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California Highways

Routes 265 through 272

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

265 · 266 · 267 · 268 · 269 · 270 · 271 · 272


State Shield

State Route 265



Routing

From Route 97 in Weed northwesterly to Route 5 at North Weed Interchange.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1402 defined Route 265 as “Route 97 in Weed northwesterly to Route 5 at North Weed Interchange.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This is an original routing for Route 99. I-5 is a freeway bypass. This was part of the original LRN 3, defined in 1909.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 265:

  • Total Length (1995): 0.5 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,150.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0.5; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 0.5 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 0.5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Siskiyou.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 265 as “[LRN 60] near Malibu Beach to [LRN 4] south of San Fernando”. This was the proposed "Malibu Canyon" freeway, Route 64, that after running as the "Whitnall" Freeway across Chase, turned and ran across the Santa Monica Mountains along Malibu Canyon Road to meet Route 1.


State Shield

State Route 266



Routing

From the Nevada state line easterly of Oasis to the Nevada state line northerly of Oasis.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1875 defined Route 266 as “Route 168 near Oasis to the Nevada state line via Mono county road 101.”

In 1984, Chapter 409 relaxed the definition: “Route 168 near Oasis to the Nevada state line via Mono county road 101.”

In 1986, Chapter 928 extended the route with a transfer from Route 168: “Route 168 near The Nevada state line easterly of Oasis to the Nevada state line northerly of Oasis.”

Note that Route 266 continues into Nevada as NV 266. The NV 266 numbering in Nevada dates back to Nevada's state route renumbering (around 1976 or so) but before the portion between the stateline/NV 264 and the Route 168/Route 266 junction was transferred from Route 168 to Route 266. The portion that was once Route 168 continues north as NV 264. The NV 266 portion is former NV 3; NV 264 is former NV 3A.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The portion from Oasis to Southern Nevada was part of LRN 63, defined in 1933. The rationale for this extension was closing the 2½ mi gap over Fish Lake Valley from the then end of LRN 63 (present-day Route 168) to bring the route to the California-Nevada state line, where a Nevada state highway proceeds northeasterly. Inclusion of this short section as a State highway closed the gap between the California and Nevada highway systelIls, and provided a complete interstate connection and corrected an obvious error in State highway designation.

 

Status

Route 266 AdoptionIn September 2012, the CTC adopted the remaining portion of Route 266 as a State Route highway location. This route adoption addressed the lack of continuity of this route east of Oasis to the Nevada State line. The proposed route adoption will extend existing Route 266 from the intersection with Route 168 to the California-Nevada state line easterly of Oasis. The route adoption allows Caltrans to construct a curve correction project within this segment and complete the route for Route 266 in Mono County.

Route 266 is a rural two-lane conventional highway located in the remote southeast corner of Mono County. It begins at the California-Nevada state line east of Oasis and connects Nevada (NV) 266 and US 95 (the northwestern access into Las Vegas) to Route 168 and the Eastern Sierra region of California. From the intersection with Route 168, it continues to the north to connect with NV 264 and provides access to the town of Dyer and Fish Lake Valley, in the state of Nevada. Route 266 travels primarily through public lands used for open range grazing. Other than several alfalfa ranches in the Oasis area, there is no development along the highway. The route is used primarily for rural goods movement and interregional access, but also connects with many dirt roads providing access to the surrounding foothills and open range lands for local and recreational use.

This segment of Route 266 was brought into the State Highway System in 1931 as former LRN 63 from Oasis easterly to the California-Nevada state line. In 1963, LRN 63 was designated as Route 168. In 1986, this segment of Route 168 was transferred to Route 266 and the limits of Route 266 were redefined as “The Nevada state line easterly of Oasis to the Nevada state line northerly of Oasis.” However, a route adoption was never sought for approval by the Commission for the transferred portion. The original segment of Route 266, from Route 168 to the California-Nevada State line to the north, was adopted on November 1, 1965. will e

Within the project limits, the existing highway consists of two 12-foot paved lanes and paved or unpaved shoulders that vary from zero to four feet in width. The horizontal alignment consists of long approach tangents connected by a nonstandard horizontal curve. The proposed route adoption is consistent with a proposed curve correction project that will realign an existing nonstandard curve near PM 2.5. The existing curve has been posted for a reduced speed limit, but due to the high approach speeds and limited sight distance at the curve location, the accident rate at the curve is much higher than the statewide average for a similar facility. The proposed project will construct a new curve with an appropriate radius for the existing approach speeds and will correct existing deficiencies in the vertical profile, thus improving sight distance. The estimated cost of the project is approximately $1,100,000, which includes construction and right of way costs escalated to the year of construction. The project is fully funded in the State Highway Operation and Protection Program through the Collision Reduction Severity Program and is scheduled to begin construction in FY 2014/2015.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.7] From the Nevada state line easterly of Oasis to Route 168 at Oasis.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 266:

  • Total Length (1995): 12 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 70 to 110.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 12; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 4 mi; FAU: 8 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 4.3 mi; Collector: 7.4 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mono.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 266 as “[LRN 9] near Sunland to [LRN 58], including a connection to [LRN 61] north of La Canada”. This route includes portions of Route 118 (from Route 118 to Route 249, unconstr.); Route 249 (from Route 118 to Route 14, unconst.); and Route 122 (from Route 14 to Route 58, unconst.).


State Shield

State Route 267



Routing

From Route 80 near Truckee to Route 28 near Kings Beach, Lake Tahoe via Northshore Boulevard.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1425 defined Route 267 as “Route 80 near Truckee to Route 28 near Kings Beach, Lake Tahoe via Northshore Boulevard.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This routing was first defined post 1963.

 

Status

A bypass for Route 267 in Truckee has been constructed to get all the Tahoe-bound traffic out of central Truckee. The Route 89 portion of the alignment is short; most of the bypass is for Route 267. The bypass includes a long viaduct across the Truckee River, which is visible as you come off the hill near the Central Truckee exit. This bypass is a 2 lane expressway with sufficient right of way to expand it to 4 lanes when needed. From the old interchange, the east and west bound on ramp will remain to provide the town with direct highway access.

 

Naming

In Truckee is the "Truckee Round House Historic Plaque", named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 76, Chapter 106, in 1992. The Truckee Roundhouse Historical Plaque marks the location of the Central Pacific Railroad roundhouse maintenance facility from 1868 to 1942.

The Route 267 bypass in Truckee is named the "CHP Officer Glenn Carlson Memorial Bypass". California Highway Patrol Officer Glenn Carlson died in the line of duty at 33 years of age during a traffic stop near the foot of Donner Summit on November 15, 1963. He had stopped a trio of men after learning that the license plates on their car were stolen, but not knowing that the three men had robbed a bank in Sacramento and were making their escape. He was fatally shot as he stepped out of his patrol unit by one of the men enabling the fugitives to temporarily escape. All three men were ultimately arrested, prosecuted, and convicted for their crimes. Officer Carlson's death was the catalyst for then California Highway Patrol Commissioner Brad Crittenden to seek additional officers, and within two years of Officer Carlson's death, the number of uniformed officers was doubled. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 138, Chapter 95, July 12, 2000.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.19] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 267:

  • Total Length (1995): 13 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 6,700 to 12,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 13; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 13 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 10 mi; Collector: 3 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Nevada, Placer.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 267 as “[LRN 59] to [LRN 266] near the San Bernardino county line”. This is proposed Route 48 from the Route 14/Route 138 junction to Route 122 near the San Bernardino County Line.

The 1963 map also shows LRN 267 as applying to the portion of Route 138 between I-5 and Route 14. That segment was LRN 59. Evidently, the straight-line segment would have become LRN 267 upon the completion of a new routing for LRN 59 to the S directly into Palmdale.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 268



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1769 defined Route 268 as “Route 27 to Route 405, via Mulholland Drive. The commission may allocate from the State Highway Fund the necessary funds for acquisition of right of way and construction of all or any portion of said route when the City of Los Angeles and the County of Los Angeles have entered into a cooperative agreement with the department wherein said city and said county each agree to pay at least fifteen percent (15%) of the cost of such acquisition and construction and said city furnishes the State of California without charge plans for said construction, which plans shall be subject to the approval of the department.”

In the 1967 budget, the CTC approved $8.3 million to construct Mulholland Drive as a four-lane scenic highway between Topanga Canyon (Route 27) and Sepulveda Blvd. However, this apparently never happened as much of Mulholland Drive between Sepulveda and Topanga is still a dirt highway, closed to the public.

In 1970, Chapter 1473 deleted this route.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This routing was first defined post 1963.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 268 as “[LRN 59] to [LRN 43]”. This is present-day Route 18 between Route 138 and I-15.


State Shield

State Route 269



Routing

From Route 33 at Avenal to Route 145 near Five Points.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1972, Chapter 748 defined Route 269 as “Route 33 at Avenal to Route 145 near Five Points.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This routing was first defined post 1963.

 

Naming

The portion of Route 269 from Route 198 to the City of Five Points in Fresno County is named the "Officer John Palacios Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Officer John Palacios, who faithfully served the residents of the City of Huron in Fresno County as an officer of the Huron Police Department. Officer Palacios died in the line of duty at 21 years of age on June 13, 1976, when he was assisting the California Highway Patrol with a traffic accident on Route 269 in Huron, California, when he was struck and killed by a drunk driver. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 14, Resolution Chapter 92, on 7/12/2007.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 269:

  • Total Length (1995): 30 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,200 to 5,100.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 24; Sm. Urban: 6; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 30 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 30 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kings, Fresno.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 269 as “[LRN 61] to [LRN 23] south of Palmdale.” This was Route 196 between 1964 and 1965, and is currently Angeles Forest Highway, Los Angeles County Route N3, from Route 2 to Route 14 south of Palmdale. .


State Shield

State Route 270



Routing

From Route 395 south of Bridgeport to Bodie State Historic Park.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1970, Chapter 1473 defined Route 270 as “Route 395 south of Bridgeport to Bodie State Historic Park.”

 

Status

Unconstructed From 9.9 mi E of US 395 to Bodie State Historic Park. Mono County and the State Department of Parks and Recreation entered into an agreement on 12/6/1983 whereby the Department of Parks and Recreation is responsible for maintaining, developing, repairing, improving, constructing, and reconstructing this 3.5 mi segment of Route 270. The Department of Parks and Recreation has indicated they would like to keep the existing dirt road so the tourist can have the true Bodie experience by travelling the last 3.5 mi on a dirt road. District 9 recommended that this stretch be deleted from the state highway system.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 270:

  • Total Length (1995): 10 miles traversable; 3 miles unconstructed (near Bodie)
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 350.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 13; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 10 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 10 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mono.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 270 as “Terminal Island to [LRN 173]”. This was the proposed "Industrial" Freeway, Route 47 from Terminal Island to I-10.


State Shield

State Route 271



Routing

From Route 101 near Cummings to Route 101 near the Humboldt-Mendocino county line.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1970, Chapter 1473 defined Route 271 as “Route 101 near Cummings to Route 101 near the Humboldt-Mendocino county line.” This is a former segment of Route 101 that has been replaced by freeway. The known constructed segments are as follows; there is no cosignage between the segments:

  1. From US 101 in Cummings to Route 1 in Leggett near the Route 1/US 101 junction

  2. From US 101 about 1000 feet north of the Combs Road interchange (about 2 miles south of Piercy) to US 101 in Cooks Valley passing through Piercy and Andersonia

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was previously signed as part of US 101; it was LRN 1, defined in 1909.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 271:

  • Total Length (1995): 15 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 90 to 980.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 15; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: None.
  • Functional Classification: Rural Minor Collector/Local Road: 15 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mendocino, Humboldt.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 271 as “a connection between [LRN 170] to [LRN 168] near Pico Rivera”. This is present-day Route 164 from I-605 to Route 19 near Pico Rivera.


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 272



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 272 as “[LRN 19] near the City of Industry to [LRN 26] near Pomona”.

In 1961, Chapter 1146 changed the terminus: “…to [LRN 26] near Pomona [LRN 240]”.

This is present-day Route 57 from Route 60 near the City of Industry to Route 71 at the Kellogg Interchange (I-10/Route 57/Route 71) interchange near Pomona.



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