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California Highways

Routes 289 through 299

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

289 · 290 · 291 · 292 · 294 · 295 · 296 · 299


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 289



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 289 as “easterly of the Bayshore Freeway from San Jose to the highway described in subdivision (a) of Section 553.1, the Hunters Point Freeway”. This route ran from San Jose to Route 230 in San Francisco, providing a tertiary freeway to east of US 101 (to the west was I-280). The portion between US 101 and Route 280 is Route 230; the portion between Route 230 and Route 237 is no longer part of the state highway system (it was part of Route 87, but was deleted in 1970). The remainder of the route is part of Route 87.


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 290



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 290 as “[LRN 60] northwest of Santa Monica to [LRN 4] near Tunnel Station”. This is the proposed "Reseda" Freeway, segment (a) of Route 14, from Route 1 (near Sunset) to Route 5 near the Route 405/Route 5 tunnel (actually, Balboa Boulevard).


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 291



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1961, Chapter 1838 defined LRN 291 as “[LRN 158] near Western Avenue to 25th Street in San Pedro”. This was Route 213.

In 1963, Chapter 1729 added the language "The commission may allocate from the State Highway Fund the necessary funds for the construction of all or any portion of said route when the County of Los Angeles and the Cities of Los Angeles and Torrance have entered into a co-operative agreement with the department wherein the said cities and county shall furnish to the state of California without charge all right-of-way necessary and agree to pay one-half the cost of plans and construction." However, this language never took effect, and the equivalent change was made to Chapter 385's Route 213.

Also in 1963, Chapter 2155 added a second definition of LRN 291, this time from [LRN 48] near Boonville to [LRN 1] near Ukiah, but this never took effect. In the post-1963 reality, that route was added as Route 253.


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 292



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1961, Chapter 2013 defined LRN 292 as “[LRN 68] in the vicinity of the Guadalupe River to [LRN 239] in the vicinity of Pearl Avenue.” This is part of present-day Route 87.

In 1963, Chapter 1698 changed [LRN 239] to [LRN 114], but this change never took effect.


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 294



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1963, Chapter 1898 defined LRN 294 as “[LRN 1] in Eureka across Humboldt Bay to the Samoa Pennisula”. However, this addition did not take effect; instead, the route was added by the same act as Route 255.


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 295



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1961, Chapter 1382 defined LRN 295 as “LRN 21 near Wicks Corner to Paradise.” This is present-day Route 191.


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 296



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1963, Chapters 890 and 901 defined LRN 296 as “the Avenue of the Giants, comprising a portion of the former Redwood Highway through and connecting a number of state parks, from Route 101 near the Sylvandale interchange to Route 101 near the Redcrest interchange.” However, this definition did not happen due to the great renumbering; instead, the route was defined as post-1963 Route 254.


State Shield

State Route 299



Routing
  1. From Route 101 near Arcata to Route 395 at Alturas.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was actually two segments: “(a) Route 101 near Arcata to Route 5 at Redding via Weaverville. (b) Route 5 at Redding to Route 395 at Alturas.”

    In 1998, Chapter 828 combined segments (a) and (b), giving “(a) Route 101 near Arcata to Route 395 at Alturas.” This eliminated the discontinuity in Redding, which arose due to a short multiplex with Route 273 in downtown Redding. At the northerly (now southerly) junction of Route 299 (Eureka Way) and Route 273 (Market Street), Route 299 eastbound went south on Route 273 for about two blocks, then made a left turn towards Tehama Street east to the Route 299 freeway headed towards I-5; Route 299 westbound from I-5 merged into Shasta Street, then made the right turn on Market (Route 273) and then the left to Eureka Way. Note that this short multiplex was not of equal distances westbound and eastbound.

    Between Adin and Canby, this route is cosigned with Route 139, although it is legislatively Route 299.

    In 2002, a highway location routing was adopted along Lake Boulevard from Route 273 to I-5. This segment of Route 273 from Route 299 at Market Street to Route 273 at Lake Boulevard will be cosigned Route 273/Route 299. The former Route 299 segment from Route 299 at Market Street to I-5 will be designated as Route 44.

    The connecting segment of US 395 between the end of this segment and the start of the next segment is cosigned as US 395/US 299, although it is legislatively US 395.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This segment was originally signed as Route 44. In 1935, it was re-signed as US 299.

    The segment of Route 299 between US 101 and Redding was LRN 20. The portion between US 101 and Weaverville was defined in 1915; the remainder of the route to I-5 in Redding was defined in 1909. The segement of Route 299 between Redding and US 395 was LRN 28. The portion between Redding and Alturas was defined in 1909; the remainder was defined in 1915.

     

    Status

    General Segment Information

    This is constructed to freeway standards from Route 101 to E of Blue Lake, and from Route 5 to the Old Oregon Trail.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route: High Priority Project #2080: Reduce congestion and boost economies through safer access to the coast by realigning Route 299 between Trinity and Shasta Counties. $5,600,000.

    Arcata to Willow Creek (Route 96)

    In August 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $3,603,000 on Route 299 in Humbolt Cty PM 0.0/43.0 near Arcata, from Route 299/US 101 Separation to South Fork Trinity River Bridge. Outcome/Output: Install new metal beam guard railing to reduce the number and severity of the run-off-road collisions and to comply with the recommendations of the Traffic Investigations Report.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Humboldt County to repair and stabilize two segments of Route 299 near Blue Lake; including realigning lanes, installing underdrains and constructing two tieback walls. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $21,069,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources and hydrology/water quality to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to hydrology/water quality and biological resources in the project area will be mitigated through restoration of existing wetlands and riparian areas to pre-project conditions. On-site revegetation planting will be provided to replace trees and shrubs removed during project construction.

    In January 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Humboldt County that will construct eight-foot wide shoulders and close a 1,100-foot gap in the climbing lane segments on a portion of Route 299 near the community of Blue Lake. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $4,645,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

    Willow Creek to Redding (I-5)

    There are plans to add east and westbound passing lanes near Douglas City between Little Browns Creek Bridge and Trinity River Bridge #5-18. July 2005 CTC Agenda.

    In January 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Trinity, at Steel Bridge Road, consisting of a reconstructed and relocated county road.

    Buckhorn Grade Project.

    Middle BuckhornThere are currently plans to realign the Buckhorn Grade in Shasta and Trinity Counties. This currently is in the Environmental Report preparation phase. [July 2002 CTC Agenda, 2.2.a].

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed improvements to the Route 299/Route 44/Route 36 area. These would complete "Buckhorn" to allow STAA trucks to travel direct from I-5 at Redding to US 101 near Eureka and into the Port of Humboldt, now prohibited due to the existing curvilinear alignment that causes truck off tracking. This is the only viable alternative to get STAA trucks into the north coast. STAA trucks cannot access the Port on US 101 north due to environmental restrictions at Richardson's Grove that pre-empt major improvements to the route. Route 44 widening reduces congestion in the Redding urbanized area and also improves inter-regional through movement for people and goods.

    In 2007, the CTC considered a request for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), which was not recommended for funding. This request was for the Buckhorn Grade realignment.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will realign Route 299 near the city of Redding (middle of Buckhorn, PM 2.5 through PM 4.3). The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $13,894,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    According to aNewsCafe.com, the next round of improvements to the Buckhorn Grade on Route 299 west of Redding is scheduled to begin in September 2011. This is the second phase in a four-phase project intended to make the treacherous stretch of road safer and to open the highway between Redding and Arcata to larger trucks. In July 2011, Caltrans awarded a $10.5 million contract to Mercer Fraser of Eureka for the “Middle Buckhorn” project, which involves widening the highway, realigning 10 turns and eliminating seven other turns in a 1.8-mile stretch. Fall 2011 work will include removal of timber cut in early 2011, and installation of erosion control measures. Heavy construction work will begin in spring of 2012. In 2009, Caltrans completed improvements to sections at the base and top of the grade. The section at the top provides an example of what the entire Buckhorn Grade will be like when finished two westbound climbing lanes, one eastbound descending lane, a four-foot-wide median and broad shoulders.

    Upper BuckhornAfter completion of the Middle Buckhorn project, scheduled for fall of 2012, Caltrans will begin realigning two hairpin turns in the Twin Gulches section below Middle Buckhorn. In subsequent years, Caltrans will tackle the relatively mild lower section and the Upper Buckhorn.

    In November 2016, it was reported that the Buckhorn Grade project was completed, with a completion ceremony that was held Monday, 11/21/2016. This massive highway project that has interrupted Trinity County’s Route 299 route to Redding for the past several years, but was completed ahead of schedule and all remaining clean-up work should be finished by the end of November. There are also plans for a roundabout at Lance Gulch Road and Route 299.
    (Source: Trinity Journal, 11/16/2016)

    In March 2011, the CTC approved funding to install truck climbing lanes near Redding, from 2.5 to 4.3 miles east of Trinity County Line to reduce congestion and minimize traffic delay.

    In May 2010, the CTC vacated right of way in the city of Redding along Route 299 at 0.08 mile west of Overhill Drive, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    The CTC considered the route adoption for a highway location along Lake Blvd in the Citty of Redding from Route 273 at Lake Blvd to I-5.

    Redding to Alturas

    In May 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Shasta County that will rehabilitate a section of the roadway on Route 299, including replacing drainage facilities, installing new pavement, constructing a center median, widening the Salt Creek Bridge, and other improvements. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $39,392,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

    In September 2010, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Shasta along Route 299 at 1.0 mile west of Buzzard Roost Road, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In February 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of two segments: (a) right of way in the County of Shasta, between Goose Valley Road and Mackinac Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads; and (b) right of way in the County of Modoc, at the intersection with County Roads 54, 82 and 83, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads..

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $2,000,000 in SHOPP funding for Route 299 in Burney at Burney Creek Bridge #06-0062. This work would replace one scoured bridge to maintain structural integrity, reduce the risk to lives and properties, and to comply with Bridge Inspection Report recommendation.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved $13.3 million to rehabilitate 36.6 lane miles of pavement to extend the service life of the highway and enhance highway safety in and near Montgomery Creek, from 0.3 mile west of Backbone Ridge Road to Big Bend Road.

    In May 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Shasta, at County Road No. 9S060 (Lewis Road), County Road No. 9S061 (Williams Road), County Road No. 9S02 (Pittville Road), County Road No. 9S062 (Lee Ranch Road), and County Road No. 9S066 (Pittville Totten Road), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads.

    In October 2016, the CTC amended the SHOPP as follows: 2-MOD-299 0.51, 1.02 | Route 299 Near Adin, at Butte Creek Bridge No. 03-001 and at Ash Creek Bridge No. 03-002. Replace bridges. During the environmental phase, additional work was identified due to increased project footprint and a new community volunteer fire station in the project vicinity. Additional design support is needed to consider hazardous materials, hydraulics evaluations, community impact coordination and park impacts. Construction Support has increased to account for the use of consultants for inspection over two seasons instead of one. R/W support has increased to cover the cost for two additional parcels and their environmental mitigation. These changes add $1,269,000 to the cost of the project. Allocation: $47K $131K (R/W), $5.6MM (C), Support (PA & ED $1.82MM / PS & E $680K $940K / RW Sup $270K $485K / Con Sup $1.15MM $1.86MM). FY 17/18.

    In May 2016, the CTC allocated additional Capital SHOPP funding for Route 299 near Canby, at Caldwell Creek Bridge No. 03-0028. Replace bridge. Additional design, survey, and environmental clearance effort is necessary to develop a newly identified full detour instead of the original planned stage construction of the bridge. Also, hydraulics studies have since identified the need to raise the profile of the bridge and address greater creek flows. The increase to support costs also reflects an adjustment using current rates. These changes add $725,000 to the cost of the project.

    In December 2012, the CTC received a request to amend the 2012 STIP to delete the Alturas Route 299 Widening project (PPNO 3368) and the Route 299/Route 139 Canby Highway Advisory Radio project (PPNO 3382) in Modoc County. MCTC has determined that the two STIP projects are no longer a priority in the region due to a continued economic downturn, slow population increase and business demise. It was deferred to the January 2013 meeting, and deferred again to the March 2013 when it was again... deferred. The original need for the project was first identified by the MCTC in mid 1990s to improve traveler safety and reduce speeds approaching the city. As this segment of two-lane highway enters the City of Alturas, traffic flow can become congested due to the turning movements of vehicles. Business and residential areas exist along this mile long reach where traffic interruptions and queuing occur. Future growth was anticipated, further contributing to congestion and the potential for increased accidents. Shoulder widths vary from 1 foot to 4 feet wide, and mobility of bicycles and pedestrians is a challenge. A project was initiated and programmed in the 1998 and 2000 STIP to address the need by adding a continuous left turn lane, wider shoulders and drainage improvements. Project development work continued over the years until MCTC alerted the Department that local priorities and project support had changed. The unmet need remained until MCTC requested that the Commission reprogram the project in the 2008 STIP, with the Environmental phase to begin in 2011. In a collaborative effort, the Department and MCTC developed a project charter that identified the specific needs of the project; including wider shoulders and crosswalks along with flashing beacons to improve pedestrian mobility and safety, speed radar feedback signs for traffic calming, installation of concrete gutters, culverts and paved areas for drainage improvements. The continuous left turn lane was deleted from the project. However, in August 2012, just after the Department completed the environmental phase, MCTC requested the project be terminated for a second time due to changed local priorities and support for the project. The Department strongly supports the continued development of this project for a number of reasons, including safety, bicyclist and pedestrian support, traffic calming, and congestion issues.

    In May 2013, the CTC received notice that Caltrans, the City of Alturas and the Modoc County Transportation Commission (MCTC) propose to amend the 2012 STIP to reduce the scope of the Alturas Route 299 Improvements project (PPNO 3368); decreasing the programmed Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funding by $1,010,000, from $3,244,000 to $2,234,000, and removing $1,052,000 of programmed RIP Transportation Enhancement (TE) funds. It is also proposed to program $1,173,000 in RIP funding for a new pedestrian improvements project (PPNO 2534) along the Alturas Central Business District in Modoc County. Specifically, in a collaborative effort to identify the specific needs of this project, the department and MCTC have negotiated an agreement to reduce the scope of improvements along Route 299. It is proposed to remove lower priority TE elements from the scope of work, while improving the shoulder width and drainage systems for bicyclists and pedestrians. Three new radar feedback signs for traffic calming will also be installed. This scope reduction will allow $2,062,000 to be returned to Modoc County’s regional share balance. The design work necessary for revising the scope will delay construction from FY 2013-14 to FY 2014-15. MCTC proposes to program a new pedestrian improvement project, the Alturas Central Business District project (PPNO 2534) with $1,173,000 from Modoc County’s regional share balance. The project proposes to improve existing facilities adjacent to surface streets along the central business district of the city of Alturas. This project is higher priority for the county and includes TE eligible elements that will enhance pedestrian mobility in the downtown area.

     

    Naming

    The segment between US 101 and Redding is named the "Trinity Scenic Byway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 126, Chapter 131, in 1992.

    The portion between the Shasta county line and the Modoc county line is named the "Lassen State Highway". It was named by Resolution Chapter 498 in 1911.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 04-036, over the Mad River in Humboldt county, is named the "Thomas L. De Vore Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1965, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 94, Chapter 229, in the same year. Thomas L. De Vore was killed in action in World War II on February 1, 1943.

    Bridge 04-042, at Redwood Creek in Humboldt county, is named the "Don O. O'Kane Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1965, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 58, Chapter 178 in 1970. Don Hunter O'Kane was the publisher of the Humboldt Standard newspaper from 1935 to 1946 and an avid supporter of the development of the state highway system.

    Bridge 04-050, 8 mi E of Willow Creek over the south fork of the Trinity River in Humboldt county, is named the "Hlel-Din Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1988, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 158, Chapter 112, in the same year. The Native American village of Hlel-Din was an important gathering place for many tribes to exchange ideas and goods and to seek marriage partners, until it's destruction in the 1850's.

    Bridge 05-006 over the Trinity River in Trinity county is named the "William D. Abarr Memorial Bridge". William D. Abarr, a Caltrans heavy equipment operator, died January 25, 1983, in a massive mudslide on SR 299 in Trinity County. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 134, Chapter 126, in 1984.

    Bridge 05-082 over the Trinity River, 3.5 mi E of the Humboldt county line in Trinity county, is named the "Charles William Carpenter Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1989, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 84, the same year. Trinity County deputy Sheriff Charles William Carpenter was killed in the line of duty on the morning of July 13, 1928, while attempting to arrest three robbery suspects.

    Bridge 05-0081, over the Trinity River, is named the "Raymond A. Nachand Memorial Bridge". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 176, Chapter 160 in 1998. Raymond A. Nachand, a 22 year Division of Highways employee, started the "Ironside Museum" at Hawkins Bar with his wife, Jo Ann, in 1976.

    The Burney Creek Bridge on Main Street along Route 299, in the unincorporated area of Burney, County of Shasta, is named the "Deputy Kenneth Fredrick Perrigo Memorial Bridge". It was named in memory of Deputy Kenneth Fredrick Perrigo, who was born in 1958. Deputy Perrigo first worked for the Shasta County Sheriff's Office as a civilian cook at the main jail facility in 1981. Prior to his appointment as a Deputy Sheriff, Kenneth Perrigo served our country as a member of the United States Coast Guard. Deputy Perrigo was hired as a full-time Deputy Sheriff in1982 and assigned to the Burney Patrol Division. Deputy Perrigo was one of the charter members of the Shasta County Sheriff's Office Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team. Deputy Perrigo was a board member of the Shasta CountyPeace Officers Association. Deputy Perrigo was Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 216 inFall River Mills. On Monday, October 21, 1991, Deputy Perrigo arrested two suspects for being intoxicated in public, and was transporting themto the Shasta County main jail in Redding, California, when the suspects shot him in the back and head several times using Deputy Perrigo's secondary service weapon, and he died in the line of duty that day. The suspects were subsequently apprehended without incident, following an almost five-day pursuit, deemed the largest and longest in the County of Shasta's history. President George H. W. Bush telephoned Deputy Perrigo's wife, Debra, to express his condolences. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Resolution Chapter 88, on August 24, 2012.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Francis B. Mathews Memorial Rest Area (Salyer), in Trinity County, 3 mi E of Salyer. Named in memory of Francis B. Mathews. Mr. Mathews was a well respected attorney and community leader in Trinity and Humboldt Counties for over 50 years. He was also a a real estate developer, logger, builder, fishing boat and marina owner. Although he was known largely for his representation of timber, logging, and sawmill companies, his pro bono services and dedication to the citizens of Trinity and Humboldt Counties and the Hoopa and Yurok Indian tribes were well known throughout the region. His reputation for integrity and his dedication to community endeavors were unsurpassed. As an Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America, Francis B. Mathews sat on the scout council and was an active fundraiser and contributor to the scouting programs in Trinity and Humboldt Counties. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He was instrumental in the founding of Trinity Village at Hawkins Bar in Trinity County, a large planned community built upon reclaimed land. Lastly he was a naturalist and lifetime birdwatcher who donated his entire bird book collection of over 3,000 books to California State University, Humboldt. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 38, Chapter 110, September 17, 2001.

    • Moon Lim Lee (Weaverville), in Trinity County, 5 mi E of Weaverville. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 88, Chapter 16, in 1986. It was named in honor of Moon Lim Lee by the State of California Transportation Department. Moon Lim Lee's name comes from the activities of his father, Lim Sue Kin. The father operated a Weaverville restaurant in the late 1800s with the name, Sam Lee. Located on Main Street, its name means three fold prosperity in a Cantonese dialect. Lim Sue Kin became widely know as Sam Lee, Thus, the family name changed in a manner not uncommon for that period. Moon Lim Lee was a prominent businessman and served on many boards and committees that worked for the betterment of of Trinity County. He was appointed by Governor Ronald Reagan to the California Highway Commission in 1967 and served as a commissioner for eight years. His effort in saving Won Lim Miao helped produce Weaverville Joss House State Park.
      [Information from the Heritage West Books website on California's Chinese Heritage]

    • Hillcrest, in Shasta County, 3.9 mi E of Montgomery C.B.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 101 near Arcata to Route 96 near Willow Creek; and from Route 3 near Weaverville to Route 5 near Redding.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.8] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 89 near Burney to Route 139 near Canby.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Humboldt 299 0.00 0.10


  2. From Route 395 near Alturas to the Nevada state line via Cedarville.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Although the road itself looks to have been a state route (part of LRN 28) since 1935, there is no evidence that this was signed. It connected to NV 8A, which puts any US highway signage in doubt.

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Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 299:

  • Total Length (1995): 307 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 150 to 44,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 300; Sm. Urban: 1; Urbanized: 6.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 281 mi; FAS: 26 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 161 mi; Minor Arterial: 120 mi; Collector: 26 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Berry Summit (2859 ft); Buckhorn Summit (3212 ft); Hatchet Mt. Summit (4366 ft); Big Valley Mt. Summit (4603 ft); Adin Pass (5173 ft); and Cedar Pass (6305 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Humboldt, Trinity, Shasta, Lassen, Modoc.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Between Route 101 and Route 89, and between Route 139 and Route 395.



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