend

1899

The following highway was defined in the 1899 statutes (PDF, 26.8 MB):

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Signage Action Segment
Mono Lake Basin State Road
"An act to provide for the construction of a free wagon road from the Mono lake basin to connect with a road called 'Tioga road,' at or near the 'Tioga mine,' and making an appropriation therefor."
(February 23, 1899, Chapter 26)
LRN 40 CA 120   CA 120
CA 108
Define Route 108/Route 49 junction near Chinese Camp to Yosemite National Park

"...for the purpose of locating and constructing a free wagon road from the Mono Lake Basin to and connecting with a wagon road called the "Tioga Road" and near the "Tioga Mine"..."


1901

The following highways were defined in the 1901 statutes (PDF, 57.8 MB):

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Signage Action Segment
Sonora-Mono State Road
"An act to declare a part of the Sonora and Mono wagon road, commencing east of Sonora, at a point known as Long Barn...and running thence across the summit of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to Bridgeport...a state highway."
(March 12, 1901, Chapter 111)
LRN 13 CA 108   CA 108 Define Long Barn to US 395

"That portion of the Sonora and Mono wagon road, commencing E of Sonora and at a point commonly known as Long Barn in Tuolumne Cty and running thence across the summit of the Sierra Nevada mountains to Bridgeport in Mono County is hereby declared a state highway."

 

With respect to the Sonora-Mono State Road, there were a number of acts in later years that simply authorized funding or other financial aspects, and didn't change routing. These acts include:

  • 1905. "An act...for the purpose of erecting and constructing bridges, culverts, and grading upon the Sonora and Mono road, a state highway."
    (Chapter 150. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1907. “An act...for the maintenance of the Sonora and Mono road, a state highway...”
    (Chapter 204. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1909. “An act...for the purpose of partially changing the line of road and making permanent culverts on the Sonora and Mono road, a state highway.”
    (Chapter 561. Repealed in 1935)

 

Note that this may also have affected LRN 23.


1902

In 1902, the state constitution was amended to give the Legislature the power to establish a system of state highways, and to pass the laws necessary for highway construction. It also permitted state aid to be provided to counties for road construction.


1903

The following routing was authorized for surveying in the 1903 statutes (PDF, 45 MB):

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Signage Action Segment
Trinity-Humboldt State Highway
"An act to provide for locating and surveying a proposed highway from a point on the Trinity River...near the town of North Fork, thence westerly down said river about forty miles to connect with an existing road in Humboldt county..."
(March 26, 1903, Chapter 366)
LRN 20 CA 44 US 299 Unknown Survey Only "for the purposes of locating and surveying a proposed highway from a point on the Trinity River near the town of North Fork, thences W-ly down said river to connect with an existing road in Humboldt County."
This looks to have been part of what was funded as LRN 20 in 1913, for it seems to be part of the segment from US 101 to Weaverville/Douglas City

Chapter repealed by 1935 Chapter 29, Article XX


1905

The following routing was defined in the 1905 statutes (PDF, 68.5 MB). The Chapter also repealed an 1895 highway definition, using its funding for this route:

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Signage Action Segment
Kings River Canyon State Road
"An act to provide for the location and construction of a public highway from the General Grant Park...to the Kings River canyon...and providing for a commission to take charge of, locate and construct said highway..."
(March 22, 1905, Chapter 598)
LRN 41 CA 180   CA 180 Define General Grant Park to Kings River Canyon

"...for the purpose of locating, surveying, and constructing a public highway from the General Grant National Park in Fresno County, thence E-ly into Kings Canyon..."

 

With respect to the Kings River Canyon State Road, there were a number of acts in later years that simply authorized funding or other financial aspects, and didn't change routing. These acts include:

  • 1909. "An act to provide for the continuation of the construction of the highway known as King's river highway, to declare it a state highway..."
    (Chapter 223)

  • 1911. “An act to provide for the continuation of construction of the highway known as Kings river highway...”
    (Chapter 502. Repealed in 1935)

 


1907

In 1907, the Legislature dissolved the Department of Highways, and created the Department of Engineering, the forerunner of the Department of Public Works. Highway funding was provided by the Legislature through "Special Appropriations". This was at a minimum funding level, and most funds were devoted to maintenance, such as clearing storm debris and the construction of retaining walls and culverts.

The following routes were defined in the 1907 statutes (PDF, 77 MB)

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Signage Action Segment
Sierra State Highway
"An act to make an appropriation for the location, survey and construction of a state highway from a point known as the Mount Pleasant ranch on the road between Quincy and Marysville thence in a southeasterly direction by Eureka to Downieville, Sierra County."
(March 8, 1907, Chapter 116)
LRN 36 Unknown   CA 194 Define Mt. Pleasant Ranch to Downieville. Not currently in the state highway system.
This is roughly a routing from Oroville to Downieville, which appears to go near Collins Lake, but I'm not aware of it ever being constructed

"...for the location, survey, and construction of a state highway from a point known as the Mt. Pleasant Ranch on the road between Quincy and Marysville thence in a SE-ly direction by a place called Eureka to Downieville, Sierra Cty..."

Peanut to Kuntz
"An act to provide for the survey, location and construction of a state highway connecting the present county road systems of any one or all of the counties of Trinity, Tehama and Shasta with the road system of Humboldt County..."
(March 23, 1907, Chapter 117)
LRN 35 CA 36   CA 3
CA 36
Define Peanut to Kuntz

"...for the purpose of locating, surveying, and constructing a state highway connecting the present county road systems of any one or all of the counties of Trinity, Tehama, and Shasta with the road system of Humboldt County..."

 

With respect to this highway, there were a number of acts in later years that simply authorized funding or other financial aspects, and didn't change routing. These acts include:

  • 1911. “An act...for the construction and completion of a state highway connecting the counties of Trinity, Tehama and Shasta with the road system of Humboldt county.”.
    (Chapter 274. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1913. “An act to make an appropriation for maintenance of the Trinity-Humboldt state road.”.
    (Chapter 118. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1913. “An act...for the location and survey of a proposed highway to connect the counties of Trinity, Tehama and Shasta with the road system of Humboldt county.”
    (Chapter 609. Repealed in 1935)

 


1909

The following highways were defined in the 1909 statutes (PDF, 63 MB):

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Signage Action Segment
Emigrant Gap State Road
"An act to make an appropriation for the location, survey and construction of a state highway from Emigrant Gap...to the west end of Donner Lake..."
(March 13, 1909, Chapter 224)
LRN 37 US 40   US 40 Define Emigrant Gap to Donner Lake

...for the location, survey, and construction of a state highway from Emigrant Gap, Placer County in an E-ly direction through what is known as the Truckee Pass to the W end of Donner Lake in Nevada County... and it shall be the duty of the department to locate, survey, and construct said road along the line of the wagon road known as the Dutch Flat and Donner Lake wagon road..."

With respect to the Emigrant Gap State Road, there were a number of acts in later years that simply authorized funding or other financial aspects, and didn't change routing. These acts include:

  • 1911. “An act...for the maintenance of the state highway from Emigrant Gap...to the west end of Donner Lake...”
    (Chapter 503. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1913. “An act to make an appropriation for maintenance of the Emigrant Gap state road.”
    (Chapter 121. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1913. “An act...for changing the state road known as Emigrant Gap so as to eliminate the grade crossing over the railroad track near Summit station.”
    (Chapter 619. Repealed in 1935)

 


1909/1910 - First Bond Issue

In 1909, the Legislature authorized the first State Highway Bond Act, for $18,000,000 (approved by the voters in 1910). This act established a State Highway system and authorized construction of 3,052 mi of highways.It required that the Department of Engineering acquire the necessary land, and construct a continuous and connected highway system. The funding allowed a significant quantity of highways to start construction. For example, with funds from the State Highway Bond Act of 1909, construction began on California State Highway Contract No. 1: paving a segment of El Camino Real in Burlingame and South San Francisco, San Mateo County. The highway was eventually designated US 101.

Note: The definitions of the bond routes can be found here.

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Route (R) and Signage (S) Action Segment
"The route or routes of said state highways shall be selected by the department of engineering and said route shall be selected and said highways so laid out and constructed or acquired as to constitute a continuous and connected state highway system running north and south through the state traversing the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys and along the Pacific Coast by the most direct and practicable routes, connecting the county seats of the several counties through which it passes and joining the centers of population, together with such branch roads as may be necessary to connect therewith the several county seats lying east and west of said state highway."
LRN 1 From San Francisco to Crescent City, 371.2 mi
US 101   US 101 Define San Francisco to Crescent City
US 101   CA 254 Define "Avenue of the Giants": US 101 near Sylvandale to US 101 S of Stafford
US 101   CA 271 Define US 101 near Cummings to US 101 near the Humboldt-Mendocino county line
US 101   CA 283 Define US 101 S of Rio Dell to the N end of the Eel River Bridge and Overhead in Rio Dell
LRN 2 From San Francisco to San Diego, 481.8 mi
US 101   I-5 Define San Diego to Santa Ana
US 101   San Diego
County Route S21
Define Old surface routing of US 101 in San Diego from Genesee Avenue near UCSD to I-5 near Camp Pendelton
US 101   CA 72 Define Santa Ana to Downey Street in Los Angeles
US 101   I-5 Define Downey Street in Los Angeles to US 101/US 99 split in downtown Los Angeles
US 101   US 101 Define Los Angeles to Ventura
US 101   CA 1 Define Ventura to Sea Cliff (transferred from US 101 to Route 1 in 1980)
US 101   US 101 Define Sea Cliff to San Jose
US 101   CA 1
CA 135
Define US 101 near Los Alimos to US 101 near Santa Maria
US 101   CA 82 Define San Jose to San Francisco
LRN 3 From Sacramento to the Oregon Line, 291.3 mi
US 40   CA 160 Define Business Route 80 (real Route 50) in Sacramento to Business Route 80 (real Route 51)
US 40 US 99E CA 51, Business Route 80 (Signed) Define Route 160 in Sacramento to I-80 N of Arcade
US 40 US 99E I-80 Define Business Loop 80 (real Route 51) N of Arcade to Route 65 near Roseville
CA 65 CA 256 None Define Roseville to Roseville
CA 65   CA 65 Define I-80 near Roseville to Route 70
US 99E   CA 99 Define Route 20 to I-5 near Red Bluff
US 99   I-5 Define Route 99 near Red Bluff to the Oregon State Line
US 99   CA 3 Define I-5 to Route 263
US 99   CA 263/R,
Business Route 5/S
Define Route 3 N of Yreka to Route 96
US 99   CA 265/R,
Business Route 5/S
Define Route 97 in Weed to I-5
US 99 I-5 CA 273/R,
Business Route 5/S
Define I-5 near Anderson to I-5 NE of Redding
LRN 4 From Sacramento to Los Angeles, 359.0 mi
US 99 US 6 I-5 Define US 101/US 99 jct in Los Angeles to Route 14 (Tunnel Station)
US 99 US 6, Route 7 Route 14 Define Route 14 (Tunnel Station) to Route 126
US 99   I-5 Define Route 126 to I-5/Route 99 junction near Wheeler Ridge
US 99   CA 99 Define I-5/Route 99 junction near Wheeler Ridge to French Camp near Manteca
US 99   CA 204,
Business Route 99
Define Union Avenue and Golden State Avenue in Bakersfield
US 99 US 50 CA 99 Define French Camp near Manteca to Sacramento
LRN 5 From Stockton to Santa Cruz via Oakland, 116.9 mi
CA 13   CA 17 Define Route 1 near Santa Cruz to I-280 in San Jose
CA 13 CA 17 I-880 Define I-280 to US 101 (renumbered in 1961 to LRN 239)
CA 21   I-680 Define US 101 in San Jose and Route 262/I-680 junction near Warm Springs. This was originally planned as part of Route 17.
CA 9   CA 262 Define I-880 near Warm Springs to I-680 near Warm Springs
CA 9 CA 21 I-680 Define Route 262/I-680 junction near Warm Springs to I-680/Route 238 junction near Irvington (Mission San Jose)
CA 9   CA 238 Define I-680 near Irvington and I-580 near Hayward
US 48 US 50, I-5W I-580 Define I-580 near Hayward to Tracy
US 48 US 50 I-205 Define I-580 near Tracy to I-5 E of Tracy
US 50 US 50, CA 4 I-5,
CA 4
Define I-5 E of Tracy to Stockton
LRN 6 From Sacramento to Woodland Junction, 14.3 mi
US 40 US 99W I-80 Define Route 113 (Woodland Jct) to Business Loop 80 in W. Sacramento
US 40   CA 51/R,
Business Route 80/S
Define I-80 in W. Sacramento to Route 160
US 50 CA 275 None Define US 50 near Westacre Rd W of Sacramento to the junction of Capitol Ave and Ninth St in Sacramento (defined as CA 275 in 1967)
LRN 7 From Tehama Junction to Benicia, 142.7 mi
US 40   I-80 Define Bay Bridge to Davis (as US 40)
US 40A US 99W CA 113 Define I-80 near Davis to I-5 near Woodland
US 99W   I-5 Define Woodland (near US 99) to Red Bluff (Route 99)
LRN 8 From Ignacio to Cordelia via Napa, 38.6 mi
CA 48 CA 37 CA 37 Define US 101 to Route 121
CA 37 CA 29 CA 221 Define Route 37 to Route 39 near Napa
CA 28   CA 29 Define Route 12 to Route 121
CA 12   CA 12 Define Route 121 near Napa to I-80
LRN 9 From San Fernando to San Bernardino, 53.5 mi
CA 118   CA 118 Define I-5 (former US 99) near San Fernando to I-210 near San Fernando
CA 118   I-210 Define I-210 near San Fernando to Mountain Avenue E of Monrovia
US 66   None Define Mountain Avenue E of Monrovia to Route 30 near San Bernadino

LRN 10 From Goshen to Hanford, 13.2 mi
CA 198   CA 198 Define Hanford to Route 99 (US 99) [Goshen]
LRN 11 From Sacramento to Placerville, 46.5 mi
US 50   US 50 Extend (Sacramento) Folsom to Placerville
LRN 12 From San Diego to El Centro, 127.5 mi
US 80   I-8 Define US 101 in San Diego to El Centro
US 80   San Diego
County Route S80
Define El Centro
LRN 13 From Salida to Sonora, 49.2 mi
CA 108   CA 219 Extend Route 99 (US 99) at Salida to Route 108 in Sonora
CA 108   CA 108 Extend Route 108 to Route 120
CA 120 CA 108 CA 108/S
CA 120/SR
Extend Route 120 to Route 49
CA 108   CA 108 Extend Route 49 to Sonora
LRN 14 From Albany to Martinez, 20.6 mi
US 40   CA 123 Define I-580 (US 50) in Albany to I-80 (US 40) to Martinez
LRN 15 From Williams to Colusa, 8.7 mi
CA 20   CA 20 Define Williams to Colusa
LRN 16 From Hopland to Lakeport, 19.3 mi
Unknown   CA 175 Define US 101 near Hopland to Route 29 near Lakeport (N Junction, S of Lakeport)
LRN 17 From Roseville to Nevada City, 33.4 mi
US 40   I-80 Define Route 65 near Roseville to Route 49 near Nevada City
CA 49   CA 49 Define I-80 (former US 40) to Route 20
LRN 18 From Merced to Mariposa, 39.2 mi
CA 140   CA 140 Define Route 99 near Merced to Mariposa.
LRN 19 From [LRN 9] W of Claremont to Riverside, 17.7 mi
US 60 US 395
I-15E
CA 194
CA 71
I-215 Define I-215 E of Riverside (former US 395) to Route 91. [There is a possibility this actually ran from the current I-215/Route 91 (former US 60/US 91) junction to US 66 along Garey Avenue as Route 71. Another definition gives Route 9 (US 66) W of Claremont to Riverside (Route 91). See note.]
LRN 20 From Redding to Weaverville, 50.0 mi
CA 44 US 299 US 299 Define Redding to Weaverville
LRN 21 From [LRN 3] near Richvale to Oroville, 7.0 mi
CA 162   CA 162 Define Route 99 [LRN 3 near Richvale] to Route 70 (Alt US 40)
CA 24 US 40A CA 70 Define Route 162 to Quincy [this is the former LRN 30 portion]
LRN 22 From San Juan Bautista to Hollister, 7.1 mi
CA 156   CA 156 Define US 101 near San Juan Bautista to Hollister
LRN 23 From Saugus to Bridgeport, 337.5 mi
CA 7 US 395 US 395 Define Route 89 to Bishop
CA 7 US 395
US 6
US 395 Define Route 89 to Route 14 near Inyokern
CA 7 US 6 CA 14 Define Route 14 near Inyokern to Saugus
CA 89   CA 89 Define US 395 to Markleville
LRN 24 From [LRN 4] near Lodi to San Andreas, 36.6 mi
CA 12   CA 12 Define Route 99 (US 99) near Lodi to Route 49 near San Andreas
LRN 25 From Nevada City to Downieville, 47.0 mi
CA 49   CA 49 Define Route 20 (Nevada City) to Downieville
LRN 26-LRN 27 Defined in the 1916 Bond Issue
LRN 28 From Redding to Alturas, 151.1 mi
CA 41 US 299 US 299 Define Redding to Alturas
LRN 29 From Red Bluff to Susanville, 100.0 mi
Unknown   Route 36 Define Red Bluff to Susanville.
LRN 30 From Oroville to Quincy, 67.0 mi
  US 40A CA 70 Define Oroville to Quincy. This route was abandoned as a distinct route, and LRN 21 extended to cover approximately the same milage.
LRN 31-LRN 33 Defined in the 1916 Bond Issue
LRN 34 From [LRN 4] near Arno to Jackson, 34.4 mi
Unknown   Route 104
Route 88
Unknown US 99 (LRN 4) near Arno to Jackson

1911

In 1911, the Legislature passed the Chandler Act, which authorized the appointment of a three member board to advise the Department of Engineering. This board was to become the first Highway Commission. It also created the position of State Highway Engineer, serving at the pleasure of the Governor. The first State Highway Engineer was Austin B. Fletcher. Mr. Fletcher and the highway commissioners took a 6,800 mi tour of the state highways in 1911, and as a result of the recommendations from that tour, adopted the state highway system. Mr. Fletcher also recommended dividing the state into seven divisions (now "districts"), each in charge of an experience engineer. The Highway Commission also recommended that road be "permanent in character" and provide a "continuous and connected state highway system".

The following routes were defined in the 1911 statutes (PDF, 109.7 MB):

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Route (R) and Signage (S) Action Segment
Myers Station-McKinneys State Road
"An act to provide a state highway from Meyer's station...to McKinney's..."
(March 9, 1911, Chapter 158)
LRN 38 CA 89   CA 89 Define US 50 to I-80

"...a state highway from a point on the Lake Tahoe state wagon road, at or near Myers Station... thence past Tallac, Emerald Bay, to McKinney's in Placer County...."

 

With respect to the Myers Station-McKinneys State Road, there were a number of acts in later years that simply authorized funding or other financial aspects, and didn't change routing. These acts include:

  • 1913. “An act to make an appropriation for maintenance of the state road from Meyers station to McKinneys. ”
    (Chapter 119. Repealed in 1935)

  • 1913. “An act to make an additional appropriation for the completion of the road from Meyer's Station...to McKinney's. ”
    (Chapter 423. Repealed in 1935)

 

Alpine State Highway
"An act to establish the Alpine state highway; to define its course..."
(April 15, 1911, Chapter 468)
LRN 23 CA 89   CA 89 Extend

LRN 23:
CA 89: US 50/Route 89 jct near Myers to Picketts
CA 88: Picketts to Woodsfords
CA 89: Woodsfords to Route 4, Markleeville to Woodsfords
CA 14: Route 126 near Solement to US 395 near Little Lake

LRN 24:
CA 4: Calavaras Big Trees to Route 89

LRN 34:
CA 104: Route 99 to Route 88 SE of Ione
CA 88: Route 104 to Route 89

"The certain road commencing at the Calaveras big tree grove located in Calaveras County thence running to Dorrington in said county, thence E-ly following what is known as the Big Tree and Carson Valley Turnpike to Mt. Bullion in Alpine Cty, thence along county road to Markleeville in Alpine Cty, thence along that certain road via Kirkwood, Silver Lake, Pine Grove and Irishtown to Jackson in Amador Cty, including therewith the road from Picketts in Hope Valley connecting with the Lake Tahoe Wagon Road, a state highway, at Osgood's Place in El Dorado Cty, and the road from Mt Bullion via Loupe in Alpine Cty to Junction in Mono County connecting with the Sonora and Mono State Highway is hereby declared and established a state highway and shall be designated and known as "Alpine State Highway""

CA 89 CA 88 CA 88 Extend
CA 89 CA 4 CA 89 Extend
CA 89   CA 89 Extend
CA 7 US 6 CA 14 Extend
LRN 24 CA 4   CA 4 Extend
LRN 34 CA 104   CA 104 Extend
CA 8   CA 88 Extend
 

With respect to the Alpine State Highway, there were a number of acts in later years that simply authorized funding or other financial aspects, and didn't change routing. These acts include:

  • 1913. “An act to make an appropriation for maintenance of the Alpine state highway.”
    (Chapter 120. Repealed in 1935)

 

Lassen State Highway
"An act declaring a state highway from the Shasta county line through Lassen county to the Modoc county line..."
(April 22, 1911, Chapter 498)
LRN 28 CA 41 US 299 US 299 Reauthorize This was actually funded in the 1909 bond act.

"That certain highway known as the county road and beginning on the boundary line between Shasta and Lassen Counties in the NE corner of T37N R6E and running and extending through T38N R6E, T38N R7E, T38N R8E, to the Modoc County Line...shall be designated and known as the Lassen State Highway"


1912

On August 7, 1912, Commission Chairman Burton Towne turned the first shovel of dirt on State Highway Contract No. 1, for a section of the coast route between South San Francisco and Burlingame. However, this was not the first ground breaking for a new state highway, which had occurred a month earlier 3 mi N of Wheatland for what would become US 99E.


1913

The following routes were defined in the 1913 statues (PDF, 94.7 MB):

Eventual LRN First Signage Other Signage Present Route (R) and Signage (S) Action Segment
California Redwood Park State Road
"An act to provide for the survey and construction of a state highway from Saratoga Gap, on the line between the counties of Santa Clara and Santa Cruz, to, into and within California Redwood Park..."
(June 13, 1913, Chapter 398)
LRN 42 CA 236   CA 236 Define CA 236: Governor's Camp in California Redwood Park to Route 9/Route 236 junction near Waterman Gap
CA 9: Route 236 near Waterman Gap to Sunnyvale

"for the survey and construction of a state highway from the point known as Saratoga Gap on the line between the counties of Santa Clara and Santa Cruz, extending thence by the practicable route in a generally SW-ly direction along the ridge between the San Lorenzo and Pescadero creeks to the present boundary of the California State Redwoods Park, thence into the California State Redwoods Park in Santa Cruz County to Governor's Camp, and thence through said park to the boundary thereof at Bloom's Mill."

CA 9   CA 9 Define
Bakersfield, Maricopa and Ventura Road
"An act declaring and establishing a state highway from the city of Bakersfield through a portion of the counties of Kern, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura to the city of San Buenaventura, designated and known as the Bakersfield, Maricopa and Ventura state highway."
(June 16, 1913, Chapter 610)
LRN 138 US 399   Route 33,
Route 119
Survey Only "A certain highway now partly constructed and partly in the course of construction by the several counties through which the same passes and running substantially along the following lines, courses, and distances: Commencing at a point on the proposed California state highway between Bakersfield and Los Angeles [LRN 4] thence following the present county road W 6 mi, then S 12 mi, thence W ½ mi, thence S ¾ mi, thence W 8 mi, thence SW 4 mi, thence W 5 mi to the town limits of the city of Maricopa, thence ... SW 13 miles to the W boundary of Kern County..., thence from a junction at the Kern Cty line with the proposed road as surveyed by Buffington ... for a distance of approx. 5 mi in the county of San Luis Obispo W about 1 mi through the lands of the Kern Cty Land Company and Cuyama Ranch, thence SW-ly 1½ mi, thence E-ly ¾ mi, thence SE-ly about 1 mi through the lands of the Santa Barbara Forest Reserve and of S.B. Miller, said line of proposed road ... following along the E-ly side of the Cuyama River and in the valley of said Cuyama river to the S border of SLO Cty. Thence from a junction point ... being in Sec. 11 T9N R25W SBM and running in a generally SE-ly direction, following the valley of the Cuyama river for a distance of 8.1 mi to a point in the E boundary of Santa Barbara Cty in Sec 17 T8N R24W SBM. Thence from ... the W boundary of Ventura Cty in the valley of the Cuyama River...beginning at a point in Sec 17 T8 R24W SBM approx. 1100 ft S of the N boundary of Sec 17, thence SE-ly along the NE bank of the Cuyama river a distance of 10 mi to a point near the center of Sec 19 T7N R23W on the S-ly bank of the Cuyama river thence E about ¾ mi to a point in the W half of Sec 20 T7N R23W, thence S through the W half of the W half of Sec 20 T7N R23W, and the W half of the W half of Sec 29 T7N R23W on the E side of Boulder Cyn, thence S on the W side of Boulder Cyn through the E half of the SE qtr of Sec 30 and the W half of Sec 32 T7N R23W, thence SW passing the great saddle rock to a point on the summit of Pine Mtn at the quarter corner between Sec 5 and 6, T6N R23W, thence S along the W side of Chorro Chiquito Cyn through Sec 6, 7, 8 and 18 T6N R23W to the valley of the Sespe River, thence crossing the Sespe River and S up the E side of Cherry Ck Cyn through Sec 19, 30, and 31 T6N R23W to the summit of Ortega Hill in Sec 31 T6N R23W, thence from the top of Ortega Hill and following along the Wheeler Ridge passing through the SW corner of Sec 32 T6N R23W, through the NE corner of Sec 1 T5N R24W, through the center of Sec 6 T5N R23W, to the SE corner of Sec 5 T6N R23W, thence S through Sections 8 and 9 T6N R23W, to a point near the ¼ corner on the S side of Sec 8 T5N R23W, to a point in the Matilja Rd near the Matilja Hot Springs in said Sec 29.... thence SE-ly with the Matilja and Meiners Rds ... to the town of Nordhoff ... thence S-ly with the San Antonio Crk Rd, the Nordhoff Rd, and the Ventura Avene to the N-ly limits of San Buenaventura."

Chapter repealed by 1935 Chapter 29, Article XX

Emigrant Gap
"An act to make an appropriation for changing the state road known as Emigrant Gap so as to eliminate the grade crossing over the railroad tracks near Summit Stn"
(June 16, 1913, Chapter 619)
LRN 37 US 40   US 40 Reroute "for making a change in the location of the Emigrant Gap state road so as to eliminate the grade crossing of said road over the railroad track near Summit Station provided that the Southern Pacific company shall contribute not less than $3,500 for the same purpose."
This is a minor rerouting of the highway

Chapter repealed by 1935 Chapter 29, Article XX


1914

In 1914, the function of Maintenance was added to the Division of Engineering, supported by funds made available by a 1913 legislative act requiring motor vehicle registration. Revenue generated by these fees were to be divided between the states and counties, making it possible to develop a systematic maintenance program.


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