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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


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State Shield

State Route 1



Routing
  1. (a) Route 5 south of San Juan Capistrano to Route 101 near El Rio except for the portion of Route 1 relinquished:

    (1) Within the city limits of the City of Dana Point between the western edge of the San Juan Creek Bridge and Eastline Road at the city limits of the City of Laguna Beach.

    (2) Within the city limits of the City of Newport Beach between Jamboree Road and Newport Coast Drive.

    (3) Within the city limits of the City of Santa Monica between the southern city limits and Route 10.

    (g) The relinquished former portions of Route 1 within the Cities of Dana Point, Newport Beach, and Santa Monica are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For those relinquished former portions of Route 1, the Cities of Dana Point, Newport Beach, and Santa Monica shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1. The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 1 within its jurisdiction, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (h) The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Pleasant Valley Road and Route 101, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

    (1) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 1 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

    (3) For portions of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Oxnard shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    Change Notes:

    In 2001, AB 635, Chapter 757, 10/11/2001 authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of Dana Point and is between the western edge of the San Juan Creek channel overcrossing and the city limits of the City of Laguna Beach to the City of Dana Point. It was up for relinquishement in January 2005... and again in July 2005.

    In 2008, AB 1366, Chapter 717, 9/30/2008 authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 located within the city limits of that city and between Pleasant Valley Road and US 101, as well as reauthorizing the Dana Point relinquishment:

    (g) (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Dana Point, the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between the western edge of the San Juan Creek channel overcrossing and the city limits of the City of Laguna Beach, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 1 so relinquished shall cease to be a state highway. (4) For portions of Route 1 that are relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Dana Point shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    (h) The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Pleasant Valley Road and Route 101, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (1) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 1 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (3) For portions of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Oxnard shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    Note: In March 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of the item (h) right of way in the city of Oxnard on Route 1 from Pleasant Valley Road to Route 101, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 717, Statutes of 2008, which amended Section 301 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    Note that the following two previously authorized relinquishments were not in AB 1366, and thus appear to have been silently unauthorized:

    In 2001, SB 290, Chapter 825, 10/13/2001 authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 that is located between Jamboree Road and the southern city limits of the City of Newport Beach to the City of Newport Beach. This was up for consideration by the CTC in June 2004.

    In 2008, AB 2326, Chapter 639, 9/30/2008 authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 within the City of Torrance:

    (a) The commission may relinquish to the City of Torrance the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of the city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (b) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (c) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (1) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section shall cease to be a state highway. (2) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

    (d) The city shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 1, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (e) For the portion of Route 1 that is relinquished, the city shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    In 2009, SB 532 (Chapter 189, 10/11/2009) authorized relinquishment of the portion in Santa Monica by adding Section 301.2 (this portion was relinquished in May 2012):

    (a) Notwithstanding Section 301, the commission may relinquish to the City of Santa Monica the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of the city, from where the route crosses the city limit south of Ozone Street to the Route 10 westbound offramp, pursuant to a cooperative agreement between the city and the department, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (b) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (c) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (1) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section shall cease to be a state highway. (2) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

    (d) For the portion of Route 1 that is relinquished, the City of Santa Monica shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    In 2009, AB 344 (Chapter 238, 10/11/2009) reauthorized relinquishment of the portion in Newport Beach by adding Section 301.3:

    (a) The commission may relinquish to the City of Newport Beach the portion of Route 1 that is located between Jamboree Road and the Santa Ana River, within the city limits of the City of Newport Beach, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (b) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective immediately following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (c) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (1) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section shall cease to be a state highway. (2) The portion of Route 1 relinquished under this section shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (d) The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 1, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (e) For those portions of Route 1 that are relinquished, the City of Newport Beach shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    In 2010, SB 1318 (9/29/10, Chapter 491) changed the definition of this segment to clarify relinquishments by adding " except for the portion of Route 1 relinquished: (1) Within the city limits of the City of Dana Point between the western edge of the San Juan Creek Bridge and Eastline Road at the city limits of the City of Laguna Beach. (2) Within the city limits of the City of Newport Beach between Jamboree Road and Newport Coast Drive." SB 1318 also rewrote all the relinquishment subsections from (g) onward as:

    (g) The relinquished former portions of Route 1 within the City of Dana Point and the City of Newport Beach are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For those relinquished former portions of Route 1, the City of Dana Point and the City of Newport Beach shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1. The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 1 within its jurisdiction, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (h) The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Pleasant Valley Road and Route 101, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (1) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 1 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (3) For portions of Route 1 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Oxnard shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1.

    SB 1318 had the interesting side effect of omitting any mention of the following previously authorized relinquishments:

    1. The 2008 authorization of relinquishment (AB 2326, Chapter 639, 9/30/2008) of the portion of Route 1 within the City of Torrance. Note that this was dropped earlier in the confusion of some 2008 bills.

    2. The 2009 authorization of relinquishment (SB 532, Chapter 189, 10/11/2009) of the portion within the city limits of Santa Monica.

    In 2013, SB 788 (Chapter 525, 10/10/13) clarified the definition of this segment to:

    1. Add "(3) Within the city limits of the City of Santa Monica between the southern city limits and Route 10."
    2. Clarify that "(g) The relinquished former portions of Route 1 within the Cities of Dana Point, Newport Beach, and Santa Monica are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For those relinquished former portions of Route 1, the Cities of Dana Point, Newport Beach, and Santa Monica shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 1. The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 1 within its jurisdiction, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression."
    3. Clarify that "(h) The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 1 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Pleasant Valley Road and Route 101, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment."

    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was defined in 1963 (Chap. 385).

    As of July 1, 1964, part (1) was planned as freeway for the entire route. Construction of this as freeway was killed around the same time as the Whitnall Fwy, Route 64.

    On May 22, 1964, a portion of the Pacific Coast Freeway in Orange County, from 0.8 mile south of MacArthur Boulevard to 0.2 mile north of Adams Boulevard, 10.2 miles, estimated to cost $63.4 million, had a route adoption.

    According to a 1971 report by the City of Long Beach about the Pacific Coast Freeway (Route 1), most of the freeway proposals for the route in adjoining cities had been killed (with the exceptions of the route adoptions in Huntington Beach and Newport Beach), so that the freeway, once envisioned as running from Oxnard to San Juan Capistrano, would only run from the Harbor Freeway across Long Beach to the San Gabriel River Freeway (indeed, the report refers to the route as the Crosstown Freeway as often as it refers to it as the Pacific Coast Freeway). Since the truncated freeway would be of little benefit, the Long Beach City Manager requested that the State Division of Highways remove the route from the Freeway and Expressway system. The proposed route in Long Beach would have run to the south of Pacific Coast Highway (between Anaheim Street and 10th Street) and a portion of the Pacific Electric right-of-way; the truncated route would have then turned northeast to connect to the western stub of the Route 22 freeway (7th Street) and I-405 and I-605.
    (Thanks to Daniel Thomas for finding this information)

    Remarkably, plans were under review to construct this freeway as an ocean causeway in the Malibu area (and you thought oil-rigs were bad!) California Highway and Public Works, March-April 1964, said:

    This is the longest freeway planned in District VII; it will extend about 113 miles from the Ventura Freeway north of Oxnard to Serra Junction at Capistrano Beach, in Orange County. The only portions constructed to date are a 6.8 mile section south of Oxnard, and a connection between the Pacific Coast Highway and the San Diego Freeway in Capistrano Beach. Briefly, the status of the route, from north to south in the district, is as follows:

    El Rio to Oxnard: location of the route is being considered in connection with the Oxnard Bypass, on which two public hearings have been held.

    Oxnard to Calleguas Creek, 6.8 miles constructed in 1957.

    Conversion of the existing three-lane Pacific Coast Highway to freeway standards in the vicinity of Point Mugu Naval Station is planned for the future.

    Calleguas Creek to Malibu Canyon Road: California Highway Commission hearing on adoption of route, about 22 miles, was held in Santa Monica February 25, 1964, and two district hearings were held in 1961.

    Malibu Canyon Road to terminus of the Santa Monica Freeway in the City of Santa Monica: In addition to conventional inland locations, route location studies on this 13-mile section are considering the possibility of locating all or part of the freeway on a causeway offshore in the ocean; an alignment along the existing shoreline on a widened beach; or various combinations of causeway and shoreline locations.

    In 1961, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was engaged by the Division of Highways to study the feasibility of the marine location. A report of this study, received in November 1963, is being reviwed by the division and other interested state agencies. The report covers only the marine phase of the project. Conventional land locations are being studied by the division.

    The Corps of Engineers investigated nine alternate offshore and onshore freeway alignments involving earth fills and embankments, beach widening and structures. [...] The report concluded that:

    1. It is engineering feasible to construct the proposed freeway on a marine alignment.
    2. A joint highway-recreational facility extending from Santa Monica to Malibu would enhance the recreational potential of the area.
    3. Maintenance of sand bypassing operations in connection with each of the plans considered are feasible.
    4. It is not expected that builidng any of the considered projects would post any insurmountable problems to the construction industry.

    From Santa Monica south to the end of the route, location studies are being made except in the following areas: 10 miles in Orange County (Huntington Beach-Newport Beach) already adopted; 14 miles between El Segundo and the Harbor Freeway in Wilmington; and about 3 miles between the Marina Del Rey and Olympic Boulevard on the Santa Monica Freeway.

    On February 25, 1964, the CHC held a hearding regarding the Pacific Coast Freeway (Route 1) from Malibu Canyon Road to terminus of Santa Monica Freeway in the City of Santa Monica, 13 miles. The 22.5-mile section of this freeway from Malibu Canyon Road north to Point Mugu was under consideration by the California Highway Commission for route adoption.

    Freeway Routing nr Pt MuguIn February 1964, the CHC adopted a freeway routing for Route 1 between Malibu Canyon Road and Pt. Mugu. This routing follows the general alignment of the existing Route 1 from just W of Malibu Canyon Road to just E of Corral Canyon Road, then swings inland slightly to Latigo Canyon Road, and continues W-ly approx 3/4 to 1/4 mi inland from the existing highway, rejoining the latter just W of Trancas Canyon Road. It then continues along the existing highway to Pt. Mugu except for a short stretch near the western limits of the adoption. The plans called for construction of a six-lane freeway with room to expand to eight-lanes when required at an estimated cost of $41.6 million, including rights of way.

    Here are some more details on this, from the Santa Monica Surf in 2003:

    [Causeway]Along with the company Seaway Enterprises Incorporated of Beverly Hills, John Drescher (a local businessman), crafted an ambitious scheme. On July 19, 1961, Seaway Enterprises presented the City Council with a thirty-page document, complete with artist renderings, proposing the construction of an island causeway off the coast. Located 4,000 feet from shore, the 30,000-foot long causeway would run parallel to the coastline from Santa Monica beach all the way north to Malibu. In the middle of this artificial archipelago would stretch a 200-foot wide freeway called "Sunset Seaway." It was a remarkable concept. Not only would the brand new highway alleviate the pressure on the coastal road but it would also provide an additional 2.5 million square feet of public beach facing the ocean. The new beaches would accommodate "up to 50,000 persons on peak days," according to the Seaway Enterprises document. In addition to the new land, the area of water between the natural shoreline and the artificial causeway would become a series of marinas accommodating 1,700 small craft.

    On August 29 1961, with Santa Monica City Manager Ernest N. Mobley leading the charge, the Santa Monica City Council established a Causeway and Freeway Committee to "consider and recommend on the desirability and feasibility of the causeway proposal made by Seaway Enterprises and/or any similar proposal." One of the most challenging questions facing committee members was: "Where would all the rock come from?" When the Santa Monica breakwater was constructed in the early thirties, quarry stone had been shipped in barges all the way from Catalina Island; specifically, it was on barges that were towed by tugs and then dumped into the bay at the side of the breakwater. In the case of Sunset Seaway, the estimated tonnage clocked in at a staggering 97 million cubic yards of landfill for the causeway alone and an additional 2.5 million tons of rock to construct a submerged reef to protect it. According to Drescher’s proposal, the causeway would be a phased operation. Rock from the nearby mountains would first be used to create a protective reef. Once in place, the initial landfill for the causeway would come from terracing the mountains, creating an ideal location for new property while at the same time providing some much-needed tonnage. To do this, there would be a conveyor system crossing over Pacific Coast Highway; resulting in millions of tons of rock passing over the heads of motorists below.

    What killed the project was reality. The reality, learned from experience in the Marina Del Rey project, that tidal forces would require regular and costly dredging for silt. The reality of opposition from residents. The reality of construction costs. The reality of legal and legislative headaches, requiring watertight inter-agency agreement just to get the project into planning phases. The reality of the environmental effects of taking 97 million cubic yards of landfill from the nearby Santa Monica Mountains and piling it into the ocean to create a six mile landmass on which to build a highway. The reality of LA Councilman Marvin Braude opposing any city contributions to the project. In September 1965, Governor Edmund "Pat" Brown vetoed the causeway bill. The Causeway Freeway Commission was disbanded in 1966.

    The segment in Santa Monica was relinquished in May 2012.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield US Highway Shield The portion of this segment from San Juan Capistrano to Oxnard was added to the state highway system in 1919 as LRN 60. The segment, opened in the late 1920s as part of the Roosevelt Highway, a 1,400-mile road that traced the western margin of the United States. Nationally, Americans found the first highway linking the Mexican and Canadian borders an appropriate memorial for the country's late and famously internationalist president, Theodore Roosevelt. Locally, Southern Californians celebrated the reduced travel time between the various beach towns of the region; the Roosevelt Highway represented the first direct link between Newport Beach and Laguna Beach and between Ventura and Santa Monica. There's a good summary of the early history, including pictures, on the LA As Subject pages from KCET.

    The legislative route was extended in 1925 as far as El Rio (Chapter 309). The segment (Jct. US 101 at Serra to Jct. US 101 at El Rio via Santa Monica) was first signed as Route 3 in 1934 as part of the initial state signing of highways. It was the "Roosevelt Highway" south from El Rio. The highway was named after President Theodore Roosevelt. By October 1935, was also signed as US 101A, and for portions was co-signed with US 6 and US 91.

    As for the numbering as US101A: On July 20, 1935, the highway department notified AASHTO:

    In accordance with the rights delegated to the individual states, we have designated the State Highway from Junction US 101 north of El Rio in Ventura County south along the coast to a junction with US 101 at Serra as Alternate US 101.

    Practically all of the area this route traverses is incorporated, and the designation conforms to that given for an Alternate Route.

    We would like to have this route shown in the description of US Numbered Routes.

    AASHTO subsequently approved this alternate route on September 26, 1937, with an effective date of January 1, 1938. The current Route 1 number was signed in 1964.

    There has been some interesting discussions regarding the route of this segment (Route 3/US 101A, future Route 1) in the Los Angeles South Bay in the early 1940s. According to one map, it angled slightly northeasterly the current alignment in the middle of Redondo Beach, directly intersecting Camino Real (Sepulveda coming in from Torrance), then sharply angled northwest and then northeast at the north end of Redondo Beach. One explanation for this is an alignment that leaves the current route at Francesca Avenue, then follows Francesca (which angles just east of north then curves back northwest) and crosses the current alignment again to intersect Catalina Avenue (formerly Pacific Avenue), then back to the current alignment at the Hermosa Beach line. Another probable old alignment through Torrance is Newton Street, which skirts the base of the Palos Verdes Hills and intersects (or intersected) PCH at an angle on both ends. This runs through the once-independent village of Walteria, now essentially indistinguishable from the rest of Torrance. [Above information from Steve Riner]

    The tunnel under the LAX runways opened in April 1953 as part of the airport expansion to the Interim terminal. The tunnel was funded by a half-and-half combination of a 1945 airport bond issue and a special federal grant. Construction, estimated at $3.5 million, began in 1949. When the 1,909-foot-long divided tunnel was finished four years later, it was the only traffic tunnel beneath a large airport runway in the country

    McClure Tunnel - Nov 1935The McClure Tunnel (originally called the Santa Monica Tunnel) was constructed in 1935 to eliminate the necessity of climbing the Palisades bluff (i.e., the California Incline), and to eliminate the crossing of main city streets and crossing of the railway tracks on Ocean Avenue in the city of Santa Monica. With completion of the tunnel, through traffic proceeding south along the usual highway may go through the bluffs and under the intersection of Colorado Street and Ocean Avenue and under the tracks of the Pacific Electric Railway and then continue South on Lincoln Boulevard toward San Diego. What is interesting about the tunnel is its construction method. Traditional tunnels are constructed by boring. In order to secure satisfactory alignment at reasonable cost it was found necessary to build the tunnel on a curve and make it cross under a portion of the Palisades Park area. In order to secure necessary vertical clearance without dropping the tunnel floor to such extent as would make necessary the reconstruction of a valuable sewer system, or on the otber hand raising the top of the tunnel to such extent that a hump would appear in the track and street above, the designers were forced to make the tunnel flat and wide. Lastly, the ground upon which the tunnel had to be built was not rock and was not capable of safely supporting the load required. The ground was reinforced by driving concrete piles into it so that the piles might act as a substitute for rock. In the case of this tunnel it was also discovered that it was cheaper to construct it via cut and cover, building a barrel as a culvert and then replacing the dirt, park, and streets above. A portion of the street is almost flush with the crown of the tunnel arch. The tunnel is a rigid frame structure resembling a very flat arch with a span of 56' and has a clearance above the pavement of 21'. The tunnel is constructed in 40' foot sections and each of these sections contains approximately 420 yd3 of concrete and 32 tons of bar reinforcing steel.

    The McClure Tunnel replaced an earlier railroad tunnel shown this 1898 film from Thomas Edison's production company. As early as 1886, the Southern Pacific bored a tunnel through Santa Monica's ocean bluffs so that trains traveling through the Santa Monica Arroyo—a natural drainage that once marked the southern edge of town—could turn parallel to the beach toward a long shipping wharf up the coast. Pacific Electric trolleys later used this curved tunnel, which remained in service until shortly before its rotted wooden frame collapsed in 1935. By then the state had already drafted plans to reconfigure the historic conduit. When the dust settled in 1936, Olympic Boulevard traced the old path of the railroad through the arroyo, and a wide, arched concrete tunnel curved through the bluffs where the wooden railroad shaft had been.
    (Source: Southland Blog, 4/29/14)

    In 1941, the Roosevelt Highway was renamed Pacific Coast Highway in much of Southern California.

    Through Malibu, one intransigent landowner, May Rindge, had blocked the construction of the route. Since at least the 1890s, a primitive road had existed, but reached a locked gate at the property line of Rindge's 17,000-acre ranch. Rindge and her late husband had long fought to keep homesteaders off her ranch, and in 1906 she forced the politically powerful Southern Pacific to divert its Santa Barbara line around Malibu and though the San Fernando Valley. In 1907, the county proposed extending the coastal road through Malibu, and in response Rindge posted armed guards at the entrances to her ranch and challenged the county's power of eminent domain in court. A stalemate ensued for years, but the road's prospects improved in the early 1920s when it was incorporated into the newly planned Roosevelt Highway. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the county's right to appropriate the land for the highway in 1923, and the dispute finally came to an end in 1925 when a superior court judge granted the county title to the right-of-way in return for $107,289. Delayed by the litigation, the Malibu segment of the Roosevelt Highway was the last to start construction and open. In February 1925, California Highways and Public Works noted that the contract for the grading of the Coast Boulevard through Malibu Ranch was awarded. The final opening occurred on June 29, 1929, when California Governor C.C. Young, flanked by Miss Mexico and Miss Canada, cut the ceremonial ribbon and a parade of 1,500 cars sped by to navigate the road's curves.
    (Source: KCET Website)

    001 in MalibuIn 1947, California rerouted Route 1 in the Malibu area, but it appears the old routing is still visible and used. The 1947 project eliminated the last remaining original 20' pavement along Route 1 between Ventura and Dana Point. The project was constructed in 3 units: the first was a line change around a slide at Latigo Canyon; the second relocated the highway around slide and slipout areas between Corral Creek and Malibu Creek; the third was between Latigo Creek and Corral Creek. The new roadway was an 80' wide divided highway with 2 lanes in each direction. It was also on a higher elevation a bit further away from the beach.

     

    Status

    There is a regional transportation improvement project to widen the following portions of Route 1 in Los Angeles County: between 92nd and Grand; between 33rd Street and Rosecrans Avenue; between Hughest Terrace to La Tijera Blvd; between Figi Way and Hughest Terrace. This will also include demolishing the Culver Blvd overcrossing and constructing a new six-lane overcrossing with longer spans, as well as removal of some medians to turn them into traffic lanes.

    In July 2011, Metro approved about $1.24 million in Measure R funding to improve Route 1 (Pacific Coast Highway) from Artesia Boulevard to Anita Street, and the intersection of Route 1and Aviation Boulevard under the program—split as $240,000 for Route 1 from Artesia to Anita and $1 million for the Route 1-Aviation junction.

    In late March 2007, the City of Torrance indicated its desire to take over the segment of this route within its city limits. Specifically, the Torrance City Council voted unanimously to send a letter indicating its interest in having the state Department of Transportation relinquish control of the 5-mile segment of Pacific Coast Highway and 6-mile stretch of Hawthorne Boulevard within Torrance limits. Sending the letter is a precursor to an estimate the city is required to provide to Caltrans of the cost of bringing each road up to a "state of good repair." City staff members believe it will cost $25M to $30M for each road, which the state would provide to the city in the form of a one-time payment. Bringing the route under city control will allow the city to improve the timing of signal lights to improve traffic flow and reduce the bureaucracy needed to upgrade the roads.
    (Source: Daily Breeze, 3/29/2007)

    The intersection with Route 107 in Torrance is being reconstructed under TCRP Project #46. This project was to reconstruct the intersection of Hawthorne Boulevard (Route 107) and Pacific Coast Highway (Route 1) by adding turn pockets. The cost to complete PA&ED was significantly underestimated in the original application, and additional TCRP funds are required to complete the phase. With R/W estimated to be over $26,000,000, the overall project cost has exceeded the total TCRP funds available. Per the September 2006 CTC Agenda, until such time as the City of Torrance and the Department can identify additional funds to complete PS&E, R/W, and Construction, those phases have been put on hold. In order to complete PA&ED and closeout the phase, an additional $467,000 of TCRP funds is required. Note: According to the Daily Breeze on 3/29/2007, this project was originally began by the City of Torrance, and was to consist of a right turn lane from northbound Hawthorne Boulevard to eastbound Pacific Coast Highway. The project was estimated to cost about $2 million. Caltrans took over the project, changed the scope of the improvements to include the entire intersection, studied and designed it at a cost of $2 million, and concluded that upgrading the entire intersection would cost $15 million.

    A study in late 2009 indicated that nearly half of the 125 intersections on the oft-congested 11-mile stretch of Pacific Coast Highway between Torrance and El Segundo need improvements to help traffic flow better. The same study found that many of those upgrades would be relatively easy and inexpensive to implement. Fifty-four of the 125 intersections need modifications along the major commuter route, the study said. The yearlong, $100,000 study included not only analysis and observations by transportation experts, but motorists who drive the route on a regular basis, according to the South Bay Cities Council of Governments, which commissioned the study. The study also found that the three busiest intersections along PCH were Rosecrans Avenue in Manhattan Beach and Hawthorne and Crenshaw boulevards in Torrance. The single worst stretch of crowded highway: the segment between Rosecrans Avenue and Manhattan Beach Boulevard. The study also found that Manhattan Beach Boulevard in Manhattan Beach is a "significant choke point" during the evening commute, but southbound traffic usually continues without stopping until vehicles hit Pier Avenue/Aviation Boulevard in Hermosa Beach. (More Details).

    In September 2012, it was reported that construction was beginning on the $3.5 million Sepulveda Tunnel retrofitting project that promises to better illuminate the road with energy efficient LED lighting. Construction is scheduled to start the first week of October 2012 and continue through November 16, 2012. The work will resume after the holidays, from January 2, 2013 and continue through June 20, 2013. The majority of the work will take place in the overnight hours. The work inside the tunnel, which runs underneath a runway on the south side of Los Angeles International Airport, will address poor visibility and other safety issues. The work is part of a collaborative effort between state and local agencies. Rosendahl brought Los Angeles World Airports, Bureau of Street Lighting, Bureau of Street Services, Department of General Services, and CalTrans to the table to figure out a plan to not only renovate but also maintain the tunnel. The agencies agree to be responsible for tunnel upkeep, properly sweep and maintain the roadway, and power wash the walls and ceiling.

    In March 2013, the LED lighting project was completed.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $450,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs along Route 1 from Torrance to Malibu from Camino De Las Colinas Road to Sunset Boulevard that will construct Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) curb ramps at 13 locations to upgrade curb ramps to comply with ADA standards.

    In August 2011, the Santa Monica City Council approved a resolution accepting responsibility for the section of Lincoln Boulevard, also called Route 1, which runs from the I-10 Freeway to the southern city limits. Santa Monica officials have been pushing for control over sections of Lincoln Boulevard since 1996, when City Hall won control over portions of both Lincoln and Santa Monica (Route 2) boulevards. In 2009, the California Legislature approved a bill greenlighting Santa Monica to assume responsibility for the southern section. That bill became effective Jan. 1, 2010. Under the previous arrangement, the Santa Monica Public Works Department had the authority to fill potholes, but major repairs, like sealing the road or adding additional asphalt emulsion, were the responsibility of cash-strapped Caltrans. This resulted in Lincoln having one of the lowest scores (i.e., being in the worst shape) in Santa Monica. It will cost approximately $2.2 million to bring the 1-mile section of road up to snuff and repair the curb, gutter and sidewalk damage that has wreaked havoc on the roadway. Caltrans isn't required to pay for those improvements, particularly after responsibility trades hands from state to City Hall, but it is its practice to do so.
    (Source: Santa Monica Daily Press)

    In May 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Monica on Route 1 between Route 10 and the southeasterly city limits, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement scheduled to be signed by the City Manager by May 5, 2012. The City Council authorized the City Manager to sign the relinquishment agreement during the City Council meeting dated August 23, 2011. Authorized by Chapter 189, Statutes of 2009, which added Section 301.2 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    In October 2013, the CTC authorized $2.2 million in Santa Monica on Route 1, from Dewey Street to Route 10, with the goal of relinquishing 5.2 miles of roadway (Lincoln Boulevard) to local jurisdiction. City will accept ownership, maintenance, operation and liability over the relinquished facilities.

    A small portion in Malibu was up for vacation in April 2003: 07-LA-1-PM 50.9 Route 1 in the City of Malibu.

    In February 2012, it was reported that the Southern California Association of Governments and the city of Malibu have posted a bid for a Pacific Coast Highway Safety Study for all modes of travel along the 21 mile stretch between the eastern and western edges of Malibu. The Scope of Work document indicates that the "study will examine current conditions along the roadway and determine accident patterns based on roadway geometry, adjacent land-uses and/or other factors that may be unique to Malibu. The study will analyze and identify potential strategies, (engineering, education and enforcement) to promote improved safety along PCH for all modes of travel including bicycling and walking." The Scope of Work also breaks the long, skinny city into four sections for the study to examine, including: 1) Topanga Canyon Road to Big Rock Road, 2) Big Rock Road to Cross Creek Road, 3) Cross Creek Road to Busch Drive, and 4) Busch Drive to Western City Limits." A $300,000 grant (pdf) from Caltrans provides most of the funding for this portion of the study, which is expected to take 24 months to complete.

    Route 1 in Oxnard is currently undegoing extensive construction at the Pleasant Valley Road Interchange. When this construction is complete in June 2003, Route 1 will be routed onto Rice Ave vice Oxnard Blvd. In 2008, the Ventura County Star reported that on January 1, 2009, the designation of Route 1 will be moved from Oxnard Boulevard to Rice Avenue. That will give the Port of Hueneme a more efficient and direct route to US 101, As part of the Route 1 redesignation, the California Transportation Commission provided $30.5 million to improve and expand the Rice Avenue-US 101 interchange. That project is expected to be completed in 2012. Having control of Oxnard Boulevard will enable the city to undertake a variety of traffic improvement and beautification measures. The city will sequence traffic signals to allow traffic to flow more smoothly and will also install a computerized sensor system to reduce waiting times at intersections, he said. The redesignation of Route 1 also will allow the city to move heavy trucks off Oxnard Boulevard, which also will improve traffic. New landscaping, sidewalks and parking along the main thoroughfare downtown are also in the works.

    In December 2012, it was reported that the City of Oxnard had regained control of Oxnard Boulevard (the former routing of Route 1). This permits the city to reroute Route 1 in Oxnard down Rice Avenue, where construction of a new interchange at US 101 recently ended, except for landscaping and minor touch-ups. The city also has a grant to design and build a bridge on Rice over railroad tracks just north of Fifth Street, a potential trouble spot for the high volume of truck traffic shuttling goods to and from the Port of Hueneme. The agreement with Caltrans concerns Oxnard Boulevard as well as some segments of Fifth Street and Vineyard Avenue now under state control. The portion of Fifth that is affected runs from Oxnard Boulevard to Rice. The Vineyard strip sits between US 101 and Oxnard Boulevard. The move would give the city ownership of the roads, which means local officials would control permits and other issues for streets, sidewalks, medians and driveways. An estimated $15 million in improvements is needed to bring the streets up to city standards, according to a staff report, and ongoing maintenance costs are estimated at $100,000 a year. The upgrades can be paid for by development fees and grants, the report says, and Caltrans is requesting a $1 million, one-time payment to the city that can be used for ongoing maintenance costs.
    (Source: VC Star, 11/26/2012)

    In June 2013, the CTC authorized $1,000,000 for improvements in the city of Oxnard from Pleasant Valley Road to Route 101, from Oxnard Boulevard to Rice Avenue, and from Oxnard Boulevard to Route 101 in order to relinquish roadway

    In August 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $16,400,000 on Route 1 PM 22.5/22.0 near the city of Ventura, from 1.0 mile north of the Ventura Overhead to 4.8 mile south of the Seacliff Overhead and Separation. Outcome/Output: Replace 1,800 feet of existing seawall to protect the roadway from sea wave forces. Also, reconstruct and pave adjacent roadway shoulder and bicycle lane, construct new public access stairway and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant ramp to the beach.

    In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Oxnard adjacent to Route 1 and US 101 on Wagon Wheel Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

     

    Naming

    Officially named "Pacific Coast Highway" per State Highway Code §635. The name derives from the fact the highway runs along the Pacific Coast. This designation came from Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 1569, in 1959.

    Maps based on the 1956 freeway plan show a coastal freeway, named the "Pacific Coast Freeway" or "Ocean Freeway" between Malibu Canyon and Seal Beach. This route would have run to the W of Los Angeles International Airport along Vista Del Mar. The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards in Ventura County is named the "Pacific Coast Freeway" (per the book LA Freeways), and opened in 1957.

    The portion of this route from its southern terminus in the City of San Juan Capistrano to its intersection with Golden West Street in the City of Huntington Beach is named the "Orange County Korean War Veterans Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Korean War, for June 25, 2000, marked the 50th anniversary of the invasion of South Korea by North Korea and the start of the three-year Korean War with combat hostilities ending upon the signing of an armistice agreement by the United Nations and North Korea on July 27, 1953.

    The portion of this route from the intersection of Golden West Street in Huntington Beach to the intersection of Westminster Avenue in Long Beach is officially named the "U.S. Submarine Veterans of WWII Memorial Highway." This segment is near the U.S. Submarine Veterans WWII National Memorial West located at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, which honors the 52 boats and over 3,500 sailors lost on World War II submarines and the two submarines lost in the Cold War, the Thresher and the Scorpion. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 98, Chapter 103, August 14, 2000.

    The portion of Route 1 that runs between Coil Street and the east side of the main entrance to the Tesoro Refinery, in the community of Wilmington in the County of Los Angeles, is named the "Honorable Jenny Oropeza Memorial Overcrossing". Named in memory of Jenny Oropeza, who was a lifelong public servant and active in her community. She was elected to the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education, the Long Beach City Council, the California State Assembly, and finally to the California State Senate. During her time as a member of the California Legislature, Jenny Oropeza was a champion for public transportation, health care, education, clean air, equality, and prevention of cancer. Former Senator Oropeza was so admired by her constituents and community that since her death she has been honored by the Democratic Women's Study Club in Long Beach, which posthumously awarded her the Political Leadership Award. In future years the award will be called the Jenny Oropeza Political Leadership Award. Additionally, the Long Beach Community Hispanic Association (Centro CHA) posthumously awarded Senator Oropeza the Create Change Community Service Excellence Award, which will in future years be called the Create Change: Jenny Oropeza Community Service Excellence Award. In recognition of former Senator Oropeza, the Long Beach Lambda Democratic Club created the Jenny Oropeza Ally of the Year Award, which was, similar to the two previously mentioned awards, first awarded in 2011. As a tribute to former Senator Oropeza's dedication to fostering protections for key state public health programs, the Los Angeles County Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, in joint collaboration with the six other California-based Komen affiliates, known as "the California Collaborative," established the Senator Jenny Oropeza Public Policy Internship position. The City of Long Beach named the community center in Cesar E. Chavez Park the Jenny Oropeza Community Center and the Los Angeles Unified School District dedicated the Jenny Oropeza Global Studies Academy at the Rancho Dominguez Preparatory School. Shortly after taking office in 2000, then Assembly Member Oropeza, became aware that the Alameda Corridor would open in 2002 and all the planned bridges, designed to prevent cars from having to wait for trains to pass at street level, would be completed, except the bridge on Route 1 (Pacific Coast Highway) in the community of Wilmington, the busiest route along the Alameda Corridor. At the time, Route 1 bisected the Equilon Refinery and was therefore the most complicated and expensive bridge to build. Furthermore, there was not enough funding available to complete the bridge on Route 1. Former Assembly Member Oropeza brought together the interested parties, including the California Department of Transportation, the Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the Equilon Refinery, the Union Pacific Railroad, and the City of Los Angeles to solve this problem and was able to help facilitate $107 million in funding from a combination of sources which included state transportation funds, state Proposition 116 bond funds, federal demonstration funds, Metropolitan Transportation Authority funds, and railroad funds. Former Assembly Member Oropeza was also successful in her pursuit to have the long bridge built. This design not only eliminated the train and car conflicts on the Alameda Corridor, but also eliminated these same conflicts on Alameda Street and the San Pedro Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 79, Resolution Chapter 102, on August 29, 2012.

    The portion of this route in Los Angeles County is also officially named the "Los Angeles County Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway". Additionally, the portion in Ventura County is named the "Ventura County Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway". It was named this because Route 1 has a strong historical significance for the military personnel of the Vietnam War era as it passes beside a significant number of California military bases (United States Naval Weapons Station at Seal Beach, the United States Coast Guard Headquarters at Long Beach, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Point Mugu Naval Weapons Station, the United States Coast Guard Station at Oxnard, the Ventura County Naval Base, Camp San Luis Obispo Military Reserve, the Ventura County California Air National Guard Base, the United States Naval Reservation at Monterey, and Fort Hunter Liggett) on which military personnel were trained and dispatched to Vietnam. More than 350,000 California veterans served in the Vietnam War, which resulted in 40,000 of them being wounded and 5,822 killed or missing in action, representing more than 10 percent of the nation's total casualties. Los Angeles County has the largest number of Vietnam veterans in California and 1,857 of its residents were killed or missing in action during that war. More Californians received the Medal of Honor, the Bronze Star, and the Purple Heart than veterans of any other state. The Los Angeles County portion was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 115, Chapter 94, July 12, 2000. The Ventura County portion was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 135, Chapter 89, June 27, 2002.

    In 10/15/2008, the City of Los Angeles designated Lincoln Boulevard (Route 1) between La Tijera and Sepulveda Boulevard as "Officer Tommy Scott Square". This commemorates the death of the first Airport Police officer killed in the line of duty in the department's 59-year-history. Scott, 35, died April 29, 2005, while trying to detain a transient walking along the airport perimeter. The man first got into Scott's patrol car and drove off with Scott trying to stop him. With Scott hanging onto the side of the car, the man hit a fire hydrant, killing the 4-year veteran of the police force. William Sadowski, 46, pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity last month to a charge of first-degree murder. The death devastated the close-knit, independent police department. Scott, who had worked for the city department of parks before becoming a police officer, joined the force Oct. 7, 2001 and graduated from Rio Hondo Police Academy on Feb. 21, 2002. At the April 29, 2009 ceremony Airport police and city officials unveiled two street signs on Lincoln — one facing the northbound traffic and the other southbound — near where Scott was killed. A bronze plaque was put up earlier.

    Route 1 was originally named the "Roosevelt Highway", after President Theodore Roosevelt.

     

    Named Structures

    Tunnel 53-008, in Santa Monica, is named the "Robert E. McClure Tunnel". It opened on February 1, 1936, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 234, Chapter 393, in 1969. Robert McClure was the editor and publisher of the Santa Monica Evening Outlook, a delegate to the 1964 Republican Convention, and a member of the California Highway Commission from 1954 to 1962. He is remembered as "the father of the Santa Monica Freeway".

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From the Los Angeles-Ventura County line to Route 101 near El Rio; constructed as freeway for 8 mi S of Oxnard.

    • 1959: Entire segment was added to the Freeway and Expressway system (Chap. 1062).
    • 1965: Deleted: Route 107 to Route 91 (Chapter 1372).
    • 1967: Deleted: Route 91 to Route 105 (I-105) (Chapter 674)
    • 1970: Deleted: Route 90 to Santa Monica (Dewey Street) (Chapter 634)
    • 1971: Deleted: Santa Monica to Los Angeles-Ventura County line (Chapter 179)
    • 1971: Deleted: South border of LAX to Route 90 (Chapter 963)
    • 1972: Deleted: Route 22 to Route 47 (Chapter 150)
    • 1972: Deleted San Juan Capistrano to Route 22; Route 47 to Route 107 (Chapter 784)
    • 1981: Deleted I-105 to South border of LAX (Chapter 292)

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 5 south of San Juan Capistrano to Route 19 near Long Beach; and from Route 187 near Santa Monica to Route 101 near El Rio.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Orange 1 0.00 0.33
    Orange 1 0.58 0.87
    Los Angeles 1 R34.58 35.20


  2. From Route 101 at Emma Wood State Beach, 1.3 mi north of Route 33, to Route 101, 2.8 mi south of the Ventura-Santa Barbara county line at Mobil Pier Undercrossing.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was added to Route 1 in 1980 (Chap. 740). It was likely added to reflect completion of the freeway portion of US 101 in the area, as the routing was former US 101. In 1992, Chap. 1243 changed "State Park" to "State Beach".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This segment was originally added to the state highway system in 1909 as part of US 101, LRN 2. It was signed as US 101.

     

    Naming

    This segment appears to be called "Pacific Coast Highway".


  3. From Route 101 near Las Cruces to Route 101 in Pismo Beach via the vicinity of Lompoc, Vandenberg Air Force Base, and Guadalupe.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as being from "near Las Cruces to Route 101 near Pismo Beach via the vicinity of Lompoc and Guadalupe". In 1984, it was clarified via an added section that Route 1 also included that portion of the Lompoc-Casmalia Road and Vandenburg Road in the County of Santa Barbara from the intersection of the Lompoc-Casmalia Road and Route 1 north of Lompoc near Mission Hills to the intersection of Vandenburg Road and Route 1 south of Orcutt.

    In 1988, the route was relocated to serve Vandenberg AFB by incorporation of the route of former County Route S20. The previous alignment of Route 1 became Harris Grade Road from the intersection of the former County Route S20 with Route 1 to the junction with Route 135, and Route 135 from that junction to Route 135. In 1992, Chap. 1243 deleted the clarification and changed the definition of this segment to the "Route 101 near Las Cruces to Route 101 near Pismo Beach via the vicinity of Lompoc, Vandenberg Air Force Base, and Guadalupe."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield Pre-1964 State Shield A small portion (the segment between the two current Route 135 portions) was originally defined as LRN 2 in 1910, but was later transferred to LRN 56. In 1933, LRN 56 was extended to include the remainder of this segment (Chapter 767). By 1935, this route was under construction between Orcutt and Pismo Beach (in segments). This was signed as Route 1 in the initial 1934 state signage of routes, although a small segment may have been part of US 101.

    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of Route 1 (Jct. US 101 at Las Cruces, via Cambria, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Pt. Reyes, and Westport to US 101 at Fortuna).

     

    Naming

    This segment is officially named "Cabrillo Highway" in the State Highway Code, §635. Juan Rodríquez Cabrillo was the leader of one of the first European expeditions to California. In 1542, Cabrillo led the first European expedition to explore what is now the west coast of the United States. Cabrillo was commissioned by Pedro de Alvarado, Governor of Guatemala, for a voyage up the California coast under the flag of Spain. Cabrillo hoped to find the fabulously wealthy cities known as Cibola, believed to be somewhere on the Pacific coast beyond New Spain, and a route connecting the North Pacific to the North Atlantic. Cabrillo reached "a very good enclosed port" which is now San Diego bay, on September 28, 1542, naming it "San Miguel". He probably anchored his flagship, the San Salvador at Ballast Point on Point Loma's east shore. Six days later, he departed San Diego sailing northward and exploring the uncharted coast line of California. The expedition reached San Pedro on October 6, Santa Monica on the 9th, San Buenaventura on the 10th, Santa Barbara on the 13th and Pt. Concepcion on the 17th. Because of adverse winds Cabrillo turned back, harboring at San Miguel Island, and did not progress beyond Santa Maria until November 11. With a favorable wind later that day they reach the "Sierra de San Martin," probably Cape San Martin and the Santa Lucia Mountains in southern Monterey County. Struck by a storm and blown out to sea, the two vessels are separated and do not rejoin until the 15th, probably near Año Nuevo north of Santa Cruz. The next day they drifted southward, discovering "Bahía de los Pinos" and "Cabo de Pinos." These are most likely Monterey Bay and Point Pinos. On the 18th they turned south, passing snow-capped mountains (the Santa Lucias), and on November 23 returned to their harbor at San Miguel Island, where they remained for nearly three months. Cabrillo died January 3, 1543, on San Miguel Island, and may have been buried on Catalina Island. He died from complications of a broken leg incurred from a fall during a brief skirmish with natives. It was named by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 569, in 1959.

    The portion of Route 1 between Route 166 and the Santa Barbara County line is named the "Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of the Vietnam Veterans living on the Central Coast. Route 1 has a strong historical significance for the military personnel of the Vietnam War era as it passes through the central coast region, and is home to many veterans' museums and memorials. The State of California has the largest United States veteran population in the nation, making California home to more than 7,000,000 veterans and dependents representing more than 10 percent of California's population. More California residents currently serve as active duty military personnel than do residents of any other state. More than 350,000 California veterans served in the Vietnam War, 40,000 of whom were wounded and 5,822 of whom were missing in action or killed, representing more than 10 percent of the nation's total casualties in that war. More California residents gave their lives in the Vietnam War than residents of any other state, and more Californians were awarded the Medal of Honor, the Bronze Star, or the Purple Heart than veterans of any other state. 220 young men and women from the City of Guadalupe served their country in the Vietnam War, three of whom bravely made the ultimate sacrifice. The residents of Santa Barbara County wish to express their gratitude and appreciation for the sacrifices these Vietnam veterans made for their country by creating a veterans recognition corridor that hopefully will become an ongoing memorial for veterans and their families. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 26, Resolution Chapter 90, on September 15, 2011.

    The portion of Route 1 between the California Boulevard exit and the Santa Lucia Canyon Road/Floradale Avenue exit in Lompoc is named the "Correctional Officer Scott Williams Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Federal Correctional Officer Scott Williams , who was violently murdered on April 3, 1997 by an inmate while working as a Federal Correctional Officer at the United States Penitentiary in Lompoc. Officer Williams was born in Ventura and graduated from Lompoc High School in 1986. Upon graduating from high school, Officer Williams enlisted in and honorably served the United States Marine Corps, receiving numerous awards for his outstanding service. In December of 1990, Officer Williams, as a reservist, was called to active duty to serve in Operation Desert Storm and received the "Marine of the Year" award. After serving his country overseas, Officer Williams returned to serve his country at home. Upon his return, Officer Williams began working for the Federal Bureau of Prisons in Lompoc as a Federal Correctional Officer in 1993 and was selected as a member of the Special Operations Response Team. Officer Williams was actively involved in his community, where he volunteered with the local Men's Club and the Lions Club. Officer Williams' death is a tragic reminder that the law enforcement officers who serve the public risk their lives on a daily basis. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 28, Resolution Chapter 91, on September 15, 2011.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 101 near Las Cruces to Route 227 south of Oceano.

    • 1959: Entire segment defined as F&E (Chapter 1062).
    • 1967: Deleted: segment north of Route 227 (Chapter 1584)

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 101 at Las Cruces to Route 246 near Lompoc; and from Route 227 south of Oceano to Route 101 near Pismo Beach.

     

    National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.


  4. From Route 101 in San Luis Obispo to Route 280 south of San Francisco along the coast via Cambria, San Simeon, and Santa Cruz.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The original definition of this segment in 1963 (Chap. 385) was "San Luis Obispo to Route 280 south of San Francisco along the coast via Cambria, San Simeon and Santa Cruz." In 1968, this was clarified by Chap. 282. to note that the route was from Route 101 in San Luis Obispo.

    There were once plans to reroute this segment in Carmel across a new freeway in Hatton Canyon. This section was for a realignment of Route 1 from Carmel Valley Road to the Pacific Grove Interchange of Route 1 and Route 68. The Hatton Canyon is a scenic and environmentally sensitive area, comprised of undeveloped land that includes one of the few genetically pure Monterey Pine forests left in the world, significant coastal habitat and recreation areas, as well as diverse wildlife. Although originally planned for a freeway alignment, the Department of Transportation determined that a freeway bypass in the Hatton Canyon was not currently viable. As a result, AB 434 (Chapter 136, 7/31/2002) rescinded the route adoption, dated January 9, 1956, for the realignment of Route 1 in Hatton Canyon near the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea; furthermore, it nullified the freeway agreement, dated April 8, 1997, related to that realignment. The property located in Hatton Canyon was declared to be surplus state property located within the coastal zone, as defined in Section 30103 of the Public Resources Code, and the Department of Transportation was directed sell its ownership interest in the Hatton Canyon for the purpose of creating or adding to a state park.

    Until the early 1980s, Route 1 entered Castroville from the south via Route 156 eastbound (the current freeway), then exited at the diamond interchange for Merritt Street and continued northwest via Merritt. However, by the mid-1980s, the current Castroville bypass was constructed; as a consequence, the portion of freeway on Route 1 between Merritt Street and the bypass became an extension of Route 156, and Merritt Street became part of Route 183.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield The portion of this segment from San Simeon to Carmel was added to the state highway system in 1919 as the first segment of LRN 56. It was extended southward to Cambria in 1921 (Chapter 837). It was extended further southward to San Luis Obispo in 1931 (Chapter 82). It was also extended northerly (again as LRN 56) to San Francisco in 1933 (Chapter 767).

    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of signed Route 1 (Jct. US 101 at Las Cruces, via Cambria, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Pt. Reyes, and Westport to US 101 at Fortuna).

    The portion of the route in the Monterey area originally ran along Munras and North Fremont in Monterey, Freemont in Seaside, merging at the N end of Seaside into Del Monte Ave. Del Monte ran along the current freeway routing through Fort Ord into Marina, where it ran along the current Del Monte Ave.

    Freedom Boulevard between Aptos and Freedom was the original Route 1 before the current bypass (originally a surface road, now freeway) was proposed. In Watsonville, Main Street and Salinas Road were the original Route 1 routings before the freeway bypass and new bridge over the Pajaro were built.

    001 at ThorntonAccording to CHPW, the original rerouting of Route 1 from Edgemar to Skyline Boulevard was completed by 1960; it was constructed after traffic engineers felt the Thornton-Edgemar route would be too congested as Daly City grew, and after 17 major closures between 1950 and 1957 (the worst being a 120 day closure). However, the original interchange with Skyline and Route 1 was a trumpet; this was modified when the Route 1 freeway was extended to I-280, to bypass Thornton Beach and the Westlake district of Daly City completly. At the time, Route 5 (now Skyline Boulevard/Route 35) was expressway in the portions that became co-signed with Route 1 (from Pacifica north to John Daly Boulevard, which was then Alemany Boulevard) until I-280 was finished. The route from Edgemar to Skyline Boulevard was originally adopted on November 17, 1952; LRN 55 between Alemany (John Daly) and the Edgemar area was completed in December 1954, and the contract for construction of the Route 1 freeway was awarded on May 3, 1957 to the McCammon, Wunderlich, and Wunderlich Company of Palo Alto.

    Parts of the route between Thornton Beach and Santa Cruz were recycled in the 1920's and 1930's from the abandoned r/w of the Ocean Shore Railroad. At least one book on the Ocean Shore was published that can shed some light on the process. The portion along the cliffs in Daly City (abandoned after the 1957 earthquake, and therefore logically shown on the 1955 map) was directly on the railroad alignment, as were some other pre-freeway portions of the road in Pacifica, Montara-Half Moon Bay, and Scott Creek-Santa Cruz. The southern part of the Devils Slide segment is on the railroad alignment, but overall the RR took a lower-altitude line across the slide than the present highway. For details, see: Jack R. Wagner, "The Last Whistle"; 1974, Howell-North Books, Berkeley, CA.

    By 1957, Route 1 ran northward up the coast through an unincorporated group of communities that later incorporated as Pacifica. The highway then entered Daly City near the coast, and ran northward along the bottom of the high cliff next to the beach west of the Palisades section of Daly City. At what is now the abandoned Thornton Beach area, Route 1 sharply veered eastward and crossed what was then Skyline Blvd (Pre-1964 Route 5, later Route 35). Route 1 then ran eastward through the Westlake part of Daly City on a wide divided road that was then known as Alemany Blvd. Route 1 proceeded eastward on Alemany Blvd in Daly City until it reached Junipero Serra Blvd. The highway then turned northward at a 90° angle at Junipero Serra Blvd. Route 1 entered San Francisco as Juniepro Serra Blvd, as it does today. Later Alemany Blvd. (which ended at Junipero Serra in Daly City just south of the San Francisco border, and restarted about ¼ mile north inside of San Francisco and proceded eastward) was renamed as John Daly Blvd. The name of Knowles Road in Daly City (which was a continuation of Alemany in Daly City, beginning at the Alemany/Junipero Serra junction) was also changed to the John Daly Blvd., which essentailly fused two streets that continued into each other, anyway. The earthquake of 1957 destroyed the cliffside portion of Route 1 in Daly City and so that year it was rerouted fom the Daly City-Pacifica border from staying along the coast to instead proceeding northwest at the border and joining present-day Route 35 near the current Route 1/ Route 35 interchange. Route 1 then came to run northward to the east of the Palisades section of Daly City and no longer to the west of this district. In the 1960's there was a sign on Route 1 (when divers were headed South) near the Route 35 interchange indicating that Santa Cruz was 70 miles away (down Route 1). Also Skyline Drive never joined or intersected with either of these routes at its northern dead end. Skyline Drive was always a dead end there. Two maps (here and here) show a distinct route W of Skyline between Edgemar and Thornton, but there appears to be no present day street in that position.

    References indicate that a in 1957 the area near Mussel Rock marked the epicenter the Daly City Earthquake, measuring 5.3, which resulted in ground shaking and landsliding above the coastal bluffs in the Westlake Palisades area with an estimated $1 million damage. A picture from the archives of the 1957 Daly City Earthquake clearly shows a highway or road starting at what is now John Daly Boulevard, heading south on the steep cliff along the water's edge. Today there is nothing left of the road on the hillside—neither a lip or ledge. This is because Route 1 was rerouted after the earthquake. The section of Alemany Blvd west of the interchange was later reopend for a few years from the old Route 1/Route 35 interchange heading straight west to the ocean and Thornton State Beach was built there where this road met the ocean. The road was not reopened soouthward from this State Beach where Route 1 had previously run northward rom Pacifica south of this beach. After a few years, the road to this Beach from the interchange became unstable, and the road was closed once again, and now all that is left of this connection to the Beach is a tiny stub of road heading west from the Route 1/Route 35 interchange approximately 1 block long leading to a fenced off dead end. A portion of the pre-1957 alignment is still accessible; it is used as a vista point now and some of it leads off into a cliff into nowhere. It is accessible near the Edgemar neighborhood (the exits for Manor Drive and Monterey Road). The portion between Westline Drive and Thornton Beach is now covered by Mussel Rock Park and Northridge Park; a portion still remains (albeit closed off almost always) west of Route 35/John Daly at Thornton State Beach as an access road (usually fenced off with "ROAD CLOSED" sign) into the beach. An old grass median is visible; it is a two lane road that does not seem to be well-maintained at all (due to lack of usage). A small finger of the road is visible from John Daly Boulevard, as what looks to be a continuation of the road behind a fence with a Road Closed sign. Skyline Boulevard just north of the I-280 exists as a four-lane expressway for a short stretch. Where the two sides merge, the grade for the southbound side continues north for a few feet, paved, and is actually a part of the paved hiking trail to its side.

    Main Street in Half Moon Bay is old Route 1; this was supplanted in the early 1960s by the Half Moon Bay Bypass.

     

    Status

    In January 2012, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the county of San Luis Obispo along Route 1 at Willow Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    [Map]There are plans to make some roadway improvements near Cambria that include passing and left turn lanes. The project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The total estimated project cost, support and capital, is $4,389,000. It is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2008-09. The CTC received the report of a negative mitiaged EIR in December 2007.

    In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval a funding a project in San Luis Obispo County that will construct a retaining wall and realign the highway to stabilize a portion of Route 1 near the community of Ragged Point. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $23,005,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In Fall 2012, in an attempt to extend the life of the pavement, Caltrans applied a $2.1 million chip-seal coating. In last fall’s chip-sealing, the Caltrans contractor used larger aggregate rocks than had been applied previously on that roadway. They were selected for durability, for as the “chips” degrade over time, larger ones could last longer. As opposed to repaving, chip-sealing was significantly less expensive; full repaving would cost $7 million to $8 million. As soon as the chip-sealing was complete, however, bicyclists and others began to complain that the surface was rough. Rocks kicked up by vehicles pelted cyclists and chipped vehicle paint and windshields. Caltrans has swept loose rocks from the surface, rolled the pavement in a test area between Cambria and San Simeon and hired the U.C. Davis Pavement Research Center to come up with the best way to fix the problem. Results are due in May 2013. The agency does expect the aggregate to smooth out over time as the rocks settle and wear down, but that doesn't help the summer bicycle season.
    (Source: The Cambrian, 4/14/13)

    Some portions of this road are being funding for emergency repair near San Simeon due to the fact that the current roadway is likely to be lost in the Winter 2002 storms. In the segment from PM 65.4 to 66.5 in SLO, ocean surf has eroded a 20-foot high bluff to within 2 feet of the edge of the pavement (this is 1.6 mi N of Piedras Blancas Lighthouse Road). In the same area (PM 64.1 to 64.7, 0.3 mi N of Piedras Blancas Lighthouse Road), the surf has eroded a 25 foot high bluff to within 10 feet of the edge of the pavement. [CTC Agenda, August 2002].

    [San Simeon]There are plans to realign the route near San Simeon. In December 2008, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR regarding the realingment, but had no comments other than a need to identify a funding source. The project would realign a portion of Route 1 from just north of Piedras Blancas Lighthouse to the Arroyo de la Cruz Bridge near San Simeon. The project is not currently funding, but is included in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) Long Lead Projects list consistent with Commission Resolution G-13. This resolution requires the Department to notify the Commission when project development work begins on SHOPP projects that are not currently programmed. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $43,270,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. There are currently two alternatives:

    • Alternative 1 - No Build.

    • Alternative 2 - This alternative realigns inland this portion of Route 1 approximately 1400 feet north of the Piedras Blancas Lighthouse driveway and re-connects with the existing roadway just prior to the Arroyo de la Cruz Bridge.

    Point Peidras BlancasIn November 2010, the CTC received a proposal to realign the adopted route for Route 1 from 0.3 miles north of Point Piedras Blancas to Arroyo De La Cruz Creek and redesignate it to Conventional Highway. Specifically, the proposal is to realign Route 1 from one-third of a mile north of Point Piedras Blancas to Arroyo de la Cruz Creek, north of San Simeon, in San Luis Obispo County to provide protection of the highway from coastal bluff erosion. The coastal bluff undulates to and away from the current alignment of SR 1. In 2005, the bluff was as close as 19 feet from the highway centerline at PM 65.4, reaching the southbound shoulder of the highway at two locations. This new alignment was designed to closely follow the expected 100-year shoreline and minimize environmental impacts. The project area is located in a rural part of northern San Luis Obispo County, which closely follows the shoreline between Cambria and Carmel. Route 1 is designated a rural minor arterial and federal aid primary route. Route 1 from 0.6 miles north of San Simeon to Rio Road near Carmel is a California Legal Advisory Route. It serves both regional and interregional traffic and includes high levels of recreational traffic, bicycles, and limited commercial users. The section of Route 1 where the project is located is the only roadway access for emergencies to the north. Route 1 between San Luis Obispo City limits and the northern San Luis Obispo County line was designated a State Scenic Highway in 1999. The Federal Highway Administration declared this highway segment an All American Road in August 2003, the highest designation under the National Scenic Byways Program. This project is within the limits of a Freeway Agreement dated February 9, 1959. Only one connection point exists south of Arroyo del Oso within the project limits. No local roads exist within these project limits. From San Simeon to the Monterey County line, Route 1 is a two-lane conventional highway. The design speed on this highway, based on existing geometric features, is generally 43 mph or higher. The existing highway in the project area has 10 horizontal curves on rolling terrain. Lane widths vary from 10-12 feet and paved shoulders vary from 1-8 feet. Non-standard items include horizontal curve radii, vertical curve length, superelevation rates, vertical sight distance, lane width, side slopes, and shoulder width. The proposed highway realignment project will correct all these non-standard features although in some locations side slopes will be somewhat steeper than standard, to reduce wetland impacts. Caltrans proposed adopting the new alignment as a conventional highway, which is consistent with the District 5 2006 Transportation Concept Report and the Hearst agreement. This project is also included in the 2005 Regional Transportation Plan for San Luis Obispo County. The current capital cost estimate is $50.1 million. Construction of this project will be in two phases. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program for Right of Way capital and Construction capital in 2013-2014.

    It was reported that along the northern Big Sur coast, about a 1/2 hour south of Carmel, work is being done at the Rocky Creek Bridge. CalTrans is stabilizing the roadway, widening the shoulders, upgrading guardrails, and installing a retaining wall. Judging by the multiple scaffolds, it appears that the bridge, built in 1932, is undergoing a multi-point inspection.

    Another two projects are taking place at the site of Pitkins Curve and Rain Rocks, along the southern coast of Big Sur near Lucia. Pitkins Bridge and Rain Rocks Rock Shed perch atop the shifting scree of greywacke within the narrowest construction jobsite ever visited. Steel netting is draped over the rockface to contain ceaseless falling rocks. The netting was initially draped with helicopter assistance, then climbers fasten it tightly in place. The rock shed will allow for cars and bicyclists to safely travel this passage and the bridge will connect the rock shed to the northern roadbed. More information and pictures here.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $16,944,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near the city of Santa Cruz, from Pajaro River Bridge to North Aptos Underpass, that will rehabilitate 39 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality and prevent further deterioration of the road surface.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved $1.3 million to construct ¾ mile of concrete median barrier between Route 9 and High Street in the City of Santa Cruz.

    aSalinas Road InterchangeIn 2007, the CTC recommended funding of the following projects from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA): 2-lane expressway, Salinas Rd interchange in Monterey County ($37,061K requested and recommended) and auxiliary lanes, Morrissey to Soquel Ave. in Santa Cruz County ($16,190K requested and recommended). They did not recommend funding auxiliary lanes from 41st Ave to Soquel Ave. in Santa Cruz County ($17,973K requested) or from Park Ave to Bay/Porter in Santa Cruz County ($21,389K requested). In May 2008, the project was amended to delete Morrissey Ave from the scope. In June 2008, the funding was adjusted.

    In May 2010, the CTC approved amend the CMIA baseline agreement for the Highway 1 Soquel to Morrissey Auxiliary Lanes project (PPNO 6500) in Santa Cruz to revise the project schedule. The start of the Design (PS&E) phase was delayed more than a year because (1) the baseline schedule indicated that the Design phase would start nine months before the end of the Environmental (PA&ED) phase. This is inconsistent with Public Resources Code Section 21150, which requires the environmental document and Future Consideration of Funding to be approved prior to the Design phase allocation. (2( Proposed retaining walls were moved to accommodate the ultimate width of the highway, which will include high occupancy vehicle lanes. This necessitated additional environmental technical studies based on the new project footprint, which caused a delay of nearly four months. The Design phase started on October 15, 2009 upon approval of Future Consideration of Funding and the Design phase allocation. Subsequent milestones have been delayed as a result of the Design phase delay. Completion is now estimated for November 2013, with closeout ending in December 2014.

    With respect to the Salinas Road interchange: In October 2008 the CTC recieved the MND regarding its construction on Route 1 between Jensen Road to Trafton Road and convert a two-lane highway to a two-lane expressway. The project is programmed through construction with $9.945 million in Regional Improvement Program, $1.510 million in Interregional Improvement Program, and $37.061 million in Corridor Mobility Improvement Account funds. The total estimated project cost is $48.5 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09. A mitigated negative environmental impact declaraction was received. The project will involve construction activities resulting in permanent wetlands loss and visual impacts that will be mitigated to less than significant levels. However, construction was delayed due to the California Budget Crisis in 2008-2009. Construction was to have begun in late 2009 to convert Salinas Road into a three-lane span over Route 1, add traffic signals and remove the dangerous left turn drivers must now make at this intersection. This is delayed.

    101 Santa CruzIn October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Santa Cruz County that will construct auxiliary lanes on Route 1 from just west of Soquel Avenue to just east of Morrissey Boulevard, replace the La Fonda Avenue Overcrossing, and construct roadway improvements. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes Federal Demonstration funds, Regional Surface Transportation Program funds, and local funds. Total estimated project cost is $22,058,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the concurrent project baseline amendment. The amendment will modify the project by eliminating the proposed improvements at the Morrissey Boulevard Interchange.

    In August 2011, it was reported that federal transportation officials have raised questions about the controversial $503 million project's lack of progress. In face, the Federal Highway Administration has not only threatened to pull the plug on the project, it told the county's Regional Transportation Commission it could seek payback of $5.5 million. That's the federal government's share of a $12 million environmental impact report that's dragged on for eight years. In order to keep the project alive, the regional transportation commission voted to pursue a smaller, $30 million project: adding exit lanes between 41st Avenue and Soquel Drive and a bike-and-pedestrian bridge over Route 1 near Chanticleer Avenue. The hope is that this would be the first of several segments that together complete the original vision. By pursuing smaller pieces under the umbrella of a single environmental study, the RTC hopes to appease the Federal Highway Administration and move forward incrementally as funds become available. The original plan would add high-occupancy vehicle lanes along a nine-mile length of Route 1 between Soquel Drive and San Andreas Road. It would add auxiliary lanes between exits, as well as three new bike and pedestrian bridges over the freeway.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $185,000 in SHOPP funding to stabilize and repair slope and install Rock Slope Protection at one location damaged by heavy rainfall near Pescadero, 0.4 mile south of Pescadero Creek Road.

    Devils Slide. There are plans to construct a tunnel under the infamous Devil's Slide. In September 2004, Senate Bill 792 required the Department of Transportation to sell and transfer certain property under its control in the County of San Mateo as surplus state property to the Department of Parks and Recreation for state park purposes. This bill was in response to San Mateo County Measure T (1996), which proclaimed that the construction of a surface bypass in this area would seriously damage the watersheds, wildlife habitats, and parks of Montara and San Pedro Mountains, and directing the amendment of their local coastal program to provide for a tunnel alternative to such a bypass. After Caltrans determined that a freeway bypass over Montara Mountain ("Devils Slide") is not currently viable, the property located in the existing Martini Creek Devil's Slide bypass right-of-way for the realignment of Route 1 from the northern boundary of the town of Montara (State Parcel Number 39874) to past the alignment summit over Montara Mountain (State Parcel Number 39873 and a large portion of State Parcel Number 39872), hereinafter "the Martini Creek Bypass Alignment," became surplus state property located within the coastal zone. This bill relinquishes the property, in order to add it to the McNee Ranch Acquisition area of Montara State Beach. Surprisingly, this transfer removes the last hurdle for the state Department of Transportation, which has been trying since the late 1950s to create a bypass for slide-prone Highway 1 between Pacifica and Montara. Caltrans officials hope to begin work in January 2005 on a pair of 4,000-foot tunnels that will speed drivers under San Pedro Mountain, completing the project by 2010. San Mateo County approved the $270 million project in May, but the tunnel was held up when the state Coastal Commission filed an appeal in July, pending transfer of the surplus Caltrans property near the tunnel to the state Parks Department.

    There are plans for a $270 million project to build a tunnel for Route 1 between Pacifica and Montara. The rocks of Devils Slide have defined life on the coast since 1937, when the "Sea-Level Boulevard" was built on a former railroad bed. It has steadfastly refused to hold a highway. Pounded by waves, the soil slips into the sea. All that keeps the road in place, clinging precariously to the cliffs, are giant bolts and cables. Nine times, Route 1 at Devils Slide has closed. In 2006, it was shut for four months, sending commuters on long detours and threatening coastal businesses. A closing in 1995 lasted nearly six months. The plan is to replace the highway with a tunnel. For more information, see this article. According to the article, the realization of the Devil's Slide tunnel would culminate a saga that began with environmentalists and residents battling a planned six-lane highway between San Francisco and San Luis Obispo in the 1960s and led to them convincing the state's giant transportation department to build the twin-bore tube through Montara Mountain. According to the Half Moon Bay Review in 2006, the construction bids for the tunnel came in over $32 million over the original Caltrans estimate. Caltrans had first pegged the price of the tunnel at $240 million, estimating construction time at about five years. The low bid, presented by Kiewit Pacific, came in at $272.4 million with construction expected to take 1,500 calendar days. A second bid - made by a joint venture of construction companies Shea, Traylor and Atkinson - came in nearly $50 million more than Kiewit's and asked for an additional year to complete the work. After the contact is ready, preparation work may begin in spring 2007 to provide the site with adequate drainage and better stability. The proposed 4,200-foot-long twin tunnels will bypass the Devil's Slide section of Highway 1 by an inland route through Montara Mountain. The boring for the tunnel began in September 2007. The twin tunnels will connect to a graceful and lofty set of bridges spanning a scenic canyon. The $322 million project will be ready for traffic by late 2010. The tunnels, four-fifths of a mile long, will be built in stable rock far from the cliffs that are sliding into the sea. The bridge construction spares precious wetlands. The long-haunted stretch of old Route 1 will be turned into a 1.2-mile recreation area, while the new road will be a reliable thoroughfare. The tunnels at Devils Slide are estimated to be completed in 2011, and the final cost will be about $325 million.

    In June 2010, it was reported that good progress was being made on the tunnel. The buildings and the bridges are finished, and the tunnel diggers are expected to bust through the north end of the mountain by Fall 2010. Each of the roughly 4,200-foot bores - 30 feet wide and 24 feet high—is about 90% of the way through the mountain. The contractor, Kiewit Pacific, is using the New Austrian Tunneling Method, which involves analyzing the kind of soil that's being excavated and using different types of machinery to get through it. The main diggers are the road header, which features a long arm with a pair of 2½-foot-wide spinning wheels—covered with carbide-tipped spikes—and an excavator workers refer to as the T. rex. The road header is used on harder soils and rocks. It bites into the earth and gnaws it into smaller pieces. A series of rotating metal plates moves what's left onto a conveyor belt that lifts the muck into a truck that carries it to a disposal site on the side of the mountain, just outside the south portal. The smaller T. rex works similarly, but on softer soils. Once the hole is extended, workers secure it by installing arched metal ribs and coat the tunnel walls with sprayed concrete, applied by a remote-controlled robot. The thickness varies from 4 to 14 inches, depending on the stability of the soil. Next, a bright yellow sheet of plastic waterproofing material is installed to protect the tunnel. Two layers of reinforcing steel bars come next, and then the whole thing is smothered in a thicker, smoother layer of concrete, using an overhead gantry that straddles the tunnels and slides on rails. Although it's known as the final coat, enamel panels and a brighter paint job will be applied before the tunnel is opened to traffic. By Fall 2011, the finished tunnel should open to traffic. This will be California's first highway tunnel built since 1964, when the third bore of the East Bay's Caldecott Tunnel (Route 24) opened.
    [Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 6/19/10]

    In October 2010, it was reported that the Devil's Slide tunnel had broken through near Pacifica. This was about a month ahead of schedule. When the break-through happened, there was a ceremony on the north side of San Pedro mountain, where workers excavating the northbound bore of the Devil's Slide tunnel smashed through a sprayed concrete coating, opening a small hole through the mountain slope. They then enlarged that hole to about 8 by 8 feet and emerged to greet a crowd of dignitaries and other invited guests gathered atop the Devil's Slide bridges.

    In January 2011, it was reported that all excavation was completed.

    In July 2011, the completion date was pushed back to late 2012. That is more than a year later than the general contractor estimated when it started construction on the $342 million project in 2007. The variability of the rock and convergence - or movement of the soil - has delayed the project. Crews have had to do more reinforcement work than called for in the original plans as well. Although crews completed excavation in January, digging continued to complete the bottom portion of the bore. Every time they run into a new kind of rock, they have to dismantle the equipment.

    In February 2012, it was reported that concrete roadways into the tunnel have been completed. The concrete roadways under construction inside the bores are a little more than 21 feet wide and sit between two emergency walkways. Workers are putting 5 inches of concrete atop a 1-inch layer of asphalt that sits atop another 5 inches of concrete placed atop a crushed-rock base. Each tunnel will accommodate a single lane of traffic, 12 feet wide, with an 8-foot shoulder on the right and a 2-foot shoulder on the left. The 8-foot shoulder will serve double duty as a place for stalled cars to pull off the road as well as for bicyclists to pedal through the tunnel. Most bike riders, however, will probably choose to pedal along the current stretch of highway, which will become a bike trail and park offering spectacular cliff-top views of the Pacific Ocean. The remaining work on the tunnel includes installation of 32 jet-powered fans - 16 in each bore - to provide ventilation, enamel-covered curved panels that will line the walls, electrical systems and a water line, as well as completing landscaping outside the portals and finishing touches to the fake rock walls at the entrances. The northbound tunnel will open first to allow crews to build safe connections to Route 1. Southbound traffic will follow a week or two later. Once the tunnels are open, crews will build parking lots on both sides.

    In November 2012, it was reported that the opening of the tunnels had been delayed until early 2013. The extension is related to safety and electronics testing, including the ventilation system and cameras monitoring activity inside the tunnel. Once those are complete, Caltrans must finish the road connections between Route 1 and the tunnels.

    Devil's SlideIn late March 2013, the Devil's Slide tunnels opened. The opening of a tunnel, and not a 4.5-mile freeway bypass to the east, is the result of a remarkable grass-roots coalition of environmentalists and Coastside residents who rose up to oppose the agency's plans for an inland route. The four-lane bypass would have cut McNee Ranch State Park in half and, activists feared, opened the coast to more aggressive development. Devils Slide -- less than a quarter-mile of steep, crumbling rock between Pacifica and Montara -- has tormented travelers since the late 19th century. The promontory forms the western flank of San Pedro Mountain, rising abruptly from the Pacific Ocean to a height of about 1,000 feet. Its presence sealed off the coast from the sort of development that occurred in Pacifica and Daly City during the mid-20th century. In 1937, Caltrans carved a 5.9-mile extension of Route 1 into the cliffs, just down the slope from a more primitive road built in 1879. It suffered its first major closure the following year. Fatal accidents, with cars plunging into the rocks at surf's edge, became a regular occurrence. By the 1960s, state and county officials were eyeing a bypass of four to six lanes that would run east of San Pedro Mountain. The road was tied to a bold idea for development on the sparsely populated coast. But the plan collided with the burgeoning environmental movement. The Sierra Club and others sued to block the project in 1972, sparking an epic legal and political fight that reached a climax in 1996 when county voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure in favor of a tunnel. The twin tunnels are each 30 feet wide and 4,200 feet long, making them the second-longest in California behind the Wawona Tunnel in Yosemite National Park. The excavation involved removing about 11.4 million cubic feet of rock from inside San Pedro Mountain. Each tunnel is equipped with sensors that monitor heat as well as nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide levels. The tunnels are monitored by cameras 24 hours a day. Tunnel operators can override motorists' car stereos to communicate during emergencies. There are 16 powerful jet fans affixed to the ceiling of each tunnel to provide ventilation in the event of a fire or other incident. The southern entrances to the tunnels are covered in a fake rock surface, created by a man who worked on Disneyland's Indiana Jones ride, that is designed to blend into surroundings.
    (Source: San Jose Mercury News, 3/25/13)

    In July 2013, information was provided on the fate of the former Route 1 roadbed bypassed by the tunnels. The county will operate the Devils Slide Trail, which will run 1.3 miles between parking lots Caltrans has constructed near the northern and southern portals to a pair of bypass tunnels that opened in March. The county's plan calls for the trail to be about 24 feet wide, with two 6-foot bicycle lanes to the east and a 12-foot walking path closer to the cliff's edge. The county envisions building two scenic overlooks, each with coin-operated spotting scopes and benches, as well as restrooms and drinking fountains. The trail will be fenced on either side, mostly with 3-foot concrete barriers known as K-rails, according to the plan. The county may paint the barriers an earth tone to blend in with the scenery. The overlooks will be surrounded by metal guardrails strung with cables. The county has budgeted nearly $2 million to prepare the trail. The work will begin after the county takes over the roadway in August 2013. The work includes "microsurfacing" the pavement, or coating it with a polymer to create a smoother surface, which will benefit bicyclists. It also includes signs, trail striping and some cyclone fencing to shield peregrine falcons that have been nesting on the southern end of Devils Slide.
    (Source: San Jose Mercury News, 7/24/13)

    In February 2014, it was reported that rallies had started against a proposed Caltrans project in Pacifica. The project -- which Caltrans says would seek to reduce environmental impacts -- would widen Route 1 from Sharp Park Golf Course to Rockaway Beach from four to six lanes. The goal is to ease traffic congestion during peak hours. The project would require land acquisition, including several businesses.

    In March 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Mateo County that will widen a portion of Route 1 from four lanes to six lanes in the city of Pacifica. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $53,250,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funds, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15.

    In August 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Mateo on Route 1 in the Devil’s Slide area, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    Other

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for this route:

    • High Priority Project #51: Route 1 San Pedro Creek Bridge replacement in Pacifica. San Pedro Creek is currently flood-prone, and the bridge needs to be replaced in order to provide 100-year storm capacity. $2,500,000.

    • High Priority Project #719: Route 1 improvements between Soquel and Morrissey Blvd, including merge lanes and the La Fonda overpass near Santa Cruz. $2,936,000.

    In August 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of the portion of Route 1 right of way in the County of Santa Cruz, at Harkins Slough Road, consisting of a bridge wingwall built and maintained by the County within State Right of Way.

    In October 2013, the CTC received a MND for future consideration of funding regarding a project located on Route 1 from post mile 40.6 to 40.8 spanning San Pedro Creek in San Mateo County. The project will replace the existing bridge with a 63-foot wide by 140-foot long structure consisting of two 12-foot lanes, two 8-foot wide shoulders and a 12-foot wide separated pedestrian/Class I bicycle path. The project also includes rebuilding a 990-foot long section of roadway at the southern end of the bridge, and a 570-foot long section of roadway at the northern end of the bridge as well as the widening of San Pedro Creek to provide the capacity needed to accommodate 100-year flood flows under the bridge.

     

    Naming

    This segment is officially named "Cabrillo Highway" in SHC 635. It was named by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 569, in 1959.

    Historically, this segment was named the "San Simeon Highway". This is because the segment starts at San Simeon, the home of Hearst Castle.

    The portion of Route 1 from the Park Avenue Undercrossing to Branciforte Avenue Overcrossing in the County of Santa Cruz is named the "CHP Officer A. Donald Hoover Memorial Highway." It was named in memory of Officer A. Donald Hoover, who was born on January 1, 1903, in Wichita, Kansas, to John and Pearl Hoover. Officer Hoover was an eight-year veteran of the CHP, and served in the County of Santa Cruz. Officer Hoover was killed on August 31, 1934, while traveling on the Santa Cruz-Watsonville Highway, on a stretch known to locals as “Slaughterhouse Curve,” when his motorcycle collided with an automobile, traveling in the opposite direction, that began turning onto a side road in front of him. The impact of the collision caused Officer Hoover to lose and never regain consciousness. Officer Hoover’s dedication and service will be remembered throughout the CHP and law enforcement community for years, as the loss was not just to family, friends, and coworkers, but to the entire community and the state that Officer Hoover served.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    A portion of Route 1 midway between Pacifica and Montara in San Mateo County is named the "Devil's Slide". The origin of name is not confirmed but believed to come from the practice of prohibition days gangsters using the once-deserted area to dispose of their enemies into the sea at this precipitous location. However, San Mateo County historian Barbara VanderWerf, who has written two books on the area, asserts in Montara Mountain that "Originally, Devil's Slide meant only the promontory and its inland ridge. In the 1880s, travellers in horse-drawn wagons on the Half Moon Bay-Colma Road, which ran along the top of the ocean bluffs, paused to note the chute-like ridge ending in the massive rock dome. They thought it looked fit for a Devil's Slide and named it so." To avoid the slides, there will soon be a tunnel here.

    Route 1 adjacent to and including the future Devil's Slide Tunnels in San Mateo County is named the “Tom Lantos Tunnels at Devil's Slide”. This segment was named in memory of Representative Tom Lantos, a member of the United States House of Representatives between 1981 and 2008. Tom Lantos was born in Budapest, Hungary, on February 1, 1928, and was 16 years old when Nazi Germany occupied his native country. Tom Lantos was a member of the anti-Nazi underground movement and later was part of the anti-Communist student movement, and is the only Holocaust survivor to ever serve in the United States Congress. An American by choice, Tom Lantos received a B.A. and M.A. in economics from the University of Washington and a Ph. D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. For three decades prior to being elected to the Congress, Tom Lantos was a professor of economics at San Francisco State University, an international affairs analyst for public television, and a consultant to a number of Bay Area businesses, and served in senior advisory roles to members of the United States Senate. As a member of the House of Representatives, Tom Lantos worked diligently to address quality of life issues in Bay Area communities, with a strong record on environmental protection and efforts to reform the nation's energy policy. As a former professor and chairman of the Millbrae Board of Education, Tom Lantos has also been a consistent supporter of public education. Tom Lantos led a major investigation of waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and has been a leader in congressional oversight of federal programs. As Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Tom Lantos has been a strong voice for responsible international involvement and an advocate for participation in international organizations, with an emphasis on human rights, having also founded the Congressional Human Rights Caucus and served as its cochairman. Tom Lantos obtained one hundred fifty million dollars ($150,000,000) in federal funds for construction of a bypass of the hazardous coastal State Highway Route 1 at Devil's Slide and led the bipartisan congressional effort urging the President to declare the area eligible for federal disaster assistance, resulting in San Mateo County being eligible for FEMA's Public Assistance Program that provides 75 percent reimbursement for repair or replacement of disaster-damaged public facilities. In April 2007, Tom Lantos successfully pushed for expedited federal small business loans to private, for-profit coastal area businesses that have lost significant clientele due to the closure of Route 1, and he was a staunch advocate of the tunnel project option for the Devil's Slide Bypass, which prevented the construction of a destructive and environmentally damaging highway bypass over Montara Mountain, which was the plan initially proposed by the Department of Transportation and supported by many people. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 71, Resolution Chapter 85, on 7/10/2008.

    The portion of Route 1 between 0.1 mile north of the Green Valley Road and 0.1 mile north of the Pajaro River bridge is named the "CHP Officer John Pedro Memorial Freeway." It was named in memory of CHP Officer John Pedro (1965-2002) from Watsonville, California. John Pedro served in the United States in the Army Reserves from 1987 to 1997, and served in the Air Force Reserves from 1991 to the time of his death. He played in the band for the Air Force. He joined the California Highway Patrol on July 31, 1989, as a cadet and graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy on December 21, 1989. After he graduated from the Academy, John Pedro was assigned to the San Jose area, and he was transferred in 1992 to the Redwood City area, in 1993 back to San Jose area, and in 1994 to the Santa Cruz area. On June 3, 2002, John Pedro was killed, while on duty, in a traffic collision. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 67, July 16, 2004, Chapter 118.

    The portion of Route 1 between Route 84 (San Gregorio Road) at postmile 18.189 and Verde Road/Lobitos Creek Road at postmile 22.662, is named the "Ranger Patricia M. Scully Memorial Highway". Named in memory of California Parks and Recreation Service Ranger Patricia M. Scully, who was born in April 1951, in Sacramento, California, to Patrick and Eileen Scully. She was raised on a poultry ranch owned by the Scully family in Rio Linda, California. Ranger Scully graduated from Rio Linda High School in June of 1969. She attended American River College for two years where she played on the field hockey team with her sister Mary, and then transferred to California State University, Sacramento, where she received her bachelor of arts degree in social science and anthropology (archaeology) in January 1974. She was an outstanding student and received scholarships and awards of merit for her academic achievements. At the time of her untimely death, Ranger Scully was working on a master of science degree in anthropology and environmental resources at California State University, Sacramento, and had completed all coursework and lacked only a thesis. Ranger Scully joined the California Parks and Recreation Service in 1974, now named the Department of Parks and Recreation. In late 1974, she graduated from the Parks and Recreation Academy (the Mott Training Center in Asilomar) after six weeks of training. She was one of two women among the 38 cadets in academy class 18. Her first assignment after graduation was to the Big Basin State Park where she received additional (interpretative) training. Ranger Scully’s last assignment was as a State Park Ranger 1 at the Pescadero State Park in Half Moon Bay on the San Mateo coast. When not working, she worked on a historical survey of Ano Nuevo State Beach. She was dedicated to the preservation of the environment and the education of the park visitor. She was a nine-year veteran of the Department of Parks and Recreation at the time of her death. While on patrol at San Mateo Coast State Beaches, Half Moon Bay, Ranger Scully was killed by a drunk driver on May 6, 1976. She became the second female law enforcement officer to be killed in California. This segment was named to recognize Ranger Scully’s years of dedicated service to the Department of Parks and Recreation and to raise awareness about the service risks present to all peace officers, including rangers with the Department of Parks and Recreation. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 102, Resolution Chapter 120, on September 10, 2012.

    The portion of Route 1 in San Mateo County from the interchange at Skyline Boulevard to the southern city limits of the City of Pacifica is officially named the "Louis J. Papan Highway". Louis J. Papan was first elected to the Daly City City Council in November 1970. In November 1972, he was elected to the California State Assembly, and was reelected seven times, serving in the California State Assembly until 1986. He was again elected to the Assembly in 1996, and was reelected twice, serving as the Dean of the Assembly until 2002. In the Assembly, Assemblyman Papan was critical in securing funding for the purchase of Linda Mar Beach and the Pacifica Pier in the City of Pacifica; and authored legislation necessary to create CalTrain to serve commuters in San Mateo County. Together with his wife, he founded John's Closet, a nonprofit organization that to date has helped provide new clothes for over 7,000 low-income children in San Mateo County. He has also worked as a tireless and successful advocate for the development and improvement of all modes of transportation in California; as well as fighting for the needs of disabled children, and the funding for special education, child abuse programs. He oversaw the restoration of the Historic Capitol Building, has served as Chair of the Assembly Committees on Rules and on Banking and Finance. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 234, Chapter 176, September 16, 2002.

     

    Named Structures

    The bridge at Burns Creek in the Big Sur area of Monterey County is officially dedicated to the memory of Thomas M. Sanders. Thomas M. Sanders, a Department of Transportation Maintenance Supervisor, was killed in 1991 in the line of duty, at the age of 58, while repairing a section of guardrail in a coned off area of Route 1 in the Big Sur area of Monterey County by an automobile operated by a driver under the influence of drugs, who was attempting to flee from a California Highway Patrol officer. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 48, Chapter 107, in 1997.

     

    Business Routes
    • In Monterey: Munras Street and North Fremont Blvd.
    • In Seaside: Fremont Blvd.
    • In Marina: Del Monte Ave.
    • Cayucos
    • Cambria: Windsor Boulevard and Main Street

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 101 near San Luis Obispo to San Simeon; the northern limits of Carmel to the west city limits of Santa Cruz; the Higgins-Purisima Road to Route 280 south of San Francisco. Constructed as freeway for 5 miles near Morro Bay, from Route 68 to Route 156, from south of Watsonville to Santa Cruz, and from Pacifica to Route 280. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959 (Chapter 1062).

    • 1959: Added to the Freeway and Expressway system (Chapter 1062).
    • 1971: Deleted the segment from San Mateo-Santa Cruz County line to Higgins-Purisima Road (Chapter 1247)
    • 1972: Deleted the segment from Santa Cruz to the county line (Chapter 812).
    • 1992: Changed the second segment to the N limits of Carmel (previous wording: "from Carmel to the W limits of Santa Cruz"). This was changed to exclude the Hatton Canyon Alignment by AB 434, Chapter 136, on 7/31/2002.

     

    National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 101 near San Luis Obispo to Route 35 near Daly City.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    San Luis Obispo 1 28.56 28.89
    San Luis Obispo 1 30.01 30.24
    Monterey 1 74.91 R84.60
    Santa Cruz 1 R0.00 R1.59
    Santa Cruz 1 R1.74 R3.37
    Santa Cruz 1 R3.37 R3.52
    Santa Cruz 1 7.83 9.68
    Santa Cruz 1 10.22 11.18
    Santa Cruz 1 11.88 13.32
    Santa Cruz 1 13.39 14.98
    Santa Cruz 1 15.09 17.41


  5. Route 280 near the south boundary of the City and County of San Francisco to Route 101 near the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The original definition of this section in 1963 was "A connection from Route 280 to Route 82 near the south boundary of the City and County of San Francisco." In 1968, Chap. 282 changed the routing, moving a routing of Route 1 from Route 280 to Route 82 was transferred to Route 280. This portion of the routing was part of the "Southern Freeway", and was the LRN 225 portion of I-280. As a result, the definition was changed to "Route 280 near the south boundary of the City and County of San Francisco to Route 480 in San Francisco."

    In 1991, Chap. 493 reflected the deletion of Route 480, changing the end of the segment to "Route 101 near the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco."

    Shortly N of this portion, there appears to have been an alternate routing where Route 1 would have diverged from 19th Avenue, ran slightly to the East, moving to meet the Crosstown Freeway, and then continuing North to the Golden Gate approach. It appears that this routing was, at one time, planned for freeway construction as the "Park Presidio Freeway" and "Junipero Serra Freeway". It appears to have been part of a 1955 traffic plan, which was later deleted as freeway.

    There are still remnants of this planning in the segment of Route 1 between 19th Ave. and I-280 Interchange, built in the early 1950s. It is hypothesized that this quasi-freeway section was to have been part of the extension of the Junipero Serra Freeway to Golden Gate Park, and of the Park Presidio Freeway going to the Golden Gate Bridge and eventually to Novato. There are two interchanges on this small stub of freeway, Brotherhood Way and Alemany Boulevard. This segment appears to have been planned to be I-280.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield This segment was first defined as part of LRN 56 in 1933.


    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of signed Route 1 (Jct. US 101 at Las Cruces, via Cambria, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Pt. Reyes, and Westport to US 101 at Fortuna).

    In 1938, before construction of the tunnel through the Presedio, there was a different routing N of Golden Gate Park. This routing ran E along Fulton to Van Ness, where it joined the US 101 routing N along Van Ness and Lombard and Richardson into the Presedio and to the Golden Gate.

    In 1958, it was reported in CHPW that, as a portion of the future Golden Gate Freeway, design is underway for a 1.3-mile-long project on Route 1 extending between the Park Presidio Freeway and the Marina approach to the Golden Gate Bridge. This project would have widened the present freeway to eight lanes and revise the interchange at the junction of US 101 and Route 1.

     

    Status

    There appear to be some plans to make a portion of this route an underground tollway. The San Francisco Chronicle published an article on 2/18/2001 where it indicated that transportation planners "said the city should look into building "supercorridor" roads under Van Ness Avenue, 19th Avenue, and Fell and Oak streets." The suggested 19th Avenue tunnel would run five miles, from Junipero Serra Boulevard through Golden Gate Park and up to Lake Street, with exits at Brotherhood Way, Ocean Avenue, Quintara Street, Lincoln Way and Geary Boulevard. The Van Ness tunnel would run almost two miles, from about Fell to Lombard Street, with exits at Broadway and Geary Boulevard. Along Oak and Fell, the planners suggest an underground road running more than half a mile from Laguna to Divisadero streets. However, the roads would would violate the long-standing general plan for San Francisco, which calls for no new highway capacity.

     

    Naming

    Officially named "Cabrillo Highway" per SHC 635.

    Route 1 and Route 101 from Lake Street (at Route 1) in San Francisco to Waldo Point (Jct Route 1/US 101, north end of Sausalito) across the Golden Gate Bridge is named the "Golden Gate Bridge Freeway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 11, Chapter 39 in 1954. This was originally planned to run along 19th Street in San Francisco.

     

    Named Structures

    Tunnel 34-016, at Park Presidio Blvd in San Francisco through the Presidio of San Francisco between Lake Street and Golden Gate Bridge is named the "General Douglas MacArthur Tunnel". The tunnel was constructed from 1938-1940 as part of the "Funston Avenue Approach" to the Golden Gate Bridge. It opened, with the rest of the Funston Approach, on April 22, 1940. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 86, Chapter 94 in 1986. Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964) was a brilliant and controversial five-star U.S. Army General. Strongly dedicated to country and duty, and gifted with superior command ability, MacArthur's military service included important command assignments in the both World Wars and the Korean War. During World War One, MacArthur commanded the 42nd "Rainbow" Division of the Allied Expeditionary Force in France. After the War, MacArthur was superintendant of West Point from 1919-1922. In January of 1930 he was promoted to full General, 4 stars and named the U.S. Army's Chief of Staff. MacArthur retired from the Army in 1937, one year after the President of the Phillipines, Manuel Quezon, appointed him Field Marshall of the Phillipine Army. In 1941 MacArthur was recalled to active duty as the U.S. prepared to enter World War Two. By 1942 MacArthur was Supreme Allied Commander of the Southwest Pacific theater. In January of 1945, MacArthur was promoted to the rank of five star General. On September 2, 1945 on board the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, MacArthur accepted Japan's unconditional surrender. In June 1950, with the beginning of the Korean War, MacArthur was appointed the Supreme United Nations commander. However, on April 11, 1951 he was relieved of his command by President Truman. This tunnel had been previously unofficially named as the "Presidio Tunnel", as it passes through the Presidio. [Information on General MacArthur from http://members.tripod.com/~DARTO/macarthur/macarthur.html]

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Route 1 between Junipero Serra Boulevard and Lake Street in the City and County of San Francisco, per Senate Bill 1419, Chapter 121, July 10, 2008.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 280 to the San Francisco county line.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 35 in San Francisco to Route 101 near the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    San Mateo 1 R43.21 R45.12
    San Mateo 1 R45.28 R45.50
    San Mateo 1 R46.42 R48.56


  6. From Route 101 near the southerly end of Marin Peninsula to Route 101 near Leggett via the coast route through Jenner and Westport.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The 1963 definition of this segment was "Route 101 near the southerly end of Marin Peninsula to Route 101 near Fernbridge via the coast route through Jenner, Westport, and Ferndale." In 1984, Chapter 489 transferred the portion from Rockport to Route 101 near Fernbridge to Route 211. The portion from Rockport to Route 101 near Leggett was transferred from former Route 208, truncating the end to " Route 101 near Leggett via the coast route through Jenner and Westport."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield The portion of this segment from San Francisco to the Marin-Sonoma County Line was added to LRN 56 as part of the 1933 extension of the legislative route. Also added in 1933 was the portion from Jenner to Westport. In 1951, LRN 56 was extended southward to the Marin-Sonoma County Line and northward to US 101 near Leggett by Chapter 1588.

    In 1934, most of segment (including the portion later transferred to Route 211, but excluding the portion that was Route 208) was signed as part of signed Route 1 (Jct. US 101 at Las Cruces, via Cambria, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, Pt. Reyes, and Westport to US 101 at Fortuna). Fernbridge is slightly N of Fortuna, confirming that the current Route 211 portion was original part of signed Route 1. The portion from Route 211 near Rockport to Leggett was briefly Route 208 post-1964; this segment was not assigned a number in 1934.

     

    Status

    A bypass was opened in Feb 1994 months around Cloverdale on Route 101. This connects to the former end of Route 101 2 mi south of Cloverdale to an approx. 3 mile stretch of freeway about 1 mile north of Cloverdale.

    There are plans to reconstruct and stabilize the roadway just above Slide Ranch, between Stinson Beach and Muir Beach. Proposed is a 523-foot-long, 20-foot-high but mostly buried retaining wall anchored by metal piles sunk 15 feet into the downslope hillside, with just 8 feet of the wall exposed at the top that would reveal only natural wood lagging. A 5- to 8-foot-wide bench area would be provided at the bottom of the retaining wall to allow for construction and wall maintenance. The project at milepost 7.7 near Slide Ranch includes replacement of drainage inlets and culverts, addition of a metal pipe drain, installation of a metal beam guard rail, and installation of cable railing along the retaining wall. The roadbed would be reconstructed and resurfaced in the areas where slope failure has caused extensive cracking and buckling of the roadway. The project site is bordered on the upslope by Mount Tamalpais State Park, and on the downslope by the Golden Gate National Recreational Area. The downslope would be planted after completion of the six-month project, scheduled to begin in April 2012. The plan follows completion in 2007 of a four-month, $25 million road reconstruction project that closed a stretch of road north of Slide Ranch to Panoramic Highway. A similar project also shut the road in 2005.
    [Source: "Highway 1 repair plan near Stinson outlined", The Oakland Tribune, 5/31/10]

    There are currently plans to replace the Route 1 Noyo River bridge (the original Larsen Memorial Bridge), at a cost of $31 million.

    There are plans to realign this route near Point Arena in Mendocino County. This is between Schooner and Hearn Gulch, N of Iverson Point.

    In March 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Mendocino County that will repair storm damage along Route 1, including constructing a retaining wall and guardrail, reconstructing the roadway, and improving drainage.

    In June 2011, the CTC approved $9 million in funding to replace the Greenwood Creek Bridge on Route 1 near Elk in Mendocino County. The 56-year-old bridge is nearing the end of its service life and is in need of deck rehabilitation and rail replacement. Additionally,the creek’s channel has shifted over the years and has exposed one of the footings for the bridge. The new bridge will be wider and will include a 5-foot-wide walkway for pedestrians. Project completion is expected by fall 2014.

    Also near Elk, in August 2011 the CTC approved $1.65 million to realign the road and fix damage from storms in the 2005-2006 winter. The road will be shifted to the east because of an unstable slope.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,650,000 in SHOPP funding for repaires near Elk, from 1.7 to 1.4 miles south of Navarro River Bridge, that will repair and realign roadway and reconstruct drainage facilities damaged by heavy rainfall.

    In June 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a fish passage project on Route 1 at Dunn Creek in Mendocino County. The project is necessary to comply with the California Department of Fish and Game Incidental Take Permit that was issued for the Ten Mile River Bridge Replacement project located on Route 1, PM 69.2/70.1. The Dunn Creek Fish Passage project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $3,552,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    In September 2011, it was reported that construction was completed on a roundabout near Ft. Bragg. The Fort Bragg roundabout is designed to help drivers on Simpson merge onto Route 1 without the potential traffic bottlenecks that a stoplight could create. It is located at Simpson Lane just south of Fort Bragg. The project cost $4.4 million project and will be completed in Fall 2011.

     

    Naming

    Route 1 and Route 211 from Mill Valley (Marin County) to Ferndale (Humboldt County) are named the "Shoreline Highway. This is because they go along the shoreline. The portion of the route between Rockport and Ferndale (Route 211) is not constructed. The road runs along the Pacific Shore. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 91, Chapter 239 in 1957.

    The portion of Route 1 in the City of Fort Bragg, from Chestnut Street in the south (milepost marker 60.925) to Elm Street in the north (milepost marker 61.993) is named the "Jere Melo Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Jere Melo, who was born November 12, 1941, and grew up in Mount Shasta, California. Jere Melo spent two years on active duty with the United States Army, including a 13-month tour on the 38th parallel in Korea, in command of a Hawk Missile site. Jere Melo’s career in the timber industry spanned 45 years. He worked as a forester for the Union Lumber Company in Fort Bragg and as a contractor for Campbell Timberland Management, and dedicated his life to keeping the woods safe for timber workers and to protecting forestland from degradation by illegal trespassing, marijuana cultivation, dumping, and encampments. Jere Melo began his long and distinguished political career in 1992 when he was appointed to serve on the Fort Bragg Planning Commission. In 1996, he was elected to his first term on the Fort Bragg City Council. Jere served as Vice Mayor from 1998 to 2000, inclusive, and as Mayor from 2000 to 2004, inclusive. At the time of his death, Jere was in his 15th year and his fourth term of office as a city council member. He was very active in the League of California Cities, was the city chair for the Board of the Fort Bragg Fire Protection Authority, and for 13 years served on the Board of the Mendocino County Local Agency Formation Commission. In addition, he also had a very strong commitment to the local fishing industry serving on the Noyo Watershed Alliance, the Board of the Mendocino Coast Sports Foundation, and the Board of the Fort Bragg-Otsuchi, along with his wife. Jere Melo was murdered on August 27, 2011, at the age of 69, while patrolling for illegal marijuana growth on Hawthorne property in Fort Bragg. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 10-130 over the Navarro River in Mendocino county is named the "Armed Forces of Mendocino County° Memorial Bridge. It was constructed in 1949, and was named by Senate Resolution 169 in 1949.

    Bridge 10-151, at Russian Gulch in Mendocino county, is named the "Frederick W. Panhorst Bridge". It was built in 1940, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 145 in 1974. Frederick Panhorst was a Caltrans employee responsible for the construction of the Alameda Creek Bridge. He is a former director of ASCE. In 1960, he received a California State Assembly Resolution of Commendation and California Highway Commission Resolution of Acknowledgement and Appreciation. He served as as an engineer with the Bridge Department of the California Division of Highways from 1927 to 1960. He has a collection of papers on file at the University of Illinois.

    Bridge 10-153, over Casper Creek in Mendocino county, is named the "Ray E. Ware Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1966, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 32 in 1973. Ray E. Ware served as Judge of the Ten Mile Justice Court from 1952 to 1971 and was a tireless advocate for an all weather highway system for California.

    Bridge 10-161, at 10 Mile River in Mendocino county, is named the "Frank J. Hyman Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1954, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33 in 1973. Frank J. Hyman activated the Paul Bunyan Association and was instrumental in forming the Noyo Harbor Commission and the Fort Bragg Rural Fire District in the 1950's.

    Bridge 10-175, over Hare Creek in Mendocino county, is named the "Sgt. Emil Evenson Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1947, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 44, in 1948. Sgt. Emil Evenson, a native of the Ft. Bragg area, was killed in action on the island of Attu in the Pacific during World War II.

    Bridge 10-176, at the Noyo River in Mendocino county, is named the "Lieutenant Charles Larsen Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1948, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 44, the same year. Lt. Charles Larsen was lost in the Pacific while flying a combat mission during World War II.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 101 near the southerly end of Marin Peninsula to the vicinity of Valley Ford; from Route 128 near the mouth of the Navarro River to Route 101 near Leggett. Added to the F&E system in 1959 (Chap. 1062).

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 101 near Marin City to Route 101 near Leggett.

Blue Star Memorial Highway

Route 1, from its junction with I-5 at Dana Point in Orange County to its junction with US 101 at Leggett in Mendocino County was designated as a Blue Star Memorial Highway. This designation was made by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 58, Chapter 108, July 29, 2003.

 

exitinfo.gif
  • Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Route 1
  • Exit Lists: Route 1 (Chris Sampang)

 

Other WWW Links

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 1:

  • Total Length (1995): 656 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 750 to 97,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 454; Sm. Urban: 19; Urbanized: 183.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 592 mi; FAU: 57 mi; FAS: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 226 mi; Minor Arterial: 426 mi; Collector: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Orange, Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, San Francisco, Marin, Sonoma, Mendocino

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The basic routing for what became LRN 1 was first defined in the 1909 First Bond Act, as part of a route from San Francisco to Crescent City. It was extended to the Oregon Border by the 1919 Third Bond Act. Ground was broken for the route in August 1912; a picture of the groundbreaking may be found here.

By 1935, LRN 1 had been codified into the SHC as "from a point in Marin County opposite San Francisco to the Oregon State Line via Crescent City and the Smith River". It was a primary route in its entirety.

LRN 1 corresponds to present-day Route 101 (US 101) and Route 199 (US 199). It was signed as US 101 between the Golden Gate Bridge and the vicinity of Crescent City, and then as US 199 to the Oregon border. Portions of the original route are current Route 254, Route 271, and Route 283.


State Shield

State Route 2



Routing
  1. The point where Santa Monica Boulevard crosses the city limits of Santa Monica at Centinela Avenue to Route 405 in Los Angeles.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this route was defined by Chapter 385 to run from "Route 1 near Santa Monica to Route 138 via the vicinity of Avenue 36 in Los Angeles and via Glendale and Wrightwood."

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 split the route into two segments: (a) Route 1 near Santa Monica to Route 101; (b) Route 101 to Route 138 via the vicinity of Avenue 36 in Los Angeles and via Glendale and Wrightwood.

    In 1990, Chapter 1187 made the endpoint of this route more specific, changing it to "Route 101 in Los Angeles".

    In 1998, Chapter 877 changed the starting point to eliminate the route within the City of Santa Monica but changing "Route 1 near Santa Monica" to "The point where Santa Monica Boulevard crosses the city limits of the City of Santa Monica at Centinela Avenue". This change also added text to permit the relinquishment of the portions of Route 2 located within the City of West Hollywood and the City of Santa Monica, effective on the date the agreement is approved. The cities were required the cities to maintain within their jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of State Highway Route 2. These portions (Doheny Dr to La Brea Avenue in West Hollywood, Route 1 to PM2.32 in Santa Monica) have subsequently been relinquished to the containing cities. Note that TCRP Project #142 will do some additional repair and maintenance on this segment.

    In 2001, the legislature authorized relinquishment of the portion of Route 2 that is located between I-405 and Moreno Drive to the City of Los Angeles, per SB 290, Chapter 825, 10/13/2001. In June 2002, the CTC had the relinquishment of the segment 07-LA-2-PM 3.9/5.9 in the City of Los Angeles on its agenda. That is likely this segment.

    In 2003, SB 315, Chapter 594, 9/29/2003, changed the legislative definition to exclude the portions in West Hollywood, Santa Monica, and the city of Los Angeles (between I-405 and Moreno Drive), and to permit relinquishment in Beverly Hills.

    In 2004, AB 3047, Chapter 650, 9/21/2004, cleaned up the relinquishement language, and added the ability to relinquish the conventional highway portion in the City of Los Angeles. For those not keeping score, once the relinquishments in Beverly Hills and Los Angeles occur, the first segment of this route will be gone. According to the Beverly Hills Weekly in July 2005, the Beverly Hills City Council approved a resolution in late July 2005 that will result in the relinquishment of a the designated portion of Route 2, and a total of $4.3 million to the city for the maintenance and repair of the highway. The Beverly Hills stretch of highway covers 1.8 miles and receives a high volume of traffic. According to Dave Gustavson, Director of Public Works and Transportation for Beverly Hills, the part of the highway west of Wilshire accommodates 35,000 vehicles per day, while east of Wilshire sees 51,000 vehicles per day.

    The first mention of the Beverly Hills Freeway was in a 1961 issue of CHPW, where it noted that studies were in progress for the Beverly Hills Freeway between the San Diego Freeway near Westwood and the Hollywood Freeway. Extensive research was being conducted for this project in land-value study zones in order to provide comparable estimates of right of way needs for alternate possible alignments. It is anticipated that the studies will be completed preparatory to a public meeting sometime in 1962.

    002/101 interchangeAccording to a September 1965 CalTrans planning map, this was to be freeway from I-405 to US 101. In late 1965, the CHC adopted a route for the Route 2 freeway from the San Diego Freeway to Adrmore. However, this was never constructed; the constructedfreeway starts just before I-5 (and continues to I-210 as the Glendale Freeway). They could never get permission to build through Beverly Hills (for the longest time, there were discussions about having the freeway go underground through Beverly Hills). Of all the freeways in the Southern California area that were never built, the Beverly Hills Freeway (Route 2) probably would have had the greatest impact on both traffic volume and the surrounding neighborhoods (not all of it for the better). The image to the right is from a 1966 Thomas Brothers map showing the interchange with US 101.

    Evidently, around 1960, there were two planned freeway corridors:

    • Red Corridor . This was a freeway route beginning at the Hollywood Freeway near Vermont and Western and extending Westerly through the S Hollywood district in the vicinity of Melrose Ave, passing through Beverly Hills residential area N of Santa Monica Blvd and terminating approximately where Sunset meets I-405. Specifically, it started at Ardmore Ave just S of Melrose on an elevated alignment, passing under Melrose slightly W of RKO and Paramount Studios. It continues on a depressed alignment N and parallel to Melrose Ave, becoming elevated again W of Fairfax. It continues elevated W across Santa Monica Blvd, passing under Doheny Drive and Arden Drive in Beverly Hills. At Maple Drive it becomes elevated again, continues over Sunset Blvd at Alpine Drive. It continues alternating depressed and elevated alignments through Beverly Hills, Bel Air, Holmby Hills, and Westwood, terminating at I-405 and Sunset, with a pair of ramp connections extending westerly into Brentwood.
    • Blue Corridor . The other corridor started at the same point, and went westerly along Beverly Blvd to Santa Monica Blvd and thence along Santa Monica Blvd to I-405. There are alternatives to avoid various churches, such as along Ohio N of the Mormon Temple. The basic route would be elevated.

    Beverly Hils Freeway RoutesFreeway adoption hearings were planned for 1964, and the Beverly Hills City Council adopted policy in 1963. This policy pushed for the Santa Monica Blvd route.

    According to an article in the Beverly Hills Weekly, the very plans for a proposed freeway to serve Beverly Hills were the original plans for the Santa Monica Freeway. The route selected by the publisher of the Santa Monica Outlook and chair of the state's Highway Commission was near Pico Boulevard. However, this was opposed by the major business interests of the Beverly Hills; the rationale was that with a Santa Monica freeway running near the southern borders of the city, customers for Beverly Hills stores could more easily reach both the downtown Los Angeles and Santa Monica shopping districts, and the freeway could make the development of competing office buildings on the booming Westside more accessible. As a result of these protests, the route was changed to the current routing. In the 1960s, the Beverly Hills City Council offered strong support for a freeway between the two Santa Monica Boulevards that would connect to the Hollywood Freeway on the east, and north and be a second link to the beach. However, this was too close to the pricy real estate just N of Santa Monica Blvd. It was also seen as a permanent divider between the north and south areas of the city. To resolve the issue, the Department of Highways proposed a "cut and cover" freeway. In fact, a geometric design study indicated that a fully depressed and concealed freeway was feasible. The problem was the cost of such construction, which was four times normal costs. The City Council could also not ensure it would be below ground. So, even though the route was on the books, the state could not give assurances of below-ground construction. The political realities were not lost on Anthony Beilenson, who sure the Beverly Hills Freeway died a quiet demise in the assembly. The freeway was officially cancelled in 1975.

    The geometric report indicated that it would be virtually impossible to provide the additional street capacity required through surface street improvements (something that has come to pass). Additional details, including the specifics of the depressed routing, the rationale, illustrations of construction and routing, and costs figures, may be found in the geometric report.

    002 vermontIn March/April 1963, it was noted that the route for the connecting link of the Glendale Freeway between the Hollywood Freeway at Vermont Avenue and the southerly end of the constructed Glendale Freeway was adopted by the CHC on 1/23/1963. Included in this portion of the 8-lane freeway is an interchange with the Hollywood Freeway that would require extensive revision of the existing Hollywood Freeway from Virgil to Normandie. In 1964, it was reported that there were public hearings regarding the Beverly Hills Freeway (Route 2), from the San Diego Freeway to Ardmore Avenue, near the Hollywood Freeway.

    In 1965, this was designated as a continuous route from Route 1 to Route 138.

    In 2010, SB 1318 (9/28/10, Chapter 491) rewrote this as two segments. The pre-2010 definition was:

    (a) The point where Santa Monica Boulevard crosses the city limits of Santa Monica at Centinela Avenue to Route 101 in Los Angeles, except the relinquished portions described in subdivision (b). Subdivision (b) defines these portions as the relinquished former portions of Route 2 within the city limits of West Hollywood and Santa Monica, and between Route 405 and Moreno Drive in Los Angeles. Those relinquished portions are not a state highway and are not eligible for re-adoption as a state highway. Those cities shall maintain signs within their respective jurisdictions directing motorists to the continuation of Route 2.

    (b) The Transportation Commission is also permitted to relinquish to the City of Beverly Hills the portion of Route 2 that is located between the city's west city limit at Moreno Drive and the city's east city limit at Doheny Drive, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state. The City of Beverly Hills shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 2. Additionally, the commission may relinquish to the City of Los Angeles the conventional highway portion of Route 2 that is located within the city limits of Los Angeles, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, including, but not limited to, a condition that the City of Los Angeles maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 2. This section was up for relinquishment in August 2005.

    This also added the following clarifying words on relinquishments:

    (b) The relinquished former portions of Route 2 within the Cities of West Hollywood, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, and Los Angeles are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. Those cities shall maintain signs within their respective jurisdictions directing motorists to the continuation of Route 2.

    (c) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the City of Los Angeles the conventional highway portion of Route 2 that is located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, including, but not limited to, a condition that the City of Los Angeles maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 2. (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately following the recording by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (A) The portion of Route 2 relinquished under this subdivision shall cease to be a state highway. (B) The portion of Route 2 relinquished under this subdivision may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (4) For the portions of Route 2 that are relinquished, the City of Los Angeles shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 2.

     

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was added to the state highway system in 1933 as LRN 162. It originally ran along Santa Monica Blvd from Ocean Ave. in Santa Monica, then North along Hyperion Ave, then S on Glendale, and then N on Fletcher to San Fernando Road (later cosigned US 99/US 101).

    In 1934, it was signed as Route 2 in the initial state routing in 1934 (Santa Monica via Santa Monica Blvd to Jct. Route 18 at Lake Arrowhead, via Arroyo Seco and Cajon). In 1935, US 66 was extended from Sunset Blvd to run to Santa Monica along Santa Monica Blvd. Route 2 was then co-signed/re-signed as US 66, and remained with that signage until 1964.

    A 1954 issue of CHPW confirms that the widening of US 101 near Vermont was in anticipation for the future Route 2 freeway (LRN 162, called, at that time, the "Santa Monica Freeway" as it ran along Santa Monica Blvd, vice LRN 173, the Olympic Freeway (Route 26), which eventually became I-10): "The design finally adopted for the Hollywood Freeway at the crossing. with Vermont Avenue was influenced by the contemplated future construction of the Santa Monica Freeway and also the possibility of rail rapid transit facilities being installed on the future Santa Monica Freeway. This required the lengthening of the Vermont Avenue Bridge and other bridges in the vicinity. The added cost providing for future rail rapid transit facilities was financed by the City of Los Angeles from city funds. Similarly financed from city funds were the bus transfer facilities at Alvarado Street and Vermont Avenue and Western Avenue."

     

    Naming

    The proposed name for the freeway segment between Route 1 and the current Glendale Freeway was the "Beverly Hills" Freeway. This is because the original freeway routing would have traversed the city of Beverly Hills. Beverly Hills was named in 1907 by B.E. Green after Beverly Farms, Massachusetts.

    This segment is part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

     

    National Trails

    Arrowhead Trail Sign This segment was part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

    National Old Trails Road Sign This segment was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

    New Santa Fe Trail Sign This segment was part of the "New Santa Fe Trail".

    National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign This segment appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Glendale Boulevard to [(b)].

    • 1959: The entire portion from I-405 to Route 138 was defined as freeway (Chapter 1062).
    • 1975: Deleted: I-405 to US 101 (Chapter 1106)
    • 1975: Changed: Western terminus changed to Glendale Blvd (Chapter 1107)


  2. The point where Santa Monica Boulevard crosses the city limits of West Hollywood into the City of Los Angeles at La Brea Avenue to Route 101 in Los Angeles.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was created in 2010 by SB 1318. See the first segment for the pre-2010 history.


  3. From Route 101 in Los Angeles to Route 210 in La Cañada Flintridge via Glendale.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this route was defined by Chapter 385 to run from "Route 1 near Santa Monica to Route 138 via the vicinity of Avenue 36 in Los Angeles and via Glendale and Wrightwood."

    On January 23, 1964, a route adoption occured on a 2.7-mile section of the Glendale Freeway. from Ardmore Avenue to Glendale Boulevard, estimated to cost $27.5 million.

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 split the route into two segments: (a) Route 1 near Santa Monica to Route 101; (b) Route 101 to Route 138 via the vicinity of Avenue 36 in Los Angeles and via Glendale and Wrightwood. This change created this segment.

    In 1984, Chapter 409 permitted for variation in the route, changing the segment to "Route 101 to Route 138 via Glendale and Wrightwood."

    In 1990, Chapter 1187 further split the segment into (b) Route 101 in Los Angeles to Route 210 in La Canada Flintridge via Glendale and (c) Route 210 in La Canada Flintridge to Route 138 via Wrightwood.

    In 2009, commercial vehicles with three or more axles, or weighing more than 9,000 pounds were banned from Route 2 between the city of La Canada Flintridge and County Route N2 in Los Angeles County. There is a fine of at least $1,000 for drivers caught with rigs over the weight limit.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    The portion of this segment between Avenue 36 (Fletcher Drive) in Glendale and I-210 was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933 as LRN 61; the portion from US 101 to Avenue 36 was defined in the same year, but was part of LRN 162. It ran N from San Fernando Road along Alverado to Eagle Rock Blvd, along Canada Blvd, then N along Verdugo Road to Foothill Blvd (Route 118).

    It appears as if this portion was the first portion of Route 2 constructed, as the "Assesandro Freeway". The primary purpose was to eliminate the grade crossings with the railroad tracks. The original construction contract covered the SP crossing near San Fernando Road and for the l.2 miles lying easterly of Fletcher Drive between the Los Angeles River and Avenue 36 near Eagle Rock Blvd.

    In 1934, it was signed as Route 2 in the initial state routing in 1934 (Santa Monica via Santa Monica Blvd to Jct. Route 18 at Lake Arrowhead, via Arroyo Seco and Cajon).

     

    Status

    The first freeway segment opened in 1958; the last segment opened in 1978.

    In January 2011, it was reported that the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Authority, in conjunction with CalTrans and LA Dot has a project to improve traffic flow where the Route 2 Freeway terminates at Glendale Blvd. Initially, Metro came up with five different plans (dubbed alternatives A-F) to address these issues. After gathering community feedback, Metro adopted Hybrid Alternative F, otherwise known as the locally preferred alternative. The most radical addition is for a proposed left-lane off-ramp from Route 2 onto Glendale Boulevard heading north. Additionally, there will be two dedicated lanes from Route 2 onto southbound Glendale Boulevard; currently they merge into one lane. Project funding originated with a $12 million federal transportation grant. None of the five original designs put forward by Metro come within this budget. $3 million has already been spent on beginning stages of the project. Going forward with Alternative F, estimated to cost $18.4 million, leaves a shortfall of $9.4 million. Even Alternative A, the most basic no-build plan, was estimated to cost $13.2 million. Open space improvements are estimated at an additional $5 million, according to Metro's timeline projects a final construction contract in place by the end of 2011, with groundbreaking slated for early 2012. Barring any unforeseen delays, and subject to the acquisition of additional funding, work is expected to be completed by June of 2013.

     

    Naming

    The segment of Route 2 from US 101 to Route 210 is named the "Glendale" Freeway. This is because this segment goes through the City of Glendale. It was named by the State Highway Commission on August 17, 1955.

    From historical usage, this has also been named the "Allesandro" Freeway (the portion parallel to Allesandro Street). Allesandro was a character in the Helen Hunt Jackson novel Ramona, which was a seminal novel in the early 20th century in creating the romance of California.

    The segment between Route 134 and Route 210 is also named the "Frank G. Lanterman Freeway". Frank Lanterman was an Assemblyman from the La Cañada Flintridge region for 28 years. He was the leading spokesperson for Republicans on all social welfare issues and health issues. He was a member of one of the founding families of the La Cañada Flintridge community, and was responsible for obtaining Colorado River water for La Cañada in 1955. In 1969, he authored the Lanterman Mental Retardation Services Act, which established a statewide system of regional centers. In 1974, he sponsored additional legislation that expanded the clientele served by the regional centers to include persons with cerebral palsy, epilepsy, autism, and other significantly handicapping conditions found to be closely related to mental retardation. He was the author of HB 3896, which prohibited the expenditure of Rapid Transit District funds from the ½¢ sales tax for purposes other than planning and design, such as capital development, unless approved by the affected local jurisdictions. The highway was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 131, Chapter 126, in 1978.

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between the city limits of La Cañada Flintridge and the intersection with Route 39. Authorized by Senate Bill 1526, Chapter 446, September 14, 2000.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Between Glendale Blvd (a) and Route 210.

    • 1959: The entire portion from I-405 to Route 138 was defined as freeway (Chapter 1062).
    • 1965: Deleted: Route 210 to Hartner Lane (Chapter 1372)
    • 1978: Deleted: Portions E of Hartner Lane (Chapter 278)


  4. Route 210 in La Cañada Flintridge to Route 138 via Wrightwood.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was created in 1990 by Chapter 1187, which split it off of the former (b) segment. Planned as freeway in 1965, but never upgraded, through the Angeles National Forest.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    The portion of this segment between I-210 and the Red Box Divide was part of the original 1919 third-bond act definition of LRN 61. In 1931, LRN 61 was extended to reach Route 39. In 1933, it was further extended to reach Route 138.

    Before the days of the freeway, this ran N along Haskell St from Foothill Blvd (signed as Route 118, but LRN 9) to the Angeles Crest Highway, and thence over the mountains (as construction allowed). It has been signed as Route 2 since the start of state signage in 1934. Angeles Crest Highway began construction in 1929 after ten years of planning, it made it to Red Box in 1934. A year later, in 1935, the road from Red Box to Mt. Wilson was paved and ready for use.

    Additionally, the route continued beyond the junction with Route 138, continuing along current Route 138 to US 91 (present I-15). This former portion was cosigned as Route 138 and Route 2, and was part of the 1931 extension of LRN 59.

    From US 91, the route, signed as Route 2, continued along the current Route 138 routing to Route 18. This portion was LRN 59 up to the current Route 138/(unsigned) Route 173 junction at the N end of the Cedar Springs Reservoir, and LRN 188 S to Route 18 (LRN 43). The LRN 59 portion was added to the state highway system in 1957; the LRN 188 portion was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933.

    In 1934, all of these portions were signed as Route 2 in the initial state routing in 1934 (Santa Monica via Santa Monica Blvd to Jct. Route 18 at Lake Arrowhead, via Arroyo Seco and Cajon).

    The Angeles Crest Highway (the portion from Route 210 to Route 138) is 66 miles long from I-210 to Route 138. The highway was originally envisioned in 1912 as "the most scenic and picturesque mountain road in the state", but the need for a road for fire-fighting was at least equally important. Funds were allocated beginning in 1919, construction began in 1929, continuing piece by piece until 1956, except from 1941 to 1946 during WWII. The road is typically closed to car traffic and unplowed between Islip Saddle and Big Pines after the first snowfall (typically October through December) until May or June.

     

    Status

    Los Angeles County is exploring constructing a tunnel between Route 2 and Palmdale, under the mountains. The cost of the route would run into the billions; a prior study conducted in 2001 predicted a $1.8 billion price tag. The route might be a six-lane toll road with a high-speed train track running down the middle.

    In 2005, a storm caused extensive damage in 17 different sites along a 10-mile stretch of the highway, from Islip Saddle to Wrightwood. After the section of highway was closed, another storm in 2006 battered the road and delayed repair efforts. The repaired section opened in May 2009. The entire repair project cost $10.5 million and was funded by the Federal Highway Administration's Emergency Relief Program. The project required the construction of a $2.6 million concrete bridge, which is designed for rockslides to flow beneath. Constructing the bridge was "unusually difficult" according to Caltrans; it is the third largest bridge of its kind in the world, and was built along a 75% mountain slope.

    In April 2009, a truck accident at the end of the road brought attention to the dangerous conditions and the lack of a truck escape ramp. Research by the LA Times identified that the problem had been identified earlier as part of a Girl Scout project, after a truck driven by Marcos Costa carrying 78,000 pounds of onions lost its brakes and careened into a parking lot and the former Flintridge Bookstore and Coffeehouse at Foothill Boulevard and Angeles Crest Highway in La Cañada in September 2008, colliding with the Ford sedan of Jorge Posca and his daughter, Angelina, in the process. In this project, Girl Scout Malia Mailes prepared a report (part 1, part 2) detailing safety problems at the intersection. The review was shown to the La Cañada Flintridge City Council in early March and forwarded to Caltrans. Malia found, among other things, a lack of signage, a repeated pattern of accidents at the intersection and a lack of regulation of trucks using the Angeles Crest Highway. When the scoutt first raised the safety issues with Caltrans, she was told the onion truck crash was an isolated incident; after the city raised the issue in letters to the agency, including one forwarding Malia's presentation, they were told the state was investigating the issue. In late October 2011, it was reported that Caltrans and the former truck driver have reached settlements with the victims' family that total more than $3 million. It was reported that Caltrans will pay the Posca family $2.25 million. Additionally, $900,000 of Costa's $1 million insurance policy would go to the Posca family. The remaining $100,000 will be split among the myriad plaintiffs, several of whom were injured from impact or witnessed the accident's horror.
    (Additional information on the settlement: La-Cañada Flintridge Patch, 10/27/2011)

    Route 2 WrightwoodIn December 2009, the CTC approved for future funding a project that will widen the existing roadbed to provide left-turn movements, add shoulders and construct drainage improvements along Route 2 in the community of Wrightwood from west of Rivera Drive to east of Sheep Creek Drive. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $8,012,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

    In July 2010, it was reported that Caltrans has pushed back the summer 2010 opening timeframe for Angeles Crest Highway, because the geotechnical crew has found a lot of problem spots that are going to require a great deal of time. Contractors from Burn Pacific Construction are still working on the first phase of the $16.5 million two phase project. Repair crews are finding the first phase particularly challenging because there are two spots along the way that completely collapsed. In addition, heavy machinery has a tough time making it up the winding road and bicyclists and hikers are ignoring road closure signs and interfering with the work.

    In June 2011, a section of Route 2 between La Cañada Flintridge and Angeles Forest Highway reopened. The road had been closed since Jan. 17, 2010, when rains in the Station fire burn area washed away three major sections of pavement through the Angeles National Forest. Caltrans had planned to reopen the road in December 2010, but record rainfall that month and in January brought down so much debris and water that it overwhelmed a culvert and washed out a slope, necessitating further repairs and delays. Restoring the road cost $32 million, officials said, and the majority of that will be paid back through the Federal Highway Administration's emergency relief program.

    In October 2010, the LA Times published a nice "Column One" piece on the Angeles Crest Highway (the following text is adapted from the article). It noted that the from the perspective of a map the route looked good: a 60-mile loop extending out of La Cañada Flintridge into the mountains and then, under the original plan, back into the city. It would begin at 2,000 feet and top out close to 8,000, bringing firefighting capabilities to the Angeles National Forest. Construction started in October 1929. Engineers plotted curves and grades on 100-key desk calculators, and surveyors in hip boots and pith helmets headed into the field. Hard labor was provided by the homeless and the convicted, enlisted from unemployment queues and state prisons. With mules, wagons, picks, steam shovels and dynamite, they pushed their way forward. The results were deemed "a miracle of modern engineering," as a reporter for The Times wrote in 1932. "In a few short years, any Angeleno with even a brief half day for escape can head into the mountain wind and in one ecstatic hour, find peace in a play-land that will forever prove panacea for all the hurts of his city-worn body and soul." The final stretch of road into Wrightwood opened on Nov. 8, 1956. The problem is that the San Gabriels are among the fastest-rising mountain ranges on Earth and one of the most quickly eroding. Stones found on the roadside today were buried a mile deep 5 million years ago, testimony to how brittle these peaks are and to the intensity of the periodic storms that tear at them. In 2005, when winter storms almost broke a century-old record for rainfall, the agency had to close the route near Wrightwood for more than four years. Those repairs cost $10.5 million.


     

    Naming

    The portion of this segment from La Canada to Mount Wilson Road is named the "Angeles Crest Highway". This is a historical name.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Freeway

    This segment was originally part of the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959, but was removed in 1965 and 1978.

    • 1959: The entire portion from I-405 to Route 138 was defined as freeway (Chapter 1062).
    • 1965: Deleted: Route 210 to Hartner Lane (Chapter 1372)
    • 1978: Deleted: Portions E of Hartner Lane (Chapter 278)

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.2] Portion (3).

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 2 14.21 15.52
Los Angeles 2 15.85 16.73
Los Angeles 2 R16.73 R17.92
Los Angeles 2 R18.20 R19.63
Los Angeles 2 R22.69 R23.44

 

Other WWW Links

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] From the north urban limits of Los Angeles and Route 138.

 


Overall statistics for Route 2:

  • Total Length (1995): 87 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 310 to 130,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 59; Urbanized: 28.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 72 mi; FAU: 15 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 28 mi; Minor Arterial: 59 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Dawson Saddle (7903 ft), Blue Ridge Summit (7386 ft) and Cloud Burst Summit (7018 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 2, from San Francisco to San Diego, was added to the state highway system in the 1909 First Bond Act. Note that this segment did not go to the Mexican border; it terminated in National City, about 10 miles from the border.

The June 1925 issue of CHPW noted that the Bay Shore Highway, from San Francisco to San Jose, was added to the state highway system. This changed the description of LRN 2 from 1923 definition of "the county line of the city and county of San Francisco to and through the county of San Mateo" to "from San Francisco to the city of San Jose."

It was extended from San Diego to the Mexico Border in 1931 (Chapter 82). Prior to 1931, the existing state highway only went as far S as National City; the remaining 10 miles to the border was traversed by county highways. The extension used portions of the county roads with an ultimate connection to the Mexican line that depended on the selected site for the US Customs House. It was anticipated that the extension would carry a large volume of local traffic but when the proportion of such traffic that can be analyzed (as of is of a transient nature) is added to the traffic originating at distant points, it was determined that the routing served principally a class of traffic that was of State rather than local nature.

By 1935, it had been codified into the SHC as:

  1. San Francisco to the International Boundary Line near Tia Juana via San Diego and National City.
  2. Orcutt to [LRN 2] S of Santa Maria.
  3. Harriston to [LRN 2] near Los Alimos

The portion from San Diego to San Francisco was considered a primary state highway.

In 1945, Chapter 1214 specified that the northern end of the route was the Golden Gate approach (“the junction of [LRN 56] (Funston Approach) and the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in the Presidio of San Francisco”)

In 1957, Chapter 1911 changed segment (2) to end N of Santa Maria.

After the 1959 changes establishing the F&E system, the route was defined as follows:

  1. From the Mexican line near Tijuana via San Diego and National City to LRN 56 (signed as Route 1) in San Francisco.

    This routing was signed as US 101. The original portion (i.e., surface street) from Ventura to Sea Cliff was transferred to Route 1 in 1980.

    Before the freeway was constructed, this ran along Ventura Blvd, across Cahuenga Pass. It split from LRN 160 at Highland, and went down to Sunset Blvd, continuing along Macy, down Boyle, to Whittier.

    In Los Angeles, this is present-day I-5 between Los Angeles and San Diego. It was previously signed as US 101. Once US 101 was constructed, LRN 2 ran along US 101 until Downey Road, took a jog at Downey Road (LRN 166) to Whittier Blvd (present-day Route 72), and then along Whittier Blvd.

    From San Juan Capestrano, US 101 ran N through El Toro and Irvine to Santa Ana. It ran along 1st Street, Main Street (Santa Ana), Santa Ana Blvd, Los Angeles Blvd (renamed after 1970 to Anaheim Blvd), and Spadra (renamed in 1967 to Harbor Blvd). It ran N on Spadra/Harbor to Whittier Blvd, and W along Whittier Blvd into Los Angeles County to Mission Road. It ran N along Mission Road to Sunset Blvd. This portion of the routing has been bypassed by I-5.

    A small portion near the S end of present-day Route 72 was briefly (1964-1965) Route 51.

    In San Jose, the freeway US 101 was signed as Bypass US 101. The LRN 2 US 101 is present-day Route 82; Bypass US 101 (LRN 68) is present-day US 101.

  2. From Orcutt to LRN 2 N of Santa Maria.

    This is present-day Route 135, and portions were part of Route 1.

  3. From Harriston to LRN 2 near Los Alimos.

    This is also part of present-day Route 135.


State Shield

State Route 3



Routing
  1. From Route 36 near Peanut to Route 299 near Douglas City.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This was added to the state highway system in 1963 (Chapter 385). CHPW noted: "Weaverville—Scott Mountain Road (Federal Aid Secondary County Road 1089) in Trinity County, a route between US 299 at Weaverville and US 99 at Yreka, was included in the state scenic highway .system enacted by the Legislature in 1963. It will be known as State Route 3."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    The portion of this route in the vicinity of Peanut was added to the state highway system in 1907 as LRN 35. It was part of "An act to provide for the survey, location and construction of a state highway connecting the present county road systems of any one or all of the counties of Trinity, Tehama and Shasta with the road system of Humboldt County...", approved March 23, 1907, chapter 117. It was extended to Route 299 near Douglas City in 1933. It was not signed as part of the original set of signed state routes in 1934, and appears not to have had a signed route number until it was signed as Route 3 in 1964.

     

    Naming

    "Weaverville-Scott Mountain" Road.

    The portion of Route 3 between Callahan at post-mile 8.8 and Etna at post-mile 19.7 in the County of Siskiyou is named the "Crynthia and Erling Hjertager Memorial Highway". This segment was named in honor of Crynthia and Erling Hjertager, two exceptionally generous individuals who continuously and unreservedly contributed to the community of Scott Valley over a period of fifty years. They donated their time and capital to the community of Scott Valley in times of dire need and emergency. For example, Erling Hjertager was known to personally fly individuals, at a moments notice and free of charge, to San Francisco that were in need of medical attention. Erling Hjertager was a successful entrepreneur and owner of a sawmill that employed many in the County of Siskiyou and provided an incredible amount of lumber to the World War II effort. Both Crynthia and Erling Hjertager were true community leaders that headed the Boy Scouts, sponsored local basketball teams, lead the Masonic society, anonymously donated to numerous charities, and delivered wood to the elderly during the winter season. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 108, Resolution Chapter 84, on 07/11/2006.

     

    Named Structures

    The Wildcat Creek Bridge on Route 3 in the County of Siskiyou is officially named the "Erling Hjertager Memorial Bridge". This bridge was named in honor of Erling Hjertager, an exceptionally generous individual who continuously and unreservedly contributed to the community of Scott Valley over a period of fifty years. He donated their time and capital to the community of Scott Valley in times of dire need and emergency. Erling Hjertager was known to personally fly individuals, at a moments notice and free of charge, to San Francisco that were in need of medical attention. Erling Hjertager was a successful entrepreneur and owner of a sawmill that employed many in the County of Siskiyou and provided an incredible amount of lumber to the World War II effort. Erling Hjertager was a true community leader that headed the Boy Scouts, sponsored local basketball teams, lead the Masonic society, anonymously donated to numerous charities, and delivered wood to the elderly during the winter season. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 108, Resolution Chapter 84, on 07/11/2006.


  2. From Route 299 near Weaverville to Montague via Main Street in Yreka.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Chapter 385 established this as two segments: (b) Route 299 near Weaverville to Route 5 near Yreka. (c) Route 5 near Yreka to Montague.

    In 1974, Chapter 123 combined segments (b) and (c) to make the continguous.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield The small portion of this route in Yreka, between I-5 and Route 263, was originally part of US 99, defined in 1910 as part of LRN 3. This portion of this segment from Route 5 near Etna to Montague was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933 as LRN 82. Its signage in 1934 is unknown. The remainder of this segment, from Weaverville to Route 5 near Etna, was added to LRN 82 in 1959.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 299 near Weaverville to Route 5 near Yreka. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959 by Chapter 1062.

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.2] Entire route.

 

Interstate Submissions

The designation I-3 was proposed in November 1957 for what is now I-280. In April 1958, I-3 was proposed again for what is now I-405. Neither was accepted by AASHTO.

 


Overall statistics for Route 3:

  • Total Length (1995): 146 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 140 to 12,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 140; Sm. Urban 6.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 140 mi; FAU: 2 mi; FAS: 4 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 4 mi; Minor Arterial: 138 mi; Collector: 4 mi; Rural Minor Collector/Local Road: 0.7 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Hayfork Summit (3660 ft) and Scott Mountain (5025 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Trinity, Siskiyou.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In the initial 1934 state signage, Route 3 was the routing that is present-day Route 1 from US 101 near El Rio to US 101 (present-day I-5) near San Juan Capestrano (LRN 60). This was re-signed as US 101A in 1935, and was later renumbered as Route 1.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

LRN 3 was defined as part of the 1909 First Bond Issue to run from Sacramento to the Oregon Line.

By 1935, it was codified into the SHC as:

[LRN 3] is from Sacramento to the Oregon State Line.

The bridge which extends across the Yuba River from the city of Marysville on the north to the State Highway on the south, and the bridge which extends across the Feather River between the city of Marysville and the city of Yuba City, are parts of [LRN 3] and are under the supervision and control of the department which shall maintain them. In the case of the bridge and highway thereon across the Feather River, the State assumes only that obligation of maintenance imposed upon the counties of Yuba and Sutter under any contract existing on August 14, 1931, with any railroad company for maintenance thereof. The department acting through the comission may, by resolution of the commission, at such time as the department finds it necessary and proper, relinquish the State's interest to the counties of Yuba and Sutter and thereupon the State's supervision and control over such bridge and highway thereon shall entirely revest in those counties.

The route was considered a primary route in its entirety.

In 1949, the text about the bridges was removed by Chapters 909 and 1467, but the routing was changed to indicate the route ran "from Sacramento to the Oregon State line via Yreka".

This route was signed as US 99E, US 99, and as Route 65 (between Roseville and Lincoln). Post-1964 signage is as Route 256 (1964-1994), Route 65, Route 99, and I-5. Portions were cosigned with US 40 (between Sacramento and Roseville). A small portion in Yreka between I-5 and Route 263 was later redesignated as part of Route 3.


State Shield

State Route 4



Routing
  1. Route 80 in Hercules to Route 5 in Stockton via north of Concord and via Antioch.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined to run from "Route 80 near Hercules to Route 99 near Stockton via north of Concord and via Antioch" by Chapter 385.

    In 1990, the language was tightened slightly to refer to "in Hercules" by Chapter 1187.

    In 1994, the segment was split into two portions: (a) Route 80 in Hercules to Route 5 in Stockton via north of Concord and via Antioch. (b) Route 5 to Route 99.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    The portion of this segment between Martinez and Route 5 was defined as part of the state highway system in 1931 as part of LRN 75.

    It was signed as part of Route 4 (Jct. US 40 at Pinole [just S of Hercules] to Jct. Route 89 near Markleeville, via Stockton). It was cosigned with Route 24 from the junction with Route 24 to 4 mi E of Antioch (starting in 1935). The current portion between Concord and the Antioch Bridge was originally signed as Route 24; a different routing was signed as Route 4. In 1964, the section of former sign Route 24 from Concord to the Antioch Bridge was renumbered as Route 4.

    Willow Pass Road, which is also part of Route 4 in Contra Costa County, had previously been a county road (since 1853). This highway served industrial traffic to and from Port Chicago, Pittsburg, and Antioch in the 1930s-1940s, especially during World War II. It became known as the Arnold Industrial Highway and John Muir Parkway. It became a state highway in 1933.

    The portion of this segment between Route 80 (US 40) and Route 24 was added to the state highway system in 1933 as part of LRN 106. The bypasses of Antioch and Brentwood were constructed after 1955, however, they were proposed by that date.

     

    Status

    In April 2013, it was reported that there was finally a path ahead to improving the interchange of I-680 and Route 4. This interchange is so problematic that Contra Costa voters in 1988 approved a half-cent sales tax to start planning its fix. Almost 25 years later, Contra Costa County's congestion management agency says it has found a path to begin the first phase of the $400 million freeway fix in about two years, pulling it out of an indefinite limbo. Under earlier plans, the congestion agency and Caltrans would have waited until the money was lined up to build the most expensive yet effective parts of the five-phase project. To break the logjam, the county agency revamped its construction staging and financing plans. The agency plans to start smaller and have more money to spend because of the improving economy. It would begin with widening three miles of Route 4 to add an extra lane in each direction between Morello Avenue and Route 242. The widening would cost some $50 million. The transportation authority also figures it will have $186 million more than previously expected over the next 21 years because of improvements in its financial picture. The agency is taking in more sales tax revenues as the economy recovers. The authority also got an "AA+" credit rating last fall from two rating agencies, enabling it to save millions of dollars in selling $225 million in bonds in December, and refinancing $200 million of existing debt. With a rosier outlook ahead, the Transportation Authority board on Wednesday is scheduled to authorize consultants to study design on the highway widening. That action could lead to a widening contract being awarded in 2015. In later phases of the freeway overhaul, contractors will build new connector ramps, remove the cloverleaf connectors, and add a flyover ramp so motorists can stay in a carpool lane continuously while merging from one freeway to another. Getting started on the project makes it easier to seek state and federal grants for later phases of construction.
    (Source: Contra Costa Times, 4/14/13) 

    Constructed to freeway standards from 5 miles east of Route 80 to Route 160. Route 4 between I-80 and I-680 will be upgraded to an expressway with provisions included to upgrade it to freeway later. Also, the freeway portion of Route 4 is being extended to bypass Brentwood. There are plans under consideration to eventually build a freeway from Brentwood to Stockton roughly parallel to Route 4's current alignment. There are also plans to widen this route in Pittsburg (March 2001 CTC Agenda). Some original portions of the route (PM R15.3) in the City of Concord were up for relinquishment in December 2001. This may eventually connect to I-580.

    In June 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Pittsburg along Route 4 on Railroad Avenue, consisting of a collateral facility.

    Metering Lights on Route 4In February 2013, it was reported there are plans to energize metering lights along Route 4 in Pittsburg by 2015. Caltrans is in the process of repairing the existing -- but never used -- traffic lights at Highway 4 entrances between Solano Way and Railroad Avenue. Construction for that segment is estimated at about $900,000, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. Plans call for lights to be added as part of the widening project under way from Pittsburg's Loveridge Road to Hillcrest Avenue in Antioch and ready to be activated once road construction is complete. The price tag for those lights is estimated at about $26 million. Though installed in 1995, Contra Costa transportation officials and local leaders had balked at using metering lights because they could cause surface street backups where onramps are short and red lights are long, thus creating headaches for local traffic.
    (Source: Contra Costa Times, 2/27/13)

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening the route in Contra Costa County. In 2007, the CTC recommended using $85M from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) to fund widening the route from Somersville to Route 160

    According to Ronald Kappesser, Route 4 East of Antioch should be upgraded to a freeway to at least Vasco by 2011-2015. It is being built by a special purpose construction authority that is funded by development fees (see http://www.sr4bypass.org/ for info). The first segment was completed and opened to traffic in February 2008 (specifically between Route 160 and Lone Tree Way). As for what to do at the new freeway end, Caltrans is studying building the long-delayed route Route 239, which would be a road extending from somewhere around Antioch (say the end of the newly extended freeway portion of Route 4) to Tracy and upgrading the rest of Route 4 to Stockton. Neither of these is certain. Also, there has been a proposal to declare Vasco Road to be Route 84 and using state highway funds to improve the Alameda county section. If this is done, some believe that Route 84 might be redesignated or cosigned with Route 4. Note that this differs from the 1953 planned freeway, which would have bypassed Brentwood to the north, then continued due east over the Orwood Tract and Woodward Island, eventually ending on the Upper Jones Tract at the terminus for the Woodward Island Ferry. Apparantly, Island Road on the Upper Jones Tract up to Route 4 would have been assimilated into the route as well.

    As of May 2002, the $86 million project to convert the 2-lane section of Route 4 between I-80 in Hercules and Cummings Skyway to four lanes has been completed. New westbound lanes were built on a new alignment just north of the existing road, which was converted for eastbound traffic. The new westbound alignment has been open for a while, but each direction didn't have two lanes for the entire section until May 15, 2002. . The project had been on the drawing board for decades. This section of Route 4 is now much safer than it was just a few years ago, since opposing traffic is separated and all cross-traffic has been eliminated. However, it is not up to full freeway standards: many intersections are full right turns instead of gentle on- and off-ramps. Eventually, new eastbound lanes will be built, and the current eastbound lanes (the original road) will revert to a two-way frontage road. There is currently no funding for the full freeway conversion project. However, the project is not completed. In particular, the right lane eastbound is still marked exit-only at Sycamore Ave. (including at the exit itself) even though it isn't any longer; the speed limits are marked inconsistently in both directions (going from 50 to 65 to 50 westbound, 50 to 65 to 55 eastbound); eastbound is still marked as a double fine zone, but westbound is not; and westbound traffic, just after Cummings Skyway, still sees a pair of signs indicating an S-curve to the right, but the curve isn't there anymore.
    [Thanks to Jim Lin's posting on m.t.r for this information, and to those that responded to Jim's post.]

    [160/4 interchange]According to James Bradley, as of August 2004, the Route 4 Bypass Authority has approved and begun construction on the new Route 4 Bypass, to be completed in THREE segments. Segment TWO was completed in 2002 and is open for traffic as a two lane roadway. It runs from Lone Tree Way at the Antioch/Brentwood border to Balfour Road in Brentwood. Segment ONE began construction in 2004, and was completed in February 2008. It runs from the current Route 4/Route 160 junction in Antioch to the completed portion at Lone Tree Way. Segment THREE began construction in the Spring of 2005, and was completed in late 2008. It runs from the ending of Segment TWO at Balfour Road in Brentwood, along Concord Ave, and will terminate at Vasco Road (future Route 84). A connecting road between the new bypass and the current Route 4 (Marsh Creek Road) will be widened and upgraded to highway status. There will be several new interchanges constructed. The interchanges will be as follows: Route 4/Route 160 in Antioch (a picture of this interchange has been provided by Carl Rodgers), Laurel Road/Slatten Ranch Road in Oakley, Lone Tree Way in Antioch/Brentwood, Sand Creek Road in Brentwood, Balfour Road in Brentwood, Marsh Creek Road in Brentwood, and Vasco Road/Walnut Blvd./Route 84. Another update is in the Pittsburg area. Construction is underway in Pittsburg for the Route 4 widening project from Baily Road to Loveridge Road. The highway is being widened from 4 to 8 lanes, including a BART extension to Railroad Ave. Some of the new exit signing (with exit numbers) has already been erected at Railroad Ave. The new overpass at Harbor Ave. is now open to traffic. As of February 2008, segment THREE had grading completed from the end of Segment TWO at Balfour Road to Marsh Creek Road. The new roadway is paved from Marsh Creek Road to Vasco Road, but not yet striped. Traffic signals have been installed at the intersections of Marsh Creek Road at Route 4 Bypass/Vasco Road, and Marsh Creek Road at Walnut Blvd. The UPRR crossing of Marsh Creek Road has been widened and new signals installed. Marsh Creek Road has been widened and paved from the new Bypass Road/Vasco Road intersection to Sellers Ave. Grading has started where Marsh Creek Road intersects with the current Route 4, and Marsh Creek Road is currently being widened from Sellers Avenue to Route 4. Also in February 2008, segment TWO of the bypass had undergone construction to lower the intersection with Sand Creek Road by several feet. This was done to accomodate the overpasses that will be built when Segment TWO is widened to four lanes in 2009-2010. The Sand Creek Road and Balfour Road interchanges will be built at that time. As of April 2008, all of the Route 4 signs that had been installed on the bypass have been removed. All street signs now simply say "Bypass Road". Also, traffic signals have been installed at the intersection of the Bypass Road & Vasco Road/Walnut Blvd. The new intersection has been graded, but not yet paved. Segment 3 is now entirely paved, with the exception of where it ties into Segment 2 at Balfour, and where it ties into Vasco Road. All work on Marsh Creek Road appears to have ceased, as there has not been any work done in several months.

    In connection with this, Route 4 through Oakley (Route 160 to Delta Road) has been named "Main Street" by the City of Oakley, and "Brentwood Blvd" through Brentwood (Delta Road to Sellers Avenue) by the City of Brentwood. This is in anticipation of the highway relinquishment when the new bypass opens. In February 2012, it was reported that the Cities of Oakley and Brentwood officially took control of the former Route 4 from Route 160/Main Street interchange to the intersection of Byron Highway and Marsh Creek Road, and the state officially renamed the Bypass as Route 4. In January 2012, the CTC approved the following relinquishments: (1) right of way in the county of Contra Costa on Route 4 between the city limits of Oakley and Brentwood and from the Brentwood city limits to Marsh Creek Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way; (2) right of way in the city of Brentwood on Route 4 from State Route 160 to the south city limits at Delta Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way; and (3) right of way in the city of Oakley on Route 4 from the north city limits near Delta Road to the south city limits at the ECCID Main Canal, consisting of superseded highway right of way. They also approved transferring the Route 4 designation to the bypass route and adopted it as a freeway.

    004 BypassThere are also plans to add a road connection for a Route 4 Bypass Road. This connection will relieve local traffic congestion and support planned development and growth in the area. The Bypass Road is being constructed in three segments. The northernmost segment, which includes the Route 4/ Bypass Road interchange, opened to traffic in February 2008. At the completion of the remaining segments, it is proposed that the Bypass Road be adopted as Route 4 and existing Route 4 be relinquished to the local agencies. However, as of the time of opening, "Bypass Road" was not yet officially Route 4, it has been signed as Highway 4 from the Lone Tree Way onramp to the interchange with NB Route 160. Some of the "Freeway Entrance" signs say Route 4 West, and others simply say "Bypass Road".

    Bypass Road diverges from Route 4 at the proposed new connection interchange in Antioch and reconnects to Route 4 at its intersection with Marsh Creek Road, a distance of 12.5 miles. Bypass Road is an access-controlled six- and four-lane freeway to just north of the Lone Tree Way interchange and continues as a two-lane expressway with limited access control to the intersection of the Bypass Road and Marsh Creek Road. The transfer will consist of relinquishment of a portion of existing Route 4 to the Cities of Oakley and Brentwood and Contra Costa County and adoption of the Bypass Road as the new Route 4 by the Department. The proposed new connection is a partial freeway-to-freeway interchange. This interchange will be located on a curve where Route 4 changes direction from west-east to south-north. The six-lane Bypass Road will extend to the east of the interchange as connector ramps will continue to Route 4/Route 160 junction to the north. Existing Route 4 is two-lanes in each direction and it will transition to three-lanes in each direction prior to the proposed connection to the Bypass Road. Connector ramps will be two-lanes wide for most of their length and will narrow to single lanes as they either exit or enter Route 4 at the proposed interchange.

    In July 2012, it was reported by Ron Langum that Bypass Road, stretching from Marsh Creek Road to Route 4, has officially been designated Route 4. The date of the change was some time between April and July 2012. The official route traveling east is now traveling straight onto the new freeway, which becomes a 2-4 lane road south of Lone Tree, then a left turn onto Marsh Creek Road, then a right turn onto the old Route 4 just outside Discovery Bay. The old Route 4, which turned left toward the Antioch Bridge, is now Route 160.

    In July 2011, the Bay Area Toll Authority budgeted $7 million to study and design a connector ramp giving drivers a direct route between the Route 4 bypass and the Antioch Bridge. Money left over from a seismic retrofit of the bridge will go toward building the overpass, which would connect the bypass to Route 160. Bridge tolls paid for the retrofit. The nearly $50 million overpass, on the Oakley-Antioch border, would take about three years to complete.

    In April 2012, it was reported that a project to build a freeway connector ramp between the Route 4 bypass and the Antioch Bridge is getting about $1.4 million in local developer funds. The additional funds will widen the bridge structure of the ramp from the bypass north to Route 160, allowing BART trains to pass underneath someday. The ramp, located on the Oakley-Antioch border, is estimated to cost about $50 million. The design change adds a sliver of road to the northeast of the ramp and improves the bridge's geometry for the BART tracks. Since the Route 4 bypass opened in 2008, drivers headed north toward Sacramento County have had to cut through Oakley side streets or drive two miles west to the Hillcrest Avenue exit, leave the freeway and enter in the other direction to cross the bridge. The overpass, which is funded by leftover money from a seismic retrofit of the bridge, will take about three years to complete and could start by spring 2014.

    In July 2011, it was reported that $25 million in funding was secured from the CTC for converting a two-lane, two-way section of the highway into a four-lane freeway. The project would radically alter a stretch from north of Laurel Road to south of San Jose Avenue, as well as the construction of an interchange at the bypass and Sand Creek Road. The bypass would skirt the western edges of Oakley and Brentwood, then rejoin Route 4 in an unincorporated area east of Discovery Bay. The bypass will remove existing Route 4 from passing through the downtown areas of Oakley and Brentwood. If the bid is awarded, the savings likely will fill the funding gap for a Route 4 bypass interchange at Sand Creek Road. The Sand Creek project would add onramps and offramps at Sand Creek and widen the bypass to four lanes from Laurel Road in Oakley to the interchange. The project, expected to cost $33 million, received $25 million in state bond funds in June. At that time, local officials also received assurances from the California Transportation Commission that any cost savings for the Route 4 widening would go toward other regional projects. The new interchange will allow commuters to continue uninterrupted instead of having to stop at the signal light at Sand Creek. Southbound traffic often backs up during peak evening hours because of the red lights beyond Lone Tree Way. If the Route 4 widening bid is approved, the next step would be to make sure money is in place to start construction. The county transportation authority either would wait for the state to sell transportation bonds in spring 2012 or look at using local funds to cover expenses until the sale. Construction on Sand Creek could start as early as May or June 2012. The widening project includes a full interchange at Contra Loma. The configuration now has only a westbound onramp and eastbound offramp. G Street no longer will have an onramp or offramp once the widening is complete.
    (Mercury News, 9/19/2011)

    In September 2011, it was reported that thanks to a low bid for a segment of the Route 4 widening in Antioch, a project in Brentwood could receive money to start construction. Rancho Cordova-based CC Myers, Inc. is expected to get the contract for building the next segment of widening -- from just west of Contra Loma Boulevard to near G Street -- after a bid of about $48.8 million. The bid represents a savings of more than $9 million from the anticipated cost.

    In July 2012, it was reported that the new sound walls in Antioch have been embossed with designs of the Delta marshlands. These new walls are at the Somersville Road exit and along Route 4 near the Contra Loma Boulevard exit. Plans call for the specialty retaining walls to be installed along the entire stretch through Antioch, including the new eBART station near Hillcrest Avenue. Transportation officials sought input from Antioch's design review committee and Caltrans years ago, leading to the Delta theme. Barb McKee of Denver-based Surface Strategy was hired to create the wall scene. The process took about five years, including a year to carve out the designs. Photos of the Delta landscape taken by McKee were used to create large rubber molds. There are 10 8-by-12-foot patterns, or molds, of the Delta walls and one "extender," or water pattern, for when walls are different sizes or heights. Among the patterns carved in the custom walls are various Delta grasses, cattails, native wildlife such as herons and water scenes.
    (Source: Contra Costa Times, 7/6/12)

    TCRP Project #16 involved widening to six or more lanes from east of Loveridge Road through Hillcrest. The project was requested by the Contra Costa Transportation Authority. In June 2006, a negative environmental impact (a good thing) was received by the CTC for subproject #16.2. This project would widen Route 4 from about 1 mile west of Loveridge Road to about 1 mile east of Hillcrest Avenue interchange near Route 160. The proposed project would widen Route 4 from 4-lanes to 8-lanes, with two of the lanes being used for high occupancy vehicle lanes. The improvements would conform with the improvements being made on Route 4 to the west of Loveridge Road, as well as planned improvements to the east of Hillcrest Avenue interchange. There are also plans (TCRP #16.4) to widen the freeway to eight lanes from Railroad through Loveridge Road in Contra Costa County. (June 2002 CTC Agenda Item 2.1c.(2)).

    There are actually two projects here. The Route 4 East Widening from Loveridge Road to Somersville Road project is located in Contra Costa County. The CMIA project will: (1) Widen Route 4 to eight lanes by constructing three mixed-flow lanes and one High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction from Loveridge Road to Somersville Road; and (2) Reconstruct Loveridge Road Interchange. The Route 4 East Widening from Somersville to Route 160 project is located adjacent to the above described project in Contra Costa County. This project will: (1) Widen Route 4 to eight lanes (three mixed flow lanes and one HOV lane in each direction), construct auxiliary lanes and a wide median for transit from Somersville Road to Hillcrest Avenue; (2) Widen Route 4 to six lanes (three mixed flow lanes in each direction) from Hillcrest Avenue to the interchange with the Route 160/Route 4 Bypass; (3) Reconstruct Somersville Road, Contra Loma, and L Street interchanges, and G Street Overcrossing; and (4) Modify Lone Tree Way/A Street and Hillcrest Avenue interchanges and Cavallo Road Undercrossing. Construction began on segment (1) in August 2010.

    [Project Map]In February 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct roadway improvements to a section of Route 4 from Loveridge Road near Pittsburg east to Route 160. The improvements will include two additional lanes in each direction, interchange reconstructions to accommodate the roadway widening, and various other safety improvements. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. The total estimated project cost is $446,739,000 for capital and support. Construction of Segment 1 is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline amendment. A Negative Environment Impact Declaration was prepared, as the project will involve construction activities resulting in visual effects that will be addressed by aesthetic treatments. The project also involves the acquisition of new right-of-way.

    In February 2010, the CTC also approved a concurrent baseline amendment request (Resolution CMIA-PA-0910-019) to increase the project scope and split the overall project into three roadway contracts and one follow-up landscape contract. This noted that the project will widen Route 4 East to eight lanes (three mixed flow lanes and one high occupancy vehicle [HOV] lane in each direction) from Somersville Road to Hillcrest Avenue; add auxiliary lanes and construct a wide median for transit from Somersville Road to Hillcrest Avenue; widen Route 4 to six lanes (three mixed flow lanes in each direction) from Hillcrest Avenue to the interchange with Route 160/Route 4 bypass; reconstruct Somersville Road Interchange and Contra Loma/L Street Interchange, and replace G Street Overcrossing and Cavallo Road Undercrossing; and partially reconstruct Lone Tree Way/A Street and Hillcrest Avenue Overcrossings. The project will also construct a wide median to accommodate the e-BART project; e-BART is a 10-mile extension of the current mass transit system in Eastern Contra Costa County that will run in the median of Route 4, extending passenger rail service from the Pittsburg/Bay Point BART Station to the vicinity of Hillcrest Avenue in the city of Antioch. The project is also being split into four segments: Segment 1 (PPNO 0192F): Widen Route 4 from Somersville Road to Contra Loma/L Street and reconstruct Somersville Road Interchange, including construction of an e-BART structure at Somersville Road, along with the construction of underground drainage, underground electrical work and sub-ballast within the contract limits; Segment 2 (PPNO 0192H): Widen Route 4 from Contra Loma Boulevard/L Street to Lone Tree Way/A Street, reconstruct Contra Loma Boulevard/L Street Interchange, and replace G Street Overcrossing, including construction of an e-BART structure at Contra Loma Boulevard/L Street, along with the construction of underground drainage, conduits for underground electrical work and sub-ballast within the contract limits; Segment 3 (PPNO 0192I): Widen Route 4 from Lone Tree Way/A Street to Route 160 and partially reconstruct Lone Tree Way/A Street Interchange, replace Cavallo Road Undercrossing, and partially reconstruct Hillcrest Avenue Interchange, including construction of e-BART structures at A Street/Lone Tree Way and Cavallo Road, along with the construction of underground drainage, conduits for underground electrical work and sub-ballast within the contract limits; Segment 4 (PPNO 0192J): Construct follow-up landscaping on Route 4 from Somersville Road to Route 160 Interchange in Contra Costa County.

    In June 2011, the CTC amended this project to update the project scope of the Segment 3 project by: (a) shortening the westbound high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane by about 0.8 mile, (b) adding a westbound auxiliary lane between Hillcrest Avenue and Route 160, and (c) replacing the Roosevelt Pedestrian Undercrossing. They also split the Segment 3 project into two sub-segments, Segment 3A and Segment 3B.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved adding the Route 4 Bypass Freeway Conversion to the scope of the Route 4 East Widening Corridor project. The Route 4 Bypass Freeway Conversion Project — Phase 1 and 2 (Laurel Road to Sand Creek Road, including Sand Creek Road Interchange) will convert a two-lane, two-way expressway to a 4-lane freeway from north of Laurel Road to south of San Jose Avenue and will construct an interchange at the intersection of the Route 4 Bypass and Sand Creek Road. The Route 4 Bypass will become the new alignment for Route 4 in eastern Contra Costa County. Once completed, this new segment will improve mobility by removing a significant bottleneck on the Route 4 Bypass. In addition, the project will also improve safety by converting a 2-lane expressway to a 4-lane freeway and constructing an interchange at Sand Creek Road. Estimated completion is in 2014.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved $33 million to convert 3.2 miles of the Route 4 bypass from a two-lane expressway into a four-lane freeway from Sand Creek Road to Laurel Road in Antioch and Brentwood. They also allocated $52.7 million to widen an additional 1.7 miles of Route 4 from four to six lanes between Lone Tree Way and Hillcrest Avenue in Antioch. The rest of the $70 million project's cost comes primarily from regional bridge toll money and the Measure J sales tax approved by Contra Costa voters. The bypass contract is expected to be awarded in the spring, with the work taking about two years to complete.

    In February 2012 (bids opened April 2012), a contract was put out to bid by Caltrans to widen Route 4 to 8 lanes, reconstruct the A St. undercrossing, and construct retaining and sound walls in Antioch from the G Street Overcrossing to 0.1 Mile East of the Hillcrest Avenue Overcrossing.

    In March 2012, it was reported that the G Street offramp from Route 4 in Antioch would close permanently as part of the project that is expanding the freeway from a little less than a mile west of Loveridge Road to about three-quarters of a mile west of Hillcrest Avenue. The project removing the on- and offramps at G Street involves constructing a new, wider G Street bridge for local traffic. Combined with a full-service interchange at Contra Loma Boulevard to be completed in spring 2015, these changes will provide better access to the highway and improve local traffic circulation.

    In August 2012, the CTC approved amending the Route 4 East Widening Corridor project. The funding source was changed -- specifically, CCTA proposed swapping $5,868,000 of those local funds with State-Local Partnership Program (SLPP) funds. Additionally, the project schedule was updated to reflect delays resulting from the revision of construction staging plans due to additional construction conflicts with the adjacent Hillcrest Station Parking Lot and Maintenance Shell project being implemented by the BART. Furthermore, the construction duration has been increased by eight months to fully address the construction conflicts with Segment 3A, which was awarded in May 2012. The project is now scheduled to end construction in August 2015.

    Route 4 widening project next phase, from CC Times 11/1/2012In November 2012, it was reported that bids on the Route 4 widening project came in lower than expected, with the Rancho Cordova-based Bay Cities/Myers in line to get the contract following a bid of $48.67 million -- about $7 million less than the anticipated price tag of $55.7 million. The low construction bid for the Hillcrest project means that each of the five segments awarded for the Route 4 widening over the last two years has yielded millions in cost savings. About $75 million has been saved on the project because of the low bids. Construction should begin in January 2012. The work will include adding lanes from just east of Hillcrest Avenue to the Route 160 interchange, along with a on- and offramps at Hillcrest. It will also include several components of BART's station east of Hillcrest, including a pedestrian overcrossing, station platform and station house and a tunnel underneath the westbound lanes so trains can get into their maintenance station.
    (Source: Contra Costa Times, 11/1/2012)

    In November 2007, there was an update on Project #16.2. On April 19, 2007, the Union Pacific Rail Road (UPRR) rejected the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District (BART) and CCTA’s final and best offer to acquire the Moccoco line where a future BART extension would have transitioned out of the Route 4 median at Loveridge Road interchange onto the Moccoco line located to the north of Route 4. As a result of the UPRR rejection, the alignment of the future BART extension has been revised to go inside the Route 4 (east) median where it will run through the Loveridge Road and Somersville Road interchanges. With the new BART alignment, right-of-way and utility costs on TCRP Project #16.2 have increased. Additional right of way is needed to accommodate the future BART extension that requires an additional 20 to 22 foot median. This change also triggered the relocation of two additional Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) high voltage transmission towers and also the relocation of an additional length of a 24 inch gas line. As a result, the Contra Costa Transit Agency requested the $14 million in TCRP funds originally programmed for construction to be redistributed to cover additional right-of-way clearance activities. In addition to right-ofway increases, material and construction costs have increased since the original cost estimate was developed due to the replacement of the Century Boulevard undercrossing, as well as another minor structure, which is now being incorporated into this project. Additional funding from State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), Federal SAFETEA-LU and local Measure C and Regional Measure 2 funds have been secured to cover the project cost increase. The project funding plan has been updated to reflect the cost increase to both R/W and Construction. The project schedule was updated to reflect the delays caused by the redesign of new BART alignment.

    In September 2009, the CTC approved an exchange of funds on this project.

    In October 2010, there was an update on Segment 1 (PPNO 0192F). Walnut Creek-based R&L Brosamer Inc. was reported to be in line to get the contract for building the next segment of widening -- from just west of Somersville Road to just west of Contra Loma Boulevard -- after a bid of $35.7 million. The bid was significantly lower than the anticipated cost of $49.7 million. The Somersville-to-Contra Loma segment is expected to break ground in January. Work on that stretch includes adding four lanes, along with a new offramp configuration at Somersville. Upon completion of the entire project, the highway will have eight lanes -- three regular lanes and a carpool lane in each direction -- from Loveridge Road in Pittsburg east to the Route 4 bypass interchange. Widening work is in progress from Loveridge to Somersville. Berkeley-based O.C. Jones & Sons was awarded the contract for the Loveridge-to-Somersville segment in February after a bid of $64.9 million, far lower than the anticipated cost of $91 million. The Loveridge-to-Somersville stretch is expected to be done by 2014. The next segment of the Route 4 widening, from Contra Loma to Lone Tree Way, is expected to go out to bid in Summer 2011. Plans have been designed and funding is in place for that stretch. The entire widening is expected to be completed by 2015, with an estimated total cost of more than $500 million. The expansion includes creating a highway median wide enough to accommodate BART's extension into East County.

    In January 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Joaquin County that will construct a new four lane roadway and structure (viaduct) from Fresno Avenue to a new interchange at Navy Drive. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Total estimated project cost is $193,640,000 for capital and support. Because of the sensitivity of the resources in the project area, an Environmental Impact Report was prepared for the project. Project impacts to community character and cohesion, visual resources, and sensitive noise receptors cannot be mitigated to a below significance level; therefore a Statement of Overriding Considerations was prepared for the project. All other potential impacts associated with the project can be mitigated to below significance through proposed mitigation measures. Additional information on this project may be found at the Caltrans website.

    In March 2012, the CTC amended the scope of the Route 4 Crosstown Freeway Extension, which will construct two mixed flow lanes and two auxiliary lanes in each direction in Stockton, from Fresno Avenue to Navy Drive. Specifically, the landscaping project was split off into a separate project.

    In March 2014, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 4 between 1.0 mile east and 0.5 mile west of Tracy Boulevard, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The County, was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate, without protesting such action.

    In January 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Angels along Route 4 from 98.43 feet (30 meters) east of the east end of the Angels Creek Bridge No. 30-0008 to the easterly city limits, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    In June 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Angels (Angels Camp) adjacent to Route 4 along Casey Street and Gardner Lane, consisting of a non-motorized transportation facility.

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized relinqishment of right of way in the city of Angels along Route 4 at Easy Street (formerly First and A Streets), consisting of a collateral facility.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #733: Upgrade Route 4 East from the vicinity of Loveridge Road to G Street in Contra Costa County, near Pittsburgh California. This may relate to NCI #24, below. $16,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #2856: Realign Route 4 within the City of Oakley. $1,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #3802: Improvements of Route 4 in Calaveras County, between Stockton and Angels Camp. $1,000,000.

    • National Corridor Infrastructure (NCI) Improvement Program #24: Route 4 East Upgrade. This likely relates to HPP #733. $20,000,000.

     

     

    Naming

    In July 2012, it was reported that Hercules is poised to ask the state to rename a section of Route 4 in honor of former Councilman and Mayor Joe Eddy McDonald, who died June 9, 2012. The longtime former postmaster of Hercules and Rodeo was elected to the council in November 2006 and served one four-year term; he was mayor from December 2008 to December 2009. He was a City Planning Commissioner from 2002 to 2006, the last 2½ years as chairman. A North Richmond native, McDonald, his wife Mary Ann and their two daughters moved to Hercules in 1984. Tragedy struck the family on Oct. 3, 1994, when Kimaree McDonald, 25, and her cousin Tiffane Spencer, 17, were killed in a crash on what was then a winding, notoriously dangerous two-lane stretch of Route 4. Joe Eddy and Mary Ann McDonald spearheaded a campaign to widen and divide the highway, collecting 10,000 signatures on a petition to state lawmakers, making presentations to local government agencies, and organizing a community walk to the Hercules City Council carrying wooden crosses wrapped in yellow ribbons that represented accident victims killed on the roadway since the 1970s. The McDonalds' advocacy led to the $86 million Route 4 West divided highway project, which added two lanes and straightened the highway. They received a Merit Award from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission in 2002. A draft resolution before the Hercules City Council in early July 2012 urged the state Legislature to rename the segment of Route 4 from its western end at San Pablo Avenue east to Franklin Canyon as the Joe Eddy McDonald Memorial Highway.
    (Source: Contra Costa Times, 7/9/12)

    With respect to the above, the Willow Avenue Overcrossing over Route 4 in Contra Costa County is officially named the "Joe Eddy McDonald Memorial Overcrossing." It was named in memory of Joe Eddy McDonald, who was born in March 1945 in Lewisville, Arkansas. The McDonald Family moved to Richmond, California, in 1950d. Joe Eddy McDonald received his primary education in the West Contra Costa Unified School District and graduated from Richmond Union High School. Joe Eddy McDonald enlisted in the United States Navy for a two-year tour of duty. Upon his return, he earned an associate of arts degree in business administration from Contra Costa College and completed professional development courses offered by Duke and Harvard Universities. Joe Eddy McDonald began working for the United States Postal Service in 1966 as a letter carrier, and worked his way through the ranks of the United States Postal Service, eventually becoming postmaster of the Cities of Rodeo and Hercules and serving in that capacity for 19 years until his retirement in 2002. Joe Eddy McDonald lost his daughter Kimaree McDonald and niece Tiffane Spencer in a tragic car accident in October 1994. He then spearheaded a campaign to widen and divide the two-lane stretch of Route 4 on the west side of the County of Contra Costa to keep others from suffering the same tragic fate. Joe Eddy and Mary Ann McDonald collected over 10,000 signatures on a petition to state lawmakers, made presentations to government agencies, and organized a community walk to the Hercules City Council. The McDonald’s advocacy led to an $86 million Route 4 widening project, which added two lanes. Joe Eddy McDonald served as president of the Rodeo and Hercules Rotary Club, as Area II Director of Chapter IV of the National Association of Postmasters of the United States; as master of Monarch Lodge No. 73 for the State of California; and was a founding member of the Black America’s Political Action Committee, a member of the Black American Cultural Association, and a charter member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Hercules chapter. He also served on the Library Ad Hoc Fundraising Committee and the City of Hercules Planning Commission from December 2002 to November 2006, serving as chairman the last two and one-half years. In 2006, Joe Eddy McDonald successfully campaigned to serve on the Hercules City Council, serving as vice mayor in 2008 and as mayor in 2009. During Joe Eddy McDonald’s tenure on the Hercules City Council, he was a dedicated and effective member of many regional committees, including the Pinole/Hercules Wastewater Management JPA, the West Contra Costa Integrated Waste Management Authority JPA, the Contra Costa Mayors Conference, and the Association of Bay Area Governments Executive Board. McDonald was responsible for the approved agreement with the West Contra Costa Unified School District to retain the music program in Hercules elementary schools and with Contra Costa College to provide classes in the redevelopment project area. It was named on 09/20/13 by SCR 44, Res. Chapter 124, Statutes of 2013.

    Route 4 between I-680 and Route 242 was once named the "Arnold Industrial Highway" by a trade association. It was named by the association that developed the highway apparently in honor of R. R. Arnold, who was the county surveyor and one of those who fathered the idea of the highway. As for the "industrial" part, this is likely because it helped industry transport goods into Richmond, Oakland, and San Francisco. Today, the portions of this route constructed to freeway standards are called the "Industrial" Freeway.

    The portion of this route from I-680 in Martinez to I-5 near Stockton is named the "California Delta Highway", as Route 4 runs through the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 11, Chapter 46 in 1987.

    Route 4 between I-80 and I-680 is informally called the "John Muir Parkway". John Muir was a naturalist who wrote of the natural beauty of California and the west. This name is not official, although the highway passes in sight of his home - an historic landmark - in Martinez.

    Route 4 between I-680 and Route 160 is historically part of "El Camino Sierra" (Road to the Mountains).

    The overcrossing at Route 4 and Loveridge Road in the City of Pittsburg in Contra Costa County is named the "Inspector Raymond J. Giacomelli Memorial Overcrossing". It was named after Pittsburg Policy Inspector Raymond J. Giacomelli, who was killed on April 15, 2003 while on duty. Inspector Giacomelli was an honored and respected member of the Pittsburg Police Department for 23 years. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 115, Chapter 39, May 3, 2004.

    The Pine Street overcrossing that crosses Route 4 in the City of Martinez is officially designated the "Martinez Police Sergeant Paul Starzyk Memorial Overcrossing". It was named in memory of Martinez Police Sergeant Paul Starzyk, who was born in Madison, Wisconsin, and grew up in DeKalb, Illinois. Paul Starzyk graduated from Northern Illinois University with a bachelor of science degree in computer science, and worked for the Bank of America Corporation in California. After excelling in the banking industry, Paul Starzyk realized his true calling was in helping others through a career in law enforcement. Paul Starzyk started his law enforcement career as a reserve police officer at the Martinez Police Department in 1992. In 1994, Paul Starzyk became a full-time police officer, serving the citizens of Martinez on a daily basis. He was a member of the SWAT team, later became a range master, and ultimately a SWAT team instructor, and he also developed the active shooter training for the Martinez Police Department. Paul Starzyk was promoted to police sergeant in December 2007. On the morning of September 6, 2008, Sergeant Starzyk responded to a domestic disturbance. A man armed with a handgun terrorized patrons at a beauty salon and then forced his way into a second story apartment where his estranged wife's cousin had sought refuge. When Sergeant Starzyk and his cover officer arrived, they approached the apartment and heard women screaming and gun fire. Sergeant Starzyk knowingly and willing placed himself in harms way by confronting the suspect who was threatening the lives of five occupants of the apartment after shooting and killing his estranged wife's cousin as Sergeant Starzyk and his partner approached. Sergeant Starzyk was immediately fired upon by the suspect and was wounded, but he was able to return fire and fatally wounded the suspect. Sergeant Starzyk's decisive and heroic actions saved the lives of two women and three children who were hiding in the apartment. Sergeant Starzyk did not survive his injuries making the ultimate sacrifice to protect the five occupants of the apartment. Sergeant Starzyk was awarded the Medal of Valor posthumously for his extraordinary and heroic actions. In the event of his death, Sergeant Starzyk asked that this statement be read at his funeral: "Here is a man that got all he ever wanted. Great career, good friends, the best wife, and a great life. He left this world with no regrets. No matter where he ended up, he is sure he will see some of his coworkers there". Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 21, Resolution Chapter 70, on August 18, 2011.

    The Harbor Avenue Overcrossing over Route 4 in Contra Costa County is named the “Officer Larry Lasater Memorial Overcrossing”. This overcrossing was named in memory of Officer Larry Lasater of the Pittsburg Police Department, who was born on December 12, 1969, and grew up in the City of Martinez. After graduating from College Park High School in Pleasant Hill, Lasater attended Diablo Valley College and then the University of California at Davis where, in 1993, he earned his Bachelor's Degree in Political Science and History. In 1994, Lasater graduated from the United States Marine Corps' Officer Candidate School where he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. Lasater devoted six years of his life to the United States Marine Corps, attaining the rank of Captain as a tank commander. In 1999, Lasater left his career in the United States Marine Corps to return to Pleasant Hill. In 2002, Lasater attended the Contra Costa County Law Enforcement Academy where he was described by the Lieutenant of the academy as one of the best police recruits, if not the best police recruit, he had seen. On September 13, 2002, Lasater became a Pittsburg Police Officer, and in 2004 he was appointed as a member of the Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team. Lasater was quick to assist his fellow officers with any task and he always volunteered for additional assignments. His communication skills and interactions with citizens were highly praised and he was often commended for his work performance. On April 24, 2005, three months before the birth of his only child, Cody, Officer Lasater died in the line of duty after being critically wounded by gunfire. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 88, Resolution Chapter 68, on 8/4/2010.

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between the intersection with the Cummings Skyway and Route 80. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

    Between the city limits of Brentwood and the Contra Costa-San Joaquin county line. Authorized by SB 1349, Chapter 378, on September 5, 2002. This bill also deleted as a double-fine zone the segment from the intersection with the Cummings Skyway and Route 80. that had been authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Contra Costa 4 R8.29 R8.70
    Contra Costa 4 R9.06 R9.33
    Contra Costa 4 R9.73 R11.12
    Contra Costa 4 T14.00 R15.07
    Contra Costa 4 19.91 20.51
    Contra Costa 4 20.57 22.29
    Contra Costa 4 22.90 24.22
    Contra Costa 4 25.28 R28.55

     

    National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.


  2. Route 5 to Route 99.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1994, this segment was created by a split of the original segment (a) Route 80 near Hercules to Route 99 near Stockton via north of Concord and via Antioch (changed to "in Hercules" in 1990). This actually was the entire portion of Route 4 that had been multiplexed with US 50 in Stockton (when Route 4 still ran down Charter Way), which was replaced by a freeway routing.

    In Stockton, the freeway routing replaced a routing along Charter Way, which still has some vestiges of signing from the pre-freeway days. Travelling along westbound Charter Way, away from Route 99, there is reflectorised green signage at the Mariposa Road intersection. The new signage shows a Route 4 (shield) leading west onto Charter Way. A lefthand (i.e., eastbound) turn places you along Mariposa Road. The signage at Charter/Mariposa seems to be placed for the convenience of local motorists heading in and out of town. In modern times, Route 4 undisputedly follows Charter Way to the west of I-5. Mariposa Street leads towards undisputed Route 4 to the east of Route 99.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    The original routing along Charter Way between I-5 (well, former US 50) and Route 99 (former US 99) was LRN 5 (defined in 1909/1910), but also overlapped with the 1931 definition of LRN 75. Specifically, Route 4 entered town on LRN 75 (1931) as far as Center St/El Dorado St. It then ran cosigned with LRN 5 (US 50) from Center St/El Dorado St. to Mariposa Road along Charter Way until it reached Wilson Way. At that point, Route 4 was cosigned with US 99 (LRN 4), along Charter Way and Marisposa Road. At Farmington, LRN 75 split back off again. In 1951 (Chapter 1562), the portion that was LRN 4 was changed to LRN 75, when LRN 4 was assigned to the Stockton Bypass.

    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of Route 4 (Jct. US 40 at Pinole [just S of Hercules] to Jct. Route 89 near Markleeville, via Stockton).

     

    Status

    In August 2005, the SJCOG released a study on the feasibility of extending Route 4 west of the I-5/Route 4 interchange in conjunction with providing the necessary access to the Port of Stockton. This extension would complete the gap between the current termini of the Cross Town Freeway (at Fresno Avenue) and the existing 2-lane highway section of Route 4 (also known as Charter Way). This was to address long term growth at the Port of Stockton. A phased approach was recommended:

    • Near Term (2005-2006). It was recommended that there be improvements to the key intersections, allowing for better traffic flow within the existing roadway network. The estimated cost of these improvements is approximately $5 million (2005 dollars).

    • Mid Term (2013-2017). It was recommended that Route 4 should be extended westward to perhaps Navy Drive, and ought to include a partial interchange that provides improved access to the Port of Stockton and relieves pressure on the I-5 / Charter Way interchange. It was believed that the project would greatly reduce the truck traffic that currently utilizes Washington Avenue through the Boggs Tract.

    • Long Term. The long-term goal would be to extend Route 4 westward to the intersection of Charter Way and Daggett Road. This will provide dramatic relief to the I-5 / Charter Way interchange and will greatly reduce Port of Stockton inbound and outbound vehicles from traveling on local roadways.

    The study noted that although right-of-way for extension of the Cross-Town Freeway had not been preserved, a freeway agreement currently exists between Caltrans District 10, San Joaquin County, and the City of Stockton that allows the possibility of potential westward extension of Route 4 along its current alignment. Route 4.

    Carl Rogers observed in November 2007 that on the western outskirts of Stockton, Daggett Road has been renamed the "Port of Stockton Expressway". The expressway, which intersects and terminates at Route 4, enjoys a northerly jog onto Rough & Ready Island via a new four-laned divided bridge. From there, traffic can bear east towards Navy Street. There is also a four-lane expressway being constructed west of the Navy Drive/West Washington Street intersection. He opines that Route 4 may one day annex one, or both, of the aforementioned expressways, permitting the Route 4 Freeway to transition into--and overlay--Washington Street towards the unconstructed expressway and the existing Port of Stockton Expressway. This might relate to the plans above.

    The CTC considered relinquishement of right of way in the City of Stockton, between Filbert Street and Route 99, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets and frontage roads, in November 2005.

    In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 4 at Tracy Boulevard, consisting of a realigned and reconstructed county road.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3802: Improvements of Route 4 in Calaveras County, between Stockton and Angels Camp. $1,000,000.

     %LANDSCAPED

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    San Joaquin 4 15.32 16.20
    San Joaquin 4 R16.31 R17.07
    San Joaquin 4 R17.44 R19.44

     

    Interstate Submissions

    (1) and (2) were submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1945, but not accepted.

     

    Naming

    The segment is named the "Ort J. Loftus Freeway". Ort Loftus was a leader Stockton's business community in the radio, television and cable industries, and worked diligently for the completion of I-5 through Stockton which was opened October 13, 1979. He was also a tireless proponent for the construction of Route 4, linking I-5 to Route 99. When the freeway opened, Loftus held a banquet at which he served "giant turkey legs" as an insult to then Caltrans director Adrianna Gianturco, whom he blamed for the delays in getting the highway (in actually, it was budget problems that led to the delay). He as a native of Minnesota. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 95, Chapter 51, in 1986

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 80 in Hercules to Route 99 near Stockton; all of (2) is constructed to freeway standards. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959, Chapter 1062.


  3. From Route 99 in Stockton to Route 49 at Altaville via the vicinity of Copperopolis.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined by Chapter 385 as "Route 99 near Stockton to Route 49 near Altaville via Copperopolis", but a later act, Chapter 1698, changed the wording to "Route 99 near Stockton to Route 49 near Altaville via the vicinity of Copperopolis".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was part of the original 1931 definition of LRN 75. Circa 1935, this route was under construction between Farmington and Altaville.

    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of Route 4 (Jct. US 40 at Pinole [just S of Hercules] to Jct. Route 89 near Markleeville, via Stockton).

     

    Status

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3802: Improvements of Route 4 in Calaveras County, between Stockton and Angels Camp. $1,000,000.

     

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.2] From Route 160 near Antioch to Route 84 near Brentwood.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 99 near Stockton to Route 65. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  4. From Route 49 in Angels Camp to Route 89 near Markleeville via Murphys, Calaveras Big Trees, Dorrington, and Bear Valley.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined by Chapter 385 as "Route 49 near Angeles[sic] Camp to Route 89 near Mount Bullion via Murphys, Calaveras Big Trees, and Dorrington."

    In 1968, this was simplified to "Route 49 near Angels Camp to Route 89 via Murphys, Calaveras Big Trees, and Dorrington."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    The portion of this route between Calaveras Big Trees and Route 89 ("An act to establish the Alpine state highway; to define its course...") was added to the state highway system on April 15, 1911, Chapter 468, as an extension on LRN 23, LRN 24, and LRN 34. In 1925, LRN 24 was extended to Route 49 near Angels Camp by "An act declaring the county road in Calaveras county, extending from Angels Camp through Vallecita and Murphy to Calaveras Big Trees in the national forest to be a state highway." (May 23, 1925, Chapter 375).

    In 1934, this segment was signed as part of Route 4 (Jct. US 40 at Pinole [just S of Hercules] to Jct. Route 89 near Markleeville, via Stockton).

     

    Naming

    This segment from Calavares Big Trees to Route 89 is named the "Alpine State Highway". It was named by Resolution Chapter 468 in 1911. This segment also had the historic name of the "Big Trees Highway".

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.2] Portion (3).

     

    Status

    According to Chris Velvin: "I just got back from a family trip to Tahoe and Yosemite, for which, I used the Microsoft Streets and Trips software to plot a route. The route that the program gave us took us over Ebbett's Pass on Route 4 from Angel's Camp to Markleesville. I'm sure this is a beautiful drive in the daytime but we got there at about 9PM, in the pitch black. The road is very well maintained but it goes down to one wide lane, with no center stripe, for about 30(?) miles. I could be exaggerating that, but it felt like a hundred miles. There are very few road signs and none that identify the road on that stretch. We thought we had made a wrong turn and were just hoping to end up in the right place. The road is full of blind curves and magestic pines that hide anything beyond 20 feet or so. Three sets of deer and one large SUV jumped out in front of us. There are times when there is nothing on the edge of the raod except black. Is it at 5 foot ditch or a thousand foot crevasse? There was no way to know with out stopping...and we weren't stopping. We were just hoping the road wasn't a dead end and we would have to back track.The closest thing I can compare this part of the trip to is the Blair Witch Project. It was a white knuckle ride the whole way. I can't wait to drive it in the day time, or at night without the in-laws."

    The September 2002 CTC agenda provided the first indication of the plans to widen this to a two lane expressway in Angels Camp. In November 2002, the CTC adopted of a controlled access highway route from PM R21.1 to PM R23.3 in Calaveras County. The bypass will mean the route will have a crossing of Route 49 rather than the current break in the route and the current co-signed section. The project looks fairly reminiscent of the Amador Bypass but about half the distance. In 2007, the CTC recommended funding $4,438K from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) for the Angels Camp Bypass. The bypass was completed and opened on July 21, 2009. The general contractor, Teichert Construction of Stockton, finished the project approximately 18 months early and $5-6 million under budget.

    In November 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Calaveras, on Meko Drive, consisting of a maintenance station access road.

    In January 2007, the CTC considered vacating right of way in the county of Calaveras, at Batten Road, consisting of right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In June 2008, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Calaveras, between 1.1 and 1.4 miles southerly of Hunt Road, consisting of right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In August 2011, the CTC relinquished right of way in the County of Calaveras along Route 4 from the easterly city limits of the City of Angels to the realigned Route 4, consisting of superseded highway right of way and a new road connection.

    In December 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Calaveras along Route 4 on Pool Station Road, consisting of a realigned and reconstructed county road. It also vacated right of way in the county of Calaveras along Route 4 at Pool Station Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Between the east urban limits of Antioch-Pittsburg and Route 89.

 

Naming

Some portion of this highway is named the Ebbets Pass Highway. The designation begins about ½ mile east of the town of Murphys (about 7 miles east of Angels Camp), and continues all the way over Ebbets Pass to approximately 2 miles west of Markleeville (the point at which the narrow, winding 1 one lane road widens back out to standard two lane highway.

 

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  • Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Route 4

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 4:

  • Total Length (1995): 192 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 240 to 91,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 147; Urbanized: 45.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 184 mi; FAU: 6 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 41 mi; Minor Arterial: 151 mi.
  • Summits: Ebbetts Pass (8,731 ft)
  • Counties Traversed: Contra Costa, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Calveras, and Alpine.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that was to become LRN 4 was defined as part of the state highway system in 1909, and was defined generally to run between Sacramento and Los Angeles, 358 mi.

By 1935, the route was defined to be “from Sacramento to Los Angeles”, but 1935 Chapter 274 amended that definition to:

  1. From Sacramento to Los Angeles
  2. A point at Santa Clara River bridge, on that portion of [LRN 4] described in subdivision [1] of this section, to Saugus.

Portion [1] was considered a primary highway.

The 1935 change surved the purpose of keeping the old alignment in Saugus. In 1937, Chapter 194 extended this older definition to Newhall by changing the wording of [2] to “to [LRN 23] near Newhall via Saugus”. In 1939, that old alignment was removed from the definition by Chapter 473, although that routing was added to an extension of LRN 79.

In Los Angeles, the routing generally ran along San Fernando Road. It was signed as US 99 from Los Angeles to French Camp (near Manteca), and cosigned as US 50/US 99 between French Camp and Sacramento. Also, in 1935, the cosigning with US 50 was moved to Stockton. A small portion in Sacramento was cosigned with Route 24 (now Route 160).

In Los Angeles, after the freeway was constructed, a portion of LRN 4 was unsigned, running along San Fernando Road between Colorado and Ave 26 near Figueroa, then along Ave 26 to Daly St, then along Daly St to Marengo, and then along Soto to end at Whittier Blvd. The freeway routing of this was I-5 from US 101 N (it is unclear where the difference was between LRN 4 and LRN 161). A portion of original LRN 4 was designated as Route 163 between 1964 and 1965.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 5



Routing

From the international boundary near Tijuana to the Oregon state line via National City, San Diego, Los Angeles, the westerly side of the San Joaquin Valley, Sacramento, and Yreka; also passing near Santa Ana, Glendale, Woodland, and Red Bluff.

 

Suffixed Routings

Originally, there was also an I-5W. This routing dates back to the original definition of I-5 in 1947. At that time, I-5 was defined to run along the present-day Route 99 routing from N of Los Angeles to Sacramento. I-5W was defined to run along a routing that corresponds to present-day Route 120, I-205, I-580, I-80, and I-505. US 50 was multiplexed on the I-580 section. The route was resigned to the present-day route numbers in 1964 as part of the regularization of state and legislative route numbers. Note that the CalTrans history shows that I-505 and I-580 were approved as interstate the same time as I-5 in 1947, but that I-205 wasn't defined until 1957, when the West Tracy bypass was constructed. However, it appears the three-digit routes were not signed until 1965. Perhaps this was done to avoid confusing the travelling public, as the interstate signage was new (and before 1965, coexisted with the pre-1964 route signage). According to Calvin Sampang, one issue of California Highways and Public Works has a picture showing an I-5W shield on a segment of present-day I-580.

A proposal unearthed by Richard Moeur from the AASHTO files indicates that, at least in 1957 and 1958, there was at least a proposal for an I-5E. These proposal had I-5 running along the traditional alignment (Route 99 in 1957; "Westerly Alignment" in 1958) until either Modesto (1957) or Tracy (1958). The route then split, with I-5W going off as described above, and I-5E continuing along present Route 99 (1957)/I-5 (1958) into Sacramento. Evidently, AASHTO liked the routings, but didn't like I-5E, because that was never signed.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, the routing was defined by Chapter 385 as "Route 5 is from the international boundary near Tijuana to the Oregon state line via National City, San Diego, Los Angeles, a point on Route 99 south of Bakersfield, the westerly side of the San Joaquín Valley, and via Yreka; also passing near Santa Ana, Norwalk, Elysian Park in Los Angeles, Glendale, Woodland, and Red Bluff. That portion between Route 99 south of Bakersfield and Route 113 near Woodland may include all or portions of any existing state highway route or routes." The routing was simplified in 1984 (Chapter 409) to the present "Route 5 is from the international boundary near Tijuana to the Oregon state line via National City, San Diego, Los Angeles, the westerly side of the San Joaquín Valley, Sacramento, and Yreka; also passing near Santa Ana, Glendale, Woodland, and Red Bluff."

In San Diego, the "Montgomery" Freeway portion of I-5 was built for US 101 and existed before I-5, as part of US 101. When the San Clemente section of I-5 was finished, it was connected to the rest of the "San Diego" Freeway, which was connected to the "Montgomery". The Montgomery was then updated to be to Interstate standard. When the San Clemente section was finished, US 101 was multiplexed to San Diego. At the time, the section of I-5 from I-8 to Mission Bay Dr. was not finished, so the rest of US 101 from the northern end of the Montgomery to Mission Bay was part of US 101. When I-5 was finished there, US 101 was decomissioned south of the East Los Angeles Split (the present-day US 101/I-5 junction).

In Oceanside, US 101 (I-5) previously ran along Hill Street.

Interstate Shield According to a book on the history of Buena Park, there was a debate regarding the routing of Route 5 through Buena Park. Apparently there were three proposed routes each of which were established as temporary highways while the freeway was being planned, and there was even a AAA map published that showed all three routes. Apparently one route was the site of the original El Camino Real Highway, which thru Orange County went up roughly what is now Route 57, and then went west on La Habra Blvd. Knotts Berry Farm, which was then the Amusement Park as this was pre-Disneyland, wanted the route that went up Beach Blvd, Route 39. Buena Park, itself, did not want to be divided by a freeway and was opting for the Manchester route which is the current route. [Thanks to David Whiteman for this information.]

One map shows that, by 1953, the freeway portion of US 101 (now I-5) south of 1965 Route 245 had been constructed.

US Highway Shield The truck route for the current I-5 near Newhall Pass is from 1954 (when the route was still US 99). At the point where the truck routes cross Sierra Highway, there is an old tunnel similar to the one on the truck routes today. Its about half-filled with dirt and is open on one side. You can even see where the lights used to be. It was an undercrossing for an onramp that no longer exists connecting southbound Sierra Highway with southbound I-5 or US 99.

New Newhall RoutingMore specifically, the history of the "truck route" in this area is as follows: The original "road" was the railroad, which still goes through the tunnel built in 1875. The surface roads were pretty primitive in those days, with a mere dirt path going through Beale's Cut less than a mile north. That road was improved in stages, and became San Fernando Road, running continuously from LA all the way up into Newhall. The road NW to Castaic Junction was extended in 1915 along the Ridge Route, connecting LA to the Central Valley. When the roads got numbered in the 1930s, the road NW became US 99 (and the Ridge Route was bypassed by a new divided highway), and the road NE got the US 6 designation, but was renamed the Sierra Highway, which is why there is now a disjoint section of San Fernando Road up in Newhall. This was also Route 7. At this time, all the traffic was going through the old Newhall Tunnel. This tunnel was constructed in 1910, and was only 17' 5" wide, and accomodated two lanes of traffic. In 1928-1929, to alleviate traffic in this tunnel, the state constructed a bypass route along Weldon Canyon. This diverted the traffic going N to Sacramento and the San Joaquin Valley. However, the tunnel remained a bottleneck. In the late 1930s, a project called the Mint Canyon Short Cut was started. This process involved creating a divided road, and completely eliminating the tunnel by excavating and opening the top. The purpose of the Mint Canyon Short Cut was to carry the US 6/Route 7 traffic. This project also involved some rerouting of the end of Foothill Blvd. At some point, US 99 in the Sylmar area was rebuilt again as a divided highway next to "The Old Road", and its interchange with Sierra Highway was rebuilt as a three-level structure, with a short tunnel to carry southbound US 6. You can still find a bit of that tunnel on the ground, but it is mostly filled in with dirt. US 99 became I-5 officially in 1964, and US 6 became Route 14. Through the 60s, the Sierra Highway was gradually replaced by a freeway following a different alignment; the freeway construction started in the Antelope Valley and worked its way south. This project was finally completed in 1971 when the old I-5 (US 99) was redefined as truck lanes, the side of the hill was carved away, and new auto lanes were built, including the connection to the new Route 14 freeway. This involved eliminating most of the connectivity to Sierra Highway. This interchange still shows signs of the plans to continue Route 14 S. Half way through this construction, the Sylmar earthquake hit, and knocked a lot of the flyover ramps down, delaying the completion of the project. Similar damage happened in 1994.

On I-5 south at Route 118 there's a section of a bridge just before Paxton where it looks like the exit for Paxton originally went before Route 118 was built. It's an extra lane on the right with the original round rails but a little bump of concrete has been put down to kind of block off that lane.

Often, folks ask about the famous "French Switch", where the two sides of I-5 swap which side of the road they are on. This occurs to give southbound - downhill - traffic a gentler descent so as to reduce the incidence of trucks losing their brakes. The uphill lanes are curvier and much steeper, as they follow the previous route of US 99/Golden State Highway. Uphill traffic stays on the valley floor until it reaches the base of the mountains, then takes a path through the canyons as it travels to the top of the first major set of hills. Downhill traffic takes a nearly straight constant-grade path that doesn't come down to the valley floor until nearly a mile south of the point where northbound leaves the valley floor.

Some pictures of the former bridges in Piru Gorge can be seen here. A nice article on the history of the Ridge Route may be found on the KCET Website.

In 2013, it was reported that volunteers had been attempting to maintain the original Ridge Route roadway, and were running into resistance from the US Forest Service, which technically owns the two-lane road that was created by horse-drawn scrapers in 1914 across ridge tops dotting the Sierra Pelona mountain range north of Castaic. The Forest Service closed the 20-foot-wide road to the public in 2005 after heavy rains washed out parts of it. Federal officials later spent millions of dollars to repair the damage and repave 1½ miles of the road. It is now passable, although some areas remain unpaved because of pipeline relocation projects conducted by petroleum and gas companies whose lines run parallel to the road. The Forest Service also will not allow members of the nonprofit Ridge Route Preservation Organization to use mechanized equipment to clean out culverts and remove rocks that occasionally tumble onto the roadway, and have balked at designating the road a National Forest Scenic Byway. The organization, as of 2013, was sitll using shovels and wheelbarrows to clean out drains. The volunteers also use sledgehammers to break up steamer-trunk-sized boulders that sometimes fall onto the road where it slices through a steep ridge at a place called Swede's Cut. The Forest Service has indicated the roadway might reopen to the public later in 2013 after the utility companies undertake a $10-million slope-shoring project that will protect both their pipelines and the pavement at Osito Canyon, near the road's halfway point.
(Source: Los Angeles Times, 1/13/2013)

Many ask why the Westerly routing in the San Joaquin Valley was constructed. One poster on MTR noted that in 1965 or thereabouts, in response to a legislative request, the then California Division of Highways prepared a report on the effect of the Interstate system on California highway development. One important point noted in this report was that although both I-5 and Route 99 were planned for eventual development as freeways, I-5 had received artificially higher priority over Route 99 because it was funded as an Interstate and so attracted federal completion deadlines. This in turn meant that more resources were being devoted to I-5 even though it was projected to be far less busy than Route 99. This might imply that the Division had had the decision to build I-5 on an independent alignment wished on it—possibly by the Legislature, the Highway Commission, or even the B.P.R.—and would rather have chased the traffic on Route 99, possibly by building it as an Interstate, while leaving the facility now known as I-5 to be developed as a western relief route at some point in the relatively distant future.

In Sacramento, before the route was completed in the late 1960s, it appears that I-5 split off of Route 99, and ran W along Broadway, and then continued W co-signed with the West Sacramento Freeway, then signed as I-80/I-5 (now Business Route 80, unsigned Route 50). Given that, it was likely then route N temporarily along Route 113 back to the present route of I-5. Additionally, while the West Side Freeway portion was being completed around 1975, I-5 had a temporary routing that entered the Sacramento area via Route 99 (South Sacramento Freeway), then followed Route 99 westbound on the WX Freeway past the Oak Park Interchange (co-signed with I-80), before merging with the constructed portion of the West Side (but still co-routed with Route 99).

In January 2005, the CTC considered a resolution to vacate the public’s right to use roadway connectors in the City of Sacramento, along Interstate 5 (I-5) between N Street and Capitol Mall and between Capitol Mall and L Street. The connectors were constructed around 1964 as part of the I-5 freeway project. At the time, Capitol Mall (formerly LRN 6, which was signposted as US 40) was the principal route for traffic traveling between Sacramento and San Francisco resulting in high volumes of inter-regional and local traffic using the same corridor. Upon completion of the freeway system in Sacramento, inter-regional traffic on Capitol Mall was almost completely eliminated. Traffic operation studies have concluded that these connectors are no longer necessary. The connectors are currently maintained by the City of Sacramento and reimbursed by Caltrans. Terminating the public’s right to use the connectors creates excess land that can be combined with other excess parcels and sold.

The exit for Route 99 North is also labeled "To CA 70". This was placed after the original Route 70/Route 99 co-designation was removed between here and the current junction. The overhead sign at the exit had a Route 70 shield on it until around the year 2000. The Route 99/Route 70 co-designation signage that remained as of 2003 were (1) on eastbound Elkhorn Blvd at the onramp to NB Route 99; (2) on Capitol Avenue at 5th Street; and (3) on I Street and 4th Street at the Amtrak station.

I-5 almost bypassed Redding entirely. Early plans would have had the freeway skirt the town near what is now Redding Municipal Airport. News reports from 1962 say that as many as four routes originally were considered, but residents, city leaders and business owners chose the one nearest to Redding. Cypress Avenue and Hilltop Drive soon became the main pit stops for travelers, leaving many businesses on former Route 99 in south Redding, downtown and the Miracle Mile to wither away.

In the Lake Shasta area, I-5 replaced the former Route 99 routing, which was submerged when the lake was filled. Relics of this routing reappears when the lake water level drops, as noted in this story: "A bridge from Highway 99, the precursor to Interstate 5, was being used last week as a makeshift low-water boat ramp at Antlers Resort & Marina near Lakeshore Drive in Lakehead."

The following freeway-to-freeway connections were never constructed:

  • NB I-5 to SB I-405 (Northern Merge). Rationale: Illogical Reverse Move. The angle between the two freeways is too acute.

  • SB I-5 to WB Route 134. Rationale: Illogical Reverse Move. The angle between the two freeways is too acute.

  • NB I-5 to SB I-710. Rationale: Illogical Reverse Move. The angle between the two freeways is too acute.

  • SB I-5 to WB Route 118. Rationale: The interchange is only 1½ miles from I-405, and Caltrans wanted drivers to connect to the I-405 southbound to get to Route 118 westbound.

  • SB I-5 to NB I-405 (Southern Merge). Rationale: Illogical Reverse Move. The angle between the two freeways is too acute.

  • SB I-5 to EB Route 56. Rationale: Insufficient predicted traffic volume. Estimates are that this ramp would cost $140 million, but serve only 1,000 vehicles per day. This was funded in the 2005 Transportation Bill.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 5 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 13 (now Route 17) near Glenwood to Jct. Route 1 at San Francisco (along Skyline Blvd) . This route was LRN 55. This was renumbered on July 1, 1964 as Route 35, although parts of the original Route 5 alignment follow the current alignment of Route 280. Before Route 280 was constructed, Route 5 began at the intersection of Route 9 (LRN 42) and Skyline, proceeded up to the junction of Route 92 (LRN 105), and then went over Crystal Springs Reservoir, and then turned north following the existing portion of Route 280 from the Route 92/I-280 interchange north to until where Skyline Blvd exits to the left.

US Highway Shield Prior to 1964, the present day I-5 previously was numbered as US 99 and US 99W, and US 101.

The segment of I-5 (that is, former US 101) between the Mexican Border and Santa Ana (Route 72) was defined as part of the state highway system as LRN 2. It was originally signed as US 101. The segment between San Diego and Santa Ana was added in the first bond issue in 1909/1910.

LRN 2 (US 101) was extended to the Mexico border in 1931. Prior to 1931, the existing state highway only went as far S as National City; the remaining 10 miles to the border was traversed by county highways. The extension used portions of the county roads with an ultimate connection to the Mexican line that depended on the selected site for the US Customs House. It was anticipated that the extension would carry a large volume of local traffic but when the proportion of such traffic that can be analyzed (as of is of a transient nature) is added to the traffic originating at distant points, it was determined that the routing served principally a class of traffic that was of State rather than local nature.

The LRN 2 / original US 101 routing between Santa Ana and Los Angeles is present-day Route 72, which was part of the 1909 LRN 2. From San Juan Capestrano, the LRN 2 routing of US 101 ran N through El Toro and Irvine to Santa Ana. It ran along 1st Street, Main Street (Santa Ana), Santa Ana Blvd, Los Angeles Blvd (renamed after 1970 to Anaheim Blvd), and Spadra (renamed in 1967 to Harbor Blvd). It ran N on Spadra/Harbor to Whittier Blvd, and W along Whittier Blvd into Los Angeles County to Mission Road. It ran N along Mission Road to Sunset Blvd. This portion of the routing has been bypassed by I-5.

LRN 161 and LRN 174 were planned limited-access reroutings. The current segment between Main Street in Santa Ana to Firestone Boulevard (former Route 42) near Norwalk was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933 was LRN 174, and was signed as US 101.

The segment from LRN 172 (3rd Street, eventual Route 60) at the intersection of Downey Road to Firestone Blvd near Norwalk (LRN 174; former Route 42) was LRN 166, defined in 1933. The routing was moved in 1941 from Telegraph Road between Los Nietos Road and I-5. LRN 166 also included the segment of 1964-1965 Route 245 along Downey Road between Route 60 (LRN 172). This was also part of US 101.

The segment between Downey Road (eventual Route 60, LRN 172) and downtown Los Angeles was the remainder of the original 1909/1910 LRN 2. The segment between downtown Los Angeles (the current start of US 101) and Route 14/Tunnel Station was defined in 1909 as part of LRN 4. It was signed as US 99. Portions of this were later bypassed by LRN 161, leaving the only the portion between downtown and Route 110, and the portion N of Colorado Street in Glendale, as what was LRN 4. LRN 161 (between Route 110 and Colorado Street (originally Route 134)) was defined in 1947. The Burbank section was completed in 1959; the San Bernardino Split in 1947, and the San Fernando section in 1963. This segment was signed as US 99 until 1961.

An August 1941 report issued by the Regional Planning Commission of Los Angeles County entitled "A Report on the Feasibility of a Freeway Along the Channel of the Los Angeles River" proposed a four-lane roadway on each levee from Anaheim Street in Long Beach north to Sepulveda Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley; excepting between Soto Street and Dayton Street in downtown Los Angeles, where, due to a lack of right-of-way along the river, the alignment matches the future alignment of the US 101 portion of the Santa Ana Freeway. There is no mention in the report of a master plan of freeways like that issued in 1947, although the maps showed connections to the already-completed Arroyo Seco Parkway and the proposed Ramona and Rio Hondo Parkways.
(Thanks to Daniel Thomas for hunting down this information)

The segment between Route 14 (pre-1964 Route 7, US 6) and Route 126 was added to LRN 4 in 1935 (Chapter 274).

The segment between Wheeler Ridge and Woodland (the "westerly realignment") was defined in 1957 (Chapter 26), and was LRN 238. Before the westerly realignment, the route (as US 99) continued along US 99 (LRN 4) through Bakersfield to Sacramento. It then ran, as US 99W (cosigned with US 40), from Sacramento along LRN 6 (the present day routing approximates I-80) to just W of Davis, where it turned N, running cosigned as Alt US 40/US 99W (LRN 7; present-day Route 113) to Woodland. Currently, portions of this routing include LRN 138 (defined in 1955, Chapter 1912) from Route 33 near Oilfields to Route 33 and LRN 5 from I-205 east of Tracy to Route 4 in Stockton (defined in 1909/1910).

The segment from Woodland to Red Bluff was defined in 1909 was part of LRN 7. It was signed as US 99W to the junction with US 99E (now Route 99).

The segment from Red Bluff to the Oregon State Line was defined in 1909 as part of LRN 3. It was signed as US 99. See NAMING for more details on this history of this segment. Portions of this LRN have since been renumbered (as bypasses have been constructed) as Route 263, Route 265, and Route 273.

 

Status

San Diego County

In National City, there are plans to construct an auxiliary lane from 24th St. to Harbor Drive.

In March 2012, the CTC approved funding for two projects: (1) In San Diego at Civic Center Drive and the Wilson Avenue/I-5 northbound onramp: $1,150,000 to add signalization; add northbound lane on Wilson Avenue; widen northbound I-5 onramp; lengthen left-turn pocket from westbound Civic Center to Southbound I-5; add left-turn pockets for eastbound/westbound Civic Center. (TCIF Project 72); (2) In San Diego at Bay Marina Drive and I-5. $910,000 to widen Bay Marina Drive and add right turn lane onto Southbound I-5. (TCIF Project 69)

In June 2013, the CTC authorized $5,052,000 on I-5 in the city of San Diego, from 0.1 miles south of Route 8 to 0.3 miles north of Tacolote Creek Bridge; also on Route 8 from Route 5 to 0.3 mile east of Morena Boulevard. Outcome/Output: Construct auxiliary lanes and widen connector to improve traffic operations.

In September 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to reconstruct the I-5/Genessee Avenue Interchange in the city of San Diego. The scope of work includes replacing existing overcrossings at Genesee Avenue and Voigt Drive, ramp widening at Genesee and at Sorrento Valley Road interchanges, construction of I-5 auxiliary lanes, realignment of Gilman Drive and various measures to improve pedestrian and bicycle access. The entire I-5/Genesee Interchange Reconstruction project will be constructed and designed in phases. Phase 1 includes the reconstruction of the I-5/Genesee Interchange, the addition of auxiliary lanes north of Genesee Avenue, and improvements to the Sorrento Valley Road on-and off-ramps. Phase 2 includes the addition of auxiliary lanes south of Genesee Avenue, replacement of the Voigt Drive Overcrossing and realignment of Gilman Drive. Phase 1 is fully funded with local and federal dollars and is estimated to begin construction in 2014. Phase 2 is fully funded through Plans, Specifications, and Estimates only. Depending on the availability of funding, construction of this phase is estimated to begin between 2015 and 2020. The realignment and widening of the Genesee southbound off-ramp (PPNO 0129P) is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). Total cost of this portion of the project is $12,987,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The approximate estimated cost of the entire Interstate 5/Genesee Interchange Reconstruction Project, including the SHOPP funding, is $145,000,000. The SHOPP scope of work as described scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to traffic, biological resources, aesthetics, noise, and paleontology to a less than significant level by incorporating measures to minimize, avoid, restore, and replace impacted resources. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

In May 2013, the CTC authorized $8,423,000 to realign and widen the Genesee southbound off-ramp. The CTC also authorized $8,000,000 of Prop 1B funds to reconstruct I-5 Genesee Bridge and interchange including ramps and retaining walls; add Type 1 bicycle facility between Voigt and Sorrento Valley Road.

In San Diego, there are plans to add an auxiliary lane at the Mission Bay Overcrossing to Route 52 (PM R24.1/R25.8). [CTC February 2002 Agenda Item 5.2b(1) Project 4]. There are also plans to realign the freeway at Virginia Avenue approaching the San Ysidro Port of Entry [CTC April 2002 Agenda Item 2.1c.(1) TCRP Project #88]. According to Don Hagstrom in October 2002, plans to re-align the southbound I-5 lanes towards the old Virginia Avenue crossing, allowing a conversion of the current southbound lanes into northbound lanes, to alleviate some of the waits and congestion there. This would mean that I-5 southbound into Mexico would veer sharply to the right to meet the new crossing. It is likely that a suitable connection to the Calle Internacional (a 4-lane divided highway in Tijuana that parallels the border fence) will be constructed, since this important highway is the main gateway to the MEX-1D toll freeway to Rosarito and Ensenada.

In January 2010, the CTC authorized use of ARRA funds for a project that consists of extending the high occupancy vehicle lanes from the Route 5/Route 805 merge to Carroll Canyon, constructing a north facing Direct Access Ramp with Carroll Canyon and extending Carroll Canyon to Sorrento Valley road. This project is an excellent candidate for Recovery Act funds as the project will likely create approximately 660 jobs in San Diego County. In accordance with AB 3X-20, which authorizes the Commission to allocate bond funds displaced by Recovery Act funds, SANDAG plans to request that the $57,500,000 in CMIA funds be reprogrammed to other eligible projects in the region at a future Commission meeting.

I-5 Widening Near Camp PendletonIn November 2010, there was additional information on the project that would widen I-5 between the I-5/I-805 interchange and the Camp Pendleton boundary. There are a number of different options for expansion (shown in the figure to the right, from the S-D Union Tribune). There is lots of opposition. At least four cities along the corridor have paid for their own impact studies and will be conveying their conclusions to Caltrans. Del Mar’s City Council urged Caltrans to look at alternatives to move people and goods, rather than just cars and trucks. SANDAG sought to contain any construction to the existing right of way and to protect the six lagoons and ocean views traversed by the highway. Community groups have hired attorneys to fight the plan every step of the way. Groups like the Audubon Society and Sierra Club have weighed in against the expansion. Allan Kosup, Caltrans director for the I-5 corridor, says it will take until the middle of 2011 to sort through and address all the comments and then pick a preferred option. Construction could begin in 2013.

SANDAG later indicated that their preferred approach is a phased-in development of the 12-lane highway that retains the inner-freeway but would require far less taking of private land and homes along the corridor. Their letter to the CTC stated that the board of directors supported the 8+4 option for the highway and encouraged Caltrans to minimize right-of-way impacts to adjacent properties to the corridor. It backed a gradual introduction of the HOV/HOT lanes, starting with two in the center (one in each direction) and expanding only if necessary. They also suggested that the design minimize and mitigate visual, noise and air quality impacts as well as effects on the corridor’s coastal lagoons.

In July 2011, it was reported that had decided to go with the 4-lane widening option. The decision to build only four express lanes (open to buses, carpools and drivers willing to pay a fee) reduces the project cost to $3.5 billion. It also cuts in half the number of homes and businesses slated for seizure and removal to make way for the project. Caltrans must still obtain a development permit from the California Coastal Commission before the agency can widen the freeway. Caltrans estimates the first phase of construction—a northbound and southbound express lane from Encinitas to Oceanside—could start as early as 2013.

In September 2012 additional details were provided. The new information about the project is contained in a draft supplemental Environmental Impact Report, which was officially released for public comment on Aug. 31, 2012. The public has until Oct. 15 to review and comment on the document. Additional documents to be released in the coming months include a final EIR and a “public works plan.” The project involves the addition of four carpool lanes — for a total of 12 lanes — between La Jolla and Oceanside, as well as rail improvements such as double-tracking, enhancements to North County lagoons, bicycle paths along the entire 27 miles of the project, and pedestrian walkways. In preparing the supplemental EIR, Caltrans commissioned hydraulic and other studies to determine how best to protect and enhance the health of the lagoons. The study found that longer bridges over three lagoons — San Elijo, Batiquitos and Buena Vista — are needed to provide better water flow in and out of the lagoons. Bridges across Penasquitos, San Dieguito and Agua Hedionda were found to be adequate. Caltrans has also acquired 100 acres of land along the lagoons, which will be preserved as open space to compensate for environmental impacts of the I-5 project. Planners have also added bicycle lanes along the entire project corridor; some will be within the freeway right-of-way, while others will be on local streets. Construction on the road improvements and environmental mitigation could begin in 2014, pending approval by the California Coastal Commission and other agencies. The road portion of the project will cost $3.5 billion, while the total project, including rail improvements, is pegged at $6.5 billion. The estimated completion date for the entire project is 2035.
(Source: Rancho Santa Fe Review, 9/26/2012)

In October 2012, more information on the EIR was obtained. There are five alternatives being considered:

  • No Build Alternative.
  • Alternative 1: 10 + 4 Barrier. Would build one general purpose lane in each direction and two HOV/Managed Lanes in each direction; HOV/Managed Lanes and general purpose lanes would be separated by a concrete barrier.
  • Alternative 2: 10 + 4 Buffer. Would build one general purpose lane in each direction and two HOV/Managed Lanes in each direction; HOV/Managed Lanes and general purpose lanes would be separated by a painted buffer.
  • Alternative 3: 8 + 4 Barrier. This alternative would not add any general purpose lanes to the existing highway. Two HOV/Managed Lanes would be added in each direction separated from the existing general purpose lanes by a concrete barrier.
  • Alternative 4: 8 + 4 Buffer. This alternative would not add any general purpose lanes to the existing highway. Two HOV/Managed Lanes would be added in each direction separated from the existing general purpose lanes by a painted buffer.

In March 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Diego County that will construct roadway improvements on I-5 for 27 miles from Oceanside to San Diego. Phase 1 (PPNOs 0615A, 0615B, and 0615C) will extend the existing High Occupancy Vehicle lanes from Manchester Avenue to Route 78, replace the San Elijo and Batiquitos Lagoon bridges, and build soundwalls. Phase 1 is programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program and is fully funded. The total estimated cost of this phase is $481,820,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015-16. The remaining phases are not yet funded. The locally preferred alternative was Alternative 4: 8 + 4 buffer.

In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Encinitas adjacent to Route 5 along Regal Road, consisting of non-motorized transportation facilities. The CTC also relinquished right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 5 on Roselle Street, consisting of roadway and sidewalks.

There are currently vague plans to add high-occupancy tolls lanes to the route in Northern San Diego County.

In San Diego: In July 2005, the CTC received a notice of EIR preparation for Route 5 and Route 56 in San Diego County that would provide a connector between Route 5 and Route 56 near Del Mar Heights (NOP). This is funded in the 2005 Transportation Bill. The alternatives being considered are:

  • No Project.
  • Direct Freeway-To-Freeway Connector Ramps.
  • Freeway-to-Freeway Connector Ramps with Loop.
  • Local Street Improvements.
  • Local Street Improvements with West to North Direct Freeway-To-Freeway Connector Ramp.

In San Diego, TCRP Project #82 reconstructed the I-5/I-805 interchange, from Genesee Avenue to Del Mar Heights Road. The basic plan was to extend C/D (Collector/Distributor) roadways along I-5 from Route 56 to I-805. Trucks would also be directed onto the C/D roads, so they would also serve as truck bypass lanes, separated from the main lanes by concrete barriers. The "C/D lanes" (4 in each direction) are labelled as the "LOCAL BYPASS" (not truck lanes). Northbound the signage (from both I-5 and I-805)’160;is "LOCAL BYPASS/Junction 56 EAST", reflecting that one must use the bypass to access Route 56); southbound it is "LOCAL BYPASS/Carmel Mountain Rd". The bypass includes a new Carmel Mountain Rd exit in both directions. Route 56 traffic going south merges into the bypass.

In April 2007, the CTC considered an amendment to TCRP Project #82.2 that changed the project from constructing of northbound and southbound auxiliary lanes from Via De La Valle to Lomas Santa Fe Drive (including soundwalls and bridges) to extedning the existing HOV lane from just south of Via de la Valle to just south of Manchester Avenue, and realigning ramps at the Lomas Santa Fe Drive Interchange. The original proposal was part of a larger project to revise the interchange at Lomas Santa Fe Drive. However, the estimated cost of the interchange work increased beyond the region’s funding capability. The auxiliary lane work was then removed from the larger project and is now being constructed as part of another project. A Value Analysis Study suggested that the region would likely be able to fund the interchange work if the construction was combined with a planned extension of a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction from just south of Via de la Valle to just south of Manchester Avenue. The HOV work would provide significant congestion relief by allowing HOV users to continue through an area of daily recurring congestion. By removing the scope of the auxiliary lanes and combining the interchange work and the HOV extension project, the region expected to be able to fully fund the project. The project is scheduled for completion in FY 2009/2010.

In January 2007, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Diego on Vista Sorrento Parkway, north of Sorrento Valley Boulevard, consisting of frontage road.

In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening this route for HOV lanes, Mixed Flow and Auxiliary Lanes.

2007 CMIA. A number of projects on I-5 in San Diego County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects included the North Coast Corridor, Stage 1A, Unit 1 ($64 million requested); the N Coast Corridor, Stage 1B, Encinitas HOV ($327 million); the N Coast Corridor, Stage 1C, Carlsbad HOV ($92 milllion); the N Coast Corridor, Stage 1F, Voigt Dr-I-805 HOV ($158 million); and the N Coast Corridor, Stage 1E, Genesee Av interchange ($78 million). None were recommended for funding.

In the City of Carlsbad, the small segment at KP 78.0 was up for relinquishement in September 2002.

[I-5 Sign]Near San Clemente, there is a freeway crossing sign (5-feet × 7-feet) warning of people attempting to run across this freeway. This is because there is a border crossing checkpoint on NB I-5 in this area, and people wishing to avoid the INS often attempt (stupidly) to run across the freeway. The unusual signs are a reminder of an era when San Diego County had by far the most freeway pedestrian deaths in the nation. In the 1980s, dozens of illegal aliens were killed or injured each year as they tried to cross the treacherous freeways near the U.S.-Mexico border. Recent efforts have reduced the death rate. There are a variety of factors: beefed-up law enforcement, a doubling of patrols at the border and increased public awareness. The problem reached its height in 1989, when 24 illegal aliens were killed on the freeways near the border. From 1985 to 1987, 128 died and 105 were injured. In 1992, Caltrans erected a special warning sign, and built 10- to 12-foot high median fences in the area. Since that time, the number of injuries and deaths has dropped. Part of this is due to Operation Gatekeeper, a joint operation that fortified walls between San Diego and Tijuana that moved the cross-border traffic to the east. There were none in 1997, the year the California Highway Patrol stopped keeping track. There were no pedestrian fatalities between 1998 and 2002, and there is currently talk that the sign has outlived its usefulness and should be taken down. The sign itself was designed by John Hood, a longtime CalTrans graphic artist in 1990. There were several versions of the sign, some stuffed in the envelopes of residential electric bills, other posted at rest stops. In some, the characters had eyes and other features; officials felt those would be too detailed for motorists to discern at high speed. In another, the mother juggled a baby and a sweater, but that too was deemed overly complicated for the freeway. The artist is quoted in an article on the sign in the Los Angeles Times (4/4/2008) as saying, "People are going fast. It had to be simple." In the end, the artist thought about family, noting "When you think about a little girl, you are more sensitive to something horrific.". Additionally, the choice of a family permitted the artist to give the girl pigtails -- a visual tool that made it easy to demonstrate the idea of motion, of running. A photograph of the sign is hanging at the National Museum of American History, part of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.

In December 2011, the city of San Clemente has asked Caltrans to remove a 16-foot sound wall that was constructed along the I-5 Freeway near South El Camino Real. San Clemente's city attorney thinks Caltrans might have violated the California Environmental Quality Act by not notifying residents east of the freeway that the wall was planned. They have also asked Caltrans to reopen the environmental-review process for the $5.3 million project, which also calls for a see-through wall on the west side of the freeway atop the El Camino Real overcrossing. In February 2012, Caltrans offered to consider changes to the design. Changes could include extending and lowering the existing wall, though Caltrans told the city in October that the wall is the height required to meet a mandatory level of sound reduction for residents west of I-5.

Orange County

In January 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Orange County that will widen southbound on and off ramps at Camino Capistrano, reconfigure the hook-ramp interchange and construct roadway improvements on I-5 in the city of San Juan Capistrano. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project cost is $19,015,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $5,978,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Dana Point and San Clemente from south of Camino De Estrella Road to south of Via California Road that will construct an auxiliary lane between two interchanges and widen overcrossing structure to alleviate traffic delay.

In March 2012, it was reported that a new $275 million project will add a carpool lane in each direction and rebuild the Avenida Pico interchange, including widening the northbound Avenida Pico on-ramp to three lanes. Construction is expected to start in late 2013. In early March 2012, the OCTA board authorized the acquisition of ten properties, most commercial and one residential building, to make way for construction. Some of the properties include: Saint Andrew's by the Sea Methodist Church, Victoria Land Partners, and Faith Lutheran Church of Capistrano Beach.

The CTC minutes from February 2012 clarified the March 2012 report above. In late February 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that widen I-5; adding one HOV lane in each direction and re-establishing and constructing auxiliary lanes between Avenida Pico and San Juan Creek Road; in the cities of San Clemente, Dana Point, and San Juan Capistrano. The project is not fully funded, however, the project is entirely funded through the environmental, planning, design, and right of way phases with federal and local dollars. The total estimated project cost is $275,000,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources, aesthetics, noise, and water quality to a less than significant level. Proposed mitigation measures include pre-construction surveys for rare and endangered species, establishment of fenced Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESA), incorporation of sound control features in final project design, landscaping, and adherence to Best Management Practices (BMP) for erosion and water quality.

In November 2012, it was reported that the OCTA has approved projects on I-5 in S Orange County. In 2013, construction will begin to add lanes, improve interchanges and ease congestion at Avenido Pico to San Juan Creek Road. Approximately 241,000 vehicles currently travel through the area daily, leading to traffic and congestion during peak hours. By 2040, the number of vehicle trips is expected to rise by 24 percent, or 300,000 vehicles traveling across the freeway. Construction will come in three phases, with the final segment of Avenida Pico to Vista Hermosa expected to be completed in 2016. Upon completion of that project, work will begin in 2018 to widen the stretch from the Route 73 toll road to El Toro Road.
(Source: OC Register, 11/12/2012)

In January 2013, it was reported that the first work being done on “Segment 2” of the larger Orange County Transportation Authority project, the widening of I-5 between the San Clemente city line to just south of Avenida Vista Hermosa, has begun. The project will widen I-5 to accommodate a high occupancy vehicle lane through the length of the project and is slated to last until 2014. The third segment of the total project, which includes the widening of the Avenida Pico exchange, is scheduled to begin construction in 2014 and last until 2017.
(Source: San Juan Capistrano Patch, 1/11/2013)

In January 2014, freeway construction started on the project that will add carpool lanes between San Juan Creek Road and Avenida Pico.

In May 2013, the CTC received notice that the OCTA was going to propose amending the 2012 STIP for the I-5 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane – South of Avenida Vista Hermosa to South of Pacific Coast Highway project (PPNO 2531E) to reduce Regional Improvement Program (RIP) construction by $10,000,000, from $47,381,000 to $37,381,000 and backfill with Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Program funding. It is also proposed to reprogram the $10,000,000 in RIP funds to the design phase of a new STIP project, I-5 widening – El Toro Road to Route 73 (PPNO 2604B) in Orange County.

In January 2014, it was reported that the $275 million I-5 widening that will add carpool lanes between San Juan Creek Road in San Juan Capistrano and just past Avenida Pico in San Clemente could lead to a second widening in San Clemente. Specifically, a new OCTA long-term transportation plan will propose I-5 carpool lanes between Pico and the San Diego County line. However, there is no timetable for the second project, and the OCTA has yet to determine the project’s scope and a source of funding for it. Work could begin on the current I-5 widening project late this month, with completion by the end of 2016. The second widening project (widening I-5 in downtown San Clemente) figures to be costly and could be tricky, with tight tolerances, impacting homes and businesses. A wider freeway would not only need a broader roadbed but longer bridges, new sound walls and re-engineered on- and off-ramps. The San Diego Association and Caltrans are proposing widening I-5 by 2035 to 12 lanes from La Jolla to the north end of Oceanside, 27 miles north. Beyond that, a long-term plan from the San Diego Association shows four toll express lanes from Oceanside north to the county line. The San Diego County group is figuring four toll express lanes will be needed based on population and traffic projections, but it's too far out to be certain. Additionally, some San Clemente residents have voiced fears that ending the southbound carpool lane at Pico will create a bottleneck right away, narrowing I-5 there from five to four lanes on an uphill.
(Source: OCTA Blog)

I-5 Ortega InterchangeIn December 2005, the OCTA approved use of Measure M money to widen the I-5 interchange with Ortega Highway (Route 74). In April 2012, it was reported that groundbreaking on the project will occur in early 2013. The first phase of construction entails rebuilding the Ortega Highway overpass, first demolishing the south side of the bridge and diverting traffic to two lanes on the north side. It also includes widening the overpass and diverting traffic to southbound lanes and building the first portions of the realigned Del Obispo and a new loop-shaped northbound on-ramp. During this first phase, the southbound on-ramp will be closed temporarily so it can be raised 4 feet; the existing northbound on-ramp will be closed to allow for construction of the new one; and Ortega Highway will be closed to traffic to complete the reconstruction of the overpass. In the second phase, travelers will be able to drive on the new Del Obispo alignment—which will eliminate the left-hand turn off Ortega Highway—while work continues on the northbound on-ramp. CalTrans has set aside $28 million to buy the land it needs to complete the interchange project. Businesses that will be demolished include the Chevron gas stations on the east and west sides of Ortega, Arby's and Jack in the Box.
(Source: San Juan Capistrano Patch, April 2, 2012)

In January 2013, it was reported that work on the Ortega interchange would begin in mid-February 2013. The $86.2 million project will completely rebuild the Ortega Highway bridge over I-5, construct a new northbound loop on-ramp, reconfigure the northern portion of Del Obispo Street leading to the bridge and apply several changes to existing on- and off-ramps. Estimated completion is Spring 2015. Additional information on this project can be found here.
(Source: San Juan Capistrano Patch, 1/11/2013)

In October 2006, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the city of Tustin, between Browning Avenue and Pasadena Road, consisting of frontage roads.

In December 2006, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the city of Orange, at Chapman Avenue, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets and frontage road.

Newspaper reports in February 2009 have indicated that art projects installed along I-5 S of Route 22 are melting and shredding. These panels were part of a $956,000 project by the California Department of Transportation "to provide aesthetic enhancements on existing sound walls and to deter graffiti where sound wall vine coverings are not feasible." Caltrans put about 2,400 of these panels on freeways throughout Orange County. The project was funded by specifically designated funds for transportation-related beautification projects from the Transportation Enhancement Activities (TEA) program within the federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Enhancement Act. Each panel cost approximately $250, and were created by Orange County artist Janet Inez Adams. There are four images: one abstract flower, and three wildflowers native to Orange County. Caltrans believes the damage to the panels are from vehicular accidents, not vandalism.

I-5 has been beautifully reconstructed between Route 91 and Route 22. North of Route 91, the freeway narrows to three lanes and the pavement gets horried. However, it appears that construction to fix this section of I-5 (specifically, from Route 91 to the Los Angeles County border) together with a companion project up to I-605, should begin in 2006, depending on land acquisition and bond sales. Caltrans needs to acquire 68 parcels for the freeway, including full and partial properties. The state's goal is to purchase all land by next June. This has started showing up on the CTC RADAR. The August meeting agenda shows an amendment to designate $21M in funding for the Los Angeles County segment widening, and there is also discussion on the Orange County portion of the widening.

In July 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Anaheim, between Euclid Way and Cherry Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

In August 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on W. Lincoln Avenue and N. Manchester Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

In January 2010, the CTC approved relinqishment of right of way in the city of Santa Ana along Route 5 between Santa Ana Boulevard and Seventeenth Street, consisting of relocated and reconstructed city streets and frontage roads

In August 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 between Ball Road and Santa Ana Street, consisting of reconstructed city streets.

In January 2011, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 at the intersection of South Walnut Street and West Broadway Street, consisting of collateral facilities. It also approved relinquishing right right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on South Anaheim Boulevard, consisting of collateral facilities; right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Gene Autry Way, Santa Cruz Street, and Stanford Court, consisting of collateral facilities, and right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 at Katella Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities..

In December 2004, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the City of Anaheim, at Mariposa Place, consisting of a cul-de-sac. The City, by freeway agreement dated November 9, 1992 and by amendment to freeway agreement dated July 9, 1996, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The 90-day notice period expired November 10, 2004.

In January 2011, the CTC reqlinquished right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 at Katella Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

In July 2006, the CTC considered Resolution No. R-3638, relinquishment of right of way between PM 37.7 and 37.9 in the City of Anaheim, on Disneyland Drive between Ball Road and 0.2 mile northerly of Ball Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city street and frontage road.

In November 2006, the Control City for Orange County was changed to Santa Ana. However, it isn't signed consistently.

In July 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Palm Street, consisting of relocated or reconstructed city streets and frontage roads. They also approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Ana along Route 5 between Santa Ana Boulevard and Seventeenth Street, consisting of a collateral facility that is appurtenant to a previously relinquished collateral facility and was inadvertently omitted from said relinquishment. In August 2010, they authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 between the southerly city limits and South Harbor Boulevard, consisting of collateral facilities.

In October 2010, the widening of I-5 between Route 91 and the northern Orange County line was completed.

In August 2012, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Santa Cruz Boulevard, consisting of collateral facilities; right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Fir Avenue, Ivy Lane, Maple Street, Holly Street, and Catalpa Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities; right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Anaheim Way, consisting of collateral facilities; right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Illinois Street, consisting of collateral facilities; and right of way in the city of Anaheim along Route 5 on Westmont Drive, consisting of collateral facilities.

2007 CMIA. Two projects on I-5 in Orange County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects were a transitway interchange at Gene Autry Way ($17.5 million) and the I-5/Route 74 interchange ($38 million). Neither was recommended for funding.

Los Angeles County

Interstate 5 Major Improvement Project - Route 91 to Route 710. Detailed information on the I-5 Improvement project may be found at http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist07/travel/projects/I-5/. The project is divided into the following segments, with the indicated schedule as of 2011:

Segment Name Location on I-5 Project Approval Anticipated Initiate Right of Way Process Begin Construction
Carmenita Interchange Carmenita Road Approved 6/20/01 Summer 2008 Winter 2011
A Route 91 to I-605 Approved 12/31/07 Summer 2009 Winter 2011
B I-605 to I-710 February 2015 February 2017 Winter 2019
C I-710 Interchange February 2015 February 2017 Winter 2019

[TCRP 43]Carmenita Road. In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening and improving the SB Carmenita Road Interchange. This is TCRP Project #43. This project, costing $165 million, should start in summer 2009. In November 2007, the CTC had more information on this interchange. The proposed project is the re-construction of an interchange at Route 5 and Carmenita Road. The project would provide added capacity for two HOV lanes and two mixed flow lanes, as well as provide for a grade separation for a railroad crossing south of the freeway. It has received a mitigated negative EIR. The reconstruction design proposes an arterial overcrossing structure with a railroad grade separation (maintaining existing freeway profiles). The scope of work includes raising the profile grade of Carmenita Road to span both the Route 5 freeway and the Union Pacific Railroad located to the southwest of Route 5. An overcrossing structure above the freeway and an overhead structure above the railroad will be constructed. The interchange will be reconstructed to be consistent with the ultimate configuration of the Route 5 HOV project.

Ground for this segment was broken in late June 2011. The bridge is two lanes wide at present. The new bridge will widen it to 10 lanes, according to Caltrans, with a scheduled completion date of 2015. The $380 million project is financed by federal, state and local funding, which includes $15 million from the state’s 2006 Proposition 1B and $288.7 million programmed through Metro. This project is the first of six, totaling $1.24 billion, to improve I-5 from the Orange County line to the San Gabriel River Freeway (I-605). The Carmenita project will replace the existing two-lane steel overpass with a ten-lane concrete structure nearly five times its current size, and widen the freeway by adding one High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV), or carpool lane, and one general purpose lane in each direction from Alondra Boulevard to Shoemaker Avenue, a distance of 1.2 miles.

In August 2011, the CTC updated the schedule for this project, which will add one HOV lane and one mixed flow lane in each direction on the I-5 mainline freeway, reconstruct Alondra Avenue bridge, Alondra Avenue/North Fork Coyote Creek bridge, and reconstruct adjacent frontage roads. This project was originally planned to be ready for advertisement in March 2011. However, difficulties in obtaining necessary federal and county permits for the project, including right of entry permits to conduct hazardous waste investigations, delayed the project baseline design, R/W and construction milestones. In March 2012, it was reported that construction was about to begin on the $110 million project. The Alondra Boulevard Bridge Project is expected to be completed by mid-2015.

[TCRP 42.1]Route 91 to I-605. According to plans, commuters will have to wait until 2016 to see what is predicted to be a $1.4-billion expansion from the Orange County line through the L.A. County cities of La Mirada, Norwalk, Santa Fe Springs and part of Downey to the junction with I-605 Freeway. This is TCRP Project #42.1 ’150; Route 5; widen Santa Ana Freeway to 10 lanes (two HOV & eight mixed flow), Orange County line to Route 605, with related major arterial improvements, in Los Angeles County ’150; Orange County line to Route 605. This project is to widen Route 5 from six lanes to ten lanes (two HOV and eight mixed flow) from the Orange County line to Route 605 and will also improve related major arterials. This project will improve the level of service during peak hours and improve access to regional transit. The project is now projected to be completed in FY 2015/2016. The funding for this project includes $387 million in funds from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and SAFETEA-LU monies.

In April 2007, it was announce that full funding ’150; $1.2 billion ’150; has been secured to widen the Santa Ana (I-5) Freeway at the gateway between Orange and Los Angeles counties, from the county line in Buena Park north to the San Gabriel River (605) Freeway. Construction on the 6.4-mile stretch is to begin in 2009 and will take about seven years to finish. In Norwalk, 21 homes must be razed to make way for the wider freeway. Five homes have already been bulldozed as of April 2007, the remaining residents must vacate by November 2007. In Buena Park, the Western Avenue bridge over I-5 was demolished in November 2006. The Stanton Avenue and Beach Boulevard bridges will come down next, though some lanes will always remain open on Beach as that bridge is slowly dismantled beginning in spring 2008. Work on the Orange County side is scheduled for completion in 2010.
(Source: Orange County Register, 4/5/2007)

In March 2007, the CTC was asked to comment on the Draft EIR. This EIR provided the following options:

  • Transportation System Management/Travel Demand management Alternative: No improvements to Interstate 5 mainline beyond those of previously approved projects.

  • Alternative 3 ’150; Transit Enhancement Alternative: Improvements to the efficiency of transit service through the corridor. No improvements to Interstate 5 mainline beyond those of previously approved projects.

  • Alternative 4 ’150; Widen to 10 lanes (4 MF + 1 HOV in each direction): This alternative has two alignment options: The Modified MIS Alignment maintains the edge of travel on one side of existing Interstate 5 or the other.

  • Alternative 5 ’150; Widen to 12 lanes (4 MF + 2 HOV or 5 MF + 1 HOV in each direction): This alternative has the same two alignment options as Alternative 4.

  • No Build Alternative.

In July 2008, the CTC approved an increase in funding for this project due to cost increases. This project will widen I-5 with HOV and mixed-flow lanes from just south of Artesia Avenue to just north of the Florence Avenue overcrossing. The project will eliminate the bottleneck as a result of a lane-drop between the Orange/Los Angeles county line, improve the performance of major intersections and interchanges along the corridor, and improve access to regional transit and HOV facilities. This amendment proposes to increase the programmed amount for PA&ED, PS&E and Right of Way Support to address GF-RIP support expenditures on the project. These support components are now capped at this programming level for this fund type and any future increases, if necessary, will be funded through other means. It is also proposed to increase construction support from $34,500,000 to $80,068,000. Construction support is currently funded with $34,500,000 in LACMTA funds. An additional $45,568,000 is needed to fully fund the component.

According to material submitted to the August 2008 CTC, the project in Los Angeles County would widen the facility from three lanes in each direction to four mixed-flow lanes and one HOV lane in each direction for a total of ten lanes near Buena Park. The project is programmed with Corridor Mobility Improvement Account funds, Regional Improvement Program funds, Interregional Improvement Program funds, Traffic Congestion Relief Program funds, Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Program funds, Federal Demonstration funds, and local funds. The total estimated project cost, capital and support, is $1,240,524,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11.

I-5 Construction Segmentation Orange County Line to I-<a href=605" HSPACE="10" VSPACE="5">In September 2010, the CTC recived notice of a proposal to amend the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) Program, the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) for the Route 5 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV), Orange County Line to Route 605 project (PPNO 2808) in Los Angeles County as follows: ’149; Split the project into five constructible segments ’149; Revise the programmed components for the overall project ’149; Revise the schedule for staging and construction purposes. This project is a $1.24 billion project and includes $387,000,000 in Proposition 1B - CMIA funding. This project will widen Interstate 5 through the addition of one mixed-flow lane and one HOV lane in each direction from just south of Artesia Avenue to just north of the Florence Avenue overcrossing. The Route 5 corridor is one of the most congested areas in the Los Angeles basin. It connects Los Angeles county (population 10 million) and Orange County (population 3 million), two of California’s largest counties. Construction of this project will eliminate the bottleneck as a result of the lane drop between the Orange / Los Angeles County line, improve the performance of major intersections and interchanges along the corridor and improve access to regional transit and HOV facilities. The project will also upgrade the corridor to meet current Department and FHWA design standards, improve freeway Level of Service during AM and PM peak hours, reduce travel time delays and congestion related accidents and improve the mobility in the region. The proposal is to split the $1.24 billion project into five manageable segments to facilitate construction staging and delivery, and maximize efficiency and contract bidding competitiveness. The proposed segments are:

  1. I-5 South ’150; OCL to Route 605 - North Fork Coyote Creek Overcrossing to Marquardt Avenue

  2. I-5 South ’150; OCL to Route 605 - Artesia Boulevard (OCL) to Coyote Creek Overcrossing

  3. I-5 South ’150; OCL to Route 605 - Shoemaker Avenue to Silverbow Avenue

  4. I-5 South ’150; OCL to Route 605 - Silverbow Avenue to Orr and Day Road Overhead

  5. I-5 South ’150; OCL to Route 605 - Orr and Day OH to Route 605; and striping for entire project - Segments 1-5

The project is funded from a variety of sources, including $387 million of CMIA funds. The Proposition 1B Bond Act mandates that the inclusion of a project in the CMIA program be based on demonstration that the project can commence construction or implementation no later than December 31, 2012. The project location spans through both industrial and residential areas, with the need to acquire or obtain easements for 344 parcels. Right of way issues on a project of this magnitude are substantial. There were delays due to changes in the Code of Civil Procedures for Order of Possessions, changes in the Streets and Highways Code regarding the right of way appraisal process and delays due to the closure of Department 59 of the Los Angeles Superior Court which hears eminent domain cases. Many parcels were identified as needing further investigation, monitoring, or clean up, leading to additional delays in the right of way process. Right of way mapping and acquisition activities were further delayed due to staffing issues related to the state mandated furlough program and the lack of available STIP and TCRP funding.

In November 2010, the CTC amended the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) Program, the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) for the Route 5 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV), Orange County Line to Route 605 project (PPNO 2808) in Los Angeles County as follows: ’149; Split the project into five constructible segments ’149; Revise the programmed components for the overall project ’149; Revise the schedule for staging and construction purposes. The Route 5 HOV Orange County Line to Route 605 project (PPNO 2808) is a $1.24 billion project and includes $387,000,000 in Proposition 1B - CMIA funding. This project will widen Interstate 5 through the addition of one mixed-flow lane and one HOV lane in each direction from just south of Artesia Avenue to just north of the Florence Avenue overcrossing. The proposed segments are:

  1. Segment 1 (PPNO 4153): In Santa Fe Springs from North Fork Coyote Creek Overcrossing to Marquardt Avenue. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; reconstruct the Alondra Avenue/North Fork Coyote Creek Bridges and adjacent frontage roads. ($109,520,000)

  2. Segment 2 (PPNO 2808): In La Mirada, Santa Fe Springs and Cerritos, from the County Line (Artesia Boulevard) to Coyote Creek. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; reconstruct Valley View Avenue Interchange, Coyote Creek Bridge and adjacent frontage roads. ($416,204,000)

  3. Segment 3 (PPNO 4154): In Norwalk, from Shoemaker Avenue Bridge to Silverbow Avenue Overcrossing. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; reconstruct the Silverbow Pedestrian Overcrossing, three bridges and adjacent frontage roads. ($214,421,000)

  4. Segment 4 (PPNO 4155): In Norwalk, from Silverbow Avenue Overcrossing to Orr and Day Overhead. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; reconstruct three bridges and adjacent frontage roads. ($302,159,000)

  5. Segment 5 (PPNO 4156): In Norwalk, Santa Fe Springs and Downey, from Orr and Day Overhead to Route 605 Interchange. Construct one HOV lane and one mixed-flow lane in each direction; Construct pedestrian overcrossing at Buell Cecilia; reconstruct the Florence Avenue Bridge and widen the railroad overhead. ($198,220,000)

This project is funded from a variety of sources, including $387 million of CMIA funds. The Proposition 1B Bond Act mandates that the inclusion of a project in the CMIA program be based on demonstration that the project can commence construction or implementation no later than December 31, 2012. It is proposed to consolidate the CMIA funding into Segments 1, 3, and 4. These are the segments the Department is confident can be delivered by the 2012 deadline through active risk management. The key areas that have been focused on are right of way acquisition and utilities. Due to issues affecting delivery, the schedule has now slipped as shown in the following table. These issues included the complexities of the project and its affect on the cities along the corridor (La Mirada, Santa Fe Springs, Norwalk, and Downey), the individual City’s concerns that affected negotiation and approval of each City’s Freeway Agreement. Additionally, the project location spans through both industrial and residential areas, with the need to acquire or obtain easements for 344 parcels. Right of way issues on a project of this magnitude are substantial. There were delays due to changes in the Code of Civil Procedures for Order of Possessions, changes in the Streets and Highways Code regarding the right of way appraisal process and delays due to the closure of Department 59 of the Los Angeles Superior Court which hears eminent domain cases. Many parcels were identified as needing further investigation, monitoring, or clean up, leading to additional delays in the right of way process. Right of way mapping and acquisition activities were further delayed due to staffing issues related to the state mandated furlough program and the lack of available STIP and TCRP funding. The most significant right of way challenges are within the limits of segments 2 and 5. These segments include 114 parcels, mostly commercial, with extensive right of way acquisition and utility relocation issues. The overall construction estimate has increased due to the discovery of previously undocumented existing utilities, unanticipated changes to required design strategies and more costly foundation designs due to unfavorable soil conditions in the area. It should be noted, however, that the end of construction and project benefits for the entire corridor will be realized by the end of 2016, as indicated in the original CMIA Baseline Agreement schedule.

In August 2011, it was reported that construction is expected to start in late 2011 and continue through 2016 on the approximately $1.6 billion, six-mile widening project. The project will include an estimated 365 parcels of land to be acquired. Most of the affected property owners have been notified as of August 2011 that their properties are required and will be visited or have already been visited by agents to discuss the valuation of the site, sale and relocation. The only unknown properties impacted might be a small percentage in the Florence Avenue area, pending completion of design, which is about 80% finished. Plans are to widen the freeway, currently averaging three lanes in each direction, to five lanes both ways including a high occupancy vehicle, or carpool, lane. The widening will match the width of the freeway in Orange County to the point east of La Mirada. The project has been divided into six segments, two in Santa Fe Springs and four in Norwalk. First to get under way this fall is construction of a new, 10-lane bridge taking Carmenita Road in Norwalk and Santa Fe Springs over the freeway at Excelsior Drive. It will be built beside the current two-lane bridge, which will be demolished when the new structure is completed in late 2015. Also planned are the re-alignment and upgrading of frontage roads between Alondra Boulevard north of Excelsior and Shoemaker Avenue. Estimated cost is $380 million. The 1.2-mile stretch will take about 65 parcels of land. In early 2012 widening will start on the freeway portion between North Fork Coyote Creek and Marquardt Avenue in Santa Fe Springs with reconstruction of bridges at North Fork Coyote Creek and Alondra Boulevard and upgrading frontage residential roads. Cost is estimated at $110 million. Completion is expected in mid 2015. Three other segments, all in Norwalk, are: (1) About 1.29 miles from Shoemaker Avenue and Rosecrans Avenue northwest to Silverbow Avenue west of Bloomfield Avenue, including alignment and reconstruction of bridges at Alondra, Shoemaker and Rosecrans and removal of the pedestrian crossing at Silverbow and the re-alignment of the Firestone Boulevard frontage road. It will affect 48 parcels and cost about $214 million. Construction begins in late 2012 and ends in mid 2016. (2) About 1.89 miles from Silverbow Avenue to Orr and Day and Studebaker roads affecting 196 parcels and costing about $302 million. Work includes bridges at San Antonio Drive, Imperial Highway and Pioneer Boulevard and a new southbound off-ramp at Imperial Highway. Construction is to start in late 2012 and end in mid-2016. (3) About 1.71 miles on 56 parcels from Orr and Day Road and Cecilia Street northwest to Florence Avenue and the San Gabriel River at the Downey city limits. Work includes widening bridge structures at Orr and Day and Florence Avenue and construction of a pedestrian crossing at Cecilia and Buell streets. Work is to start in mid-2013 and be completed in late 2016 at a cost of $198 million. A sixth segment planned is reconstruction of the bridges at Valley View Avenue in La Mirada from Artesia Boulevard northwest to Coyote Creek, upgrading Valley View, Artesia Boulevard and Coyote Creek frontage roads and re-alignment of the Firestone Boulevard frontage road. Cost is estimated at $416 million. Work is to start in mid-2013 and be finished in mid-2016.
(Source: Los Angeles Wave)

In June 2013, the CTC approved amending the 2012 STIP, the CMIA Baseline Agreement, and TCRP Project #42 for the Route 5 Carpool Lane-Orange County Line to I- 605 project (I-5 South Corridor project) in Los Angeles County to program an additional $35,709,000 from Los Angeles County’s share balance and to update the project funding plan and schedule for the corridor.

In August 2013, it was reported that Caltrans will fully close the southbound Santa Ana Freeway (Interstate 5) off-ramp at Pioneer Boulevard/Imperial Highway beginning Thursday, August 15 at 8 a.m. The ramp will remain fully closed for eight months, through April 2014, when a new elevated off-ramp is complete and re-opens.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $6,736,000 in Prop 1B state-administered CMIA project fundings for the Route 5 South HOV Lane-Segment 1 in Santa Fe Springs, from North Fork Coyote Creek Overcrossing to Marquardt Avenue. This funding will reconstruct Alondra Avenue bridges, widen I-5 freeway by adding two lanes in each direction (one mixed flow and one HOV), and reconstruct frontage roads.

On November 28, 2011, the CTC awarded the construction contract with a cost savings of 20,308,000, reducing the original CMIA allocation for construction from $65,555,000 to $45,247,000, from the I-5 Carpool Lane - Orange County Line to I-605 (Segment 1) project (PPNO 4153) in Los Angeles County.

Shoemaker SegmentIn April 2012, the CTC approved $335 million total allocation for two segments of the I-5 South Corridor Widening and Improvement Projects from the Los Angeles/Orange County line to I-605:

  • $147 million to add one HOV lane and one mixed flow lane in each direction from Shoemaker Avenue to Silverbow Avenue in the City of Norwalk and Santa Fe Springs. The project will also reconstruct the Rosecrans Avenue and Bloomfield Avenue bridges, reconfigure ramps, upgrade and realign Firestone Boulevard frontage road. The total project cost is $214 million.
  • $188 million to add one HOV lane and one mixed flow lane in each direction from Silverbow Avenue to Orr and Day Road in the City of Norwalk. The project will also reconstruct the San Antonio Drive, Imperial Highway and Pioneer Boulevard bridges and construct a southbound off-ramp at Imperial Hwy. The total project cost is $302 million.

In February 2013, it was reported that work had begun on Segment 3, from Shoemaker Avenue to Silverbow Avenue. This will widen the 5 freeway for 1.2 miles between Shoemaker and Silverbow avenues by adding a general purpose lane and HOV lane in both directions. The project will also widen three bridges over the freeway — at Shoemaker, Rosecrans and Bloomfield. Metro is contributing $42 million of the $214 million cost of the project, with Metro’s money coming from Prop C (1990) and Measure R (2008) sales tax increases approved by county voters. The Rosecrans, Shoemaker and Bloomfield Avenue bridges will be demolished and reconstructed to accommodate the wider freeway.

In March 2013, it was reported that the NB I-5 Firestone off-ramp (the infamous left-exit) would close permanently in April 2013.

In May 2013, it was reported that Caltrans and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA) propose to amend the CMIA Baseline Agreement, the 2012 STIP and Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) Project 42 for the Route 5 Carpool Lane-Orange County Line to I-605 project (I-5 South Corridor project) in Los Angeles County to program an additional $35,709,000 from Los Angeles County’s Regional Improvement Program share balance and to update the project funding plan and schedule for the corridor. This solves a known funding gap on the corridor. As has been previously reported, the location of this project is extremely complex, with the Department’s Risk Management Plan indicating potential increases for acquiring right of way and associated costs for delays and hazardous materials. Specifically, city requirements necessitated setbacks more than originally planned which added significant right of way costs and additional complications with public utilities. The FHWA began requirements that property be purchased at the value of existing mortgages if the amounts were higher than fair market value, significantly adding to right of way costs. Additional scope added at the Valley View Bridge also increased right of way and construction costs. In December 2012, the Commission approved a financial allocation adjustment (Assembly Bill 608) for award savings on the I-5 North – Empire/Burbank project, returning $35,709,000 in RIP funds to Los Angeles County’s regional share balance. LACMTA now proposes to program the $35,709,000 to the I-5 South Corridor to fund increases to support and capital components on the various segments. This action, along with the proposal to increase federal demonstration and CMAQ funding will further close the gap in funding for the overall project.

I-5 Widening I-<a href=605 to I-710" HEIGHT="373" BORDER="0" HSPACE="10" VSPACE="5">I-605 to I-710. In April 2008, the CTC reviewed a notice of preparation for an EIR for roadway improvements near Commerce. The proposed project would construct additional lanes and upgrades to existing lanes and shoulders to current standards. The project is programmed in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program for environmental only. The project is fully funded for Project Approval/Environmental Document in the amount of $2,592,000 in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (Transportation Facilities Account) - Regional Improvement Program ($432,000) and Federal Demonstration funds ($2,160,000). Depending on the alternative selected, the total estimated project cost ranges from $900 million to $1.6 billion (including right of way and construction). Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2016-17. The proposal intially saw the following options:

  • Alternative 1 - No-build.

  • Alternative 2 - TSM/TDM Plan. This alternative would implement a Transportation System Management / Transportation Demand Management Plan.

  • Alternative 3 - 10 Lane Facility. This alternative would construct a 10-lane facility with two HOV lanes.

  • Alternative 4 - 12 Lane Facility. This alternative would construct a 12-lane facility with two or four HOV lanes.

According to the Caltrans website, the improvements to I-5 will finally remove the left-exit for Firestone Blvd.

In November 2011, the Downey Patriot provided more information. According to the Downey public works department, 12 homes in northeast Downey will be impacted by the widening freeway, which will overtake Dollison Drive and turn several streets in the area into cul-de-sacs. Florence Avenue, one of the major frontage roads along the I-5 Freeway, will also be widened to accommodate another lane, which is expected to help ease traffic along the overcrossing from Studebaker Road to Orr and Day Road. By 2013, all six projects will be under construction. Caltrans officials anticipate construction will conclude in 2016.

In May 2013, it was reported that Metro and Caltrans broke ground in late May on the I-5 Carpool Lane Widening/Imperial Highway and Pioneer Boulevard Project, the fourth of six segments to begin construction. The I-5 Carpool Lane Widening/Imperial Highway and Pioneer Boulevard Project will widen nearly two miles of freeway in Norwalk by adding one carpool lane and one regular lane in each direction from Silverbow Avenue to Orr and Day Roads; and bridges at San Antonio Drive, Imperial Highway, and Pioneer Boulevard will be rebuilt to accommodate the wider freeway. The improvements also include a new southbound I-5 off-ramp at Imperial Highway, new sound walls and frontage roads. The project is primarily funded ($167.5 million) by Proposition 1B, a 2006 voter-approved transportation bond. To date, nearly $15 billion in Proposition 1B funds have been put to work statewide. The project also received $104 million in state transportation funds and $30.5 million from Metro’s Proposition C and Measure R.

I-5 HOV Lanes - Route 134 to Route 210. There appear to be plans for a study to improve the I-5/Route 134 interchange (March 2001 CTC Agenda). This study should be complete in early 2001; it is District 7 TCRP Project #154. It plans to explore completing the "back moves", i.e., from Eastbound Route 134 to Northbound I-5, and from Southbound I-5 to Westbound Route 134.

In Burbank, there are plans to construct a new interchange. [Per Sept. 2002 CTC Agenda.]

There are plans to add HOV lanes between Route 134 and Route 170. This is not on the TCRP list, but is SAFETEA-LU High Priority Project #570, which funded $400K. It was considered by the CTC in May 2001, but there has been no action since. However, the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account allocated $73 million for this project. According to the Daily News, the cost is about $605 million, and construction should start in spring 2009. In May 2008, the scope was changed to add an Empire interchange to the project. It will be constructed in four segments: I-5 HOV lanes from N of Buena Vista to Route 170; lanes from S of Empire Ave to Buena Vista, including the Empire interchange; S of Burbank Blvd to S of Empire Ave; and Route 134 to S of Burbank Blvd. This also involves railroad realingment. The second and third segments have been moved to FY 2009-2010. In July 2008, this was formalized by the CTC. This project is to construct one HOV lane in each direction for approximately ten miles on Route 5 from Route 134 to Route 170. The work involves the reconstruction and modification of the Burbank Boulevard interchange, the realignment of a short segment of Route 5, railroad realignment and elevation, and the construction of a grade separation at Buena Vista. The amendment added the Empire Avenue Interchange project to the scope of the Route 5 CMIA Project. This would close a one-mile gap, completing the HOV lanes along the Route 5 corridor from Route 134 to Route 170. Benefits would include mainline improvement, direct access to the Burbank airport, and safety enhancements as a result of the elimination of an adjacent railroad at-grade crossing. The cost and funding for the combined project is equal to the sum of the cost and funding of the individual projects. The combined cost is $609,539,000.

In July 2009, the CTC received a proposal to use local Proposition C funds to move forward with the HOV lane project in Burbank. The plan also involves funding changes to the other two segments along the corridor to consolidate all CMIA funds on the Route 5-South of Burbank Boulevard to south of Empire Avenue project (PPNO 3986) and STIP programming on the Route 5-South of Empire Avenue to north of Buena Vista Street project (PPNO 3985). With respect to the segment from South of Burbank Boulevard to south of Empire Avenue: The total project cost has increased from $50,844,000 to $123,765,000. The majority of the increase is due to the need to realign a portion of the mainline and reconfigure the interchange from a cloverleaf type interchange to a tight diamond interchange to meet geometric standards. The need to acquire additional property, the complexity of the interchange, as well as additional utility relocation costs substantially increased the right of way and construction estimates. With respect to the segment from South of Empire Avenue to north of Buena Vista Street: The total project cost has increased from $248,627,000 to $315,500,000. The majority of the increase is due to the extensive railroad work on the project. During design, it was determined to be more cost effective for the railroad work to be completed by Southern California Regional Rail Authority (Metrolink) through a C&M contract. The C&M agreement streamlined the design and approval process, brought in railroad experts and placed Metrolink in direct responsibility for their own lines. As details of the design evolved, the estimates for the project were updated to reflect the complex staging and coordination of the railroad and roadway. This is particularly challenging because both freeway and railroad must be kept in operation during the entire construction period.

In January 2012, it was reported that construction was back on track for the HOV construction between Route 134 and Magnolia Blvd in Burbank. Construction had been delayed so that Caltrans could iron out electricity and gas line issues with the city-owned utilities in Glendale and Burbank. Construction on this segment is expected to be competed in 2014.

In May 2010, Caltrans put out a request for bid to construct HOV lanes, retaining walls, sound walls and replace concrete pavement in Burbank from 0.3km South of the Cohasset Street Undercrossing to 0.1km North of the Sheldon Street Overcrossing. This includes replacement of the Cohasset St. Bridge, built in 1960. The estimate was $63M.

In November 2010, the CTC approved combining the Route 5 Empire Avenue Interchange project (PPNO 3985) and the Route 5 Burbank Boulevard reconstruction project (PPNO 3986) for staging and construction purposes and to revise the schedule and funding plan accordingly. As background, at its meeting in July 2008, the Commission approved a CMIA baseline amendment for the Route 5 HOV widening project in Los Angeles County to combine the original CMIA project (PPNO 0142F) with the STIP Route 5 HOV/Empire Interchange project (PPNO 3985) and split the resultant project into four constructible segments. Two of the segments (PPNOs 0142F and 3987) have been delivered. It is now proposed to combine the remaining two segments (PPNO 3985 and 3986) for construction purposes.

In May 2012, it was reported that costs for this project were coming in higher than expected (which would be covered by reallocating money from different funds). In particular, there was a $9,000,000 cost increase to the design phase. The increase was because (a) The initial proposal of replacing the flood control channel with a shallower but wider covered channel in order to maintain the existing freeway elevation was not acceptable to the US Army Corps of Engineers. The recommendation was to cap the existing channel using concrete piles and precast slabs. This resulted in the redesign of 20 – 30 percent of the completed highway and construction staging plans. (b) Plans for the relocation of utilities within the railroad right of way were not acceptable to the Burbank City Council because of the length of construction. Alternate methods of utility relocation were redeveloped and designed. (c) It was necessary to redesign portions of the railroad plans to be consistent with the reworked utility relocation and the redesigned roadway staging plans. The additional design work activities, along with extremely complicated right of way coordination, resulted in a seven month delay to project delivery. The design has now been delivered and was scheduled for a construction allocation at the May 2012 Commission meeting.

In March 2011, Caltrans broke ground on a nearly $70-million project that will add new carpool lanes on both directions to the 4.4-mile stretch of the I-5 between the Route 170 Freeway interchange and Buena Vista Street. Funding for the project comes from nearly $40 million in federal stimulus money and $22.6 million in Los Angeles County Proposition C revenue. In addition to the carpool lanes, the project will also include repairing damaged pavement, installation of sound walls and the realignment of the Hollywood Way on- and off-ramps. Crews will first reconstruct the Empire Avenue interchange. The new interchange will be at West Empire Avenue near the Scott Road off-ramps to the I-5 and will connect Empire Avenue west of Victory Place to San Fernando Boulevard through an undercrossing with Victory Place, railroad tracks and the freeway. The off-ramp will be converted to allow full access to the freeway from Empire Avenue and San Fernando Boulevard. The existing San Fernando Boulevard undercrossing of the freeway will be eliminated. In one of the largest of the project’s impacts, the Burbank Boulevard bridge over the I-5 will be closed for nearly 14 months as crews reconstruct the overpass with new on- and off-ramps starting in 2013. Demolishing the Burbank Boulevard bridge will partially cut off access to the downtown area. Vehicles traveling northbound on the I-5 will only be able to turn right to reach the Burbank Town Center and vehicles traveling southbound will only have the option of turning right toward Costco and the Empire Center.

In late April 2011, Caltrans broke ground on the segment from Magnolia to Route 134. The $57.8 million project will create a high-occupancy vehicle lane between the Ventura Freeway and Magnolia Boulevard in Burbank, a segment of 2.7 miles in each direction.

In February 2012, it was reported that Caltrans was offering contractors millions of dollars in incentives to finish the Burbank portion of the I-5 project ahead of schedule. The incentives come after representatives for Caltrans heard concerns that the work on the I-5 corridor through Burbank would isolate neighborhoods around the Empire Center and limit access to Bob Hope Airport. They hope the incentives will shave up to a year off the project timeline. An estimated $5 million to $7 million in incentives for the contractors will shorten the construction time by six to nine months for the Empire Interchange and four to six months for the Burbank Boulevard interchange if the early benchmarks are met, according to the agencies. About $2 million to $3 million in incentives will help with the Burbank interchange work. Some of the concern arose from a request to close San Fernando Boulevard to facilitate railroad and utility relocation work. The agencies estimated the street could be closed for roughly three years, prompting fears among Burbank officials that the closure would isolate some residents. The early closure of San Fernando is critical to accommodating a project schedule that preserves state funding for the project, transportation officials have said. Further delays would result in a funding lapse that would jeopardize the entire project.
(Source: Los Angeles Times, 2/24/2012)

In late May 2012, the CTC approved $224.1 million for work on the I-5 HOV lanes from Magnolia Boulevard to Buena Vista Street in Burbank. The project extends from Empire Avenue to Burbank Boulevard and includes interchange modifications and railroad realignment. The work is scheduled to begin in early 2013 and the total project cost is estimated at $452 million.

San Fernando Blvd ClosuresIn May 2014, as part of the Empire project, Caltrans permanently closed a portion of San Fernando Road. Specifically, the northbound I-5 Lincoln Street off-ramp and southbound San Fernando Boulevard on-ramp will be closed permanently. The southbound Scott Road/Burbank Boulevard off-ramp will be closed when San Fernando Boulevard is closed and will be integrated into the new Empire Avenue interchange. This is part of a $355 million project that will improve I-5 in Burbank between Magnolia Boulevard and Buena Vista Street. It includes elevating the railroad tracks, building a new interchange at Empire Avenue, reconstructing the Burbank Boulevard Bridge, adding carpool lanes in both directions and more.

In late September 2010, Caltrans broke ground on a $140.2-million project to add carpool lanes to a nearly 10 miles of I-5 from Route 170 to Route 118. The project will also widen under-crossings and reconstruct the carpool connector between Route 170 and I-5. The project is scheduled to be completed in fall 2015.

[005-014 interchange]Construction started in late 2008 on a $156 million project to elevate a two-lane car-pool lane to connect car-pool lanes on I-5 and Route 14. The project should be done by 2012. The project appears to have gone to bid in November 2007, with an estimate of $120M for the connectors in Los Angeles County (Santa Clarita) on I-5 from 0.2 Km South of the Balboa Boulevard overcrossing to 0.9 Km South of Weldon Canyon and on Route 14 from the I-5/Route 14 separation to 2.0 Km North of the Sierra Highway undercrossing. According to the Daily News, in mid-August 2008 transportation officials broke ground on the project. When the $161 million, two-lane elevated connector is finished in 2012, drivers will no longer have to get out of the car-pool lane on one freeway and weave through traffic to get back into the car-pool lane on the other. The direct car-pool lane connector will be the third in Los Angeles County. The others are at the Route 57/Route 60 interchange in Orange County and the I-105/I-110 interchange in South Los Angeles. Most of the construction and road closures will be done during off-peak hours. The roughly half-mile-long, nearly 70-foot-high connector is being paid for by a mix of federal, state and county transportation money.

[Santa Clarita HOV]In March 2009, the CTC recieved a draft EIR for review concerning a project in Los Angeles County will construct high occupancy vehicle lanes in each direction and roadway improvements from I-5/Route 14 interchange to just south of Parker Road Interchange near the City of Santa Clarita. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed with Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEALU) funds and private funds in the amount of $63,200,000. The total cost of the project is estimated to be between $506,000,000 and $605,000,000. Assuming the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. There are three alternatives:

  • No Build Alternative.

  • Reduced Median Alternative. This alternative would widen the center median 48 feet, construct high occupancy vehicle lanes, add auxiliary lanes and outside shoulders of the north and southbound lanes between Route 14 and north of Parker Road.

  • Full Median Alternative. This alternative would widen the center median 62 feet, construct high occupancy vehicle lanes, add auxiliary lanes and outside shoulders of the north and southbound lanes between Route 14 and north of Parker Road.

In February 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration a project in Los Angeles County that would construct high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes, truck climbing lanes, and additional auxiliary lanes on I-5 from Route 14 on the south to Parker Road on the north. Proposed improvements include extending the existing HOV lanes on Interstate 5 from Route 14 to south of Parker Road and adding truck climbing lanes from the State Route 14 Interchange to Calgrove Boulevard (northbound) and to Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue (southbound). The project is scheduled in phases. The construction of the truck lane improvements from the Route 14 Interchange to south of the Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue Interchange is fully funded with Proposition 1B in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program for $75,000,000 for capital and support. This phase also includes $55,000,000 of local funds. Construction of this phase is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The total estimated project cost of all phases is $456,000,000. A Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been prepared as the project will involve construction activities resulting in biological impacts including the loss of oak woodlands.

In early November 2010, it was reported that funding sources and environmental reviews have been completed for this project, called the "Interstate 5 Gateway Improvement Project". It will be constructed in three phases, cost upwards of $500 million, and will add two truck lanes and a high-occupancy-vehicle lane both southbound and northbound on I-5 from the Route 14 interchange north to Parker Road. Construction will likely not start until late 2011 or 2012. Caltrans, the project lead, has a design team working on the first truck lanes, from Route 14 to Lyons Avenue. Selection of a contractor will start in the fall of 2011, with construction starting shortly after. The project will take two to three years to complete. This first phase alone will cost $130 million. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority will use $56 million from Measure R, the half-cent sales tax Los Angeles County voters approved in November 2008. Caltrans will pay for the remaining $74 million with SHOPP funds, Raptis said. Federal dollars have helped too, with $1.6 million used for environmental reviews. The second and third phases of the project will add a carpool lane, an auxiliary lane and second truck lanes to Santa Clarita’s stretch of I-5, from the Highway 14 interchange to Parker Road.

In November 2011, it was reported that the first phase of the widening project was going out to bids, with construction anticipated to start in early 2012. The first phase will extend truck lanes from just north of Newhall Pass to Calgrove Boulevard on the northbound side and from the Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue bridge to just north of the Newhall Pass on the southbound side. Caltrans estimated that constructing the first phase would cost $100 million; bids are coming in at $43 million. The $543-million project's second phase will extend high-occupancy vehicle lanes on the I-5 through Santa Clarita.

In May 2012, local and state officials announced a $72-million project to add truck lanes on I-5 through Newhall Pass and into Santa Clarita. The truck lanes are needed to separate heavy big-rig traffic from passenger vehicles and create safer, quicker passage for a growing population in the Santa Clarita Valley. The southbound truck lane will extend 3.7 million from Pico Canyon Road/Lyons Avenue in Santa Clarita to Route 14 (3.7 miles); the northbound lane will run 1.4 miles from Route 14 to Gavin Canyon. Construction is slated to be completed in early 2014.

In December 2012, the HOV connector between I-5 and Route 14 opened. The long-awaited connector allows motorists in the HOV lanes on I-5 and Route 14 to remain in the HOV lanes while traveling between the two freeways. It opened in late December and a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held in January 2013 to celebrate the project, which began in 2008 and cost $175.8 million.

In February 2013, it was reported that Metro officials were looking into building a new combination of toll and carpool lanes along 13-1/2 miles of I-5 in northern Los Angeles County (what's new here is the toll aspect). Allowing toll users on the new lanes would allow them to be constructed by 2018, instead of waiting 30 years for sales tax revenue to accumulate for the project. The agency proposes to use Fast Trak toll devices to charge solo or two- occupant vehicles a varying charge for using the lanes, which would be free to carpools with three or more people. The lanes would extend in both directions between the Antelope Valley (14) Freeway on the south, and Parker Road in Castaic, in 2018. Under current Measure R schedules, those lanes are 30 years away from opening.

In April 2013, Members of the Planning and Programming Committee for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority voted unanimously to approve the toll road concept and file the environmental impact report for the project. As proposed, the project would add two new 13.5-mile carpool lanes through the Santa Clarita Valley from Parker Road in Castaic to the I-5 junction with Route 14, one in each direction.

In May 2013, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR regarding a project in Los Angeles County that will construct high occupancy toll lanes on I-5 from Route 14 to Parker Road in the City of Santa Clarita and unincorporated Los Angeles County. The project was originally proposed to construct high occupancy vehicle lanes. A Final Environmental Impact Report was approved for the project in September of 2009. The Department and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority are now proposing to implement high occupancy toll lanes instead of the previously proposed high occupancy vehicle lanes on this 13.5-mile portion of I-5. In August 2013, the CTC approved this for future consideration of funding.

In April 2014, it was reported that Metro and Caltrans have decided to publicly finance the HOT project instead of seeking a public-private partnership (known as a PPP). This is because it is less expensive to publicly finance the project by using $352 million in now-available Measure R and other funds and a federal low-interest loan for $175 million. This project as originally proposed was also unusual because it included new sound walls for I-210 in Pasadena and Arcadia and Route 170 and I-405 in Los Angeles, and adding extra lanes for a short stretch of Route 71 in Pomona. Under the public financing deal, those projects will be built separately. The toll revenues would be reinvested and used for transit services and traffic operations in the 5 freeway corridor in the Santa Clarita Valley. The current forecast calls for the HOV lanes on I-5 to open in 2021, the soundwalls to be completed in 2019 and for the additional lane on the southbound side of Route 71 to be done in 2021 and the lane on northbound Route 71 to be finished in 2028.

In June 2008, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Los Angeles, on The Old Road at 0.1 mile north of the Route 126 Freeway, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

In January 2012, the CTC approved relinquishement of right of way in the city of Santa Clarita along Route 5 on Wayne Mills Place, consisting of collateral facilities.

In May 2007, there was a report of plans to update I-5 to address the growth in northern Los Angeles County, where the population is expected to grow to 1.18M by 2030. Specifically, in Summer 2007, Los Angeles County plans to start construction on the Hasley Canyon interchange in Castaic. The project will include a bridge replacement and the construction of roundabouts to ease congestion. That project is expected to be completed by early 2010. Long-term projects for the freeway include the construction of a carpool lane as well as a truck climbing lane from Route 14 to Castaic. Construction on the $259M project is expected to begin in the summer of 2010. As of May 2007, the City of Santa Clarita was also constructing the $50M second phase of a project funded by the city of Santa Clarita to improve the Magic Mountain Parkway freeway interchange.
[Santa Clarita Signal, May 18, 2007]

Gary Richards (Mr. Roadshow) reported that Caltrans will begin replacing the rough concrete with rubberized asphalt in late 2010 from Castaic to the Visa Del Lago Road overcrossing, a yearlong project. In 2014 the state will repave I-5 from San Fernando Road to Lake Hughes Road

In August 2011, the CTC approved $130,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Gorman, from Vista Del Lago to the Kern County Line, that will rehabilitate 127 lane miles of road way to improve safety and ride quality. Project will replace pavement on outside shoulders, grind and overlay median shoulders and ramps, place concrete termini on seven ramps, install ADA curbs, replace bridge approach and departure slabs, and replace dike.

In November 2007, Caltrans put out a request for bids to remove the Brake Check area N of Lebec from 0.1 Km North of Cressey Cattlepass Bridge to 0.7 Km South of the Lebec Road Overcrossing. This had been closed since 1995.

San Joaquin Valley

According to Gary Roberts (Mr. Roadshow), plans call for the widening I-5 to six lanes through Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern counties. Long-range plans call for eight lanes. But don't hold your breath.

In March 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on I-5, 06-Fre-5 22.8/26.8 Near Coalinga, from north of Tuolumne Avenue to south of Route 33. $2,171,000 to construct double thrie beam median barrier to reduce the number and severity of traffic collisions along 4 centerline miles.

[TCRP 108]TCRP Project #108 plans to add a northbound lane to the freeway through the Mossdale "Y", from I-205 to Route 120 in San Joaquin County -- specifically, to extend the #1 lane in the northbound direction of Route 5 from Route 205 to Route 120. The project will provide five continuous through-lanes on northbound Route 5 within this segment. In June 2006, it was reported to the CTC that the project is ready to go to construction, but that the schedule required updating due to the previous transportation funding shortfalls (with a corresponding escalation of project costs). The project is now scheduled to complete in FY 2006-2007.

I-5 Project Near StocktonIn December 2007, the CTC received an EIR regarding a project near Stockton that would construct roadway improvements including a new interchange on Route 5 near Stockton. The project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The total estimated project cost, capital and support, is $40,000,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

In September 2011, it was reported that the pavement rehabilitation near Stockton is taking an interesting approach. This approach, known as "continuously reinforced concrete pavement", is made from concrete reinforced with steel and is estimated to last 40 years. Concrete roads in the state are more commonly built with breaks - called joints - that help keep the surface from cracking as the concrete changes shape. Using reinforcing steel makes this project different.

In January 2011, the CTC approved for futore consideration of funding a project in San Joaquin County that will construct HOV lanes, auxiliary lanes, traffic operation systems, soundwalls and rehabilitate pavement. Phase 1 of this project, from 8th Street Undercrossing (PM 25.0) to Hammer Lane Undercrossing (PM 32.9) is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account. Total estimated project cost of Phase 1 is $119,500,000 for capital and support. Construction of Phase 1 is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Resources that may be impacted by the project include: farmlands, visual resources, biological resources, water quality, paleontological resources, residential relocations, and noise. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance through proposed mitigation measures.

In August 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $41,779,000 on I-50 San Joaquin PM PM 25.1/28.6 in and near Stockton, from Charter Way to Country Club Boulevard. Outcome/Output: Rehabilitate roadway, including reconstruction of the existing eight freeway lanes, widening inside shoulders, reconstructing outside shoulders and auxiliary lanes in order to improve safety and ride quality along 28 lane miles.

[Rte 5 Widening]There are also plans to add an Auxilliary Lane from the Monte Diablo on-ramp to the Country Club off-ramp, northbound. In March 2009, the CTC recieved more specifics on this project in the notice of preparation of an EIR. The proposed project would construct two additional lanes on Route 5 (one in each direction) between Country Club Boulevard and Eight Mile Road, modify two existing interchanges (Hammer Lane and Eight Mile Road), and construct two interchanges (Otto Drive and Gateway Boulevard). It is proposed that the project be funded from San Joaquin Measure K funds, future bond funds, developer contributions, and local public facility fees generated by ongoing development. The total estimated project cost is $500,000,000. Construction of the mainline improvements is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, with the interchange improvements to follow in phases with final completion estimated for FY 2020. The alternatives being considered are:

  • No Build Alternative: The No-Build Alternative proposes to maintain the existing conditions without any alterations.

  • Build Alternative: This alternative proposes the project to be constructed in phases beginning in 2010 with the interchange improvements to follow in phases with final completion in 2020. Proposed phasing is as follows: 1) Mainline widening from Country Club Boulevard to Eight Mile Road. 2) Hammer Lane Interchange Improvements. 3) Otto Drive Interchange. 4) Eight Mile Interchange Improvements. 5) North Gateway Interchange.

A project to add HOV lanes in North Stockton was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding ($225 million). It was not recommended for funding.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,271,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Santa Nella at the Santa Nella Weigh Station Facilities that would restore two structures, improve lighting and replace guardrail to improve safety for vehicle traffic.

Sacramento Area

[Consumnes River Blvd Bridge]In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project located in the southwest quadrant of the City of Sacramento that would extend Cosumnes River Boulevard from its current westerly terminus at Franklin Boulevard to an interchange at I-5, and then farther west to an at-grade intersection with Freeport Boulevard (Route 160) in the currently unincorporated town of Freeport. The project would improve route continuity, reduce existing and projected traffic congestion improving traffic safety, and redistribute traffic along I-5, thereby reducing travel time and delay. The proposed action would accommodate future development of the project area both west and east of I-5 in accordance with the land uses in the adopted City of Sacramento General Plan. The EIR evaluated two build alternatives in addition to the no build alternative. Alternative A: Franklin to Freeport North Alignment and Alternative B: Franklin to Freeport South Alignment. Alternative A was identified as the preferred alternative because it would avoid bisecting the Bufferlands property, has the support of the local landowners, and parallels the Lower Northwest Interceptor alignment and the Freeport Regional Water Project pipeline, thereby reducing right-of-way requirements for roads and utilities. According to Caltrans, the project is estimated to cost $110,172,000 and is fully funded with STIP ($15,608,000) and Local ($94,564,000) funds.

In December 2012, the CTC approved allocating $18,191,000 for the locally administered multi-funded Proposition 1B State-Local Partnership Program (SLPP)/State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) I-5 / Cosumnes River Boulevard Interchange (PPNO 3L42). The project will construct interchange and roadway extensions for the I-5 / Cosumnes River Boulevard Interchange in the city of Sacramento, between the Meadowview Road and Laguna Boulevard Interchanges on Route 5.

A portion of this roadway is already constructed, extending from Franklin Boulevard east to Route 99, where the roadway becomes Calvine Road within unincorporated area of Sacramento County. Calvine Road is a major arterial, extending to the east to Grant Line Road and servicing major growth areas in south Sacramento County. The proposed project will improve circulation in southern Sacramento by providing route continuity between I-5 and Route 99. In addition, this project will provide access to land currently targeted for development in the City and County General Plans. Traffic studies predict that this project will accommodate anticipated travel demand through the year 2025. Construction of the I-5/Cosumnes River Boulevard interchange was originally identified in a study of the Route 148 corridor conducted by the Department in the early 1960s. On February 27, 1963, the Department adopted the Route 148 freeway corridor segment between I-5 and Route 99. In 1974, the Commission withdrew the freeway designation of Route 148 due to financial constraints. In a memorandum dated July 1, 1974, the County of Sacramento’s Department of Public Works recommended that the City of Sacramento maintain the adopted route as an east-west transportation corridor that would be less than freeway status. The City of Sacramento then embarked on the necessary steps to begin preserving right-of-way within the Route 148 corridor. On November 4, 1981, the Sacramento City Council certified an Environmental Impact Report for the Route 148 Arterial Plan and adopted the route alignment for the arterial. That approval allowed the City to begin reserving the right-of-way for the future development of Route 148 and to construct segments of the approved route as funds became available. After approval of the Route 148 Arterial Plan, the name of the proposed facility was changed to Cosumnes River Boulevard. The names Route 148 and Cosumnes River Boulevard are synonymous and refer to the same proposed facility within the city of Sacramento. The estimated construction cost for the interchange is $36,000,000 and right of way costs are roughly $6,000,000. The project is programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program and includes funds from the Regional Surface Transportation Program, Sales Tax Measure A, and local developer fees.

Also in Sacramento, the city of Sacramento has plans to bridge over the depressed section of I-5 to reconnect to its waterfront.

[Map]In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing HOV lanes in Sacramento County. In December 2007, the CTC received notice of preparation of an EIR regarding construction of these lanes. The proposed project would construct bus/carpool lanes on a portion of Route 5 in and near Sacramento in Sacramento County. The project is not fully funded. Sacramento Transportation Authority has agreed to contribute $121 million of Measure A funding. The total estimated project cost is $200,000,000. This project should be ready for construction in Fiscal Year 2011-12, depending on the availability of funds.

In May 2013, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR for a project in Sacramento County will add bus/carpool lanes to I-5 from 1.1 miles south of Elk Grove Boulevard to US 50. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program for design and right of way only. The total estimated cost for construction and support is $125,200,000. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. There are four alternatives under consideration: (1) No Build Alternative; (2) Bus/Carpool HOV lanes in both directions plus additional lanes in each direction from 1.1 miles south of Elk Grove Blvd. to just south of the I-5/US 50 interchange; (3) Includes the construction of mixed flow or general-purpose lanes in both directions rather than HOV lanes; (4) convert an existing lane to a HOV lane. This alternative would re-stripe and sign the existing inside shoulder lane to prohibit non-HOV traffic during peak periods.

There are also plans to close the depressed section of freeway in 2008 for major repair work lasting eight months. The sunken section of freeway has sprung leaks, and the roadway is in danger of flooding if a heavy winter storm hits. Beginning in February or March and lasting through October, Caltrans will close one or two freeway lanes in each direction from Richards Boulevard on the north to the I-5 junction with US 50 on the south. This section of freeway is the busiest stretch on I-5, north of Los Angeles. Caltrans officials said they had contemplated doing the $55 million project the normal way -- at night and during weekends -- but figured that could take five years. The portion of the freeway, called the "boat section," is 34 years old and sits beneath river level, literally surrounded by water. Years of leaks are crumbling the roadway. Drainage pipes have become clogged with silt and can't keep up. Workers will dig up the roadway, replace the extensive pump and drain system underneath, then rebuild the road and a 6-inch concrete slab underneath. The new drainage system will be electronically controlled and monitored. Until the fix, Caltrans inspectors will continue to drive through the section during storms to see if the pumps are keeping up.

2007 CMIA. Two projects on I-5 near Sacramento were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects were a I-5 to Route 113 direct connector, auxiliary lanes from Consumnes River to Pocket Rd, and the Richards Blvd interchange ramp widening. None were recommended for funding.

In March 2005, the CTC considered a resolution to vacate the public’s right to use roadway connectors from I-5 in the City of Sacramento, along I-5 between N Street and Capitol Mall and between Capitol Mall and L Street. The connectors were constructed around 1964 as part of the I-5 freeway project. At the time, Capitol Mall (formerly LRN 6 which was signposted as US 40) was the principal route for traffic traveling between Sacramento and San Francisco resulting in high volumes of inter-regional and local traffic using the same corridor. Upon completion of the freeway system in Sacramento, inter-regional traffic on Capitol Mall was almost completely eliminated. Traffic operation studies have concluded that these connectors are no longer necessary. The connectors are currently maintained by the City of Sacramento and reimbursed by Caltrans. Terminating the public’s right to use the connectors creates excess land that can be combined with other excess parcels and sold.

In July 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Sacramento along Route 5 at Richards Boulevard on Bercut Drive and Jibboom Street, consisting of collateral facilities.

In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval of funding an FEIR regarding a project that would construct High Occupancy Vehicle lanes and sound walls in both directions from US 50 to Morrison Creek on I-5. Phase 1 is funded through Plans, Specification, and Estimate with federal dollars, and is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program for Right of Way only. The total estimated cost is $127,200,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2017-18. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. Phase 2 (PPNO 5836) will construct High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes from Morrison Creek to south of Stone Lake Creek. Phase 2 is not yet funded. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $70,600,000. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $13,734,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Sacramento, from Sacramento River Bridge to 0.2 mile north of Adams Creek Bridge, that will rehabilitate 49.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $277,000 in SHOPP funding, programmed in Fiscal Years 2012-13 and 2013-14, for repairs in Nevada, Sacramento and Yolo Counties on Route 5, Route 20 and US 50 at various locations that will upgrade crash cushions and guardrail to meet the current National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) 350 standards and improve safety.

North of Sacramento

There are plans to add a truck climing lane near Red Bluff. This was discussed during the March 2005 CTC Meeting, Agenda Item 2.2c.(1). This project is fully funded in the 2004 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP), and had a negative environmental declaration.

In 2007, the CTC considered a number of requests for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). one request was funded: Cottonwood Hills Truck Climbing Lanes ($22.902M). Requests to construct a I-5/Route 44 direct connector, expand the route to 6 lanes from Bechelli to Churn Creek S of Redding, improvements to the South Avenue interchange in Tehama County, and widening the route to 6 lanes from Bonnyview to Riverside in North Anderson were not recommended for funding.

In August 2011, it was reported that Caltrans recently wrapped up a $16.479 million dollar project that saw a third lane open over Cottonwood Hill. A new lane was installed in the north and southbound directions on I-5 from Gas Point Road to Deschutes Road. Construction on the project started in June of 2011, and while rain delayed the completion, it was still finished on schedule. Tullis Construction was the main contractor, but the entire project was a group effort between Caltrans, Shasta Regional Transportation Planning Agency, Shasta County and Tullis Construction. A portion of the project—$13.7 million—was funded by California’s Proposition 1B.
(Source: Anderson Valley Post)

In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing an additional freeway lane in both directions in Shasta County.

In May 2011, Caltrans closed a culvert under I-5 near Mountain Gate that locals had used to cross the freeway. Caltrans requires workers accessing the culvert to first test the air quality inside the culvert for the presence of toxic gases and an appropriate oxygen level — between 19.5 and 23.5 percent. Then, it mandates laborers pair up, with one person inside working while another watches, to rescue the other if he passes out. Workers regularly encounter rattlesnakes, posing serious danger to a single person in the culvert. Given this, Caltrans could not have the culvert open to the public; Caltrans is facing a lawsuit from the family of a man who died after crawling through a culvert in Mariposa County in 2010 to reach a famous scenic view. Those wishing to cross the freeway must now use a traditional overpass with a 40 mph speed limit and about four feet of room to walk.

According to Gary Araki, in 2006 Caltrans made a change in the City of Weed. Pre-2006, the transition from SB I-5 to Route 97 used to direct motorists to use exit 747, the Central Weed exit; traffic then was routed to use S Weed Blvd, and then turn right to get on to Route 97. In Summer 2006, new signage went up directing SB traffic to exit 748, Edgewood Road, which is now signed with "To Route 97" (and the Central Weed signage has been removed for Route 97) . In other words, Route 97 traffic is suggested to use Route 265 to get to Route 97 in Weed.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $22,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Weed, from 0.1 mile south of Route 5/Route 97 Separation to 0.1 North Edgewood Overhead, that will rehabilitate 25.2 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

In April 2012, Caltrans was holding open houses regarding plans to widen I-5 to six lanes between Anderson and south Redding. The estimated $60 million project will connect with the six freeway lanes currently scheduled for completion by August or September 2012 in Redding and with the existing six lanes south of Deschutes Road in Anderson that were completed in September 2011.

Deschutes Road InterchangeIn April 2012, the CTC approved $6 million for the City of Anderson to fund for construction of the Deschutes Road/Factory Outlets Drive roundabout east of I-5. The allocation will allow Anderson and California Department of Transportation officials to move forward with construction likely to start in August 2012. Construction should be completed and the roundabout operating by late-summer 2013. Construction plans include a new northbound off-ramp from I-5 to Deschutes Road and a modern roundabout intersection that will connect three roads and a freeway on-ramp to the off-ramp, all without need of a signal light. Also included is a new retaining wall, a pathway for pedestrians and bicycles as well as lighting and landscaping at the roundabout intersection.

In June 2007, the CTC considered authorization for replacement of a bridge in Shasta County near Redding. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $213,881,000. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2009-10. The project will involve construction activities in the environmentally sensitive habitat of the bald eagle, a federally listed threatened species. In addition, visual concerns related to the construction of a larger bridge than currently exists resulted in a Mitigated Negative Declaration being completed for this project. This could be the Antlers Bridge. In May 2009, Caltrans advertised a project for replacement of the I-5 Sacramento River bridge at Antlers ($230 million)--the project also includes relocating the approaches to the bridge to ease sharp curves on I-5, and entails a massive road cut.

In January 2013, the CTC approved a $3.7 million bridge rehabilitation project that includes 19 spans in Shasta and Siskiyou counties. These bridges are Flume Creek Road, Creekside, Conant Road, Castella Sidehill Viaduct, Castella, Soda Creek Road, South Dunsmuir, Willow Street, Dunsmuir Avenue, South Mt. Shasta, Moonlit Oaks Avenue, Oberlin Road, Yreka Creek, Miner Street, Miner Street, North Yreka Separation, and Henley Way. The bridges will be rehabilitated by replacing their damaged decks. The decks will be sealed with methacrylate, a viscous material that acts as a bonding agent that keeps the water out to better protect the steel structure. Workers also will place polyester concrete overlays and repair joint seals on the bridges. Work is expected to start in summer 2013 and be complete before fall 2013.
(Source: Redding Record Searchlight, 1/10/13)

In July 2011, Caltrans removed safety cable barriers installed along the I-5 median through Redding. The cables were installed in 2009 to prevent vehicles from crossing the median into oncoming lanes during traffic incidents. They were removed as part of a project to widen the freeway through Redding. When the $2.2 million cable barrier was installed Caltrans had plans to widen the freeway but had no definite timeline when it would receive funding. The Shasta Regional Transportation Planning Agency regularly applied for the needed funds, but didn't expend the award (which occurred in 2011). I-5 is being widened to three lanes in both directions from the Smith Road overcrossing south of Redding, to north of the Hilltop Drive overcrossing. The money to widen the highway comes from 2006's Proposition 1B, which was approved by voters statewide and allows the state to sell up to $20 billion in bonds to pay for transportation and transit projects. When the widening project is complete, the cables will be reinstalled, for $443,000. Except for a section of highway between Cypress Avenue and the Route 44 interchange, where there will be a concrete barrier, after the widening is done there will be cable barriers from Gas Point Road to just north of the Route 44 interchange.
(Source: Redding Searchlight, 7/7/11)

In November 2011, it was reported that a $5.9 million project to add two lanes to southbound I-5 at the Route 44 interchange was completed ahead of schedule, thanks in part to a financial incentive from the California Department of Transportation. Caltrans had offered the contractor $64,500 for early completion. Work on the bridge over Route 44 should wrap up in summer 2012.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $41,999,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Tehama and Shasta Counties, in and near Red Bluff, from south of Adobe Road to the Gas Point Road Overcrossing that will rehabilitate 40.9 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

In August 2008, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way along I-5 in the county of Tehama near Red Bluff at Adobe Road, consisting of a relocated and reconstructed county road.

In January 2012, the CTC approved 2.9 million to extend on-ramps and reduce the number and severity of collisions at the Bowman Road overcrossing on I-5 just south of Cottonwood.

In April 2012, the CTC authorized $373,000 to construct a viewing area on I-5, at Castella Vista Point.

Shasta BridgeIn October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will replace the Shasta River Bridge (note that this bridge is not on I-5 proper, but appears to be on the former US 99 alignment next to I-5). The existing bridge is a two span concrete bridge built in 1922. The new bridge will be placed in the same location as the existing bridge and will be a single span concrete structure on piles with two traffic lanes. The project is estimated to cost $1,542,000. The project is programmed for funding with STIP ($177,000) and Highway Bridge Program ($1,365,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2009/10. On September 23, 2009 the County provided confirmation that the scope addressed in the MND is consistent with the scope of work that is programmed in the STIP.

In October 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the county of Shasta near the Pollard Flat overcrossing along Route 5, consisting of relocated or reconstructed county roads or frontage roads.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $52,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Yreka, from 0.3 mile south of Shasta River Bridge to 0.1 mile south of Klamath River Road Undercrossing, that will rehabilitate 28.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

General

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #134: Improvement of the intersection of Balboa Blvd. and San Fernando Road. This intersection is near the Balboa Blvd. on-ramp to I-5 just north of Sylmar, California. $400,000.

  • High Priority Project #287: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. See also HPP #3798. $2,800,000.

  • High Priority Project #465: I-5 Santa Clarita-Los Angeles Gateway Improvement Project. According to Santa Clarita Magazine, the I-5 Santa Clarita - Los Angeles Gateway Improvement Project will provide significant economic, environmental, safety and congestion mitigation benefits to North Los Angeles County. This portion of Interstate 5 serves as the gateway to Southern California and currently carries over half a million trucks each month. This volume of truck traffic is projected to increase dramatically over the next several years. The proposed truck lanes over the Newhall Pass will provide for the much-needed separation of slower trucks from the other vehicles traveling on Interstate 5 that effectively choke the roadway. $1,600,000.

  • High Priority Project #570: I-5 HOV improvements from Route 134 to Route 170. This is not on the TCRP list, but would connect to TCRP #41, which are the HOV lanes from Route 170 to Route 14. It was considered by the CTC in May 2001, but there has been no action since. The funding is likely only sufficient for some planning studies, as there are no HOVs currently constructed in that segment. $400,000.

  • High Priority Project #702: Construction of the I-5 and Route 56 Connectors near San Diego, California. $6,400,000.

  • High Priority Project #2067: Complete the engineering design and acquire the right-of-way needed for the Arch-Sperry project in San Joaquin County. The Project will widen Arch-Sperry Road to six lanes west of Airport Way to Route 99 and construct an interim four lane elevated roadway including five bridges crossing three railroads, two roadways and French Camp Slough east to I-5. The project will include reconstruction of the French Camp/I-5 interchange.$4,000,000.

  • High Priority Project #2340: Construct truck ramp linking I-5 to the National City Marine Cargo Terminal, National City.$2,400,000.

  • High Priority Project #2577: Widen I-5 to 10 Lanes and Improve Corridor Arterials, Route 91 to I-710.$4,160,000.

  • High Priority Project #2750: Engineering support to I-5 Joint Powers Authority to widen I-5 freeway and improve corridor arterials from I-710 to Orange County line.$120,000.

  • High Priority Project #3086: I-5, Sorrento Valley Road and Genesee Avenue Interchange Project in San Diego.$1,600,000.

  • High Priority Project #3120: Completion of I-5 and I-8 Connectors, San Diego. $4,800,000.

  • High Priority Project #3206: I-5 and Route 78 Interchange Improvements. $4,000,000.

  • High Priority Project #3482: Project design and environmental assessment of widening and improving the interchange at H Street and I-5 in Chula Vista. $2,160,000.

  • High Priority Project #3488: Interchange improvements for the Laval/I-5 interchange, Lebec. $4,000,000.

  • High Priority Project #3494: For Environmental Review Process at I-5 interchanges: Stockton, North Grove, Eight Mile Road, Otto Drive, Hammer Lane. $500,000.

  • High Priority Project #3798: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. This seems to be supplemental funding for HPP #287. $1,500,000.

Seemingly related to HPP #3494, during its April 2006 meeting the CTC considered the draft EIR for construction of an interchange at French Camp Road (San Joaquin County Route J9), together with an extension of Sperry Road in the City of Stockton in San Joaquin County (PM 22.1/23.6). There were three alternatives being considered: (1) Full-Build Alternative: Interchange improvements, auxiliary lanes, and eight-lane Sperry Road extension; (2) Reduced-Build Alternative: Interchange improvements, auxiliary lanes, and four-lane Sperry Road extension; (3) No-Build Alternative. The report found that there will be potentially significant impacts associated with traffic circulation changes and biological issues, and thus indicated that an Environmental Impact Report is being prepared.

PCNO 7239Seemingly related to HPP #2067, during its July and September 2006 meetings the CTC considered reprogramming funds into a project to reconstruct the interchange at I-5 and French Camp Road in the city of Stockton (City). In the 2006 STIP, SJCOG proposed programming construction funding in FY 2007-08 for the project. The Commission was unable to program the project in the 2006 STIP, due to insufficient funding capacity for San Joaquin County. Since the adoption of the 2006 STIP, SJCOG and the City have been looking for ways to fully fund this project. The City is the implementing agency for the project, and indicates the environmental document of the project is nearly complete. The PS&E phase will be done and the project will be ready for construction in FY 2009-10. SJCOG is requesting the Commission reprogram the $16,667,000 from Route 12 (Bouldin Island) Passing Lanes (PPNO 7350) to CON in FY 2009-10 for the new I-5/French Camp Interchange project. The $16,667,000 of RIP funds, in combination with $23,333,000 of local funds from the City, will fully fund the project. In July 2009, the CTC approved this for future consideration of funding, given the negative FEIR.

In January 2011, it was reported that the I-5/French Camp Interchange project was programmed in the 2010 STIP with $18,229,000 in Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds for construction in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13. The RIP programming had been delayed twice due to limited STIP capacity. However, the City of Stockton had continued with project development using local funds. It was expected that this project will be ready for a RIP allocation in June 2011, and an advance allocation was not feasible, nor was an AB 3090 replacement project. Therefore, it was proposed that the CTC delete $18,229,000 RIP construction from this project, fund construction with $18,229,000 of SJCOG Measure K funds, and begin construction in August 2011. (Information Only in January 2011). This was approved in March 2011.

In May 2011, the CTC amended the baseline agreement for a project that will widen I-5 by adding an additional lane in the northbound (NB) and southbound (SB) directions from 0.3 mile south of Smith Road to 0.2 mile north of the Route 5/Route 299 Separation.  

In May 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on I-5, in Siskiyou County, 02-Sis-5 R50.6/52.1 Near Yreka, from 0.6 mile south of Shasta River Bridge to 0.2 mile south of Vista Point. $8,200,000 to replace bridge decks and upgrade the structures to maintain structural integrity, reduce the risk to lives and properties, and to meet the current seismic strengthening standards.

 

Historical Route

The segment of Route 5 from Route 10 to Route 99, and from the northern I-5/Route 99 junction to the Oregon border, is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

Some portions of I-5 have been signed as part of Historic Route 99:

  • Dunsmir Ave. in the city of Dunsimar.

  • Red Bluff: Business Route 5 and Route 99 in the City Limits.

  • Burbank: San Fernando Road in the City Limits.

  • Los Angeles: San Fernando Road N of the city of Burbank.

 

Naming

Historically, the portion of this route from the Mexican border to the roads connecting to Route 72 is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). This portion has officially been designated as "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 1569, in 1959.

The entire route in California has been submitted to be part of the National Purple Heart Trail. The Military Order of the Purple Heart is working to establish a national commemorative trail for recipients of the Purple Heart medal, which honors veterans who were wounded in combat. All states in the union will designate highways for inclusion in the commemorative trail, and all of the designated highways will be interconnected to form the National Purple Heart Trail. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 14, Resolution Chapter 79, July 10, 2001.

The segment of Route 5 from the Mexico border to Route 94 is named the "John J. Montgomery Freeway". John J. Montgomery (1858-1911) was one of the pioneers in the field of aviation. He was born in in Yuba City, California, in 1858, and moved to Oakland when he was 5. He was always interested in flight. He attended St. Ignatius College in San Francisco (MS, circa 1880), and Santa Clara College (PhD, 1901). In 1894 Montgomery joined the faculty of St Joseph's College, Rohnerville, California, where he taught mathematics while continuing studies of air and water current impacts on edged surfaces, parabolic and plane. He later experimented with 4 foot and 8 foot wingspread model aeroplanes and built a wind-tunnel to vary experiments in degrees of parabolic wing-curve and length, fore and aft, rudder and rear stabilizer control. At Santa Clara College (now University), he worked part time for Rev. Richard H. Bell, S.J., on improvements in the Marconi Wireless. Montgomery patented an "Improvement in Aeroplanes" in 1906 and in 1909 completed an electric typewriter and patented an alternating current rectifier, which he sold to a San Francisco company. His findings and airplane designs finally earned him a well-deserved place with Octave Chanute and Dr. Samuel Pierpont Langley as American pioneers in controlled flight before the Wright brothers. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 16, Chapter 83, in 1949.

The interchange between I-5 and Route 905 in the County of San Diego is named the "Caltrans Equipment Operator II Richard Gonzalez Memorial Interchange" . It was named in memory of Caltrans Equipment Operator II Richard Gonzalez, a dedicated maintenance worker. Richard Gonzalez, while working on a special programs crew at the connector of I-15 and Route 94, was struck on the morning of June 20, 2011, and died in the line of duty at the age of 52 as a result of injuries sustained in the collision. Richard Gonzalez was an exemplary employee who gained the respect of supervisors, management, and peers for his devotion to the values of integrity, commitment, and teamwork. Richard Gonzalez's passion was restoration of classic cars and serving as a mentor and role model to his family and friends. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Resolution Chapter 94, on September 15, 2011.

The portion of I-5 from Leucadia Boulevard to La Costa Avenue in the City of Encinitas is officially named the "C.H.P. Officer Stephen M. Linen, Jr. Memorial Freeway". It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Stephen M. Linen, Jr.. Officer Linen, Jr. was killed in the line of duty during the morning of August 12, 2001 while issuing a citation on I-5 near Leucadia Boulevard in Encinitas when a drunken-driving suspect collided into his patrol vehicle and struck the officer. Born on July 22, 1970, Officer Linen graduated from California State University, San Diego with a degree in Criminal Justice in 1993. He joined the CHP on July 25, 1994., and began service in the Monterey area as an officer on January 26, 1995. He made significant contributions to traffic safety and assisting the motoring public while assigned to the Monterey, San Diego, and Oceanside Area offices. He was nominated for the Burn Institute's "Spirit of Courage Award" for his 1998 act of bravery and heroism when he rescued a man trapped in a burning vehicle on I-5 in San Diego. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 24, Chapter 127, 9/12/2003.

The portion of I-5 from Tamarack Avenue to Route 78 in the City of Carlsbad is officially named the "C.H.P. Officer Sean Nava Memorial Freeway". Named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Sean Nava. Officer Nava was killed in the line of duty during the morning of October 28, 2000 while investigating an earlier traffic collision on I-5 in the City of Carlsbad when a drunken driving suspect collided into him. Born on April 8, 1967, in West Covina, Officer Nava served his country as an Army Military Police Officer in Germany and in Herlong, California. As an Army Military Police Officer, he conducted undercover narcotics investigations with the Army Criminal Investigation Division. Sean Nava was honorably discharged at the rank of sergeant. He joined the California Highway Patrol on July 31, 1989. His first assignment was in the San Jose Area. He made significant contributions to traffic safety and assisting the motoring public while assigned to the Monterey, San Diego, and Oceanside Area offices, and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Valor for his off-duty act of bravery and heroism when he attempted to rescue the driver of a vehicle that had collided with a residence and propane tank, and subsequently erupted in flames. Without regard to his own personal safety, Sean Nava and a citizen made repeated attempts to rescue the trapped driver. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 24, Chapter 127, 9/12/2003.

The portion of Route 5 between Harbor Drive and Route 78, in the County of San Diego, is named the "Oceanside Police Officer Daniel S. Bessant Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Daniel S. Bessant, who was born in Oceanside, California, on October 16, 1981. Officer Bessant attended local schools in Oceanside where his father served as a member of the faculty. He then served with the Oceanside Police Department for six years, three years as a police officer and three years as a civilian with the department. On December 20, 2006, Officer Bessant was killed in the line of duty while assisting another officer with a traffic stop and was shot from behind by a gang member who was not involved in the traffic stop. Officer Bessant's father, in his role as a teacher, had tried unsuccessfully to intervene with one of the gang members convicted of killing Officer Bessant after noticing that the young man was becoming involved with gangs. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

The segment of Route 5 starting from Route 94 in San Diego to the southern I-405/I-5 junction is designated the "San Diego" Freeway. It was named by the State Highway Commission on April 25, 1957. San Diego refers to the eventual southern terminus of the route (after all merges). The name refers to Saint Didacus of Alcalá, a Franciscan saint of the 15th century. The bay was named by Vizcaíno in 1602, the mission in 1769, the county in 1850 and the new city in 1856.

The segment of Route 5 between the Basilone Road exit and the N, and the main gate of USMC Camp Pendleton to the S is named the Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone Memorial Freeway. Sgt. Basilone was a member of "C" Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Regiment, 1st Marine Division who was in charge of two sections of heavy machine guns defending a narrow pass that led to Henderson Airfield in Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, during WWII (1942). Sgt. Basilone, at great risk to life, battled through hostile lines to provide shells for his gunners. For this, he recieved the Congressional Medal of Honor. Later, in 1944, he rejoined the USMC and, on Iwo Jima, single-handedly destroyed an enemey blockhouse while braving a bombardment of enemy heavy caliber file. For this, he was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross and the Purple Heart, and has a life-sized bronze statue in Raritan, NJ. He also has a destroyer, U.S.S. Basilone, named after him (subsequently scuttled, as it was no longer seaworthy). There is a 2nd status in honor of Sgt. Basilone somewhere in San Diego, as well as a bridge and a football field. Supposedly, a postal stamp with his likeness will be issued in 2005. Named by Senate Concurrant Resolution 25, Resolution Chapter 72, on July 23, 1999.

[Steed]The segment of Route 5 between the Avenida San Luis Rey exit and the Camino De Estrella exit in the City of San Clemente is officially designated the "Officer Richard T. Steed Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of San Clemente Police Officer Richard (Rick) Thomas Steed. Steed was born on December 27, 1947, to Henry and Martha Steed, and grew up in Alexandria, Virginia with his brother Hank and sister Donna. After high school, Steed enlisted in the United States Marine Corps, where he served for eight years and rose to the rank of Staff Sergeant. During his service Rick spent one tour of duty in Vietnam as a radio technician in the Recon Platoon, and also served in Okinawa. Rick was awarded a Navy Commendation Medal, a Good Service Medal, and a Combat Action Ribbon. He also earned his jump wings. While still on active duty Rick became interested in law enforcement and became a reserve police officer with the San Clemente Police Department in July 1975. After receiving his associate of arts degree in criminal justice from Saddleback Community College, Rick was hired as a full-time police officer with the San Clemente Police Department on June 6, 1977. Officer Steed attended the Police Academy at Los Medanos College in Pittsburgh, California, where he was elected class president. On his final patrol shift, on November 29, 1978, Officer Steed answered a call for medical aid in an adjacent beat. Officer Steed announced his arrival to the dispatcher and indicated that he saw a subject approaching from behind his vehicle. As he exited the car and turned toward the subject, Officer Steed was immediately, and without provocation, shot twice with a .38 caliber handgun, and died from those injuries. A massive manhunt involving multiple law enforcement agencies resulted in apprehending the suspect and retrieving the murder weapon. The suspect was incarcerated in a state mental hospital. Officer Steed is the only San Clemente police officer to die in the line of duty was of 2011. Officer Steed was enshrined on Honor Rolls in the Santa Ana Courthouse, Sacramento, and Washington, D.C., and named in the Honor Roll and Officer Down Memorial Internet Web sites, and on memorial bricks in the Vietnam section of the Saddleback College Veterans Memorial and at the Marine Corps Museum in Quantico, Virginia. Additionally, a 64-acre park and sports complex was named the Richard T. Steed Memorial Park, and a plaque prominently displayed at Park Semper Fi near the San Clemente Pier. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Resolution Chapter 73, on August 23, 2011. The dedication was written up in the Orange County Register on 11/29/11. The article notes that the actual sign drops the word "Officer", and indicates there is an attempt in process to correct the sign and include the fact he was a San Clemente Police officer.

The segment of Route 5 from the southern I-405/I-5 junction to the Route 5/Route 10/Route 60/US 101 interchange is named the "Santa Ana" Freeway. It was named by its location.

The I-5/I-710 interchange in Los Angeles County is officially named the "Marco Antonio Firebaugh Interchange". This interchange was named in memory of Marco Antonio Firebaugh, who at the age of 39 years was running for the California State Senate when he succumbed to health ailments on March 21, 2006. Born in Tijuana, Mexico on October 13, 1966, Firebaugh emigrated to the United States when he was a young boy. He worked hard to pay his own way through school and earned his bachelor of arts degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley and a law degree from the UCLA School of Law. He was the first in his family to attend college and was committed to the notion that free universal public education is the cornerstone of our democratic society and worked hard to improve educational opportunities for all California students. Firebaugh was elected to the California State Assembly at the age of 32 years; and he served in the California State Assembly from 1998 to 2004, representing the 50th Assembly District located in southeast Los Angeles County. During his tenure in the Assembly, Firebaugh was recognized for his impressive legislative and advocacy record on behalf of California's working families and their children, establishing him as a leader and role model in the Latino community. He demonstrated outstanding leadership in introducing legislation aimed at improving the lives of immigrants and low-income families including undocumented immigrants who come to California to work and give their children a better life. He authored air quality legislation that provides funding for the state's most important air emissions reductions programs and that ensures that state funding be targeted to low-income communities that are most severely impacted by air pollution. He also authored legislation funding a mobile asthma treatment clinic known as a Breathmobile to provide free screenings and treatment for school children in southeast Los Angeles and fought hard in the Legislature to make California the first state to outlaw smoking in a vehicle carrying young children to protect them from the hazards created by breathing secondhand smoke. In 2002, he championed AB540, which allowed undocumented California high school students to pursue a college education and pay in-state tuition fees. From 2002 to 2004, Firebaugh served as Chairman of the California Latino Legislative Caucus where he was responsible for managing the development of the Latino Caucus' annual "Agenda for California's Working Families" as a policy document that focuses on issues affecting California's diverse population. Because of his effectiveness both as a policymaker and political leader, Marco Antonio Firebaugh was appointed Majority Floor Leader in 2002, and served as Floor Leader from 2002 to 2004, making him the highest ranking Latino in the Assembly and one of the chief negotiators for Assembly Democrats. Firebaugh also served six years on the State Allocation Board, which provides funding for public school construction and modernization. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 142, Resolution Chapter 132, on 9/7/2006.

The portion of I-5 between East Olympic Boulevard and South Atlantic Boulevard, in the City of Commerce, is officially named the ’147;Arnold C. Garcia Memorial Highway’148;. This segment was named in honor of Arnold C. Garcia, a Los Angeles County Probation Department group supervisor, who worked the graveyard shift at the Dorothy E. Kirby Center, supervising locked cottages housing some of Los Angeles County's youngest and most troubled offenders. As all Los Angeles County Probation Department employees, Arnold C. Garcia was equipped with only two weapons: muscle and guile. Although department guidelines recommend one guard for every 10 juveniles in custody, Arnold C. Garcia was charged with watching over a 20-bed cottage. During night shifts at the center, Arnold C. Garcia frequently bent the rules, bringing candy and videos for the most well-behaved wards. According to coworkers, he always had his Bible in hand, passing the lonely hours by praying for the wards. On April 4, 1994, Arnold C. Garcia heard a knock from inside one of the bedroom doors. The ward inside, who was serving time for burglary and possession of a concealed weapon, asked for permission to use the restroom. After opening the door, Arnold C. Garcia was struck in the head with a metal object from a disassembled desk in the room. The alleged assailant fled with another ward, but was captured a short time later. Arnold C. Garcia was the first Los Angeles County Probation Department employee killed in the line of duty since the department was formed in 1903, and the tragic death of Arnold C. Garcia serves as a symbol of the increasingly hazardous mission faced by employees at Los Angeles County's three juvenile halls and 20 probation camps. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 130, 8/30/2010, Resolution Chapter 111.

The I-5/I-10/Route 60/US 101 interchange, commonly referred to as the East Los Angeles Interchange, is named the ’147;Medal of Honor Recipient , Eugene A. Obregon, USMC, Memorial Interchange’148; (it was originally named the ’147;Marine Private First Class Eugene A. Obregon Interchange’148;). This interchange was named in memory of Medal of Honor Recipient Eugene A. Obregon, USMC. While serving as an ammunition carrier with Golf Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during the Korean War, PFC Obregon was killed in action on September 26, 1950. The machine-gun squad of Private Obregon was temporarily pinned down by hostile fire; and during this time, he observed a fellow marine fall wounded in the line of fire. Armed only with a pistol, Private Obregon unhesitantly dashed from his cover position to the side of the fallen marine. Firing his pistol with one hand as he ran, Private Obregon grasped his comrade by the arm, and despite the great peril to himself, dragged the marine to the side of the road. Still under enemy fire, Private Obregon was bandaging the marine's wounds when hostile troops began approaching their position. Quickly seizing the wounded marine's rifle, Private Obregon placed his own body as a shield in front of the wounded marine and lay there firing accurately and effectively into the approaching enemy troops until he, himself, was fatally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. By his courageous fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty, Private Obregon enabled his fellow marines to rescue the wounded marine. By fate and courage, Private Obregon is one of the valiant Mexican Americans to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor for bravery. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 109, Resolution Chapter 66, on 6/26/2008.

The segment from the Route 5/Route 10/Route 60/US 101 interchange to Route 14 is officially named the "Golden State" Freeway. It was named by the Metropolitan Transportation Engineering Board (MTEB) on February 28, 1958, based on the fact that the route traverses the "Golden State" of California. The first segment of the Golden State Freeway opened in 1954 (the segment from the Route 7 (now Route 14)/US 6/US 99 Junction to Weldon Canyon); the last in 1975. The truck route dates to 1954. [The MTEB came into existence sometime after the passage of the Collier-Burns Highway Act of 1947 and lasted until the freeway system was finalized in the late 1950s. It was described as "...a voluntary group of the administrative officials of State, County and forty-three of the Municipalities within the Los Angeles Metropolitan District." Among the forty-seven members of the LAMTAC were the following notables: Leonard K. Firestone, Firestone Tire an Rubber Co.; M. Richard Gross, Treasurer, Richfield Oil Co.; Kenneth W. Kendricks, Dist. Sales Mgr., Standard Oil of California; Harry March, Secretary, Signal Oil Co.; J.W. Miller, Union Oil Co.; D.W. Sanford, Vice President, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co.; and R.D. Stetson, Manager, LA Div., Shell Oil.]

The I-5/Route 134 interchange is named the "Gene Autry Memorial Interchange". Gene Autry was best known as a singing cowboy of stage and screen. He was also the original owner of the Anaheim Angels baseball team, and owned various media properties (KTLA-TV, KMPC-AM) in the Los Angeles area. The named interchange is near the Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum, opened in 1988. Named by SCR 17, Resolution Chapter 61, on July 16, 1999.

The portion of I-5 between West Burbank Boulevard in the city of Burbank and Hollywood Way in the City of Los Angeles is named the Burbank Police Officer Matthew Pavelka Memorial Freeway. It was named in memory of Burbank Police Officer Matthew Pavelka (1977-2004). Officer Pavelka served in the United States Air Force from 1997 to 2001, where he was awarded two medals for meritorious service. He was hired as a Police Recruit in August of 2002, attended the Ventura County Sheriff's Academy, and was promoted to Police Officer in January of 2003. He was just 26 years of age when he was called to assist veteran Officer Gregory Campbell with a routine traffic stop at the Ramada Inn on North San Fernando Road on the night of November 15, 2003. Tragically, the two men Officer Campbell had pulled over opened fire, injuring Officer Campbell and killing Officer Pavelka. Officer Pavelka was the first police officer to be killed in the line of duty in the Burbank Police Department's 82 year history. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 156, August 19, 2004, Chapter 150.

The portion of I-5 between the Rye Canyon Road overcrossing and Magic Mountain Parkway in the County of Los Angeles is named the "California Highway Patrol Officers James E. Pence, Jr., Roger D. Gore, Walter C. Frago, and George M. Alleyn Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of four CHP officers who made significant contributions to traffic safety and to the motoring public while assigned to the Newhall Area Office and who were killed in the line of duty in the early morning hours of April 6, 1970, by armed assailants during a traffic enforcement stop in Newhall: California Highway Patrol Officer James E. Pence, Jr., badge number 6885; California Highway Patrol Officer Roger D. Gore, badge number 6600; California Highway Patrol Officer Walter C. Frago, badge number 6573; and California Highway Patrol Officer George M. Alleyn, badge number 6290. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 93, Resolution Chapter 92, on 8/11/2006.

The portion of Route 5 between Palomas Wash Bridge and 5 miles north of Palomas Wash Bridge in the County of Los Angeles is named the "CHP Officers Gayle W. Wood, Jr. and James E. McCabe Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol (CHP) officers Gayle W. Wood, Jr. and James Edward McCabe. Officer Gayle Wesley Wood, Jr. was born March 26, 1937, to Gayle and Dorothy Wood, in Barstow, California. He graduated from Glendale High School in 1954, and attended Life Pacific College. He was employed by the Huntington Beach Police Department as a car and motorcycle driver prior to becoming a CHP officer. Officer Wood, graduated from the CHP Academy in 1969 and was president of his class, and upon graduation he was assigned to the Santa Ana Area Office. After approximately one year with that office, CHP Officer Wood was transferred to the South Los Angeles Area and was assigned to motorcycle duty until being transferred to the Van Nuys Airport in 1973 as a helicopter pilot, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer James Edward McCabe was born July 8, 1944, to Bud and Ruth McCabe in Los Angeles, California. Officer McCabe graduated from Don Bosco High School in 1962, and continued his education by attending California State University, Los Angeles, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Police Science and Administration in 1974. Prior to joining the CHP, Officer McCabe earned his helicopter license and joined the army, where he served in the Air Operations Division in Vietnam. Officer McCabe graduated from the CHP Academy in 1971 and was assigned to the West Los Angeles Area Office, where he earned his emergency medical technician and paramedic certificates, and was subsequently transferred to the Malibu Area Office, back to the West Los Angeles Area Office, and finally to the Van Nuys Airport for Air Operations, where he spent the remainder of his career. On September 1, 1978, the state suffered a tragic loss when these officers made the ultimate sacrifice while performing their sworn duty. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 70, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 28, 2011.

Portions of this route from the vicinity of Route 14 to the I-5/Route 99 junction are historically named the "Ridge Route". Mike Ballard's site can provide additional specifics. The Ridge Route first opened in 1915 and was paved four years later using mule-powered graders. The 20-foot wide ribbon of concrete hugged the top of the San Gabriel and Tehachapi Mountains - often precariously - as it climbed over the Tejon Pass. A trip from L.A. to Bakersfield took 12 hours, and could be a harrowing experience. Since funds for blasting were non-existent at the time of its construction, its engineers were forced to follow the contours of the hills. This created nearly 700 curves in one 36-mile stretch between Castaic and Gorman. The road was just wide enough for two Model-T's to pass, and to jump one of its few curbs could send a vehicle tumbling hundreds of feet down a canyon. Stretches of the route were so steep that it was common to see cars, which lacked fuel pumps at the time, going up backwards. The current I-5 routing from Route 138 south to Castaic is a bit to the west of the old Ridge Route. From Route 138 to Grapevine, I-5 parallels or sits on the alignment (the southbound lanes up the hill from the San Joaquin Valley sit on the old road). Sometime in the 30's, a new road was built away from the original Ridge Route; this was US 99. I-5 follows most of this alignment, with the exception of the section between Templin Hwy (at Violin Summit, north of Castaic) and Smokey Bear Rd (formerly Hungry Valley Rd). Most of that alignment is now under Pyramid Lake. You can still travel the Ridge Route: From Los Angeles, take I-5 north, exit at Lake Hughes Rd, turn right, and turn left after a few blocks on Ridge Route (yes, that's the street name). It winds its way through the mountains, although most of the curves have been now cut off. You can still see many of the original concrete patches. It comes out at Lake Elizabeth Rd. (Los Angeles County Route N2) Turn left, and you eventually meet up with Route 138. Additionally, a 17.6 mile stretch that runs through the Angeles National Forest was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1997. This section has been closed to the public since floods washed out parts of it in 2005. But one Saturday a month the gates are opened to allow a group of Ridge Route Preservation Organization (RRPO) volunteers entry for the "privilege" of cleaning drains and clearing rocks in hopes of re-opening the old road in the near future. You can find much more history at the RRPO website, and there is also a good article on the Ridge Route from the Automobile Club.
(Source: Some material came from an article on the RRPO in The Signal in March 2010)

The segment of Route 5 that was cosigned with US 6 (i.e., from Route 14 to Route 110) was named the "Grand Army of the Republic Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943. The GAR is a membership organization founded in Decatur, Illinois on April 6, 1866 by Benjamin F. Stephenson. It's membership was limited to honorably discharged veterans of the Union Army, Navy, Marine Corps or the Revenue Cutter Service who had served between April 12, 1861 and April 9, 1865. The GAR is responsible for the establishment of Memorial Day, which began in 1868 when GAR Commander-in-Chief John A. Logan issued General Order No. 11 calling for all Departments and Posts to set aside the 30th of May as a day for remembering the sacrifices of fallen comrades. The final Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic was held in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1949 and the last member, Albert Woolson died in 1956 at the age of 109 years.
[Information on the GAR excerpted from the pages of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War].

The I-5/Route 14 interchange is officially designated the "Clarence Wayne Dean Memorial Interchange". Clarence Wayne Dean was a Los Angeles Police Officer. After being awakened on January 17, 1994, by the Northridge earthquake, Mr. Dean was proceeding, in the early morning darkness on his police motorcycle, to his division for assignment in the damaged area fell to his demise at the collapsed interchange of Route 5 and Route 14 in Los Angeles County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 111, Chapter 64, in 1994.

The portion of I-5 from the Fort Tejon Exit to the Grapevine Exit in Kern County is named the "CHP Officer Erick S. Manny Memorial Highway" This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer Erick S. Manny. Erick S. Manny was born on May 24, 1970, in Bakersfield, California. He attended Highland High School in Bakersfield, where he was a three-sport athlete, participating in baseball, football, and wrestling. Manny entered the California Highway Patrol Academy on November 13, 2000, and, after graduating, was assigned to the Fort Tejon CHP office on May 11, 2001. Officer Manny was killed in the line of duty on December 21, 2005, when he was in pursuit of a speeding driver on I-5 near the "Grapevine," when he lost control of his patrol car. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 58, Resolution Chapter 114, on 9/10/2007.

Between the southern Route 5/Route 99 junction and Woodland, this route is named the "West Side" Freeway. It was named by location (on the "west side" of the San Joaquin Valley). There have also been references to this as the "Apollo" freeway.

Between Route 152 and Route 165, this route is named the "CHP Officer Alfred R Turner Memorial Highway.". CHP Officer Alfred R. Turner was born in a little log and rock house in rural Chester, Arkansas on February 9, 1940. He moved to Susanville, California in 1944, and joined the United States Navy at age 17. Seven years after joining the California Highway Patrol, on December 16, 1975, Officer Alfred R. Turner was shot and killed by a motorist on I-5 near Los Banos, after stopping the vehicle because of a burned-out headlight. Officer Turner was unaware that the car he stopped had just been stolen in San Leandro, and when the officer stepped out of his patrol car, the motorist exited his vehicle, and, as the two men began walking toward each other, the motorist suddenly pulled a .357 magnum revolver and opened fire. Officer Turner was hit with three bullets, but returned fire and hit his assailant with five shots. Officer Turner, although critically wounded, managed to return to his patrol car and radio for help. He died 12 days later. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 80, Chapter 97, on July 14, 1998.

I-5 from Stockton to Sacramento is officially named the "Carlton E. Forbes Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 62, Chapter 26, in 1982. Carlton E. Forbes was Chief Engineer of the California Department of Transportation from 1974 to his retirement in 1980.

I-5 from Eight Mile Road to French Camp Road in Stockton is officially designated as the "CHP Officer Dale E. Newby Memorial Highway". Officer Dale E. Newby graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy and was appointed a peace officer of the great State of California on April 24, 1967. He was killed while in the line of duty on July 17, 1982, during a traffic stop at I-5 and Eight Mile Road. He had stopped a motorist for speeding and erratic driving, After scuffling with the motorist, an ex-mental patient, Officer Newby was shot and killed. The tragedy was compounded when the gunman fled the area and took a hostage, who was subsequently shot and killed by the perpetrator prior to taking his own life. An estimated 850 people attended Officer Newby's funeral, including law enforcement personnel from Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Ohio, New Jersey, Florida, Louisiana, and Michigan, in addition to then Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. and then Lieutenant Governor Mike Curb. Officer Newby was only 36 years of age at the time of his death and was survived by his wife, Beverly, and their three sons, Sean, Jeffrey, and Dale, Jr. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 89, Chapter 155, September 11, 2002.

I-5 between Q Street and J Street in the City of Sacramento is named the "Deputy Sheriff Sandra Powell-Larson Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Sacramento County Deputy Sheriff Sandra Powell-Larson, who died in the line of duty at 48 years of age while transporting state prisoners on northbound I-5 at 375 feet south of R Street in Sacramento. Deputy Sheriff Powell-Larson graduated from Rio Linda High School in 1968, and began her career with the Sacramento County Department of Social Services. She continued her county career with the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office while becoming a Sacramento County Reserve Deputy Sheriff. Deputy Sheriff Powell-Larson became a full-time Sacramento County Deputy Sheriff on September 30, 1974, while continuing her secondary education at Sacramento City College, where she received an Associate of Arts degree in criminal justice. Deputy Sheriff Powell-Larson was known by her fellow officers for her dedication to the Sacramento County Sheriff's Officers Association, and to the protection of the citizens of our state. Deputy Sheriff Powell-Larson was the first female officer to die in the line of duty in the over 150 -year history of the Sacramento County Sheriff's Office. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 96, Resolution Chapter 113, on 8/18/2006.

In local usage, I-5 between Sacramento and Red Bluff is called the "West Side Highway". This name derives from the fact the route runs along the west side of the valley.

The portion of I-5 from Pocket Road to the southern boundary of the City of Sacramento is named the "CHP Officer Artie J. Hubbard Memorial Freeway". This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Artie J. Hubbard. Officer Hubbard was born on December 17, 1951, in Stockton, California. He graduated from East Union High School in Manteca, California in 1970. After high school, Officer Hubbard attended Delta College and graduated in 1973 with an AA degree in Criminal Justice. He joined the California Highway Patrol in January of 1974. After completing academy training, he reported to the Central Los Angeles Office. Throughout Officer Hubbard's years in Central Los Angeles, he was assigned to motorcycle patrol, as a field training officer, and worked protective services details. In 1984, Officer Hubbard was voluntarily transferred to the South Sacramento Office. On April 5, 1985, Officer Hubbard was involved in a serious car accident, where he sustained major head injuries. While bravely responding to an 11-99 (officer needs help) call, Officer Hubbard failed to negotiate a curve and his CHP Mustang slid off the roadway and struck a utility pole. He was placed on life support and was cared for in his parents' home for more than ten years. Tragically, on December 8, 1995, Officer Hubbard, 43, succumbed to his injuries as a result of the collision. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 12, Resolution Chapter 73, on 7/12/2005.

The interchange of I-5 and US 50 in Sacramento County is named the "California State Engineer Memorial Interchange". It was named in tribute to past, present, and future state engineers and related professionals and in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Professional Engineers in California Government (PECG). The men and women who serve Californians as engineers and closely related professionals throughout state government are persons of skill, intelligence, and advanced training who deserve to be recognized for their dedicated service. California’s state engineers and related professionals have paid a high price in serving our state with at least 37 on-the-job deaths in their ranks over the last century. The Legislature desires to promote the safety of the state’s employees and to encourage motorists traveling in and through the state to exercise caution and care when encountering a work zone. California’s state engineers design and inspect the state’s highways and bridges, ensure that schools and hospitals are safe during earthquakes, improve air and water quality, work to reduce fossil fuel emissions, and perform countless other professional functions that create jobs and protect public safety in our state. The Professional Engineers in California Government (PECG) was organized in 1962 in the San Francisco Bay Area area to represent state engineers and address the safety concerns associated with state service, and 2012 represents the 50th anniversary of the organization. PECG represents approximately 13,000 professional engineers, architects, land surveyors, engineering geologists, and closely related professionals serving the public in state government. Nam ed by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

The interchange of Route 5 and Route 113 is named the "CHP Sergeant Gary R. Wagers Memorial Interchange" This interchange was named in memory of CHP Sergeant Gary R. Wagers, who died in a patrol vehicle collision in the line of duty while pursuing a traffic violator at high speed in the early morning hours of March 15, 2001, on Route 113 at the interchange with Route 5, in Woodland. Sergeant Wagers graduated high school in Allegan, Michigan and was a graduate of California State University, Sacramento. He joined the California Army National Guard in 1970 and retired in 1998 at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, after receiving many awards, including the Army Achievement Medal, Reserve Commendation Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, and the National Defense Medal. He graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy and was appointed as a State Traffic Officer on August 9, 1979; he was promoted to the rank of State Traffic Sergeant on March 1, 1992. He served in the West Los Angeles, Westminster, South Sacramento, Riverside, Santa Ana, and Woodland Areas as well as at CHP Headquarters and California Highway Patrol Air Operations. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 16, Resolution Chapter 70, on 07/07/2005.

The portion of Route 5, from the Sunset Hills Drive overcrossing at milepost 38.716 to the Nine Mile Hill overcrossing at milepost 36.371, in the County of Tehama, is named the "California Highway Patrol Officer Robert James Quirk Memorial Highway". It was named after California Highway Patrol Officer Robert James Quirk. Born in 1922, Officer Quirk enlisted in the United States Navy in January 1942 and completed Naval Aviator Training. He was commissioned as a Lieutenant Junior Grade and saw action on the Philippine Islands while serving as a squadron commander of B-24 bombers and flew multiple bombing raids during the battle of Kwajalein. He was recognized for his many achievements and, in 1947, and was honorably discharged from the Navy. In 1951, Officer Quirk moved to San Diego, California, and began working at Consolidated Aircraft Company. In 1954, Officer Quirk was hired by the CHP and assigned to the Compton CHP Office where he worked from 1955 until 1963, when he was transferred to the Red Bluff CHP Office where he served until his untimely death in 1971. On April 11, 1971, after being involved in a foot pursuit, during which time he singlehandedly caught three suspects, Officer Quirk suffered a fatal heart attack. Following in his father’s footsteps is his son, Sergeant Ken Quirk of the Storey County Nevada Sheriff’s Department, who demonstrates the highest standards of law enforcement while carrying his father’s handcuffs and wearing his father’s brass belt buckle. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR 3), Resolution Chapter 73, on 8/15/2013.

The portion of Route 5 between Gyle Road and Flores Avenue in Tehama County is named the "Nomlaki Highway" This segment was named in honor of the people of the Nomlaki Indian Nation, who are the original native inhabitants of Tehama County and have lived in the region since time immemorial. Historically, the Nomlaki greeted the Spanish explorers when they came into Tehama County with the Alferez Gabriel Moraga expedition in 1808. The boundaries of the Nomlaki lands changed with the arrival of the Europeans, but once extended within the Sacramento River Valley including most of present-day Tehama County. The Nomlaki had a sophisticated social, political, and religious structure and were wise stewards of the land and natural resources. The original trails through the Mendocino National Forest and connecting the valley and the mountains were cleared and used by the Nomlaki, some of which evolved into current highways in Tehama and Glenn Counties. Alas, of its original 25,000 acres, the Nomlaki tribal government now has jurisdiction over only approximately 2,300 acres of federal trust land concentrated in a reservation in Tehama County. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 15, Resolution Chapter 93, on 7/12/2007.

The portion of I-5 between County Road 25 and Route 32 in the County of Glenn is named the "CHP Officer Charles T. Smith Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Charles Taylor Smith, who was born April 9, 1928, in Denison, Texas, and had four siblings, Tom, William, Virginia, and Vickie. Officer Smith graduated from Armijo High School in Fairfield, California, and joined the United States Marine Corps shortly thereafter; and after two years in the United States Marine Corps, and after achieving the rank of officer, Charles Smith married his best friend, Juanita (Jae), on November 15, 1948, and had two wonderful children, Terry and Toni. Officer Smith graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1952, and, upon graduation, was assigned to the El Centro Area. Officer Smith was killed in the line of duty on September 9, 1956, during what appeared to be a routine traffic stop for a speeding violation. Both occupants of the vehicle were absent without leave from the United States Marine Corps and were on a crime spree. While he was frisking the driver of the vehicle, the passenger shot Officer Smith three times in the back. Despite being fatally wounded, Officer Smith returned fire and fatally shot both suspects. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 75, Resolution Chapter 113, on September 28, 2011.

The portion of Route 5 from the Bowman Road overcrossing to the northbound Main Street on ramp in the City of Cottonwood is named the "Captain Mark Ratledge Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Captain Mark Ratledge, who began serving the Cottonwood Fire Department as a volunteer in 2003, was promoted to Captain in 2008, and served the department for nine years utilizing expertise he obtained while performing the perilous duties of fire protection as a member of the Redding Fire Department and the United States Forest Service. Captain Ratledge was always willing to share his knowledge and skill as a Training Officer for the Cottonwood Fire Department. Captain Ratledge died, at 35 years of age, on February 29, 2012, after being struck by an out-of-control vehicle while he was working the scene of another accident. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Resolution Chapter 88, on August 24, 2012.

The portion of Route 5 in Siskiyou County from PM 35.7 to PM 39.5, inclusive is designated as the Shawn BakerMemorial Highway. It was named in memory of Shawn Baker, born in 1963. Mr. Baker served his country in the United States Navy for five years. In 1999, Mr. Baker and his family moved to Siskiyou County and eventually settled in Weed, California. On January 31, 2001, Mr. Baker began his career with the Department of Transportation as a permanent-intermittent equipment operator in Yreka, California, and then transferred to the Yreka special projects crew in April 2004. Mr. Baker was hired as a permanent full-time equipment operator in November 2004, then transferred to the Grass Lake maintenance crew in December 2004 and the Yreka special projects crew in April 2006. On April 24, 2013, a group of eight Caltrans District 2 employees was performing rock scaling operations to remove loose material from a rocky hillside on State Highway Route 96 near Happy Camp in Siskiyou County when a rock slide occurred, tragically killing Mr. Baker and Mr. Jones, and injuring a third employee. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 53, Resolution Chapter 4, on 2/3/2014.

The portion of Route 5 in Siskiyou County from PM 41.5 to PM 43.5, inclusive, is designated as the Robert Jones Memorial Highway. Robert Jones was born in 1973 in Yreka, California. The Department of Transportation hired Mr. Jones in November 2005 as a temporary employee for the Mount Shasta maintenance crew; Mr. Jones became a permanent-intermittent equipment operator for the Mount Shasta maintenance crew in November 2006, and then transferred to the Yreka special projects crew in December 2006. In June 2008, Mr. Jones was hired as a permanent full-time equipment operator for the Grass Lake maintenance crew, then transferred to the Yreka special projects crew in December 2010. In his spare time, Mr. Jones deeply enjoyed his time as a volunteer firefighter at the Mayten Fire Department. On April 24, 2013, a group of eight Caltrans District 2 employees was performing rock scaling operations to remove loose material from a rocky hillside on State Highway Route 96 near Happy Camp in Siskiyou County when a rock slide occurred, tragically killing Mr. Baker and Mr. Jones, and injuring a third employee. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 53, Resolution Chapter 4, on 2/3/2014.

The portion of Route 5 between the Pit River Bridge in Shasta County and the Shasta-Siskiyou County line is officially designated the "Stone Turnpike Memorial Freeway". In the decade of the Gold Rush, miners, farmers, and merchants of the Counties of Shasta and Siskiyou were unable to communicate with the outside world or bring their produce to market except over dangerous pack trails due to the rugged terrain in the Sacramento River Canyon. After other wagon road building efforts failed, Elias B. Stone and his sons secured a state franchise to build a wagon road. With brawn, black powder, mules, and oxen, the Stone family built nine bridges across the Sacramento River, 15 bridges across creeks and gulches, and a narrow road notched into the Sacramento River Canyon's walls, running 43 miles, from the Siskiyou-Shasta county line to the Stone family's ferry boat and landing on the Pit River, a few miles above that river' s junction with the Sacramento River. The Stone family completed the Stone Turnpike in the Sacramento River Canyon in 1861, but after only a few months of collecting tolls, disaster, in the form of the worst winter storm known in the area to that time, destroyed most of their work. The Stone family mortgaged all of its property and rebuilt a better toll road despite several legal entanglements. Other parties finally gained full control of the Stone family's company and the Stone Turnpike in 1868. In the 1870s, the Stone Turnpike became the major north to south stage route to Oregon; in 1887, the steel rails of the Central Pacific Railroad displaced the Stone Turnpike in some sections to complete the rail link into southern Oregon. In 1915, the dusty old stage road became Shasta County's part of the Pacific Highway, the predecessor of US 99, which is now I-5. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 94, Chapter 98, in 1994.

The portion of Route 5 from the Riverside Avenue overcrossing to the North Red Bluff overcrossing in the City of Red Bluff is named the "Officer David F. Mobilio Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer David F. Mobilio, who was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay area, and graduated from Saratoga High School in 1990. Officer Mobilio moved to the City of Chico, where he met and married Linda Dias, the true love of his life, and decided to pursue his dream of becoming a law enforcement officer. Officer Mobilio graduated from the Butte College Police Academy on November 30, 1995. On October 17, 1997, David Mobilio was hired as a Level II Reserve Police Officer for the Red Bluff Police Department and in 1998 he was promoted to a full-time, permanent police officer. After approximately two years of service as a patrol officer responding to calls ranging from vandalism, domestic violence, robbery, drug violations, and driving under the influence, Officer Mobilio was assigned as a Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) Officer for the Red Bluff Police Department, providing antidrug-use education to elementary schoolchildren. On November 19, 2002, Officer Mobilio covered the graveyard shift for another officer, and at approximately 1:30 a.m. he checked out at a gas station to fuel his patrol car. Following several minutes without communication from Officer Mobilio, thedispatcher attempted to make radio contact with him. Following several more minutes of no response, a sergeant was dispatched to the location and found Officer Mobilio shot to death near his patrol car. Officer Mobilio had been ambushed while fueling his patrol car by an unknown suspect who was later apprehended with the assistance of many allied law enforcement agencies and who was subsequently convicted of murdering Officer Mobilio. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Resolution Chapter 88, on August 24, 2012.

Historically, the portion of this route from Red Bluff to the Oregon state line was called the "Cascade Wonderland Highway".

 

Named Structures

Bridge 57-487, at Del Mar Heights Road in Del Mar in San Diego county, is named the "David A. Hoffman Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1964, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 60, Chapter 69, in 1988. David Hoffman, a 30 year old Caltrans engineer, was killed by an errant motorist as he supervised a construction project on I-5 near Oceanside on March 16, 1987.

Bridges 57-845, 57-844, the Route 54/Route 5 interchange, is named the "George R. Volland Memorial Bridge". George R. Volland, United State Navy veteran of three wars, died of a heart attack brought on by the effort he exerted to assist the children who were injured in a tragic bus accident in Martinez on June 23, 1976. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 60, Chapter 30 in 1998.

The Mission Avenue bridge over I-5 in the City of Oceanside is named the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Bridge to honor the life and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American clergyman, doctor of theology, activist, and leader in the African American Civil Rights Movement, who is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience. Dr. King, who has become a national icon, became a Baptist minister and a civil rights activist early in his career. Dr. King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, Dr. King led an unsuccessful struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia in 1962, and organized nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama that attracted national attention following television news coverage of the brutal police response. Dr. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, D.C., where he delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history and said to the crowd: “With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood”. On October 14, 1964, Dr. King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In 1965, he and the SCLC helped to organize the Selma to Montgomery marches, and the following year, he took the movement north to Chicago. In the final years of his life, Dr. King expanded his focus to include poverty and the Vietnam War. Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee and was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a United States federal holiday in 1986 and a memorial statue on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. was opened to the public in 2011. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 41, Resolution Chapter 64, on August 5, 2013.

In downtown Los Angeles there are signed directing motorists to "The Wall Las Memorias Project AIDS monument". This designation relates to the The Wall Las Memorias Project, which was founded in 1993 with the mission of educating the Latino community about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and building an eternal monument to honor loved ones who have died from that disease. It was envisioned by local community activist, Richard Zaldivar, who believed that a public symbol would create a focal point for discussion and healing among those impacted by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Over the past decade, The Wall Las Memorias Project has built support for the AIDS monument through innovative prevention programs, leadership training, and grassroots community organizing, which have led to a coalition of elected officials, community-based organizations, churches, schools, entertainers, union leaders, and community members. It was designed by architect David Angelo and public artist Robin Brailsford, and is located at Lincoln Park in the historic community of Lincoln Heights, northeast of downtown Los Angeles. It is designed as a Quetzalcoatl serpent, an Aztec symbol for rebirth, and it consists of eight wall panels, six murals depicting life with AIDS in the Latino community and two granite panels containing the names of individuals who have died from AIDS, and includes a serene park setting for personal meditation. The sign is located on SB I-5 between exit 135 and 136, and on NB I-5 between Plaza de la Raza and the Main Street sign. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 3, Resolution Chapter 102, on 7/16/2007.

At the junction of Route 5 with Route 126, there will be a "1915 Ridge Route Highway Historical Monument". Begun in 1914 and completed in late 1915, the Ridge Route Highway, officially named the "Castaic-Tejon Route," connected Castaic Junction in Los Angeles County to Bakersfield. It was one of the first products of the newly formed State Bureau of Highways, paid for through the passage of a 1910 bond act. It was considered an engineering marvel of its day and was the first mountain highway built in California. Many credit the 1915 Ridge Route Highway, which opened up travel and commerce between the Los Angeles basin and the San Joaquin Valley, with having prevented California from separating into two separate states. Workers carved out the original 20-foot wide roadway by using horse and mule drawn scrapers and graders, going from ridge top to ridge top across the western San Gabriel mountains. Originally completed as an oiled, graded gravel road, the 1915 Ridge Route Highway was paved in 1919; and was well known for its 697 curves, the most notorious of which was Deadman's Curve near Tejon, that if added together, would make 110 complete circles. The 1915 Ridge Route Highway was replaced in 1933, by a straighter, three-lane highway, which was later widened and became Route 99. On September 25, 1997, 17.6 miles of the 1915 Ridge Route Highway south of Gorman, was accepted into the National Registry of Historic Places. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 98, Chapter 150, October 2, 2001. Note: The Ridge Route Preservation Organziation (RRPO) worked with Assemblyman Runner (author of ACR 98) for the purpose of getting permission to place a historical marker at Castaic Junction, the official beginning of the route on the southern end. ACR 98 directs Caltrans to issue RRPO a permit to construct the monument. Unfortunately, after the passage of ACR 98, they ran into a road block with the permit. They are currently working to resolve the issue.

Bridge 22-025, over the Sacramento River between Sacramento and Yolo counties, was named the "Elkhorn Bridge" or "Elkhorn Causeway" through historical and long usage. The name relates to the location, which is near where the Elkhorn Ferry used to run. The ferry may have run as late as 1971.

In 1969, the Elkhorn Bridge was renamed the "Vietnam Servicemen Memorial Bridge" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 145, Chapter 357. The Vietnam Servicemen Memorial Bridge is dedicated to the memory of over 600 men from Sacramento, Placer, Yolo, Yuba and El Dorado County who were killed in action in South Vietnam.

Bridge 06-021, the Pit River Arm Bridge at Shasta Lake in Shasta county, is named the "Veterans of Foreign Wars Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1941, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 59, Chapter 150, in 1994. The Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States traces its roots back to 1899 when veterans of the Spanish-American War (1898) and the Philippine Insurrection (1899-1902) founded local organizations to secure rights and benefits for their service. After chapters were formed in Ohio, Colorado and Pennsylvania, the movement quickly gained momentum. By 1915, membership grew to 5,000; by 1936, membership was almost 200,000. The VFW planned the establishment of the Veterans Administration, and has been a tireless promoter for veteran's rights. More information on the organization can be found at http://www.vfw.org/.

According to the Caltrans publication "Named Freeways, Highways, Structures and Other Appurtenances in California, 1996", Bridge 06-027, at Dog Creek in Shasta county, is named the "Harlan D. Miller Bridge". Harlan D. Miller, Chief of the California Highway Commission Bridge Department from 1924 to 1926, advocated aesthetically pleasing as well as physically substantial bridges. It was built in 1956, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 140 in 1974. This was a replacement for the old concrete arch bridge, built on the Pacific Highway in 1927 and now decommissioned. According to California Highways and Public Works, Jan 28, that bridge was was also named after Harlan D. Miller, who was the chief bridge engineer for the California Highway Commission. Mr. Miller died on October 19, 1926. A few days before his death, the CHC designated he structure as the Harlan D. Miller bridge in recognition of his service to the state. You can still see the old bridge from I-5 if you know where to look, and that the Caltrans Library has a lovely photo showing both the new bridge and the old bridge.

Bridge 06-192L, the Sacramento River Bridge O.H., is officially named the "Earl Sholes Memorial Bridge", and the highway bridge 06-193L, is officially named the "Dan Heryford Memorial Bridge". On May 25, 1950, in the vicinity of the twin bridges, Shasta County Undersheriff Earl Sholes and Shasta County Deputy Sheriff Dan Heryford were killed by two prisoners that the officers were transporting to Redding on charges that the prisoners had stolen a motor vehicle. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 2, Chapter 61, in 1997.

This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

  • Aliso Creek, in San Diego County, 5.8 mi N of Oceanside.

  • Tejon Pass, in Kern County 3.5 mi N of Gorman.

  • Buttonwillow, in Kern County, 2 mi N of the Route 5/Route 58 interchange.

  • Coalinga-Avenal, in Fresno County, 1.2 mi N of Lassen Avenue.

  • John "Chuck" Erreca (Panoche), in Merced County, 0.7 mi N of the Fresno County Line. John Erreca was a former member of the California Highway Commission and a former director of the Department of Public Works.

  • Larry Combs Memorial Rest Stop (Westly), in Stanislaus County, 0.9 mi S of the San Joaquin County Line. Named in memory of Larry Combs, a leadworker for the Department of Transportation assigned to the operation and service of all roadside rest stops for District 10 of the Department of Transportation, which included the Westly rest stop off I-5 in the County of Stanislaus. Larry Combs was well recognized as an outstanding employee of the Department of Transportation who gave the people of California selfless, dedicated service that resulted in improved and superior maintenance of roadside rest stops. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 84, Chapter 166, August 30, 2004.

  • Elkhorn, in Sacramento County at the Sacramento Metro Airport. This rest area is signed "Vietnam Veterans Memorial".

  • Dunnigan, in Yolo County, 0.5 mi N of Dunnigan. This rest area is named the Deputy Tony Diaz, Yolo County Sheriff’s Office, Memorial Rest Area. It was named after Jose Antonio “Tony” Diaz, who was born in Jacona, Mexico, in 1970. During the summers of 1986 to 1989, he worked tirelessly in the fields of farmers in Solano County. After completing high school, Tony assisted farmworkers as Assistant Program Services Manager with the Human Development Corporation, and after transferring to the corporate office, he developed a passion for computer technology. In 1999, the Yolo County Information Technology (IT) Department hired Tony and assigned him to the Yolo County Sheriff’s Office. While assigned to IT he became interested in law enforcement and attended the Yuba College Police Academy in 2004. The Yolo County Sheriff’s Office hired Tony on August 22, 2004, and his peers described him as a gentle, hardworking man who was proud of his family and community. On June 15, 2008, Deputy Diaz attempted to stop a known parolee suspected of driving under the influence with a child in the vehicle. After he failed to yield, Deputy Diaz pursued the driver into the town of Dunnigan, where he stopped on County Road 5 near County Road 99W. The suspect fled on foot. While Deputy Diaz checked on the child in the vehicle, he was shot from behind; he succumbed to his injuries a few hours later at Woodland Memorial Hospital. Deputy Diaz’ name was engraved into the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C., and the California Peace Officers Memorial at the State Capitol. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 15, August 5, 2013, Resolution Chapter 63.

  • Maxwell, in Colusa County at Maxwell.

  • Willows, in Glenn County, 2 mi S of Artois.

  • Lieutenant John C. Helmick Memorial Rest Area (Corning), in Tehama County, 1.3 mi N of Corning. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 123, Chapter 65, in 1990. Lt. John Helmick was a CHP officer who died in the line of duty on February 27, 1989 in an auto accident in Chico. He was the highest-ranking CHP officer and first area commander to die in the line of duty in CHP history. Helmick, who died at the age of 42, had served as the Red Bluff area commander since June 1988. During his tenure, he provided sound leadership and guidance, and unconditional friendship.

  • Herbert S. Miles (Red Bluff), in Tehama County, 5.7 mi N of Red Bluff. Herbert S. Miles was district highway engineer for State Highway District 2 from 1956 to 1974, during which time he developed 20 safety roadside rests in the district for the safety and comfort of the traveling public. This was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 47, Chapter 91, in 1984.

  • O'Brien (Pit River), in Shasta County, 9 mi N of Project City. It was named after a man named Con O’Brien. He also had a post office, railroad flag station, a mountain, a road, and a hotel named after him. He lived 2½ miles north of the McCloud River.
    [Information from the Shasta Wonderland Society. For more information, contact The Shasta Historical Society at 530-243-3720]

  • Lakehead, in Shasta County, 0.9 mi N of the Lakehead Overcrossing.

  • Weed Airport, in Siskiyou County, 6 mi N of Weed.

  • Randolph E. Collier (Klamath), in Siskiyou County, 2.5 mi N of Route 96. Senator Randolph Collier was elected to the State Legislature from 1938-1976 to represent Humboldt, Mendocino, Sonoma, Lake, Trinity, Del Norte and Siskiyou counties. Although he was recognized as a leader in many fields of legislation, Collier gained statewide and national fame in the planning and financing of highways. He was the principal author of the Collier-Burns Act of 1947 which brought about the California Highway Plan. The state's highway system served as a model throughout the nation in that the state assumed responsibility for state highways in cities. Other improvements came with the Highway Act of 1953 which stepped up the California freeway program and the adoption of the California Freeway and Expressway System in 1959. His interest in ecological preservation introduced legislation to provide proper regulation of California's timberlands and protection for wild rivers. He worked with local authorities in providing parks and recreational facilities for the public. Senate committees on which Collier had served include Governmental Efficiency, Finance, Revenue and Taxation, Insurance and Finance Institutions, and Transportation.
    [Biographical information excerpted from the California State Archives]

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

Midland Trail Sign The portion of this route that was part of US 6 (i.e., from Route 110 to Route 14) was part of the "Midland Trail.

National Park to Park Highway Sign The portion of this route N of Los Angeles that was originally part of US 99 (i.e., from Route 10 to Route 99) was part of the "National Parks to Park Highway".

Pacific Highway Sign The portion of I-5 N of Sacramento was part of the "Pacific Highway".

Lincoln Highway Sign Victory Highway Sign The portion of this route from I-205 to Route 120 (former US 50) was part of the coast-to-coast "Lincoln Highway" and the "Victory Highway". A good page with the history of the Lincoln Highway can be found here. It notes that a 1924 guide book noted that Elk Grove had a population of 500, an express company, telegraph, and no tourist accommodations, while Arno was listed with a population of 100, with meals, a garage, and gas available, one express company, one telegraph company, telephone, one general business place, and one public school. The same Guide lists Galt with a population of 985 with three hotels, two garages, large fruit orchards, and 'The longest iron bridge in California, one mile south of Galt. It also notes that trucks from the Calaveras Cement Company brought cement to pour on the road bed that was given free of charge by many cement companies along the way. In the early 1930's the federal government and the state funds created another state-wide route called Route 99. The new highway skirted the town of Galt east of the Lincoln Highway. The old Lincoln Highway south of Dry Creek Bridge became known as "Lower Sacramento Road", and that portion of the Lincoln Highway that ran through Galt was named "Lincoln Way" to remind the citizens of the community that Galt had played a significant role in the history of transcontinental transportation.

[Volcanic Byways]This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road, between Route 44 and US 97.

 

Business Routes

The following are Route 5 Business Loops or surface street former routings:

  • San Diego: Harbor Drive and Pacific Highway (1960s BR)
  • San Diego: Mission Bay Drive.
  • San Diego: County Route S21: Torrey Pines Road, Camino del Mar, Coast Highway 101, Carlsbad Blvd, Coast Highway (signed as BR in 1960s only)
  • Solana Beach: Via de la Valle (County Route S6), Old Coast Highway (County Route S21), Lomas Santa Fe Drive (County Route S8).
  • San Clemente: El Camino Real.
  • Los Angeles: San Fernando Road (BR in early 1970s).
  • Woodland: Main Street, Route 16.
  • Arbuckle: Fifth Street
  • Williams: Husted Road, Old Highway 99W, Seventh Street
  • Willows, Orland, Corning: Road 99W
  • Red Bluff: Main Street
  • Redding: Route 273.
  • Mount Shasta: Old Stage Road.
  • Dunsmuir: Dunsmuir Avenue.
  • Weed: Route 263.
  • Gazelle: "Old 99" Highway.
  • Yreka: South Main and North Main. Route now signed as Route 3.

 

Commuter Lanes

In Sacramento County, HOV lanes are planned between the I-5/I-80 interchange and Pocket Road (STIP Project #1, June 2002 CTC Agenda Item 2.5b(1))

In Los Angeles County, HOV lanes are proposed between Route 14 and I-10 (with proposals, planning, and eventual construction in various phases), and between the Orange County Line and I-710 (again, in various phases, TCRP Project #42). The "Ultimate HOV Project" (District 7 TCRP Project #42) plans to add HOV lanes between Route 91 and Route 710. The programmed cost is $1.25 billion, and the estimated construction completion date is January 2013, with lanes being opened in five phases, possibly as early as July 2008. The project would add one general purpose lane between Route 91 and I-605, and one HOV lane between Route 91 and I-710. Construction should start in 4Q2004.

[TCRP 41.1, 41.2]There is also a plan to add HOV lanes from Route 170 to Route 118, and from Route 118 to Route 14 (TCRP Project #41). There are various alternatives, owing to the nature of the I-5/Route 170 interchange, but the basic plan is to add one HOV lane in each direction, with truck lanes in the section near Route 14. The overall project involves the construction of one High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction in the median on Route 5, from Route 170 to Route 14. The project also involves constructing new soundwalls on each side of freeway, widening several under-crossings, ramp improvements, and reconstructing Route 5/170 Interchange to provide direct HOV connectors between Route 5 and Route 170. The overall project has been segmented into two subprojects for implementation: #41.1 (Segment 1): Route 118 to Route 14 ’150; HOV lanes with mitigating soundwalls; #41.2 (Segment 2): Route 170 to Route 118 ’150; HOV lanes. Bids for the HOV lane project were $15,790,000 over the engineer’s estimate, likely due to industry wide material shortage of concrete and reinforcing steel and by increases in oil prices resulting in higher costs for asphalt concrete and fuel. Instead of descoping the project, Caltrans utilized $7,000,000 in TCRP funds from Project #50 (Route 71 Freeway) and an additional $8,790,000 provided by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA) to allow the project proceed according to the revised schedule. This was originally scheduled for completion in October 2009. In June 2006, the CTC agenda noted that the HOV lanes for the #41.1 portion, Route 118 to Route 14, are currently under construction, and that construction of the soundwalls will commence upon the completion of the HOV lanes. However, completion of the HOV lanes was extended to Fiscal Year 2011 due to delays in awarding the project and for additional working days for the construction contract. As for the #41.2 portion, Route 170 to Route 118, the June 2006 CTC agenda noted that the project’s cost has increased due to a revised noise report requiring additional soundwalls, additional widening to meet FHWA requirements, and the escalation in cost of construction materials, such as steel and concrete, and right-of-way. The schedule was updated to allow adequate time to complete design and right-of-way acquisition and begin construction in the FY 2007-08; completion (as of June 2006) was scheduled for Fiscal Year 2009. Construction actually started in October 2010.

In May 2001, the CTC also considered approval for consideration for funding a project for HOV lanes from Route 134 to Route 118.

An EIR has been prepared for either an HOV or a general purpose lane on I-5 between Route 91 and I-605 (January 2002 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.2a). See the main status section for more details on this project.

In Orange County, HOV lanes have been constructed on I-5 between the Route 91 and the Pacific Coast Highway (Route 1). The first segment to open was between Route 405 and Tustin Ranch Road; this opened in October 1992. In November 1995, the segment between Tustin Ranch Road and .2 mi S of 4th Street in Tustin opened. In May 1996, the following segments opened: (1) .1 mi S of Avery Parkway to I-405; (2) .2 mi S of 4th Street to the Santa Ana River, and (3) Route 1 to Ortega Highway. In June 1996, the segment between Ortega Highway and Avery Parkway, opened. HOV lanes between Route 22 and Route 91 opened in 2001. All lanes require two or more occupants, and are always in operation.

In San Diego County, HOV lanes exist between the Mexico and US ports of entry. These require four or more passengers, and operate 24 hours a day on weekdays.

HOV lanes are also planned for I-5 in San Diego as follows: (1) from I-8 to I-805; (2) from I-805 to 0.3 mi N of Del Mar Heights Road overcrossing (construction starts January 1998); (3) from 0.3 mi N of Del Mar Heights Road to 0.1 mi N of Manchester Road (construction starts January 1999); (4) from 0.1 mi N of Manchester Avene to Pointsettia Lane; (5) from Pointsettia Lane to Route 76; from Route 76 to the Orange County line from the I-5/I-805 junction to Del Mar Heights Road.

 

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Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947; the original routing was along Route 99, this was later changed to the westerly realignment. This route was originally approved as I-5 (with the route splitting near Tracy into I-5W (current I-580 and I-505) and I-5E). In November 1957, the California Department of Highways suggested using I-11 for this route (to permit use of I-3 [I-280] and I-5 [I-680] in the San Francisco Bay Area, and I-7 [I-405] and I-9 [I-605] in the Los Angeles area), but this was rejected.

As noted above, the designation I-5 was proposed in November 1957 for what is now I-680.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959 by Chapter 1062.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.3] From the international boundary near Tijuana to Route 75 near the south end of San Diego Bay; and from San Diego opposite Coronado to Route 74 near San Juan Capistrano; and from Route 210 near Tunnel Station to Route 126 near Castaic; and from Route 152 west of Los Banos to Route 580 near Vernalis; and from Route 44 near Redding to the Shasta Reservoir; and from Route 89 near Mt. Shasta to Route 97 near Weed; and from Route 3 near Yreka to the Oregon state line near Hilts.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 5 R0.14 3.54
San Diego 5 3.70 4.89
San Diego 5 5.15 9.66
San Diego 5 9.78 R19.49
San Diego 5 R19.73 R20.10
San Diego 5 R20.28 R32.69
San Diego 5 R32.78 R34.76
San Diego 5 R36.08 R36.52
San Diego 5 R37.20 R37.55
San Diego 5 R39.26 R41.98
San Diego 5 R42.56 R42.84
San Diego 5 R46.52 R46.73
San Diego 5 R47.25 R48.72
San Diego 5 R48.89 R50.94
San Diego 5 R51.01 R54.05
San Diego 5 R54.17 R54.86
San Diego 5 R72.03 R72.37
Orange 5 0.00 7.11
Orange 5 8.29 8.68
Orange 5 8.68 8.78
Orange 5 8.92 12.66
Orange 5 12.72 14.79
Orange 5 14.84 19.46
Orange 5 19.64 20.17
Orange 5 20.50 21.51
Orange 5 21.56 21.80
Orange 5 22.04 23.92
Orange 5 24.84 25.19
Orange 5 25.98 26.71
Orange 5 26.71 26.89
Orange 5 26.89 33.28
Orange 5 33.52 34.48
Orange 5 34.59 36.81
Orange 5 36.93 44.40
Los Angeles 5 1.51 1.69
Los Angeles 5 2.25 2.66
Los Angeles 5 2.73 3.00
Los Angeles 5 3.32 7.06
Los Angeles 5 7.17 8.39
Los Angeles 5 8.53 9.43
Los Angeles 5 10.88 11.69
Los Angeles 5 12.63 13.06
Los Angeles 5 13.57 14.25
Los Angeles 5 14.38 18.53
Los Angeles 5 18.56 18.99
Los Angeles 5 19.04 20.05
Los Angeles 5 20.25 20.45
Los Angeles 5 20.73 25.94
Los Angeles 5 26.30 27.09
Los Angeles 5 27.19 28.73
Los Angeles 5 28.80 34.45
Los Angeles 5 34.49 41.01
Los Angeles 5 R51.24 R51.63
San Joaquin 5 23.95 26.52
San Joaquin 5 26.96 29.56
San Joaquin 5 29.65 34.26
Sacramento 5 10.66 11.05
Sacramento 5 11.90 12.33
Sacramento 5 16.00 16.52
Sacramento 5 16.62 17.79
Sacramento 5 17.84 23.78
Sacramento 5 24.18 24.82
Sacramento 5 25.32 26.69
Sacramento 5 29.71 30.13
Sacramento 5 30.18 30.44
Sacramento 5 32.54 32.94
Sacramento 5 33.72 33.98
Yolo 5 R7.02 R7.74
Yolo 5 R7.83 R9.01
Colusa 5 R6.39 R7.36
Colusa 5 R17.82 R18.0
Colusa 5 R18.57 R18.86
Glenn 5 R8.86 R9.08
Glenn 5 R9.55 R9.96
Glenn 5 R25.41 R25.70
Tehama 5 R8.85 R9.19
Tehama 5 R24.46 R25.42
Tehama 5 R25.73 R26.81
Tehama 5 R27.29 R27.46
Tehama 5 R27.46 R27.78
Tehama 5 R28.30 R30.17
Shasta 5 R0.44 R0.69
Shasta 5 R5.08 R5.82
Shasta 5 R11.94 R15.73
Shasta 5 R19.12 R21.40
Shasta 5 R21.71 R22.47
Siskiyou 5 R47.15 R47.73

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947. This route (I-5) was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 61, Ch. 116 in 1971.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 5:

  • Total Length (1995): 796 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 11,600 to 299,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 560; Sm. Urban 26; Urbanized: 210.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 796 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 796 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Tejon Pass (4183 ft) in Los Angeles County; Black Butte Summit (3899 ft) in Siskiyou County.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, Kern, Kings, Fresno, Merced, Sanislaus, San Joaquin, Sacramento, Yolo, Colusa, Glenn, Tehama, Shasta, and Siskiyou.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that was to become LRN 5 was first defined in 1909. In appears that in 1925, the segment from Point San Quentin to San Rafael was added.

The route was again extended in 1933 with a segment from Stockton to Mokelumne Hill. By 1935, it was codified into law as follows:

  1. Stockton to Santa Cruz via Hayward, together with a connection from Hayward to Oakland, and including that San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge approach, described in Section 1 of Chapter 9, Statues of 1993, which starts from the westerly side of Market Street in Oakland at a point between Thirty-Seventh and Fourtieth Streets.
  2. [LRN 4] near Stockton to [LRN 65] near Mokulumne Hill.

It was not a primary highway. In 1961, Chapter 1146 rerouted the highway in San Jose, changing the definition to:

  1. [LRN 56] to [LRN 68] near Story Road
  2. [LRN 68] near San Jose to [LRN 4] near Stockton via Hayward
  3. [LRN 68] near Oakland to the route described in subdivision [2] of this section near Hayward
  4. [LRN 4] near Stockton to [LRN 65] near Mokulumne Hill.

Chapter 2155 in 1963 extended the route to West Point.

The signage of this route was as follows:

  1. From LRN 56 (signed as Route 1) near Santa Cruz to LRN 68 (signed as Bypass US 101, and what is now US 101) near Story Road. This segment was originally signed as Route 17, and now is both Route 17 and I-880.

  2. From LRN 68 (signed as Bypass US 101, now US 101) near San Jose to LRN 4 (signed as US 50, now roughly I-5) near Stockton (originally near French Camp) via Hayward. This segment appears to have been signed as Route 21 between US 101 and Warm Springs; it is present-day I-680. It appears there were plans for this to be Route 17; see Route 680 for details.

    Near Warm Springs, this segment also includes a short spur from LRN 69 (present-day I-880) to LRN 5 (I-680); this is present-day Route 262.

    LRN 5 was signed as Route 9/Route 21 between Warm Springs and Irvington, near Mission San Jose. This is part of present-day I-680.

    LRN 5 then ran between the present-day Route 238/I-680 junction near Irvington to the (signed) Route 9/US 50 junction near Hayward. This is present-day Route 238.

    LRN 5 was then signed as US 50 (present-day I-580) to Stockton.

    In Stockton, LRN 5 (US 50) ran cosigned with Route 4 from Center St/El Dorado St. to Mariposa Road, where Route 4 split off as LRN 75. Portions of this are present-day I-5. LRN 5 (US 50) continued along Main St to LRN 4 (US 99), where it had a discontinuity (see part 3)

  3. LRN 68 near Oakland to the route described in (2) of this LRN's definition near Hayward. This segment was signed as US 50 between Oakland and Hayward. Parts of this are present-day I-580.

  4. LRN 4 near Stockton to LRN 65 near Mokelumne Hill. This was signed as (pre-1964) Route 8, and is current Route 26. The portion between Mokelumme Hill and West Point was added in 1963, and is more properly a modification to (post-1964) Route 26.


US Highway Shield

US Highway 6



Routing

From Route 395 near Bishop to the Nevada state line near Montgomery Pass.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

The definition of Route 6 is unchanged from the 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield US Highway Shield Before US 6 was truncated to end in Bishop, it consisted of the following segments:

  • US 6 may have began at Pacific Coast Highway in Long Beach at the traffic circle; there are some abiguities as to whether this was at Long Beach Bl, Atlantic Bl, or Lakewood Bl. The one thing that is clear is it was at the junction with Route 91, which was (pre-1963) Route 18. It ran W, cosigned with US 101A, until reaching Figueroa (and after the freeway was constructed, Route 11, now I-110). This segment was part of the 1919 definition of LRN 60.
  • US 6 then ran N along Route 11, cosigned as Route 11/US 6, to US 101/US 66. It continued NNE along Route 11 (Figueroa or present-day Route 110), cosigned as US 6/US 66, to the US 99 freeway. This segment was part of the 1933 defintion of LRN 165.
  • US 6 continued NNW along US 99, cosigned as US 6/US 99, to Colorado Blvd (LRN 4). This segment was part of the 1933 definition of LRN 161.
  • Before the freeway was constructed, this segment ran NNW along San Fernando Road. That routing was part of LRN 4, which was added to the state highway system in 1909.
  • From Colorado St, US 6 continued NNW cosigned as US 6/US 99 along LRN 4. to San Fernando Road. This was also part of the 1909 definition of LRN 4.
  • From San Fernando Road (later the freeway), it went to Soledad Canyon Road and then to Sierra Highway. Once it left US 99, US 6 was signed solely as US 6, and was LRN 23. Later, a cutoff was constructed between Soledad Canyon Road and San Fernando Road. From Sierra Hwy (present-day Route 14) it ran northerly to US 395. It was signed as US 6 until the junction with US 395. This segment of LRN 23 was added to the state highway system in 1911.
  • US 6 then continued cosigned as US 395/US 6 (still LRN 23) until Bishop. This segment of LRN 23 was defined in 1909.
  • US 6 continued from Bishop to the Nevada State Line. This segment was LRN 76, and was added to the state highway system in 1931 (Chapter 82). See LRN 76 for this history of this segment.

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, State Signed Route 6 was defined to run from Santa Monica to Jct. Route 39 near Fullerton. This routing was similar to that of what was later Route 26 (also LRN 173), so it is likely that once US 6 was established, Route 6 was renumbered as Route 26, and then 1934 Route 26 was dropped from the state highway system. This routing was along Pico Blvd E from signed Route 3 (Lincoln) [later signed US 101A (LRN 60), now Route 1], N on Robertson to Olympic, E on Olympic to Crenshaw, N on Crenshaw, E on 10th Street and 9th Street, then E on Mines Ave near Huntington Park, then SE along Anaheim-Telegraph Road to Santa Fe Springs, then SE along Los Nietos Road, S on Valley View, SE on La Mirada Road to Route 39. This routing appears to have disappeared by 1939 and for much of it, there is not a parallel legislative route.

Pre-1964 State Shield Prior to the definition and signage of US 6, the portion of the route from Bishop to the California-Nevada state line was signed as part of state signed Route 168. This was an eastern extension of Route 168 from its present-day terminus in Bishop.

 

Naming

In 1937, it was proposed that US 6, from Provincetown MA to Los Angeles CA be designed the Grand Army of the Republic Highway. In 1943, the California Department of Transportation adopted the name Grand Army of the Republic Highway for US 6. According to CalTrans in March 1994, the Grand Army route is now US 6, then US 395 to Route 14, Route 14 to I-5, I-5 to I-110, and then south to San Pedro. A monument marking the western terminus of the Grand Army Highway may be found on the wall on the S side of Ocean Avenue, in front of the Terrace Theatre. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943.

One map from 1938 shows US 6 as being named the "Roosevelt" Highway.

 

Historical Route

ACR 26 requested the Department of Transportation, upon application by an interested local agency or private entity, to identify any section of former U.S. Highway Route 6 that is still a publicly maintained highway and that is of interest to the applicant, and to designate that section as Historic U.S. Highway Route 6. Chaptered July 3, 2007. Resolution Chapter 67.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. Note that although the route is legislatively designated as freeway, it is not constructed to freeway standards (i.e., there are grade crossings).

 


Overall statistics for Route 6:

  • Total Length (1995): 41 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 800 to 3,100
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 41.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 41 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 41 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Inyo and Mono.

 

National Trails

Midland Trail Sign National Park to Park Highway Sign The portions of this route corresponding to present day Route 14 were part of the Midland Trail. The portions of this route cosigned with US 99 were part of the National Parks to Parks Highway.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Entire route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that would become LRN 6 was defined in the 1909 First Highway Bonds, running from Sacramento to Woodland Junction. It was extended in 1933 to run from [LRN 8] near Napa to Winters via Wooden Valley and Berryessa Valley. By 1935, the routing had been codified as being:

  1. Sacramento to Woodland Junction
  2. [LRN 8] near Napa to Winters via Wooden Valley and Berryessa Valley.

Only the first segment was considered a primary route.

In 1939, Chapter 473 changed the reference to "Woodland Junction" to [LRN 7]. In 1957, Chapter 36 filled the gap between the two segments, changing the second segment to read "[LRN 8] near Napa to [LRN 90] near Winters". In 1959, Chapter 1062 added the north bypass of Napa, changing the second segment again to “[LRN 49] near Napa to [LRN 7] near Davis”.

Signage on the route was as follows:

  1. From LRN 7 to Sacramento.

    This segment was signed as US 99W/US 40, and had a routing that approximates the current I-80. Starting at 15th and N St. in Sacramento, it ran out of the city on N Street. It continued W until reaching the US 40/Alt. US 40 junction (approximately the present-day I-80/Route 113 junction) SW of Davis. This 15 mi segment was defined in 1909. The portion between present-day Route 160 and I-80 is signed as Business Route 80, and is real Route 50. Part of this is Route 275.

    According to a CTC vacation resolution in January 2005, Capitol Mall (formerly LRN 6, which was signposted as US 40) was the principal route for traffic traveling between Sacramento and San Francisco resulting in high volumes of inter-regional and local traffic using the same corridor. Upon completion of the freeway system in Sacramento, inter-regional traffic on Capitol Mall was almost completely eliminated.

  2. From LRN 49 near Napa to LRN 7 near Davis.

    This segment was signed as Route 128 (and is still signed that way) from present-day I-505 W of Davis to the junction with pre-1964 Route 37 (present-day Route 121). This segment was added in 1933.

    LRN 6 was extended on paper between Route 505 and Route 113 in 1959.

    LRN 6 continued S signed as Route 37 (present-day Route 121) to Napa, until it reached the junction with LRN 49 (the present Route 12/Route 29/Route 121 junction). This portion was also defined in 1933.


State Shield

State Route 7



Routing

From the northerly boundary of the Federal Port of Entry near Calexico to Route 8 near El Centro.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 7 was defined as "from Route 11 [Present-Day Route 110] in San Pedro to Route 210 in Pasadena via Long Beach and including a bridge, with at least four lanes, from San Pedro at or near Boschke Slough to Terminal Island."

In 1965 the southern end was truncated by Chapter 1372, transferring the San Pedro portion and bridge to Route 47. This left the route definition as "from Route 1 to Route 210 in Pasadena."

In 1982, Chapter 914 extended the definition to include that portion of the freeway between Route 1 and the northern end of Harbor Scenic Drive, that portion of Harbor Scenic Drive to Ocean Boulevard, that portion of Ocean Boulevard west of its intersection with Harbor Scenic Drive to its junction with Seaside Boulevard, and that portion of Seaside Boulevard from the junction with Ocean Boulevard to Route 47. It was noted that this extension didn't become operative unless the commission approves a financial plan.

In 1984, this route was transferred to Route 710 as it was approved as non-chargable interstate.

Note that the pre-1963 Route 7 had been signed as Route 15 [LRN 167], but in 1964 the Route 15 designation was reassigned to I-15.

State Shield In 1990, the current incarnation of Route 7 was defined as "from a new International Border crossing near Calexico to Route 8 near El Centro." (Chapter 1187)

In 1994, the definition was changed to "from the northerly boundary of the Federal Port of Entry near Calexico to Route 8 near El Centro." (Chapter 1220)

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 7 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) at Torrance to the California-Nevada state line north of Coleville, via Mojave, and from the Nevada-California State Line near Reno Jct. to the California-Oregon State Line at New Pine Creek via Alturas. Starting in 1935, the portion of this route N of former state signed Route 95 at the Inyo-Kern County Line was renumbered as US 395. In that routing, it began at the Oregon border, and consisted of the following segments:

  • From the Oregon border to Johnstonville (Route 36 junction). This segment was LRN 73, and was added to the state highway system in 1931. This was later signed as US 395.

  • From Johnstonville (present-day Route 36 junction) S to the Nevada Border. This was part of LRN 29, as was the original portion of LRN 29 defined in 1919. This was later signed as US 395.

  • From the Nevada border near Topaz Lake to the junction with signed Route 89 (LRN 23). This was LRN 95, and was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933; it was later signed as US 395.

  • From Route 89 to the vicinity of Inyokern. This was part of LRN 23, and was defined as part of the state highway system in 1909. It was later signed as US 395.

  • From Inyokern down what was Sierra Highway (and is now approximately Route 14) through Mojave, Rosamond, Palmdale, and Lancaster, then down Soledad Canyon Road to San Fernando Road. This was originally signed as Route 7 until it was resigned/cosigned with US 6, and was part of the 1911 LRN 23 extension.

  • At San Fernando Road to Foothill Blvd. This was part of LRN 4, and was cosigned as US 6/US 99/Route 7. At San Fernando Road, Route 7 diverged from US 6 (which continued cosigned with US 99).

  • Sepuleveda at WashingtonFrom San Fernando to Westchester, near the present-day Los Angeles International Airport. This segment orignally proceeded down Maclay and Brand in San Fernando to Sepulveda Blvd. By the mid-1950s, it was running on Sepulveda Blvd directly from the southern terminus of the "Golden State Freeway" from approximately San Fernando Blvd (although the map I have doesn't show Route 7 running N of San Fernando, so it is possible the routing had been truncated by then). Route 7 then continued S along Sepulveda to Pico (in the San Fernando Valley, Sepulveda Blvd was at one time Saugus Avenue), where it jogged W to Sawtelle, and then S to Washington (where it was under construction between Washington and Centinela). At one time, however, it actually continued along Sepulveda.

    Route 7 at US <a href=101 -- Image posted by San Fernando Valley Relics on Facebook" src="images/405-007.jpg" style="float: right" width="371" align="right" hspace="10" vspace="10" height="249">As the San Diego Freeway was constructed, it ran along the San Diego Freeway. This was signed as Route 7 until the I-405 signage took over; it was the original segment of LRN 158 added in 1933. Sepulveda Blvd was named for the Sepulveda family of early Los Angeles.

    Interesting historical note: There was once a reservoir in Sepulveda Canyon operated by the Santa Monica Water Company. It failed in 1914.

    The Sepulveda Tunnel opened on September 27, 1930. Sepulveda Pass was paved and became a state highway route in 1935. In the November 1935 issue of CHPW, there is an interesting article on the Sepulveda Tunnel construction and dedication. Although the tunnel was constructed in 1930, the state highway between Ventura and Sunset was opened and dedicated on October 20, 1935. The article noted that the first steps to a modern Sepulveda came in 1922, as the the Indian footpath was transformed into a highway of commerce. The section opened in 1935, 7.6 mi in length, was from Ventura Blvd to Sunset. It was surfaced with 30-foot asphalt concrete pavement bordered on each side by oil-treated rock shoulders, costing $300K, and financed out of the state gasoline tax. Grading was previously completed in 1930. The tunnel is 665' long, and bored through the mountains 130' under Mulholland Drive. The 1935 project involved the completion of 2.1 mi of new road, and the improvement of 3.3 mi of existing road.

  • From Inglewood down Centinela, across Inglewood-Redondo Blvd (present-day Florence) to Hawthorne, and S on Hawthorne to Route 3 (later US101A [LRN 60], now Route 1) near Palos Verdes. This segment of Route 7 was later signed as Route 107 (LRN 164; defined in 1933). Once the signage for Route 107 occured, Route 7 was resigned to continue S along Sepulveda until joining US101A (LRN 60) in Westchester (near what is now LAX). Signage for Route 7 stopped at this point. It may have continued to El Segundo Blvd.

For information on the 1964-1984 Route 7, see I-710.

 

Status

A controlled access highway routing has been adopted from Route 98 to I-8, per the August 2000 CTC Agenda. It was under construction as of October 2002, according to Don Hagstrom. It was open as of March 2012, giving trucks a full expressway route to the interstate, and allowing then to avoid the narrow 2-lane Route 98. A future extension of Route 7 north may be constructed as a routing of a new Route 115 expressway as well, although this is far off.

Note: Apparently, a 2007 episode of the TV program "24" featured a Route 7 that ran from the central part of Los Angeles (Florence and something) to Newhall. Although Pre-1964 Route 7 ran to Newhall, it was only from the top of the San Fernando Valley (Sepulveda Blvd), not from Central Los Angeles.

In September 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Imperial along Route 7 from Heber Road to Hunt Road, consisting of relocated or reconstructed county roads, and frontage roads.

 

National Trails

Pre-1964 State Shield Midland Trail Sign The portions of 1934 Route 7 that correspond to US 6 and present day Route 14 were part of the Midland Trail.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route.

  • 1959: Terminal Island to Pasadena (Chapter 1062)
  • 1965: Deleted portion S of Route 1 (Chapter 1372)
  • 1982: Added portion S of Route 1 (Chapter 914)
  • 1984: Definition changed to Route 710
  • 1998: Entirety of new Route 7 added (Chapter 877)

 

Interstate Submissions

In November 1957, the California Department of Highways proposed the designation I-7 for what is now I-505. This was part of an approach to number current I-5 as I-11, and use the single odd digits for what are now loop routes in the San Francisco Bay and Los Angeles areas.

 


Overall statistics for Route 7:

  • Total Length (1995): 7 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 7.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Imperial.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 7 was defined in the 1909 first bond act, running from Tehama Junction to Benicia.

In 1931, it was extended by the addition of the secondary routing from [LRN 14] near Crockett to American Canyon Route near Vallejo. The rationale was that the route would provide a connection from the proposed American Canyon Route to [LRN 14] near Crockett. In doing so, it would provide a complete through road for trafficc from the inland valleys to the bay area.

By 1935, the route was codified as:

  1. Benecia to Tehama Junction
  2. [LRN 14] near Crockett to American Canyon Route near Vallejo.

It was then quickly amended by Chapter 274 to the simpler:

[LRN 14] near Crockett to Red Bluff

This amendment closed the gap between Vallejo and Red Buff, and included the [2] portion of the route that had been part of LRN 104. However, that portion was not removed until 1939.

By 1935, this was all considered a primary route. In 1957, Chapter 36 extended the route to Albany, simplifying the definition to “[LRN 69] in Albany to [LRN 3] near Red Bluff”. LRN 69 was signed as Route 17, and is approximately I-580 today. LRN 7 was signed as US 40, and is approximately I-80 today (thus, LRN 7 began near what is now the I-80/I-580 interchange). It continued NNE signed as US 40 (approximately today's I-80) until just SSW of Davis.

LRN 7 continued N cosigned as US99W/Alt US 40 until Woodland. This is present-day Route 113.

LRN 7 then jogged W briefly signed as US99W/Route 16, and then continued N signed as US99W until the junction with US99E (LRN 3) near Red Bluff.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 8



Routing
  1. From Sunset Cliffs Boulevard to Route 5 in San Diego.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This was formerly Route 109; it was transferred to Route 8 in 1972 by Chapter 1216. See below for 1934-1963 signed Route 8.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 286. It was added to the state highway system in 1959 by Chapter 1062.

     

    Naming

    This portion of Route 8 is named the "Ocean Beach Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 117, Chapter 233, in 1968.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] Entire portion.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    Interstate (non-chargable).


  2. From Route 5 in San Diego to Yuma via El Centro.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was added in 1963 by Chapter 385. See below for 1934-1963 signed Route 8.

    US Highway Shield This is approximately what was previously designated as US 80. The US 80 designation disappeared on July 1, 1964, when the Route 80 designation was reassigned to what was US 40. US 80 as a route dates back to at least 1929.

    Note: The current I-8 bridge in Yuma was built in 1978. The old US 80 bridge is now the Business Route 8 bridge, and the old old US 80 bridge is a pedestrian bridge. This bridge, the "Ocean to Ocean Highway" bridge, will be reopened to one-lane traffic in the near future to serve traffic visiting the Quechan Reservation.

    Eastbound I-8 follows the alignment of US 80 across Telegraph Pass. Westbound I-8 was constructed on a new alignment. The topography dictated the crossover of the roads, as there was no place to economically place a WB alignment north of the EB roadway. Vestiges of an older US 80 alignment can be seen in the pass west of the Dome Valley TI.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield The portion of this segment between San Diego and El Centro was LRN 12, and was added to the state highway system in 1909. It was signed as US 80.

    US Highway Shield The portion of this segment between El Centro and the Arizona state line was LRN 27, and was added to the state highway system in 1915. Part of this was realigned in 1972 (Chapter 742) near El Centro, with a portion becoming Route 115.

    There is a plank road just off of I-8; this it appears to be actually associated with the earlier Southern National Highway, which created the first all-season southern route across the U.S, between Washington, D.C., and San Diego. The named highway had its origins in the early 1910s, and came into prominence in 1915, predating the Old Spanish Trail by more than eight years. To arouse interest in the Pan-Pacific Exposition of 1915, a cross-country caravan set out from San Diego along the Southern National Highway in November 2, 1915, and reached D.C. in 32 days. See the discussion of former US 80 for more information.

     

    Status

    In January 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of San Diego, at the intersection area of Camino Del Rio North and Mission Center Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets.

    In February 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 8 on Alvarado Canyon Road west of Mission Gorge Place, consisting of reconstructed city streets.

    In September 2011, it was reported that the CTC approved $13,600,000 to rehabilitate 40 lane miles of I-8, from the San Diego County Line, near Ocotillo, eastward to Route 98 in Imperial County. This project includes improvements to the main road, shoulders and ramp pavement, and dikes in both directions, as well as upgrade metal beam guard rails and end treatments and replace rock fence.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #950: Widen I-8 overpass at Dogwood Road, Imperial. $1,698,000.

    • High Priority Project #1557: Improve I-8 offramp at Ocotillo to the Imperial Valley College Desert Museum/Regional Traveler Visitor Center, Imperial County. $800,000.

    • High Priority Project #1639: Resurface and construct truck lane at Route 94 and I-8 interchange. $2,400,000.

    • High Priority Project #2352: Improve I-8 off ramp to the Desert Farming Institute, Imperial County. $800,000.

    • High Priority Project #2861: Construct off ramp at I-8/Imperial Avenue Interchange, El Centro. $2,400,000.

    • High Priority Project #3120: Completion of I-5 and I-8 Connectors, San Diego. $4,800,000.

    • High Priority Project #3285: Improve access from I-8 and construct parking lot for the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Visitor’s Center, Imperial Valley. $800,000.

    In January 2014, the CTC authorized $16,699,000 to improve the Dogwood Road interchange near El Centro. 

     

    Business Routes
    • San Diego: Hotel Circle Drive (1960s)
    • San Diego: Washington Avenue, El Cajon Blvd
    • El Cajon: El Cajon Blvd, Main Street, County Business Route 8.
    • Alpine: Alpine Road.
    • El Centro: Imperial Avenue, Adamas Avenue (Route 86/County Route S80), Fourth Avenue
    • Winterhaven: Winterhaven Road, Fourth Avenue, 32nd Street

     

    Naming

    Within metropolitan San Diego, this freeway appears to be named either the "Mission Valley" or "Mission" Freeway, although at one time it appears to have been named the "Alvorado" Freeway. None of these are official names. The Mission Valley name areas because the freeway traverses Mission Valley.

    Between El Cajon's Eastern Boundary and the Imperial County boundary this route has been officially designated the "Kumeyaay" Highway. The people of the Kumeyaay Indian Nation, once referred to as Diegueno by the Spanish, are the original native inhabitants of San Diego County and have lived in that region for more than 10,000 years. Historically, the Kumeyaay greeted the Spanish when they first sailed into San Diego harbor with the Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo expedition of 1542. The boundaries of the Kumeyaay lands changed with the arrival of the Europeans, but once extended from the Pacific Ocean, south to Ensenada in Baja Norte, Mexico, east to the sand dunes of the Colorado River in Imperial Valley and north to Warner Springs Valley. The Kumeyaay had a sophisticated social, political, and religious structure and were wise stewards of the land and natural resources. The original trails through the mountains and connecting desert and the coast and inlands were cleared and used by the Kumeyaay, some of which evolved into current freeways in San Diego and Imperial Counties. Today Kumeyaay tribal governments have jurisdiction over approximately 70,000 acres of federal trust land concentrated in reservations in East County from El Cajon, Lakeside, Poway, and Ramona to the desert, and the nation is represented by 13 separate bands, those being the Barona, Campo, Cuyapaipe, Inaja-Cosmit, Jamul, LaPosta, Los Coyotes, Manzanita, Mesa Grande, San Pasqual, Santa Ysabel, Sycuan, and Viejas Bands. The named portion of the route approximates a named indian trail. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 57, Chapter 112, in 1997. The designation was extended to Nimitz Boulevard in Mission Bay by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 156, Chapter 90, on June 27, 2002.

    The portion of I-8 between post-miles R27.30 and R28.46 in the County of San Diego is named the Jimmy A. Arevalo Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Jimmy A. Arevalo,born in 1952 in Calexico. Mr. Arevalo graduated from Calexico High School in 1971, served in the United States Army and was honorably discharged in 1972, attended Imperial Valley College and later San Diego State University, receiving an associate of arts degree and a bachelor’s degree in liberal studies, respectively, received his teaching credential in 1978, subsequently was awarded a master’s degree in public administration from San Diego State University in 1980, and received a community college instructor credential from the California Community Colleges. Mr. Arevalo began his lifetime teaching career at Dool Elementary School in the Calexico Unified School District on January 3, 1978, where he taught for 34 years, most recently as a fifth grade teacher. Mr. Arevalo also taught at Imperial Valley College as an adjunct instructor in the English Department, and was employed by the Imperial County Office of Education as a migrant education principal for the Heber Migrant Summer School Program. Mr. Arevalo has been recognized for his leadership skills and outstanding service to the St. Mary’s 4-H Club, Heber Migrant Program, El Centro Elementary School District Migrant Program, Imperial Valley College, and Calexico Unified School Districtd. Mr. Arevalo was known for his interest in aerodynamics, rocketry, and woodworking, among other things, was always willing to lend someone a helping hand, and was always encouraging his students to continue with their education. On June 11, 2012, Mr. Arevalo was tragically killed in a multivehicle crash on State Highway Route 8 near Alpine in the County of San Diego involving a suspected drunk driver. In order to keep Mr. Arevalo’s spirit alive, the Calexico Educational Foundation established a scholarship in order to grant funding to a Calexico High School senior who has been admitted to a four-year accredited university or college, through the Jimmy A. Arevalo Memorial Scholarship. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 51, August 5, 2013. Resolution Chapter 65.

    Rosas Memorial SignThe portion of Route 8, between post mile R51.000 and post mile R53.5000, in the County of San Diego is officially designated the "Border Patrol Agent Robert W. Rosas Jr. Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of United States Border Patrol Agent Robert W. Rosas Jr., who was born and raised in El Centro, California, and was often referred to as the "Mayor of El Centro" because of his popularity and friendly, witty demeanor. Agent Rosas graduated from Central Union High School in 1997 where he met his future wife, Rosalie. Prior to becoming a United States Border Patrol Agent, Agent Rosas worked as a correctional officer for six years at Centinela State Prison, in addition to serving two years as a reserve police officer for the El Centro Police Department. Agent Rosas began his career with the United States Border Patrol on May 22, 2006, as a member of the 621st Session of the Border Patrol Academy. Around his fellow agents at the Campo Station, Agent Rosas was known for his enthusiasm and sound work ethic in carrying out his sworn duties. His leadership skills were also evident through his efforts in organizing and managing the station's softball team. On July 23, 2009, Agent Rosas was working near the United States-Mexico international border near Campo, California, and was responding to suspected illegal cross-border activity when fellow agents heard multiple gun shots. After a brief search, Agent Rosas was found lying on the ground, mortally wounded. It was later determined that Rosas’ killers lured him into the brush in the remote borderland to rob him of his night vision goggles and other equipment. A suspect was later identified, tried, and convicted in the murder. Agent Rosas was 30 years old at the time of his death. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 37, Resolution Chapter 54, on July 14, 2011. Unveiling of the signs memorializing Rosas were part of a ceremony at the Campo Border Patrol Station on April 13, 2012.

    The portion of this route from Route 67 to Greenfield Drive in the City of El Cajon is named the Donna P. Mauzy Memorial Freeway. It was named after Officer Donna P. Mauzy, a City of San Diego Police Officer who was killed while driving on Interstate Highway 8 in the City of El Cajon, on her way to work, the morning of June 23, 2001. The driver of the vehicle causing the accident was arrested on the scene, on suspicion of vehicular manslaughter and felony driving while under the influence of alcohol. Officer Donna P. Mauzy was an admired and respected veteran of the San Diego Police Department. She also had served as a police officer for the City of El Cajon. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 93, Chapter 127, September 24, 2001.

    The portion of I-8 in the City of El Centro is named the "Caltrans Highway Maintenance Leadworker Jaime Obeso Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Jaime Garcia Obeso, of the City of Imperial, who passed away on June 7, 2011, when he was struck by an errant motorist while working on a stretch of Route 8 near the Sunbeam Rest Area for the Department of Transportation (Caltrans). Jaime Obeso was born to Gregorio and Magdalena Obeso on January 25, 1958, in El Centro, California. He attended Ben Hulse Elementary, Frank Wright Junior High, and Imperial High School. While at Imperial High School, he excelled in football and track, holding records in pole vault, and 4x100 relay. Jaime Obeso worked for H.E. Wiggins and Sons for many years and later gained employment with Caltrans. He was known as a hard working employee and he received many awards during his service with Caltrans. His last promotion was as a Leadworker with the El Centro Travelway Crew. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Resolution Chapter 94, on September 15, 2011.

    The westbound segment of Route 8, between westbound postmile R4.60 and R6.60, in the County of Imperial, as the "Deputy Probation Officer Irene B. Rios Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Deputy Probation Officer Irene Beatrice Rios of the Imperial County Probation Department (ICPD), who died in the line of duty on August 13, 2008, who was the first female peace officer to die in the line of duty in Imperial County. Deputy Probation Officer Irene Rios was born in Brawley on July 20, 1980, to Emilio and Elisabet Rios. She grew up in Holtville, where she also attended local schools. After graduating from Holtville High School in 1998, she pursued her education at Imperial Valley College in Imperial, and two years later, transferred to San Diego State University, Imperial Valley Campus, where she received a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice administration with a minor in psychology/ Shortly thereafter, Deputy Probation Officer Irene Rios began working for the Betty Jo McNeece Receiving Home in 2002, where she worked until she was hired as Deputy Probation Officer for the Juvenile Division in January 2005. She graduated from Probation Officer Core Academy during her first year of employment. Her love for helping families and youth began when she started working at the receiving home where she found a balance of her two wishes of working in law enforcement and of working with children. In keeping Deputy Probation Officer Irene Rios' spirit alive, her brothers and sisters in law enforcement formed the 718 Foundation in order to grant scholarships to students from local, low-income families to promote professional, academic, or artistic achievement through the Irene B. Rios Memorial Scholarship. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 66, Resolution Chapter 99, on September 22, 2011.

    The portion of this route between Gordon's Well Road and Brock Research Center Road in Imperial County is named the "James D. Schultz Freeway". This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol (CHP) Officer James D. Schultz, a dedicated officer, who was killed in the line of duty at the age of 46 years while conducting an abandoned vehicle check on westbound I-8 between Gordon's Well Road and Brock Research Center Road in Imperial County. Officer Schultz, while conducting his investigation, was struck by an errant, sleepy driver during the late evening of November 15, 1996, and died in the early morning hours on November 16 as a result of injuries sustained in the collision. After graduating from Fredonia High School on June 23, 1968, in Fredonia, New York, Officer Schultz enlisted in the United States Army on August 19, 1968. He bravely served his country, including a one-year assignment in Vietnam, and received an honorable discharge from the United States Army on August 18, 1971. He began his career with CHP on January 31, 1972, and proudly served the State of California in the South Los Angeles, Oakland, El Centro, Garberville, Barstow, Bridgeport, and Winterhaven CHP areas. Officer Schultz was known by his fellow officers for his dedication to CHP and to the protection of the people of California. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 21, Resolution Chapter 87, on 7/10/2007.

    The segment of I-8, between Sidewinder Road and Ogilby Road, in the Town of Winterhaven in the County of Imperial, is designated the "Officer Robert Franklin Dickey Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer Robert Franklin Dickey who was killed in the line of duty on June 10, 2007. Officer Dickey graduated from the CHP Academy on February 22, 2002, and was assigned to the central Los Angeles area. On May 1, 2003, Officer Dickey transferred to the Winterhaven area. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 80, Resolution Chapter 70, on 7/3/2008.

    The entire route (from San Diego to the Arizona state line) has also been designed the "Border Friendship Route". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 104, Chapter 254, in 1968.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 57-720, the I-8/I-805 interchange in San Diego county, is named the "Jack Schrade Interchange/Mission Valley Viaduct". It was built in 1973, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 41, Chapter 101, in 1972. Senator Jack Schrade (R-Del Mar, 1963-1976) was a delegate to Republican National Convention from California in 1964. During the UC Berkeley student uprisings in the 1960s, Sen. Schrade called for dismissal of professors and expulsion of students who have taken part in Free Speech Movement activities, going so far as to draft a proposed constitutional amendment to require similar disciplinary action in the event of future demonstrations. Sen. Schrade also provided support for environmental causes. As chairman of the Senate Rules Committee in 1970, he introduced Senate Resolution No. 137, that officially established May 15 at Peace Officers' Memorial Day.

    The overpass on I-8 at 2nd Street in El Cajon is named the "Danielle van Dam Memorial Overpass." Named after Danielle Nicole van Dam, a young child abducted from her bedroom, and for whom the search, story, and subsequent trial garnered national attention. Danielle was born on September 22, 1994, in Plano, Texas. Her favorite colors were pink and purple and she enjoyed writing in her journals, ballet, gymnastics, Girl Scouts, and playing with her brothers and with friends. When she was seven, Danielle's family was planning a trip to Italy which was to take place on February 9, 2002, but before this could happen, on February 2, 2002, Danielle was abducted from her bedroom by a neighbor. A search center was put together by the Laura Recovery Center and over 2,000 people volunteered to search for Danielle. On February 27, 2002, Danielle's body was found on Dehesa Road in El Cajon, near I-8. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 73, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 86.

    The bridge on I-8 that crosses Pine Valley Creek is named the "Nello Irwin Greer Memorial Bridge". This segment was named in memory of Nello Irwin Greer. Greer was born on March 9, 1922, in Phoenix, Arizona and, after briefly residing in Victorville, California, moved to St. Johns, Arizona where he spent his formative years. Mr. Greer fought during World War II, serving with General George S. Patton, Jr. at the Battle of the Bulge. After returning from the war, Mr. Greer began his career with the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in 1948, advancing to an engineering position and working on many state freeway projects in San Bernardino, California. In 1960, Mr. Greer moved to District 11 in San Diego, California, where he lived until retiring from Caltrans in 1977, and some of his projects there include Route 163 from I-8 north to the Geneese exit, the design of the first bridge on Friars Road with 13 lanes of traffic, as well as various other projects throughout the county. The Pine Valley Project was by far the most incredible of Mr. Greer's projects; while Caltrans wanted the project's freeway to run through the town of Pine Valley, California, Mr. Greer moved the project to the location where it currently exists, overcoming numerous obstacles to complete it. One such obstacle was the design of a new bridge that was over 800 feet high, and Mr. Greer suggested its construction as a hollow bridge. The construction of the bridge in the Pine Valley Project received many engineering awards, and the projected removals and quantities to finish the Pine Valley Project along with the tightest budget in Caltrans history, earned Mr. Greer many awards and recognition throughout the country. After retiring, Mr. Greer worked for an engineering company that sent him all over the world designing and supervising the projects that he had designed, including the Glenwood Canyon Project (Interstate 70) in Glenwood, Colorado, that, was named the eighth man-made wonder of the world. Mr. Greer died on August 15, 2002. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 33, Resolution Chapter 89, on 7/10/2007.

    The overpass on I-8 at Buckman Springs Road in Pine Valley is named the "Army Sergeant Brud Joseph Cronkrite Memorial Bridge." This segment was named in memory of SGT Brud Joseph Cronkrite. Cronkrite was born on June 24, 1981, in El Cajon at El Cajon Valley Hospital. He moved to Potrero, California, with his parents in December of 1994, at the age of 13, and fell in love with the family' s 11-acre property, which he dreamed of someday inheriting and living at with his future family. Brud attended Mount Empire High School and was on the wrestling team. Brud joined the United States Army in March of 2001, attended boot camp and special training at Fort Knox, graduating with honors and receiving an excellent in marksmanship, and knew that he had found his calling in life. He was stationed at Camp Casey in South Korea for one year, and was then assigned to the 1st Battalion, 37th Armor, 1st Armored Division, in Friedberg, Germany, and he served in Iraq for one year. Brud's Division was scheduled to come home when their assignment in Iraq was extended by the President. Three weeks after this extension, Brud died in Baghdad, Iraq, on May 14, 2004, at the age of 22 years, from injuries that he sustained on May 13, 2004, in Karbala, when a rocket-propelled grenade fired into a building near him during a security patrol. Brud was awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart, and is buried at the Fort Rosencrans Cemetary. Brud was the 775th American soldier killed in the Iraq War and he and his family gave the ultimate sacrifice to keep all Americans safe. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 32, Resolution Chapter 95, on 7/12/2007.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Buckman Springs, in San Diego County, 3.3 mi. E of Pine Valley. This was named due to its location near Buckman Springs. Buckman Springs appears to have been named after the Buckman family that lived in the area.

    • Sunbeam, in Imperial County, 6 mi W of El Centro. This rest area is officially named the "Jaime Obeso Sunbeam Rest Area". It was named in memory of Jaime Garcia Obeso, of the City of Imperial, who passed away on June 7, 2011, when he was struck by an errant motorist while working on a stretch of Route 8 near the Sunbeam Rest Area for the Department of Transportation (Caltrans). Jaime Obeso was born to Gregorio and Magdalena Obeso on January 25, 1958, in El Centro, California. He attended Ben Hulse Elementary, Frank Wright Junior High, and Imperial High School. While at Imperial High School, he excelled in football and track, holding records in pole vault, and 4x100 relay. Jaime Obeso worked for H.E. Wiggins and Sons for many years and later gained employment with Caltrans. He was known as a hard working employee and he received many awards during his service with Caltrans. His last promotion was as a Leadworker with the El Centro Travelway Crew. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Resolution Chapter 94, on September 15, 2011.

    • Sand Hills, in Imperial County, 20 mi W of the Arizona State Line.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    This portion approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947. There was an adjustment E of San Diego in August 1965. In August 1957 this was proposed as I-8. In December 1957, the California Department of Highways proposed designating this as I-10, following a recommendation from Arizona. This was rejected by AASHTO, and this went back to the I-8 designation.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 5 to Route 98 near Coyote Wells.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 8 L0.71 R0.00
San Diego 8 R0.00 R0.11
San Diego 8 R0.18 5.18
San Diego 8 5.37 6.52
San Diego 8 6.79 8.12
San Diego 8 8.20 12.86
San Diego 8 12.94 13.26
San Diego 8 14.38 R18.21
San Diego 8 R18.43 R18.92
Imperial 8 R36.46 R38.48

 

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Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 8 was signed along the route from Stockton to the California-Nevada State Line near Woodfords, via Jackson. In 1964, the portion running (1) from Stockton to Route 12 near Valley Springs via Linden and Bellota, and then (2) from Route 12 near Fosteria through Mokelumne Hill was resigned as Route 26. This routing was LRN 5.

The remainder of 1934 Route 8, running from Route 49 near Jackson to Woodfoods (near the Nevada state line) through Pine Gr., Cooks Sta., and through Carson Pass, was resigned as Route 88 in 1964. It was LRN 34.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

National Trails

Interstate Shield De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

US Highway Shield Atlantic-Pacific Highway Sign This route (as US 80) was part of the "Atlantic-Pacific Highway".

US Highway Shield Old Spanish Trail Sign This route (as US 80) was part of the "Old Spanish Trail".

Dixie Overland Highway Sign Lee Highway Sign Bankhead Highway Sign Lone Star Trail Sign This route (as US 80) appears to have been part of the "Bankhead Highway", the "Dixie Overland Highway", the "Lee Highway", and the "Lone Star Trail".

 


Overall statistics for Route 8:

  • Total Length (1995): 172 miles traversible; 0.4 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 6,200 to 258,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 136; Sm. Urban 9; Urbanized: 27.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 170 mi; FAU: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 172 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego and Imperial.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route from San Diego to the Arizona state line was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 62, Ch. 107 in 1961.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Entire route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that would become LRN 8 was defined in the first highway bond act of 1909, running from Ignacio to Cordelia via Napa. By 1935, it had been codified into the highway code without change:

From Ignacio to Cordelia via Napa

The entire route was a primary route.

In 1937, Chapter 841 changed "Cordelia" to "[LRN 7] near Cordelia". In 1961, the description was relaxed to read “[LRN 1] (US 101) near Novato to [LRN 7] near Cordelia via the vicinity of Napa”.

Starting from US 101 (LRN 1), LRN 8 was signed as the second incarnation of US 48 (later Route 37) until the present Route 37/Route 121 junction. It then continued N signed as Route 37 (post-1964 Route 121) to Shellville, continuing easterly towards Napa cosigned as Route 12/Route 37 (post 1964 Route 121). From Napa S, it was cosigned as Route 12/Route 29 (present-day Route 221), until Route 29 diverged. LRN 8 continued signed as Route 12 to Cordelia, where it joined with US 40 (LRN 7).



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