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California Highways

Routes 201 through 208

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

201 · 202 · 203 · 204 · 205 · 206 · 207 · 208


State Shield

State Route 201



Routing
  1. From Route 99 near Kingsburg easterly to Route 63.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    In 2009, SB 532 (Chapter 189, 10/11/2009) authorized the relinquishment of the portion within the City of Kingsburg by adding:

    (b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Kingsburg the portion of Route 201 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

    (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 201 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (3) The portion of Route 201 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (4) For the portion of Route 201 that is relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Kingsburg shall install and maintain within the jurisdiction of the city signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 201.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was LRN 131, defined in 1933. It runs along Conejo Avenue and Avenue 384.


  2. From Route 63 easterly to Route 245.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(b) Route 63 easterly to Route 69."

    In 1972, Chapter 1216 changed "Route 69" to "Route 245".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was LRN 131, defined in 1933. It runs along Conejo Avenue and Avenue 384.

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 201:

  • Total Length (1995): 25 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 770 to 10,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 24; Sm. Urban: 1; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 10 mi; FAU: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 11 mi; Collector: 14 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Fresno, Tulare.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the routes "From a point on [LRN 26] approximately 2 mi W of Brawley to a point on said [LRN 26] approximately 2½ mi SW of Brawley" and "Calipatria to Brawley-Holtville Road" as part of the highway system. In 1935, these routes were added to the highway code as LRN 201, with the definition:

  1. Calipatria to [LRN 187] between Brawley and Holtville.
  2. [LRN 26] east of Heber to [LRN 187] near Brawley

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as follows:

  1. From Calipatria to LRN 187 (US 99/Route 111 junction; present-day Route 86/Route 111 junction) between Brawley and Holtville.

    This was part of Route 115.

  2. From LRN 26 (US 99; present-day Route 86) E of Heber to LRN 187 near Brawley.

    This was part of Route 111.


State Shield

State Route 202



Routing

From California Correctional Institution at Tehachapi to Route 58 near Tehachapi.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing remains as defined in 1963.

In 1999, a routing from Commings Valley Blvd to W. Tehachapi Blvd along Tucker Road was adopted.

In May 2003, the CTC considered a proposal to vacate the segment from PM 8.9 to PM 9.9 in the City of Tehachapi.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 144, defined in 1933.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 202:

  • Total Length (1995): 11 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 800 to 18,200
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 4; Sm. Urban: 7; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 11 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 4 mi; Minor Arterial: 6 mi; Collector: 1 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kern.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the routes from "[LRN 12] near Seeley to [LRN 26] near Calexico" and "[LRN 26] near Calexico to [LRN 27] near Midway Wells" as part of the highway system. In 1935, these routes were added to the highway code with the definition:

  1. [LRN 12] near Seeley to [LRN 26] near Calexico
  2. [LRN 26] near Calexico to [LRN 27] near Midway Wells

In 1953, Chapter 1793 combined the segments and changed the origin: "[LRN 12] near Coyote Wells [LRN 12] near Seeley to [LRN 27] near Midway Wells via Calexico"

This route ran from US 80 (present-day I-8) near Coyote Wells to US 80 (present-day I-8) near Midway Wells via Calexico. This is Route 98.


State Shield

State Route 203



Routing

From the Mono county line near Minaret Summit to Route 395.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, this route ran from "Mammoth Lakes to Route 395."

In 1967, Chapter 1323 extended the route from the Mono County Line to Mammoth Lakes: "the Mono county line near Minaret Summit Mammoth Lakes to Route 395."

Between US 395 and Mammoth Lakes, an "Old State Highway" parallels Route 203, taking a much more winding course along Mammoth Creek and running through Mammoth Creek Park. It reconnects with Route 203 at Sawmill Road, just west of the current interchange with the US 395 expressway. (This road is named "Old State Highway" in Compass's map and in Mapquest, but is named "Mammoth Creek Road" in MSN's mapping service.)

Note that the road actually does not end at Minaret Summit. Starting at US 395, the road is open all year round to the town of Mammoth Lakes at about 7,800 feet and to Mammoth Mountain Ski Area Main Lodge and Mammoth Mountain Inn at about 8,950 elevation. In the winter, the road is not plowed past that point. It opens to the public around mid June depending on the snow. It continues up to Minaret Summit, and then it goes down into The San Joaquin River Middle Fork valley (although past Minaret Summit, the road is not longer part of the state highway system, although it may be maintained by the park service). While in the valley there is a turn off for Devil’s Postpile. This turn off goes right to the river. During most of the summer there is a shuttle bus from Mammoth Mountain Inn to the San Joaquin River Middle Fork valley, Devil’s Postpile, and the 2 stables in the valley. From about 7:00 am to 7:00 pm most car traffic is not allowed and you have to take the shuttle bus. There is not enough parking in the valley. The road from the Inn to the summit is great. From the summit the road goes diagonally down a slope. This part of the road is narrow and sometimes downhill vehicles have to back up hill to allow uphill vehicles to pass. Usually if the vehicles are not too wide and drivers plan ahead only slowing down is needed. When the road gets to the valley it makes almost a complete U turn. It then goes down the valley a few miles. This part of the road is again wide enough for 2 way traffic. There are multiple bus stops in the valley. More information is available at www.nps.com for Devil’s Postpile. Fishing and camping are also possible in the valley. The John Muir Trail and Pacific Crest Trail are also down there.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 112, defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1964.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.19] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 203:

  • Total Length (1995): 9 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 800 to 12,700
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 9; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 9 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 9 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mono.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1935, Chapter 429 added the route “...from [LRN 26] near Oasis N-ly to Avenue 66 via Pierce Street.” with no number. In 1937, Chapter 841 deleted the 1935 definition and recreated it as LRN 203, with the same definition. This definition then remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering.

This route ran from US 99 (present-day Route 86) near Oasis northerly to Avenue 66 via Pierce Street. This is part of present-day Route 195.


State Shield

State Route 204



Routing

From Route 58 to Route 99 near Bakersfield via Union Avenue and Golden State Avenue.

Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Bakersfield the portion of Route 204 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 204 shall cease to be a state highway. (3) The portion of Route 204 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81. Added by AB 1858, Chapter 315, September 18, 2006.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "(a) Route 99 to Route 58 near Bakersfield via Brundage Lane and Oak Street. (b) Route 58 northerly to Route 99 near Beardsley School." Later in 1963, Chapter 1698 swapped a portion with Route 99, making this "Route 99 to Route 99 near Bakersfield via Brundage Lane, Union Avenue and Golden State Avenue."

In 1978, Chapter 287 changed the origin to Route 58: "Route 99 Route 58 to Route 99 near Bakersfield via Brundate Lane, Union Avenue and Golden State Avenue."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of the original routing of US 99. Before 1964, US 99 ran along Union Ave and Golden State Avenue in Bakersfield. After 1964, Route 99 was shifted westward, and the 1964 definition of Route 204 was applied to the old surface routing. Both were LRN 4, defined in 1909. Portions of this ran on the routing that was LRN 141.

 

Naming

The portion of Route 204 between F Street and Q Street in the City of Bakersfield is named the "Vernon P. Valenzuela Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Vernon P. Valenzuela, who was born in 1949. He was raised in Bakersfield, California, the youngest of five siblings. In 1966 Mr. Valenzuela quit high school to join the United States Army and volunteered to serve in Vietnam, serving from October 1967 to May 1968, when he was wounded in battle. After his honorable discharge in 1969, he returned to Bakersfield and obtained his high school diploma by attending night school. The following September, Mr. Valenzuela became the first member of his family to attend college. Mr. Valenzuela discovered the large Associated Veterans Students Club at Bakersfield College, and his association with the organization began his life as a leader and veterans advocate. Mr. Valenzuela became an active student and held positions as President of both the Associated Veterans Students Club and the Bakersfield College Student Body. After graduating with an associate of arts degree in 1973, Mr. Valenzuela continued his education at California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), where he was a charter member of the first student council and began working in the Veterans Cost of Instruction Program (VCIP). While still attending CSUB, Mr. Valenzuela was hired to be Assistant Director of the Bakersfield College VCIP. Mr. Valenzuela obtained his bachelor’s degree in June 1975 and began counseling students at Bakersfield College, many of whom were veterans. He touched so many people’s lives during his college years that for the rest of his life he would run into people he knew while at college, who remembered him, who were helped by him, or whose children thanked him. Mr. Valenzuela received his masters degree in counseling in 1977 and earned his license in marriage and family therapy in 1979, specializing in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Mr. Valenzuela began his private practice shortly after his marriage in 1981, focusing on veterans with PTSD. He worked as a contract counselor with the Sepulveda Vet Center from 1981 to 1989, inclusive. During the 1990s, Mr. Valenzuela traveled to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C. and joined the Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA). He became the President of the charter chapter of Bakersfield VVA and gradually worked through local, state, and national levels of the organization. Mr. Valenzuela served as VVA’s California president in 1993, and went on to serve on national committees for PTSD, substance abuse, and the Veterans Initiative, which involved several trips to Vietnam to recover MIA remains. Mr. Valenzuela presented PTSD seminars throughout the nation, and was called on to work with Oklahoma City bomb survivors and United Auto Workers members in the New York area after September 11, 2001. During his involvement with VVA, Mr. Valenzuela became a leading advocate for the Vet Center program, meeting quarterly in Washington with Readjustment Counseling Services Director Dr. Alfonso Batres to discuss issues related to the Vet Center program. In 1997, Mr. Valenzuela made a conscious decision to bring his efforts to a more local level and was welcomed into the Kern County Network for Children. His efforts over the last decade included advocating for children and bridging the gap of community services for veterans. Throughout the late 1990s, he collaborated with the network to raise funds for graduating seniors and families in need during the holiday season within Kern County. In April 2008, Mr. Valenzuela was recruited to be the first Team Leader for the new Bakersfield Vet Center, helping to establish a much needed counseling resource for combat veterans throughout Kern County; as Team Leader of Bakersfield Vet Center, Mr. Valenzuela’s goal was to meet all needs of the veterans, and make the vet center a safe haven, a place where veterans could come for any help or need. He wanted the vet center in Bakersfield to be a model for all other vet centers, knowing that the people of Bakersfield are truly unique in their giving capacity and collaborative efforts. In addition to providing counseling and overseeing the operation of the vet center, Mr. Valenzuela was instrumental in beginning the Veterans Justice Program in Kern County and, along with other veterans and community resources, created and chaired the newly formed Kern County Veterans Collaborative. Mr. Valenzuela’s goal was not just to provide counseling services, but also to provide any service or answer any question a veteran may have. Mr. Valenzuela passed away at 63 years of age on Monday, March 26, 2012, overlooking the ocean and surrounded by his family. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 4, August 15, 2013. Resolution Chapter 69.

 

Named Structures

The interchange between Route 99, Route 204, and Airport Drive in Bakersfield is named the "Richard Alan Maxwell Memorial Interchange". State Traffic Officer Richard Alan Maxwell began his career in law enforcement with his appointment to the California Highway Patrol on May 15, 1989, and was killed in the line of duty on July 11, 1994. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 60, Chapter 135, in 1994, and Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 119, Chapter 147, in 1994.

 

Other WWW Links

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Status

Constructed to freeway standards from North of Bakersfield to Route 99. This is likely a business loop for Route 99. Some of the original routing near PM 6.5 has been submitted for relinquishment in December 2000.

 


Overall statistics for Route 204:

  • Total Length (1995): 5 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 11,800 to 35,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 5.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 5 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kern.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1935, the route defined as “a new route or portion of route from Mecca to [LRN 26] via Avenue 66 and...” was added to the state highway system. In 1937, Chapter 841 repealed that definition, and added the same route ("[LRN 26] to Mecca via Avenue 66") as LRN 204. This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering.

This route runs from US 99 (present-day Route 86) to Mecca via Avenue 66. This is part of present-day Route 195, and was part of 1964-1972 Route 231.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 205



Routing

From Route 580 west of Tracy to Route 5 east of Tracy.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route remains as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The routing was signed as US 48 briefly during the 1930s. It was later signed as US 50. It was part of LRN 5, defined in 1909.

 

Business Routes
  • Tracy: 11th Street. This is the original route of US 48/US 50.

 

Suffixed Routings

This was once part of I-5W.

 

Status

TCRP Project #107 will widen the segment of this route from Tracy to I-5 to six lanes. This project was originally delayed due to past transportation funding shortfalls, when it was programmed to Fiscal Year 2006-07. However, in September 2005, the San Joaquin Council of Governments proposed to replace the STIP funds with Measure K funds via an AB 3090 to advance this project to construction in Fiscal Year 2005-06. The Measure K funds along with the TCRP funds will fully fund construction. There was also a declaration of no environmental impact in September 2005. With this, the project is scheduled to complete Phase 4 in August 2009. In July 2008, truck bypass lanes opened on I-580 in the area as part of the widening process. The additional lanes opened in late May 2009.

In 2007, the CTC recommended using the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) to fund auxiliary lanes at 4 locations in Tracy ($25M).

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1778: Conduct study and construct I-205/Chrisman Road Interchange Project, Tracy, CA. $800,000.

  • High Priority Project #2055: Construction of an interchange at Lammers Road and I-205, Tracy, CA. $800,000.

 

 

Naming

The portion of I-205 from I-5 to I-580 is named the "Robert T. Monagan Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 75, Chapter 128, in 1985. Prior to being elected city councilman and mayor of Tracy, California, in 1958, he served as Secretary Manager of the Tracy Chamber of Commerce and then went on to become an administrative assistant to our Congressman Leroy Johnson. During this period, he found time to manage the Eisenhower–Nixon campaign in San Joaquin County, California. In 1960, he was elected to California's 12th Assembly District and served as an Assemblyman until 1973. Assemblyman Monagan was elected to the position of Minority Leader by his Republican colleagues in 1965 and was reelected to that post each succeeding year, except for the years he served as Speaker of the Assembly (from January 6, 1969, until January 4, 1971). While he was in the California State Assembly, he also served as President of the National Conference of State Legislative Leaders and on the Executive Board of both the Council of State Governments and the National Legislative Conference. In 1973, he was appointed by President Nixon as Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs in the United States Department of Transportation. He then served as Chairman of the California State World Trade Commission, a member of the Board of Directors of the Independent Colleges of Northern California, a member of the President's Advisory Council on Private Sector Initiatives (appointed by then President Ronald Reagan), and as a member of the Board of Directors of the California Journal. He also has served as President of the California Manufactures Association from 1974 until he took office as President of the California Economic Development Corporation in 1984.
[Excerpted from a biography from the Stockton Masonic Lodge]

 

National Trails

Lincoln Highway Sign Victory Highway Sign This portion of this segment from I-205 to I-5 (i.e., former US 50/US 48) was part of the coast-to-coast "Lincoln Highway" and the "Victory Highway".

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Joaquin 205 R5.95 R8.33

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable interstate in 11/57. Freeway.

It appears that this route was originally proposed in April 1958 with the designation I-112. By August 1958, it was being proposed as I-205, which was the number accepted.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.19] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for I-205:

  • Total Length (1995): 13 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 57,000 to 65,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 8; Sm. Urban: 5; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 13 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 13 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Joaquin, Alameda.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1935, Chapter 426 added the route “from [LRN 165] near Los Angeles River in Los Angeles to [LRN 161] in Pasadena at Broadway Avenue” to the highway system with no number. This route was achieved through a compromise; the mileage for the route was transferred from LRN 186.

In 1937, Chapter 841 deleted the route and readded it as LRN 205 with the same routing.

In 1957, Chapter 1911 relaxed the routing: "[LRN 165] near Los Angeles River in Los Angeles to [LRN 161] in Pasadenaat Broadway Avenue"

This route ran from LRN 165 (US 6/US 99 and US 6/US 66 junction; present-day I-5/Route 110 junction) near the Los Angeles River in Los Angeles to LRN 161 (US 66; present-day I-210) in Pasadena. This was the "Arroyo Seco" Parkway, also known as the "Pasadena" Freeway. It was signed as US 66; later as Route 11, and is present-day Route 110.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 206



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 30 in San Bernardino via Little Mountain to Route 15 near Verdemont."

In 1976, Chapter 1354 reworded the route and changed "Route 15" to "Route 194": "Route 194 to Route 30 in San Bernardino."

In 1982, Chapter 681 changed the order back to 1963, and changed "Route 194" to "Route 215": "Route 30 in San Bernardino via Little Mountain to Route 215 near Verdemont"

This routing was deleted in 1991 per AB 1886, Chapter 928. This was to have been a connector between a freeway portion of Route 30 (now Route 210) and I-15.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1991 definition of Route 206 was LRN 191. It ran along Kendall Drive and E Street.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1935, the route “From [LRN 69] to [LRN 75] via Ashby Avenue” was added to the highway system by Chapter 630, with no number. In 1937, Chapter 841 deleted that definition, and redefined the route as:

"[LRN 69], the East Shore Highway, to [LRN 75] via Ashby Avenue, including that portion of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge approaches (on the Alameda County end) not included in [LRN 5] and [LRN 69]"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 extended the route to [LRN 257], and eliminated the specific language on the Bay Bridge: "[LRN 257] near Emeryville to [LRN 75] near Lake Temescal"

This route ran from proposed Route 61 near Emeryville to Route 24 near Lake Temescal. This is part of present-day Route 13, but the portion between I-80 (former US 40) and Route 24 was originally signed as Route 24.



207



Routing

From Route 4 near Lake Alpine to the Mt. Reba Ski Area.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 207 was defined as the route "Route 152 west of Los Banos to Route 33." That segment was signed as Route 33 before the 1964 renumbering, but was renumbered to be Route 207 when Route 33 was moved 10 mi W. to start at a different point in Route 152.

In 1972, Chapter 1216 transferred this routing back to Route 33.

State Shield In 1979, Chapter 572 redefined Route 207 as "Route 4, 1.35 miles west of Lake Alpine, to the Mt. Reba Ski Area."

In 1984, Chapter 409 relaxed the definition to "Route 4 1.35 miles west of near Lake Alpine to the Mt. Reba Ski Area."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic The 1964-1972 routing of Route 207 was part of LRN 121, defined in 1933.

State Shield The post-1979 routing of Route 207 was not a part of the state highway system before 1964. The route is Mt. Reba Road.

 

Status

Route 207 is signed in advance and at the exit from Route 4, as well as having reassurance shields.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.19] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 207:

  • Total Length (1995): 1 mile
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 540
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 1; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 1 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alpine.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

1944 MapIn 1937, Chapter 15 added the route from “[LRN 190] near Highland northeasterly to [LRN 43]; also from a point on said [LRN 43] near where it crosses Deep Creek, thence northeasterly to and connecting with Forest Service North Side Road in Green Valley”. This was added because the existing road into Big Bear was inadequate for the traffic. It also noted there would be a Federal Grant for the road. The map to the right (from 1944) shows how LRN 207 branched from LRN 190 (Route 30/Route 38 junction).

In 1939, Chapter 473 deleted and recreated the route as [LRN 207].

In 1941, Chapter 142 removed the northern branch.

In 1949, Chapter 1467 added the route that would become LRN 232 as LRN 207: “[LRN 207] is from Sacramento to Marysville; provided, however, that Section 600 of the Streets and Highways Code shall be applicable to the route added to the State Highway System by this section the same as if said route had been added by the Collier-Burns Highway Act of 1947, and the Department of Public Works shall not be required to maintain any portion of said route until the same has been laid out and constructed as a state highway” In 1951, Chapter 1562 renumbered this duplicate [LRN 207] as [LRN 232].

By 1963, this route ran from Route 30 near Highland northeasterly to Route 18. This was signed as Route 30, and ran from the present Route 30/Route 330 junction to Route 18. It is present-day Route 330.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 208



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 1 to Route 101 near Leggett Valley."

In 1984, Chapter 409 transferred this routing to Route 1.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was an extension of LRN 56 defined in 1951. It was signed as Route 1, but there was also a proposed Route 1 that ran between Leggett and Ferndale along the coast (never constructed).

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1921, Chapter 841 authorized the Department of Engineering “...to make an investigation and submit a preliminary report upon a proposed state road with the necessary bridges connecting the city of Vallejo with a point on the state highway near Sears Point in Sonoma County... Beginning at the intersection of Butte and Tennessee Streets in Vallejo, and running thence N-ly along Wilson Avenue to the limits of said city, thence continuing along the paved county roads through the Bay terrace district to a point in the vicinity of the lands formerly owned by Vallejo Brick and Tile Company, thence leaving the mainland and running W-ly across the Napa river to island number one: situated on the immediate W bank of the Napa river and immediately N of Marc island and adjacent to the E short of San Pablo bay; thence NW-ly along said San Pablo shore levee to a point near the mouth of Sonoma creek and running W-ly across Tubbs island and across Tolay creek to a junction with the state highway in the vicinity of Sears point.” It appears that this highway was not added to the state highway system at this time.

In 1939, Chapter 473 defined LRN 208 as the route from "[LRN 8] near Sears Point to [LRN 7] near Lake Chabot."

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering., It ran from Route 37 near Sears Point to US 40 (present-day I-80) near Lake Chabot. This is former Route 48; present-day Route 37.



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