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California Highways

Routes 257 through 264

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

257 · 258 · 259 · 260 · 261 · 262 · 263 · 264


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 257



Routing

From Route 34 to Route 101 near Ventura.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1372 defined Route 257 as “Route 34 to Route 101 near Ventura.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was not defined in the state highway system before 1963.

 

Status

Unconstructed This routing is unconstructed. This routing was planned as freeway; it was never upgraded. The traversable route is 5th Street and Harbor Blvd west of Route 1. It is a circuitous route around Plaza Park in Oxnard. Caltrans has no plans to adopt this route.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1965.

 


Overall statistics for Route 257:

  • Total Length (1995): 20 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 10; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 10.
  • Counties Traversed: Ventura.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 257 as “[LRN 69] near West Grand Avenue in Oakland to [LRN 69] near Albany.” This is part of present-day Route 61.


Unsigned

Unsigned State Route 258



Routing

From Route 405 near Torrance to Route 101 near Hollywood.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1372 defined Route 258 as “Route 405 near Torrance to Route 101 near Hollywood.”

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was not a pre-1963 LRN.

 

Status

This routing was planned as freeway. It looks to break off US 101 near Cuehuega, then run along Normandie until it reaches Route 405, when it becomes Route 213. It was never upgraded. According to Caltrans, the traversable route is Western Avenue, with Caltrans having no plans to assume maintenance. The freeway routing was never determined. The route concept report recommends that the alignment be moved 3.5 mi westerly, and the definition be from Route 405 near LAX to Route 101 near Hollywood.

 

Naming

Maps based on the 1956 freeway plan identify this route as a portion of the "Whitnall" freeway (Route 64). It appears to have continued N from US 101 to loop up near Olive and Alameda in Burbank to join up with the remainder of the Whitnall Freeway near Chase.

The Whitnall Freeway was named for Gordon Whitnall, the former Los Angeles city director of planning. Part of the reason for the naming could be that the route ran along Whitnall Highway, an unusual divided street that was laid out in 1927 to be part of a parkway network envisioned to dissect the Valley. In 1913, Gordon Whitnall founded the Los Angeles City Planning Association, and in 1920, he established the Los Angeles City Planning Department. From 1920-1930, he was Director of Planning for Los Angeles, and from 1929-1930 was president of the League of California Cities. From 1932-1935 he was the coordinator of the Committee on Government Simplification for Los Angeles County. In 1941, Gordon and Brysis Whitnall established a planning and government consulting firm in Los Angeles. Gordon Whitnall was an instructor in Planning at the University of Southern California, and a member of the American Society of Planning Officials, the American Institute of Planners, the American Society of Consulting Planners, and the International Fraternity of Lambda Alpha, Los Angeles Chapter.
[Some information from http://rmc.library.cornell.edu/EAD/htmldocs/RMM02880.html]

 

Status

This routing is currently unsigned.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1965.

 


Overall statistics for Route 258:

  • Total Length (1995): 17 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 17.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 258 as:

  1. [LRN 107] near Newark to [LRN 226] near San Leandro
  2. [LRN 226] near the Oakland International Airport to [LRN 5].

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 107 (Route 84) near Newark to LRN 226 (present-day proposed Route 238) near San Leandro.

    This is an unsigned portion of Route 61.

  2. From LRN 226 (present-day proposed Route 238) near the Oakland International Airport to LRN 5 (I-580).

    This is an unsigned portion of Route 13.


State Shield

State Route 259



Routing

From Route 215 to Route 210 in San Bernardino.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1371 defined this route as “Route 15 to Route 30 in San Bernardino” Prior to 1965, it was part of Route 18.

In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "Route 15" to "Route 194".

In 1982, Chapter 681 changed "Route 194" to "Route 215".

This segment was changed to end at Route 210 in 1999, reflecting the 1998 change of Route 30 to Route 210 (AB 1650, Ch 724, 10/10/99).

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of LRN 43, defined in 1933. This was part of pre-1964 Route 18.

 

Status

This routing was signed, at one point, as access to Route 30 East and I-215 South. However, the callboxes and some maps identify it as Route 259, and the new exit numbers will make this even clearer. It serves as a ramp to Route 210 E (former Route 30 E) when traveling NB on I-215, and as a ramp to I-215 S when travelling WB on Route 210 (former Route 30). It also serves Highland Avenue and E Street (which is accessed from I-215 NB only). According to some observers, by Febraury 2008, the Route 30 references had been changed to reference Route 210. Some portions were signed as Business Route 30.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Bernardino 259 0.00 1.51

 

Other WWW Links

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 259:

  • Total Length (1995): 1 mile
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 50,000 to 66,000.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 1.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 1 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 259 as “[LRN 105] to [LRN 5] near Castro Valley.” This is a proposed segment of Route 92 between Route 238 and I-580.


Unsigned

Unsigned State Route 260



Routing

(a) Route 260 is from Route 61 in Alameda to Route 880 in Oakland near Seventh and Harrison Streets.

(b) The relinquished former portion of Route 260 within the City of Alameda between Central Avenue and Atlantic Avenue is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For this relinquished former portion of Route 260, the City of Alameda shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 260.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1372 created Route 260 via a transfer from Route 61. The definition was: “Route 61 in Alameda to Route 17 in Oakland near Seventh and Harrison Streets”. That same year, Chapter 1371 reiterated the conditions that had accumulated for the previous legislative version of the route, LRN 226:

“361.1 Upon the completion of the additional subterranean tube between the Cities of Oakland and Alameda, in the vicinity of Webster Street, to be used in connection with the Posey Tube, both of which tubes are included in the description of Route 61, the department may by executive order, rule, or regulation, designate both of said tubes, and the approaches leading to or from the nearest state highway or city street, as one-way highways, and thereafter restrict said tubes and approaches to one-way traffic, proceeding in opposite directions as to each other. Upon the placing of signs notifying the public of such restrictions, any person who wilfully fails to observe such sign is guilty of a misdemeanor.”

“361.2 Because of the statewide interest in navigation, the state will hold and save the United States of America free and harmless from liability for damages to the parallel tubes between the Cities of Oakland and Alameda included in the description of Route 61 due to the initial dredging work and subsequent maintenance dredging in an area within 50 feet of said tubes in connection with the deepening of the Oakland Estuary by the Corps of Engineerings of the United States Army and the Director of Finance shall execute an agreement so to do with the proper representatives of the United States of America.”

In 1968, Chapter 282 renumbered sections 361.1 and 361.2 from Route 61 (§361) to Route 260 (§560), and updated the sections to refer to Route 260.

In 1984, Chapter 409 changed "Route 17" to "Route 880".

On August 30, 2004, AB 2027 was signed. This authorized the California Transportation Commission to relinquish to the City of Alameda the portion of Route 260 that is located within the Alameda city limits that is between Atlantic Avenue and Central Avenue, upon the terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The relinquishment becomes effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. At that point, the relinquished portion of Route 260 shall cease to be a state highway, and cannot be considered for readoption. Furthermore, the City of Alameda is required to maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 260.

Based on the new bill, in December 2004 the CTC considered relinquishment of a portion of Route 260 right of way in the City of Alameda, between Atlantic Avenue and Central Avenue, under terms and conditions as stated in the cooperative agreement dated May 21, 2004, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 325, Statutes of 2004, which amended Section 560 of the Streets and Highways Code. This appears to have been the work of the West Alameda Business Association (WABA), as reported in San Francisco Bay Crossings. This article talks about the changes to the street now that the highway designation has been dropped:

As a highway, the street had to be as wide as possible and well lit, leaving darkened narrow sidewalks. Sidewalks are being widened, and sidewalk furniture will be installed along with much-anticipated Acorn Street Lights. The old trees have been removed, and they will soon be replaced by a variety of flowering trees. Putting utilities underground will also improve the look of the street, making it a lovely street for strolling. Buses run regularly along the street, and the ferry is close by.

In 2010, Chapter 421, SB 1318, 9/29/10, changed the start of the route: "Route 61 Atlantic Avenue in Alameda to ..."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was part of LRN 226, defined in 1947.

 

Status

Although a distinct route from Route 61, this route is signed in its entirety as Route 61.

 

Named Structures

Tunnel 33-106R, the tube between Alameda and Oakland that goes beneath the Oakland Estuary, is named the "Posey Tube". It is named for George A. Posey, the engineer who devised its construction. This construction required sinking precast concrete segments into a trench running along the floor of the Oakland Estuary, and includes a ventilation system (designed by Posey) that placed high-powered fans in the portals on either end of the tube. The tube runs beneath the floor of the estuary. Construction started in 1925 and was completed in 1928.

The other tunnel (33-106L) is unofficially called the "Webster Street Tube". It was built in 1963.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Alameda 260 R0.84 R1.20

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 260:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 25,000 to 60,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 2.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 260 as “[LRN 238] to [LRN 4] north of the Calaveras River”. This is present-day unconstructed Route 235 between present-day I-5 and Route 99.


State Shield

State Route 261



Routing

Toll Road From Walnut Avenue in the City of Irvine to Route 241.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1965, Chapter 1372 defined Route 261 as “Route 101 near Longvale to Route 5 near Willows via the vicinity of Covelo and Mendocino Pass.” This same definition was also added by 1965 Chapter 1397; this duplicate definition was removed in 1967 by Chapter 235.

In 1972, Chapter 1216 repealed the route definition and transferred the routing to Route 162.

State Shield Transportation Corridor In 1991, SB 732, Chapter 775 redefined Route 261 as “Route 5 near the border of the Cities of Tustin and Irvine to Route 231”, using a routing transferred from former Route 231.

In 1996, Chaper 1154 changed the origin from “Route 5 near the border of the Cities of Tustin and Irvine” to “Walnut Avenue in the City of Irvine” (Walnut Avenue and Jamboree); the transferred portion of the route went to Route 133. It also changed the terminus to reflect the renumbering of Route 231 to Route 241: “Walnut Avenue in the City of Irvine to Route 241.” This is part of the "Eastern Toll Road", a toll road that is part of the Orange County Transportation Corridors.

According to Robert Cruickshank, the original road (Jamboree) was built as a joint project between the County of Orange and the City of Irvine, around 1989/90, to close a gap in Jamboree between Edinger and Barranca through the Tustin Marine Corps Air Station. The grade-separated interchange at Warner was constructed because as part of the agreement to build through the Marine base (now closed) the road had to have high sound walls and barbed wire atop those walls. The military may not have wanted a place where traffic would have been held up on their land, so that may have dictated the Warner interchange. In any event, since no state funds went into the construction of the road or maintenance of it, and since Jamboree was never a state route, the little freeway stub never got a state number. In the late 1990s, when the Route 261 toll road was being constructed, its builders decided to maximize travel speeds and times by constructing an interchange at Edinger, and another at Walnut (whereas before, there were simply stoplights). The result was that there was a freeway from Barranca northward, although Jamboree Road moves off of the freeway at the Walnut interchange. This was all part of a broader plan to improve road circulation between the new (in the early 1990s) developments in the Tustin Ranch area and the industrial parks in Irvine. There have always been plans to extend Tustin Ranch Road south from Walnut, through the old base, and connect with Von Karman Road at Barranca. This was to involve a grade-separated interchange at Edinger, like the one now at Jamboree, in large part because of the rail corridor that parallels Edinger near the old base.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic The 1965-1972 routing (now Route 162) was not a state route before 1964. The route runs (signed as Route 162) along Covelo Road into Covelo. It then runs E along Mendocino Pass Road (unsigned, but marked FH-7) through the Mendocino National Forest. Mendocino Pass Road becomes Alder Springs Road in Glenn County. Signage of the road resumes naer Elk Creek when Route 162 exits the National Forest. The route enters Willows along Wood Steet.

Toll Road The post-1991 routing was not a defined part of the state highway system before 1991.

 

Status

Toll Road Route 261 is the west leg of the Eastern Transportation Corridor, a toll road in Orange County. The leg connects Route 241 (the Foothill Corridor) with Jamboree Road, just south of I-5 in Irvine. It was constructed in three segments:

  • Segment I (Route 133) from Santiago Canyon Road to the Foothill Transportation Corridor (Route 241).

  • Segment II (Route 241) from the Foothill Corridor (Route 241) at Portola Parkway to Laguna Canyon Road (Route 261).

  • Segment III from the Riverside (Route 91) Freeway to Jamboree Road in Irvine (Route 241 and Route 261).

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Orange 261 0.00 3.21
Orange 261 5.75 6.20

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 261 (before consolidation with Route 231):

  • Total Length: 5 miles
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 5.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 3 mi; Minor Arterial: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Orange.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 261 as “[LRN 238] near French Camp to [LRN 4]”. This is present-day Route 234 from present-day I-5 near French Camp to Route 99.


State Shield

State Route 262



Routing

From Route 880 to Route 680 near Warm Springs. This ceases to be a state highway when Route 237 is constructed between Route 880 and Route 680.

Note: For information on the reference to Route 237, see Route 237.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1371 defined Route 262 as “Route 17 to Route 680 near Warm Springs. Route 262 shall cease to be a state highway when Route 237 is constructed between Route 17 and Route 680.” This routing was once planned as part of Route 17. For a short time Route 17 was placed on what is known as Oakland Road, which runs just east of the present-day I-880 between San Jose and Milpitas. It became Main Street in Milpitas and then met present-day Route 262 in Fremont at Warm Springs Blvd and Mission Blvd. Today's I-880 freeway was just signed as I-680 then. Later on, after the new I-680 alignment was finalized, Oakland Road and Main Street were signed as Route 238, since that portion of Mission Blvd south of the present terminus of Route 238 was signed as Route 238 to Warm Springs. Today's I-880 freeway was signed as Route 17 and Temporary I-680 north of US 101 to the junction of Route 262 and Route 17 and Temporary I-280 south of US 101 to the junction of US 280. Note that Mission Blvd crosses I-680 twice. At the first (northern) crossing it is signed as Route 238 and this is the present terminus of Route 238. At the second (southern) crossing it is signed as a connection to I-880; this is the eastern terminus of (unsigned) Route 262. Also, the city of Milpitas built a new alignment for Main Street, so present-day maps do not show how Oakland Road connected with Mission Blvd in Warm Springs via Main Street. Route 262 is the 1 mile Mission Boulevard connect in Fremont.

In 1984, Chapter 409 changed "Route 17" to "Route 880".

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This used to be short connecting segment of LRN 69 ((a), "including a connection to [Route] 5 near Warm Springs"), added to the state highway system in 1933.

 

Status

Turns into Mission Blvd in Fremont. This began as a spur for Route 680 to get from the current Route 880 to the new alignment for Route 680. As of 13 March 2001, this is signed on I-680 South.

According to an observer, although the route is signed at the exit from I-680 south, there are NO reassurance shields along the route. Westbound Route 262 is signed as 'TO I-880' and Eastbound Route 262 is signed as 'TO I-680'. Intersecting city streets have trailblazers pointing motorists to either Route 680 or Route 880. The route is constructed to freeway standards from I-880 to 0.7 miles east of I-880 at Warm Springs Blvd. This short freeway section has it's own exit and interchange, at Warren Avenue. At the east terminus of Route 262 (I-680) bridge markings call this the 'Route 680-238 separation'.

As of July 2008, the construction progresses at the I-880/Mission (Route 262)/Warren interchange. In late June 2008, the permanent exit signs for Mission Blvd started going up on I-880. None of these new signs reference Route 262--all are simply marked "To I-680". So it remains, the only signs that make a reference to Route 262 is that pair of signs on SB I-680 with the "Route 262 to I-880" markings.

In 2002, Caltrans conducted a study about building out Route 262 as a freeway, in order to relieve traffic congestion. Note that this is not the upgrading of Route 237 mentioned in the legislative definition. According to an article in the Mercury News, there are six possible routes, from Auto Mall Parkway in the north to Montague Expressway in the south. Most plans entail road improvements, such as street widenings or making bridges over city intersections. According to this article, the Fremont connector will be selected from four alternatives: (1) The Fremont and Grimmer alternative; (2) Auto Mall Parkway, which could be widened to six lanes with a bridge over Osgood Road; (3) Mission Boulevard, which could burrow underneath Warm Springs Boulevard; and (4) Scott Creek Road, Milmont Drive and Dixon Landing Road, which could each be widened. The Milpitas connector will be selected from two alternatives: (1) Calaveras Boulevard, which could be widened to six lanes with a bridge over Abel Street; and (2) an eight-lane Montague Expressway, which would have a bridge over Great Mall Parkway. This study is actually TCRP Project #6, and would run from I-680 to I-880. It was requested by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority. However, it looks like this will not happen, as it is reported in 2004 that it would cost about $750 million to close the gap, presumably with a six-lane freeway, interchange at Warm Springs, and freeway interchange at I-680.

The Santa Clara Valley Transit Authority (VTA) is presently building an elevated light-rail right-of-way in the median strip of Great Mall Parkway, which becomes Capitol Avenue at Montague Expressway, which goes over Montague. This implides that the "Milpitas Connector" option (2) most likely won't happen, since that would require Montague to go over not only Great Mall Parkway, but also over the new elevated light-rail tracks. [Thanks to Larry Silvey for this information.]

There is also a project that is building a new 3-way freeway interchange (semi-directional T) and a functionally separate 4-ramp interchange with Warren Ave, which will be extended over the freeway. The road was severed in the 1950s when Route 17 was built there. There is some good info and aerial rendition of finished interchange at http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist4/880_mission/scope.htm.

262 ImprovementsIn March 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Alameda County that will replace the Union Pacific Railroad bridges over Route 262, widen Route 262 between Kato Road and Warm Springs Boulevard, and construct ramps to Kato Road in Fremont, as the final phase of the overall Route 262/Warren Avenue/I-880 Interchange Reconstruction and I-880 Widening Project. This is a State Route 84 Local Alternative Transportation Improvement Project (LATIP) approved by the California Transportation Commission at the January 2010 meeting. The project is fully funded with federal and local funds. The project is concurrently requesting advanced funding at the March meeting. The request is consistent with Assembly Bill 1462, which allows a local agency to advance projects in the LATIP with local funds, to be repaid with revenues from excess lands when funds become available. The total estimated project cost is $52,800,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1051: Widen Route 262, replace two railroad overpass structures, and rebuild on and off ramps between Route 262 and Kato Rd. in Fremont. $3,200,000.

 

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 262:

  • Total Length (1995): 1 mile
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 45,000 to 61,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 1.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 1 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 262 as “Asilomar Beach State Park to [LRN 56]”. This is the part of Route 68 from Alilomar Beach State Park to Route 1.


State Shield

State Route 263



Routing

From Route 3 near the north city limits of Yreka northeasterly to Route 96 near the confluence of the Shasta and Klamath Rivers.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1965, Chapter 1401 defined Route 263 as “Route 96 near the confluence of the Shasta and Klamath Rivers northeasterly to Route 5 near Klamath River Bridge.”

In 1968, Chapter 282 swapped a portion of the route with Route 96: “Route 96 near the confluence of the Shasta and Klamath Rivers northeasterly southwesterly to Route 5 near Klamath River Bridge the north city limits of Yreka.”

In 1972, Chapter 1216 swapped the endpoints: “Route 5 near the north city limits of Yreka northeasterly to Route 96 near the confluence of the Shasta and Klamath Rivers.”

In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "Route 5" to "Route 3"

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This is the original routing of Route 99 (i.e., it is now Business Loop 5), and has been bypassed by the present I-5 routing. It was part of LRN 3. It was defined in 1909.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 263:

  • Total Length (1995): 8 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,100 to 2,350.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 7.8; Sm. Urban: 0.2; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 8 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 0.3 mi; Minor Arterial: 8 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Siskiyou.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 263 as “[LRN 119] near Paicines to [LRN 41] near Mendota”. This is the part of present-day Route 180 from Route 25 near Paicines to Route 180 near Mendota.


Pre-1964 Legislative Route Graphic

Pre-1964 Legislative Route 264



Status

This number is not assigned to a post-1964 route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1959, Chapter 1062 defined LRN 264 as “[LRN 238] to [LRN 4] south of Greenfield”. This is present-day Route 223 from I-5 to Route 99 south of Greenfield.



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