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California Highways

Routes 185 through 192

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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

185 · 186 · 187 · 188 · 189 · 190 · 191 · 192


State Shield

State Route 185


Routing Routing

Rte 185(a) From Route 92 in Hayward to Route 77 in Oakland.

(b) The relinquished former portion of Route 185 within the City of Hayward and within the unincorporated area of the County of Alameda are not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 185, the City of Hayward and the County of Alameda shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 185 or to the state highway system, as applicable.

(c) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward or the County of Alameda all or any portion of Route 185 located within the city limits of that city, or within the unincorporated area of the County of Alameda, as applicable, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city or county enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur:

(A) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway.

(B) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) For relinquished portions of Route 185, the City of Hayward and the County of Alameda shall maintain signs within their respective jurisdictions directing motorists to the continuation of Route 185 or to the state highway system, as applicable.

(d) For purposes of this section:

(1) The jurisdiction of the City of Hayward shall refer to all relinquished portions of Route 185 within the City of Hayward.

(2) The jurisdiction of the County of Alameda shall refer to all relinquished portions of Route 185 in the unincorporated area of the County of Alameda.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "Hayward to High Street in Oakland."

In 1984, Chapter 409 clarified the routing: "Route 92 in Hayward to High Street Route 77 in Oakland."

In 2009, AB 1386 (Chapter 291, 10/11/2009) authorized the relinquishment of the portion within the city of Hayward by adding the following:

(b) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward the portion of Route 185 located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (A) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway. (B) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) For relinquished portions of Route 185, the City of Hayward shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction directing motorists to the continuation of Route 185 or to the state highway system, as applicable.

In July 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Hayward on Route 185 (Mission Boulevard) from Foothill Boulevard to A Street, under terms and conditions stated in the letter dated June 1, 2010, determined to be in the best interests of the State. Authorized by Chapter 291, Statutes of 2009, which amended Section 485 of the Streets and Highways Code.

In 2012, AB 2679 (Chapter 769, 9/29/12) updated the language to reflect the relinquishment in Hayward:

(b) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward the portion of Route 185 located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur:

(A) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway.

(B) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) (b) For relinquished portions The relinquished former portion of Route 185 within the City of Hayward is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 185, the City of Hayward shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 185 or to the state highway system, as applicable. applicable, and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 185, including any traffic signal progression.

In 2015, SB 491, Chapter 451, 10/2/15, removed the language about ensuring the continuity of traffic flow, and added item (c):

(c) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Hayward all or any portion of Route 185 located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur:

(A) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway.

(B) The portion of Route 185 relinquished shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) For relinquished portions of Route 185, the City of Hayward shall maintain signs within its jurisdiction directing motorists to the continuation of Route 185 or to the state highway system, as applicable.

In 2017, AB 333, Chapter 339, 9/28/2017 amended the text to add relinquishment in unincorporated areas of the county of Alameda. It also provided definitions for Hayward and Alameda. The CTC also relinquished right of way in the city of Hayward on Route 185 (Mission Boulevard) from “A” Street to the Hayward city limits at Rose Street (04-Ala-185-PM 0.4/0.9).

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 105, defined in 1933.

Route 185 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 185 between 1934 and 1964. It appears that portions of Route 185 are the older surface street routing for Route 17 (now I-880), combined with an older unsigned routing. The portion N of the junction with Route 61 in San Leandro (i.e., N of Estudillo) is former Route 17.

Status Status

Prior to 2008, Route 77 from the official terminus of Route 185 in Oakland and I-880 was signed as Route 185, making it appear that Route 185 continues to I-880. This was corrected by 2008.

In October 2017, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Hayward on Route 185 (Mission Boulevard) from “A” Street to the Hayward city limits at Rose Street (04-Ala-185-PM 0.4/0.9), under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated August 29, 2017, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 451, Statutes of 2015, which amended Section 485 of the Streets and Highways Code.

Naming Naming

E 14th Street and Mission Blvd.

Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 185:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 60] near Laguna Beach to [LRN 2] near Irvine" to the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 185 with that definition. The definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering.

This route ran from Route 1 near Laguna Beach to US 101 near Irvine. This is Route 133 as defined in 1963 (i.e., present-day non-toll portions).


State Shield

State Route 186


Routing Routing

Rte 186From the international boundary near Algodones to Route 8.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 186 was defined as "Route 1 near Pacifica to Route 101 near San Bruno."

In 1965, Chapter 1372 added the portion from Route 101 to Route 87: "Route 1 near Pacifica to Route 87 via the vicinity of Route 101 near San Bruno."

In 1969, Chapter 294 renumbered this route as Route 380.

State Shield In 1972, Chapter 742 redefined the route as "From the international boundary near Algodones to Route 8. " Chapter 1216 in 1962 did the same thing; in 1990, Chapter 216 removed the duplicate definition.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1969 routing of this route was LRN 229, defined in 1947.

The post-1972 routing of Route 186 was not defined in 1963.

Route 186 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 186 between 1934 and 1964.

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Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 186:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 23] near Palmdale to Swartout Valley" as a state highway. This was codified in the highway code as LRN 186 with the definition "[LRN 23] near Palmdale to [LRN 61] in Swartout Valley", but the routing was repealed later that year by Chapter 426. This occurred as part of a compromise to create the Arroyo Seco Parkway. The following is a quote from the Historical American Engineering Record on the Arroyo Seco Parkway:

Because gas tax funds were going to be needed to build the road, another formidable political force joined the alternately strident, persuasive, and aggrieved stakeholders: the State Highway Commissioners. Unless the Arroyo Seco Parkway could qualify as a state highway, it would not receive the tax funds that would maintain it. As guardians of the 1 ╝ cent highway gas tax fund doled out to counties and cities, however, the commissioners opposed adding any more mileage to the state highway system.

To solve the problem, Los Angeles County Supervisor Roger Jessup offered a swap: the county would take back ten to fifteen miles of the Pear Blossom Highway, which ran from Palmdale to Cajon Pass at the northeastern edge of Los Angeles County, allowing that mileage to be granted to the Arroyo Seco Parkway. The State Highway Commission balked at this idea, requiring the county to assume control of the entire thirty-four miles of the Pear Blossom Highway. To keep the scheme alive, the county agreed to this.

Miller amended her bill by inserting a provision that effectively removed the Pear Blossom Highway from the state system. The coalition of South Pasadena and Highland Park residents who supported the parks for which they had been assessed, led by Thrasher, sought an amendment to return previously levied park assessment funds in the Arroyo Seco to the cities losing the land to highway right-of-way. This amendment was defeated. Assembly Bill 2345 authorizing the Arroyo Seco Parkway passed the state assembly and senate by a large margin, and Governor Frank Merriam signed it into law on July 13, 1935. The bill did not specify the exact route.

It does not appear that the LRN 186 definition of the Pear Blossom Highway was signed as Route 138.

LRN 186 was redefined in 1959 by Chapter 1062 as the route from LRN 194 (Route 79) to LRN 19 (US 60) near Moreno. This was a transfer from LRN 194. This is the former routing of present-day Route 79 along Gilman Springs Road (the present routing is Lamb Canyon).


State Shield

State Route 187


Routing Routing

Rte 187(a) From Lincoln Boulevard to Route 10 via Venice Boulevard.

(b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interest of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Los Angeles Route 187 within the city between the route’s western terminus at Lincoln Boulevard (approximately postmile 3.5) and its eastern terminus at Cadillac Avenue near Route 10 (approximately postmile 8.9), if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

(1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, Route 187 shall cease to be a state highway.

(3) Route 187, as relinquished under this subdivision, shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

SB 177, Chapter 106, 1988 contains special legislation to improve the traversable route.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

163 in Santa MonicaIn 1963, Route 187 was defined as the route "Route 1 at a point near Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica to Route 10 via Pacific Avenue and Venice Boulevard; provided that prior to the construction of any portion of this highway the City of Los Angeles shall furnish to the State of California without charge all right-of-way necessary for that portion and the City of Los Angeles and the County of Los Angeles shall enter into a co-operative agreement with the department wherein said city and county agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction."

Note that the grade separation here is part of the eastern-most portion of the Santa Monica pier.

In 1988, Chapter 106 deleted the Santa Monica portion of the route, retaining the conditions: "Route 1 at a point near Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica the South city limits of Santa Monica near Dewey Street to Route 10 via Pacific Avenue and Venice Boulevard; providedů"

In 1994, AB 3132, Chapter 1220 deleted the portion from the South city limits of the City of Santa Monica to Lincoln Boulevard, changing the origin to "Lincoln Boulevard". It is unclear why they did not identify Lincoln Boulevard as Route 1.

Note that the bridge log shows a junction with Route 1 at the McClure Tunnel. This dates back to the original 1964 definition of the route, and represents that Santa Monica Pier bridge.

In 2015, AB 810 (Chapter 561, 10/07/15) authorized relinquishment of a specified portion of Route 187 to the City of Los Angeles by adding:

(b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interest of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Los Angeles Route 187 within the city between the route’s western terminus at Lincoln Boulevard (approximately postmile 3.5) and its eastern terminus at Cadillac Avenue near Route 10 (approximately postmile 8.9), if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

(1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, Route 187 shall cease to be a state highway.

(3) Route 187, as relinquished under this subdivision, shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

AB 810 (Chapter 561, 10/07/15) also deleted the special words regarding construction restrictions:

Note that, with respect to this routing, prior to the construction of any portion of this highway, the City of Los Angeles shall furnish to the State of California without charge all right-of-way necessary for that portion and the City of Los Angeles and the County of Los Angeles shall enter into a cooperative agreement with the department wherein the city and the county agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction. The title to that portion of the right-of-way acquired by the City of Los Angeles, and furnished to the State of California, for Route 187, but not needed for that route upon its construction, has been to the city.

In October 2016, the CTC authorized relinquishment of the right of way in the city of Los Angeles on Route 187 (Venice Boulevard) from Route 1 (Lincoln Boulevard) to Route 10 (Santa Monica Freeway/Cadillac Avenue), under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated September 1, 2016, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 561, Statutes of 2015, which amended Section 487 of the Streets and Highways Code. Furthermore, the CTC authorized 14,500,000 to be allocated from the Budget Act of 2016, Budget Act Item 2660-302-0042, to provide funds for relinquishment in lieu of rehabilitating the pavement with a Capital Preventative Maintenance pavement project. The construction capital for this project is currently programmed in the 2014 SHOPP for $10,500,000 as a Capital Preventive Maintenance pavement project. This allocation request of $14,500,000 is an increase of 38.1 percent above the programmed amount. The Department and the City of Los Angeles entered into a relinquishment agreement, under Resolution R-3958 to relinquish Route 187 to the City of Los Angeles, in lieu of implementing the programmed Capital Preventive Maintenance pavement project. The City of Los Angeles estimated the value of relinquishment of the facility as $21,500,000. The Department in negotiations with the City of Los Angeles mutually agreed upon with the amount of $14,500,000 for the relinquishment. The Department has concluded that relinquishing Route 187 to the City of Los Angeles is in the best interest of the State. The City of Los Angeles will assume full maintenance ownership responsibility, control and liability in perpetuity over the relinquished facilities.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This route corresponds to the 1961 definition of LRN 163, defined in 1933. It was not signed until 1988. Route 187 was not included in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

Naming Naming

Maps based on the 1956 freeway plan show this route as the "Venice Freeway". It was named after the community of Venica, CA, founded by Abbot Kinney in 1904 as part of his Ocean Park tract, envisioning it as an imitation of Venice, Italy.

Status Status

Unsigned Not completely signed.

Santa Monica Pier

In December 2013, it was reported that the Santa Monica City Council was looking closely at the impact some of the plans to replace the “structurally deficient” concrete bridge, which connects Colorado Avenue to the historic Santa Monica Pier. There was particular concern that the new bridge allow people of all abilities equal access to the Santa Monica Pier. The future of the Pier Bridge, built in 1939 by the California Department of Highways, has been a topic of discussion for nearly 20 years in Santa Monica. Prior to August 2010, the plan was to rehabilitate the bridge; the decision to replace was made in August 2010. In a 2010 survey, the bridge received a 30.6 sufficiency rating on a 100-point scale. Caltrans says it has inadequate seismic strength, crumbling concrete and cracks in the deck. Also, the sidewalks are too narrow and it has steep curbs and substandard lane widths. The replacement project is eligible for nearly 90 percent federal funding. In the next step, City planners will move forward with environmental impact studies required by both State and national law, a process they said can last from 18 to 24 months.

In January 2018, it was reported that the Santa Monica City Council and Caltrans were holding meetings to discuss the replacement of the Santa Monica Pier bridge. The more than $8 million project comes after the California Department of Transportation deemed the bridge “structurally deficient” and “functionally obsolete.” The City had planned to rehabilitate the the bridge built in 1939, but decided in August 2012 to rebuild the structure after Caltrans said rehabilitation would not be cost-effective and did not qualify for federal funding. The Pier Bridge Replacement Project approved by the Council is eligible for nearly 90 percent federal funding. The project will replace the structure -- which received a 30.6 sufficiency rating on a 100-point scale from Caltrans -- with either a single bridge or two separate bridges. The Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment (EIR/EA) for the proposed project explores the three following options:

To make the current bridge safer, in 2013 the City added a designated walkway that separates pedestrians from bike and vehicle traffic as part of $150,000 in improvements.
(Source: SM Lookout, 1/2/2018)

Later in January, it was reported that City of Santa Monica staff have recommended replacing the current 1939 pier bridge with two separate bridges: one for automobiles, and one for pedestrians and bikes. A new 40-foot bridge would connect pedestrians and bikers to the pier from Colorado Avenue. Emergency vehicles and delivery trucks may use the span during off-peak hours. A lower, second bridge would allow cars to access pier parking from Moss Avenue. The bridge would be span 150 feet over Ocean Front Walk where restaurants currently are located, with two vehicle lanes separated by barriers. The construction would be done in stages, so that the pier would always be accessible. All options would either construct an elevator for handicapped visitors, or a separate ADA walkway cantilevered from the side of the bridge.
(Source: SM Observer, 1/5/2018)

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 187:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the following routes to the highway system:

In 1935, these routes were added to the highway code with the following routing:

  1. [LRN 26] near Whitewater to Morongo Valley
  2. [LRN 26] near Whitewater to [LRN 64] near Indian Wells
  3. [LRN 26] near Indio via Mecca and the north shore of the Salton Sea to [LRN 26] near Brawley
  4. [LRN 26] near Brawley to [LRN 27] near Holtville
  5. [LRN 27] near Holtville to [LRN 202] near Bonds Corner

In 1959, Chapter 1062 extended segment a to "[LRN 43] near Lucern Valley via Monongo Valley", and corrected the spelling of White Water.

Signage on this route was as follows:

  1. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near White Water to LRN 43 (Route 18) near Lucerne Valley via Morongo Valley.

    This is present-day Route 62 to Yucca Valley, and Route 247 to Lucerne Valley.

  2. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near White Water to LRN 64 (US 60/US 70; present-day I-10) near Palm Desert.

    This is Route 111.

  3. LRN 26 (US 60/US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near Brawley to LRN 27 (US 80; present-day I-8) near Holtville.

    This is Route 111 to Brawley, and Route 115 to Holtville.

  4. LRN 27 (US 80; present-day I-8) near Holtville to LRN 202 near Bonds Corners.

    This was Route 115 until 1973.


State Shield

State Route 188


Routing Routing

Rte 188From the international boundary near Tecate to Route 94.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 188 was defined as "the south end of Fallen Leaf Lake to Route 89 near Camp Richardson." This was Fallen Leaf Road near Lake Tahoe. Few realized it was even in the state highway system. In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this routing.

State Shield In 1972, Chapter 1216 defined the current routing.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 routing for this route was LRN 94, defined in 1933.

The 1972 routing for Route 188 was not defined in 1963.

Route 188 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 188 between 1934 and 1964.

Status Status

Truck ScalesThere are plans to build truck scales near Tecate. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The project includes Corridor Border Infrastructure (CBI) funds and Federal Motorcarrier funds. The total estimated project cost is $23,870,000. The project is programmed in the 2006 SHOPP for state-only matching funds for $8,927,000.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 188:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 43] near Mr. Anderson to the Cajon Pass-Lake Arrowhead Road". In 1935, this was added to the highway code with the routing:

"[LRN 43] near Mr. Anderson to [LRN 59]"

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 great renumbering. It ran from Route 18 near Mt. Anderson to the present-day Route 138/Route 173 junction. This is signed as Route 138.


State Shield

State Route 189


Routing Routing

Rte 189From Route 18 near Strawberry Peak to Route 173 near Lake Arrowhead via Strawberry Flat.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963 (hell, 1933!)

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

The current route has the same number as the pre-1963 LRN. LRN 189 was defined in 1933. However, Route 189 was not included in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

Other WWW Links Other WWW Links

Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 189:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "[LRN 43] near Strawberry Peak via Strawberry Flat to the Cajon Pass-Lake Arrowhead Road near Lake Arrowhead" was added to the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 189 with the routing:

"[LRN 43] near Strawberry Peak via Strawberry Flat to [LRN 59] near Lake Arrowhead"

This definition remained the same until 1963, and modulo route number changes, is still the routing for Route 189.


State Shield

State Route 190


Routing Routing

Rte 190From Route 99 near Tipton to Route 127 near Death Valley Junction via the vicinity of Porterville, Camp Nelson, Olancha, and Death Valley.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963. The 47 mi of this route between Quaking Aspen to Haiwee Pass, was adopted in late 1965. This is the segment over the Sierras, from Quaking Aspen Campground to near US 395 near Haiwee Cyn Road. It has never been constructed. The remainer of this route (from Route 99 to Quaking Aspen Campground, and from US 395 near Haiwee Cyn Road to Route 127 near Death Valley Junction is conventional highway.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 190 was signed along the route from Jct. US 99 at Tipton to Death Valley Junction via Lone Pine. This route was LRN 127, defined in 1933.

Status Status

In June 2017, the CTC approved the following SHOPP allocation: Tulare 06-Tul-190 0.0/8.0 $16,900,000 Route 190: Tulare County, from west of Route 99/Route 190 Separation to west of Road 184. Outcome/Output: Rehabilitate deteriorating pavement and realign new traveled way and shoulders to meet current standards. The project is necessary to improve safety and ride quality. Future consideration of funding approved under Resolution E-13-61; August 2013.

Route 190/Road 152 Roundabout E of Tipton (~ TUL 4.465)

SR 190 RoundaboutCaltrans is exploring creating a roundabout on this route at the intersection of Route 190/Road 152 (Bliss Lane) east of Tipton. Other potential/planned roundabout locations in the San Joaquin Valley include Route 145/Jensen near Kerman, Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather, Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran, Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 155/Browning Road in Delano. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

In December 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a roundabout at the intersection of Route 190 (Avenue 144) and Road 152 (Bliss Lane, Tulare CR J15). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $6,333,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

In August 2016, the CTC approved $3,290,000 in funding for Route 190 near Tipton, from 0.4 mile west of Road 152 to 0.7 mile west of Road 160. Outcome/Output: Construct roundabout, sidewalk, curb and gutter and reconstruct 1.0 mile of Route 190 and 0.5 mile of Road 152 to increase safety and reduce the number and severity of collisions.

In May 2017, it was reported that work was expected to begin this month on the second roundabout on Route 190. That roundabout will be constructed at Route 190 and Road 152 and work on that $2.2 million project will take about four to six months and preclude improvements to the highway all the way to Route 99. It was at that busy rural intersection which three people died in a horrific crash on Aug. 2, 2011. Two of those killed were teenagers in a Tulare County probation van, while the third was the driver of a large pickup which apparently ran the stop sign and drove into the path of the van which was eastbound on Route 190.
(Source: Recorder Online, 5/8/2017)

Prospect Street to Porterville Improvements (~ TUL R14.956 to TUL 19.063)

In October 2016, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Tulare County that will construct median barriers on Route 190 in the city of Porterville (between South Prospect Street and the Eastern Porterville City Limits). The project is programmed in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total programmed amount is $7,023,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

In May 2017, it was reported that the Prospect-Porterville was about to start. This project will complete the improvements made from Porterville to just past Poplar. Those improvements include the installation of turn lanes, shoulder widening and new pavement. That project is scheduled to begin in August or September 2017 and is expected to take more than a year and cost around $21 million.
(Source: Recorder Online, 5/8/2017)

Route 190/Road 284 Roundabout (~ TUL 21.09)

In May 2012, it was reported that Caltrans was holding meetings on the intersection of Route 190 and Road 284. Two build alternatives and a no-build alternative are under consideration. The alternatives include a single-lane rural roundabout or a traffic signal with a protected left turn.

In April 2017, there was an update on the Route 190/Road 284 roundabout. The intersection is located in unincorporated Tulare County, just east of the city of Porterville and the unincorporated community of East Porterville. Route 190 is a two-lane road. Before the roundabout was installed the intersection had been controlled by stop signs on Road 284; traffic on Route 190 did not stop. About twelve miles east of the intersection, along Road 284, is the Eagle Mountain Casino. The roundabout intersection is where casino patrons (some of whom may be inebriated or otherwise impaired) make a left turn from a small road onto the bigger road to get to Porterville, the nearby good-sized city (population 55,000). Before the roundabout was installed, drivers turning from Road 284 onto Route 190 stopped, then turned left to enter uncontrolled highway traffic moving at high speeds. According to Caltran’s environmental studies for the roundabout, the intersection was indeed deadly. From 2007 to 2010 there were eleven collisions reported: “six broadside-type collisions, two head-on, one hit object, one rear-end, and one overturn.” Caltrans found that crashes, happening at a rate that was “higher than the statewide average for similarly designed intersections,” were caused by “drivers either failing to slow down or not stopping at the . . . intersection.” Caltrans studied two alternatives: a roundabout, for an estimated $1.7 million, and a signalized intersection that would cost about $2.1 million. The roundabout was the preferred alternative due to “greatest project benefits in regard to safety.” Caltrans District 6 Information Officer Christian Lukens reported that the actual roundabout ended up costing more than the initial estimate because aesthetic features were added, as was an extended truck apron in the central island to accommodate oversize loads. During the planning phase, in response to community input, Caltrans adjusted the design, especially working with the locals to ensure the facility would handle the occasional oversized truck. The new facility opened to the driving public on February 21, 2017.
(Source: Streetsblog, 4/20/2017)

In January 2012, the CTC approved $5.75 million for an asphalt-overlay project on Route 190 in Tulare County near Lake Success. The upgrade from Road 284 to the Tule River Bridge will improve pavement quality and increase service life.

Unconstructed Unconstructed from Quaking Aspen to Route 395 on a route adopted 10/20/1965. Portions of the route were adopted as a conventional highway on 4/15/1964. Rescinding the route was recommended on 6/25/1982, but nothing ever happened. District 9 recommends deletion of the route.

One 1953 map shows the routing between Wonoga Peak and Lone Pine as what is now Horseshoe Meadows Road, Tuttle Creek Road, and Whitney Portal Road. The map implies that the Route 136 routing was used, but doesn't make it explicit. According to the Traversable Highways report, there are no local roads that adequately fit the description of a traversable highway. This is mountainous terrain. There are no plans to construct this.

Olancha Bypass (approx 395 INY 34.215) (approx 190 INY 9.925)

Olancha WideningIn 2007, the CTC did not recommend funding construction of the Olancha and Cartago Expressway ($107,600K total cost; $59,000K requested) from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). However, the minutes from the 11/08 meeting of the Inyo County Local Transportation Commission discussed the five options for US 395's realignment (either expansion or a movement west). The main problem is the proximity of the LA Aqueduct.

In February 2016, it was reported that discussions of the Olancha Bypass continue. The Caltrans preferred alternative is a bypass of the community that has Olancha residents in an uproar. Although the bypass alternative seems to be the much safer option, Olancha residents don't want to lose the business highway traffic brings into the already struggling town. Olancha residents claim the bypass alternative is unfair because the other towns on the US 395 corridor in Inyo country (Bishop, Big Pine, Independence, Lone Pine) got to keep the highway running through town. If the bypass alternative is chosen the current alignment will be turned into a combination of a local road and an extension of Route 190, a major state route taking year round visitors to Death Valley National Park. The bypass routing would be to the west, close to the base of the Sierras, which would give travelers a beautiful view. The extension of Route 190 would be to the south, through Olancha, terminating at an intersection with the newly aligned US 395.
(Source: Inyomono395 @ AAroad, February 2016)

In August 2017, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding 09-Iny-395 PM 29.2/41.8 Olancha/Cartago Four-Lane Project: This project in Inyo County will construct two new lanes (one new lane in each direction) on a portion US 395 near the town of Olancha. The project will increase safety and the Level of Service. The project is not fully funded. The project will be funded from State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funds and is currently programmed in the 2016 STIP for an estimated $16.6 million Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2020-21. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 STIP. A copy of the FEIR has been provided to Commission staff. Resources that may be impacted by the project include community impacts, noise, water quality, air quality, cultural resources, paleontological resources, hazardous waste, aesthetics, and biological resources. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance. As a result, an FEIR was prepared for the project. Note that this appears to be distinct from the once-proposed Olancha Bypass.

395 Olancha BypassIn January 2018, the CTC approved a request from the California Department of Transportation’s (Department) to adopt US 395 in Inyo County from INY 29.9 to INY 41.9 as a controlled access highway, redesignate a segment of superseded US 395 as Route 190 and, upon construction completion of the new controlled access highway, relinquish the remaining portion of the superseded US 395 to Inyo County. The Department proposes to adopt this 12.14 mile section of US 395 to construct a new expressway within the adoption limits, which will improve safety for the traveling public, raise the level of service, and provide a continuous four-lane facility in Inyo County. A final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment (EIR/EA) prepared pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act and the National Environmental Policy Act was approved by the Department on March 7, 2017 and by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on May 26, 2017. The Department approved a project report on June 27, 2017 recommending construction of the new US 395 expressway on a new alignment and redesignation of a portion of the superseded segment as Route 190. The remaining portion of the superseded highway will be relinquished to Inyo County after project construction completion.

Within the proposed adoption limits, U.S. Highway 395 is currently a two-lane undivided conventional highway. It traverses gently sloping terrain at elevations between 3,600 and 3,900 feet as it passes through the communities of Olancha and Cartago. Olancha is sparsely developed with a few businesses, a post office, and one service station. Cartago is located about three miles north of Olancha and is primarily a residential community. There are a few businesses and residences adjacent to the highway, but in general, the highway corridor is rural in nature. This project will connect the four-lane divided expressway segments at both ends of the adoption limits.

The existing highway generally consists of two 12-foot lanes and 8-foot paved shoulders within 100 feet of right of way. There are no shoulder improvements such as curb, gutter or sidewalk throughout this section of the highway. There is no median and approximately 50 percent of the highway is barrier striped to prevent passing. There are undivided passing lanes for both northbound and southbound traffic north of Cartago. The posted speed limits vary from 65 mph outside of the communities to 55 mph within the communities. In addition to the intersection with Route 190, there are six other public road connections and numerous other private roads and access points to the existing highway within the project limits.

Due to the numerous access points and limited sight distances along US 395, passing zones are limited. There is also a mixture of slower recreational and commercial vehicles, local residential and business traffic, and faster through traffic. The limited passing opportunities and mixed traffic has led to queuing within the communities, driver frustration, and frequent unsafe passing maneuvers. In 2006, shoulders were widened and the posted speed limit reduced within the communities, but the fatal accident rate remained at 1.29 times the statewide average. This section of highway is currently operating at Level of Service (LOS) D and is projected to fall to LOS E within the 20-year planning period.

The proposed route adoption will allow the Department to construct the expressway on a new alignment. It will eliminate traffic congestion and significantly increase safety for the traveling public by separating opposing traffic, removing passing restrictions, and controlling access points. Finally, the new expressway will provide route continuity on US 395 and will complete the construction of four-lanes throughout the US 395 corridor in Inyo County.

A draft project report was approved in September 2010 to evaluate five alternatives. Their environmental impacts were evaluated in an Initial Study/Environmental Assessment circulated end of 2010. Focused studies performed for the preferred alternative determined that mitigation of cultural impacts to insignificant levels may not be possible. As a result, the environmental document was elevated to a Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment (EIR/EA) which allowed the Department to discuss the potential cultural impacts and evaluate the preferred alternative. The Draft EIR/EA was circulated from August to October 2015, after which the preferred alternative was selected.

The portion of the existing highway between the intersection with Route 190 and the southern intersection with the new expressway is proposed to be redesignated as Route 190. A concurrent Commission’s action to approve the redesignation of this portion of US 395 as Route 190 is on the January 2018 Commission agenda. This action will reestablish the terminus of Route 190 at US 395. The remaining portion of the superseded highway between the intersection with Route 190 and north of the community of Cartago will be relinquished to Inyo County after project completion. The superseded highway will continue to provide a local route that preserves the existing uses and access along the existing corridor. The project will also construct or reconstruct a couple other county roads, all of which will be relinquished to Inyo County.

This project has been jointly funded by the Inyo County Local Transportation Commission, Mono County Local Transportation Commission, Kern Council of Governments, and the Interregional Improvement Program. Due to shortfalls in the programming available for the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), the Construction Capital and Construction Support components were deprogrammed. Funding for the Construction Capital and Construction Support components have been restored in the proposed 2018 STIP. The estimated total cost of the project, including construction and right of way costs escalated to the year of construction, is $138,819,000. The project is scheduled to start construction in September 2020.The Department and Inyo County have agreed with the public road openings proposed for the new expressway and intend to execute a Controlled Access Highway Agreement following the Commission’s approval of this route adoption. Currently, the Department and Inyo County are negotiating the terms of the relinquishment agreement. Inyo County has agreed in principle to accept the relinquishment of the facilities.
(Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.3a(1))

Panamint RealingmentIn June 2017, the CTC authorized for future consideration of funding a project that realigns approximately 0.6 mile of Route 190 (09-Iny-190, PM 69.2/69.8) within Death Valley National Park near Towne Pass near the town of Panamint Springs in Inyo County. The project will be funded from State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) funds and is programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for an estimated $6.7 million construction (capital and support) and Right of Way (capital and support). Construction is tentatively scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will result in less than significant impacts to the environment after mitigation. The following resource areas may be impacted by the project: cultural resources and visual/aesthetics. Avoidance and minimization measures will reduce any potential effects on the environment. These measures include, but are not limited to, disturbed areas will be recontoured and revegetated, and a historic context shall be developed for future use in evaluation of the Eichbaum Toll Road. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

In April 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on Route 190, in Inyo County, 09-INY-190 R65.9/R66.5 Near Panamint Springs, from 8.0 miles east of Panamint Valley Road to 10 miles west of Wildrose Road. $1,018,000 to realign roadway to allow the construction of a shoulder catchment area for falling rocks and minimize the potential of traffic collisions.

Scenic Route Scenic Route

[SHC 263.7] From Route 65 near Porterville to Route 127 near Death Valley Junction.

Freeway Freeway

[SHC 253.7] From Route 136 near Keeler to Route 127 near Death Valley Junction (never upgraded). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Interregional Route Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Between Route 65 and Route 127.

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Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 190:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

1944 MapIn 1933, Chapter 767 added the routes from "[LRN 9] near San Dimas to [LRN 26] near Redlands via Highland Avenue" and "[LRN 26] near Redlands to [LRN 43] near Big Bear Lake via Barton Flats" to the highway system. In 1935, these were added to the highway code as LRN 190, with the route:

  1. [LRN 9] near San Dimas to [LRN 26] near Redlands via Highland Avenue
  2. [LRN 26] near Redlands to [LRN 43] near Big Bear Lake via Barton Flats

The map to the right shows LRN 190 (Route 30) to its junction with LRN 207. This is where the route turned into Route 38.

In 1957, Chapter 1911 deleted the specific routing via Highland Avenue from segment (a).

This route was signed as follows:

  1. LRN 9 (US 66; I-210) near San Dimas to LRN 26 (US 70/US 99; present-day I-10) near Redlands.

    This was Route 30 between Route 57 and I-10; it is present day Route 210. It originally ran along Highland Avenue

  2. LRN 26 near Redlands to LRN 43 near Big Bear Lake, via Barton Flats.

    This is present-day Route 38.

LRN 190 included Orange Ave. in Redlands; the main line turned left on Lugonia along what became Route 38; the several blocks south from there on Orange was a LRN 190 spur connecting to, originally the Redlands Blvd. alignment of US 70/US 99 and later cut back a couple of blocks to I-10. The route was always legislatively defined as going to Big Bear, but that extension didn't come about until 1962, when the highway, essentially the "back way" up to Big Bear, was finally completed and signed as Route 38, including the short section into central Redlands. The original Lugonia segment was state-maintained up to a few miles west of Forest Falls; the newer construction turned north and east from there to ascend the mountain. So about 30 years passed between the designations of Route 30 and Route 38.
(Source: Sparker at AAroads, 7/1/2016)


State Shield

State Route 191


Routing Routing

Rte 191From Route 70 near Wicks Corner to Paradise.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from 1963.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 295, defined in 1961. It was unsigned before 1963.

Route 191 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 191 between 1934 and 1964.

Status Status

Route 191 Realignment Project: Taming the Curves (03-But-191, PM 6.8/8.6)

In August 2015, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Butte County that will realign curves and widen shoulders on Route 191 near the town of Paradise. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $29,250,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

In June 2018, it was reported that this project was honored in the 11th annual America’s Transportation Awards. Sponsored by AASHTO, Socrata, AAA and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the 11th annual America’s Transportation Awards competition recognizes transportation projects in three categories: Quality of Life/Community Development, Best Use of Technology and Innovation and Operations Excellence. California DOT (Caltrans) won in the large category (projects costing more than $200 million) for its Route 91 Corridor Improvement project, and in the Best Use of Technology and Innovation category for Caltrans' Route 1/Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge Replacement. Caltrans also won and award in the medium Operations Excellence category for the Route 191 Realignment Project: Taming the Curves.
(Source: For Construction Pros, 6/13/2018)

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Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 191:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

1944 mapIn 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 31] near Verdemont to Highland Avenue, San Bernardino, via Little Mountain" as part of the highway system. This route was added to the highway code as LRN 191 with the routing:

"[LRN 31] near Verdemont to [LRN 190] in San Bernardino, via Little Mountain"

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This was Route 206.


State Shield

State Route 192


Routing Routing

Rte 192From Route 154 near Santa Barbara to Route 150 near the Ventura-Santa Barbara county line via Foothill Boulevard.

Post 1964 Signage History Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

Pre 1964 Signage History Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was originally part of Route 150, which was signed in 1934. It was renumbered to Route 192 in 1963. The route was LRN 80, defined in 1931. Route 192 was not defined as part of the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

Status Status

2018 Montecito Mudslide Repairs

In January 2018, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the following project for which a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed: Route 192 (05-SB-192, PM 15.4/15.6) in Santa Barbara County. Replace existing bridge on Route 192 near the city of Carpinteria. (PPNO 0335). The project is located northwest of the city of Carpinteria in Santa Barbara County. The project proposes to replace the Arroyo Parida Creek Bridge, also known as the Arroyo Paredon Creek Bridge (Bridge No. 51-0113) on SR 192. The project will replace the current bridge with reinforced concrete slab, concrete bridge rail, wider lanes and shoulders, correct alignment, upgraded culvert crossings, and construct a retaining wall. The project is fully funded and programmed in the 2016 SHOPP for an estimated total $15 million which includes Construction (capital and support) and Right-of-Way (capital and support). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2016 SHOPP.
(Source: CTC Agenda, January 2018, Agenda Item 2.2c(1))

In February 2018, it was reported that there will be long-term closures for several bridges and one-way traffic control for others that were damaged in the Jan. 9, 2018 mudslides and debris flows. There are three Route 192/East Valley Road bridges that will be completely replaced, so they are closed to through traffic (except emergency and utility vehicles) until further notice. They include the Montecito Creek bridge at East Valley Road near Parra Grande Lane; the Romero Creek bridge at East Valley Road near Ortega Ridge Road; and the Toro Canyon bridge near Toro Canyon Road. The long-term plan is to completely close each bridge with barricades and locked gates, according to Caltrans. Other bridges have one-way traffic control with stop signs, including the San Ysidro Creek bridge at East Valley and Randall roads; Toro Creek (near Ladera Lane); and Arroyo Parida Creek near Carpinteria. The Arroyo Parida crossing has had one-way traffic control for a while, and was already slated to be replaced. There are temporary bridge guardrails on the San Ysidro and Toro creek bridges, according to Caltrans, since railings were knocked away by the force of the rocks, mud and debris during the storm. Santa Barbara County has two damaged bridges – one is gone, and one is closed – and a destroyed creek crossing on East Mountain Drive. The bridge on East Mountain Drive near San Ysidro Ranch is completely gone, and the Ashley Road bridge is closed after being severely damaged in the storm.
(Source: SB Noozhawk, 1/29/2018)

In Mid-February 2018, there was an update on the Route 192 bridges. Route 192 is closed between Sycamore Canyon/Camino Viejo Road near Santa Barbara and Cravens Lane near Carpinteria, and four bridges along the highway were heavily damaged in the storm. Caltrans contracted with Security Paving Company, of Sylmar, to rebuild the Montecito Creek, Romero Creek and Toro Canyon bridges for $20 million. The damaged Arroyo Parida Creek bridge, which was already scheduled to be replaced, will also be demolished and rebuilt. The four bridges will be closed to all vehicles (except emergency and utility vehicles) with barricades and locked gates, for several months, and then demolished, Caltrans said. There is no timeline yet for how long it will take to design and rebuild the bridges according to a Caltrans District 5 spokescritter.
(Source: SB Noozhawk, 2/12/2018)

In May 2018, it was reported that Caltrans is continuing with plans to rebuild and repair six bridges along Route 192 following debris flows and flooding in the Montecito area. This major construction effort will include rebuilding Montecito Creek (PM 8.12), Romero Canyon Creek (PM 10.92), Toro Canyon (PM 12.49) and the Arroyo Paredon Creek (PM 15.50) bridges. The demolition of these bridges will begin Monday, May 7 and continue through early June. Caltrans will begin with removal of the Toro Canyon Bridge, followed by Romero Canyon Creek, Arroyo Paredon and Montecito Creek Bridges. Caltrans is nearing completion on the design of the new bridges and is moving toward construction at an accelerated pace. The demolition process follows the completion of the relocation and repair of utility lines by Southern California Edison and the Southern California Gas Companies. Caltrans will also demolish the bridge rails on the San Ysidro Creek (PM 9.6) and Toro Creek (PM 12.14) bridges this June. Both of these bridges remain open under one-way traffic control via stop and yield signs which will remain in place until these repairs are complete.
(Source: Edhat Santa Barbara, 5/4/2018)

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Statistics Statistics

Overall statistics for Route 192:

Pre-1964 Legislative Route Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 77] via Euclid Avenue to Highland Avenue in Upland" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 192, with the routing:

"[LRN 77] via Euclid Avenue to [LRN 190] in Upland"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 relaxed the routing: "[LRN 77] via Euclid Avenue to [LRN 190] in Upland"

This route ran from Route 71 to Route 30 (I-210) near Upland. This is present-day Route 83.


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