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California Highways

Routes 193 through 200

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

193 · 194 · 195 · 196 · 197 · 198 · 199 · 200


State Shield

State Route 193



Routing
  1. From Route 65 near Lincoln to Route 80 near Newcastle.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    In 2006, AB 2733, Chapter 362 permitted relinquishment of the portion of Route 193 within the City of Lincoln:

    Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Lincoln the portion of Route 193 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 193 shall cease to be a state highway. (3) The portion of Route 193 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81. (4) For the portion of Route 193 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Lincoln shall apply for approval of a Business Route designation for the relinquished portion of the highway in accordance with Chapter 20, Topic 21, of the Highway Design Manual. (5) For the portion of Route 193 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Lincoln shall install and maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 193 to the east and to Routes 65 and 80 to the west. Added by AB 2733, September 20, 2006, Chapter 362.

    In January 2011, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Lincoln on Route 193 (McBean Park Drive and the Lincoln Newcastle Highway) from Route 65 to the easterly city limits, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated October 1, 2008, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 362, Statutes of 2006, which amended Section 493 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    In 2012, AB 2679 (Chapter 769, 9/29/12) updated the language to reflect the relinquishment:

    (b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Lincoln the portion of Route 193 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

    (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 193 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (3) The portion of Route 193 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (4) For the portion of Route 193 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Lincoln shall apply for approval of a Business Route designation for the relinquished portion of the highway in accordance with Chapter 20, Topic 21, of the Highway Design Manual.

    (5) (b) For the The relinquished former portion of Route 193 relinquished under this subdivision, within the City of Lincoln is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 193, the City of Lincoln shall install and maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 193 to the east and to Routes 65 and 80 to the west. west and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 193, including any traffic signal progression. The city may apply to the department for approval of a business route designation in accordance with Chapter 20, Topic 21, of the Highway Design Manual.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 91; it was originally signed as US 99E. It was defined in 1933. Route 193 was not defined as part of the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

     

    Status

    New Alignment near LincolnIn August 2013, the CTC adopted conventional highway as a new alignment for Route 193. Route 193 is a traversable highway without an adopted alignment by the Commission. West of I-80, Route 193 connects the city of Lincoln and the unincorporated community of Newcastle in Placer County. East of I-80, Route 193 connects the cities of Auburn and Placerville. The purpose of this route adoption is to request the Commission’s approval of this route-alignment as a conventional highway to allow the Department to construct a curve correction project on a 1.1 mile segment of Route 193 west of I-80. The segment of the route that pertains to this route adoption was brought into the State Highway System in 1935 as LRN 91 and, in 1963 was designated as Route 193. This portion of Route 193 is not part of the Freeway and Expressway System. This route began at the intersection of old Route 65 in the city of Lincoln. In January of 2011, the portion of the route that is located within city limits was relinquished to the City of Lincoln (from the intersection with Old Route 65 to the intersection with McBean Park Drive). This route is a two lane highway and intersects with various public and private roads within the project limit. It has many operational deficiencies including tight curves in its alignment, limited sight distance, short distance tangent between curves, no paved shoulders, and non-standard super-elevation transitions. There are some paved shoulder flaring for driveways and intersections that were constructed under encroachment permit. Corner sight distance at road and driveway intersections is limited due to both roadway geometry and roadside vegetation. The existing run off road recoverability for errant vehicles is limited due to adjacent drainage ditches, embankments and vegetation. Due to the geometric and operational deficiencies of the roadway, drivers are not able to adjust their speed in a timely manner causing collisions through most of the stretch of roadway proposed for realignment and reconstruction. Currently, to warn drivers to the changes in alignment, warning signs have been installed and more delineation along the horizontal curves has been added. This project was initiated by the Department’s District 3 Traffic Safety Branch in April 2008 after it was determined that the highway segment from PM 4.6 to PM 5.3 had a high concentration of run off roads collisions. The preferred alternative proposes to modify the horizontal alignment using a design speed of 50 mph. This alternative represents a balance of improved safety while minimizing impacts to adjacent property owners and the environment. The new alignment will follow fewer horizontal curves with increased radii and improved sight distance associated with the vertical alignment.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 49 near Cool to Route 49 near Placerville via Georgetown.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The current definition of this segment is as defined in 1963 ("(b) Route 49 near Cool to Route 49 near Placerville via Georgetown".... but that wasn't always the case.

    In 1972, Chapter 1216 changed the terminus of this segment: "…to Route 49 Route 50 near Placerville via Georgetown." This was the result of a transfer from Route 49.

    In 1984, Chapter 409 revered the transfer, transferring the transferred portion back to Route 49: "…to Route 50 Route 49 near Placerville via Georgetown."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was LRN 93; it was unsigned before 1964. It was defined in 1933.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 193 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 193 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 193:

  • Total Length (1995): 37 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,400 to 7,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 36; Sm. Urban: 1; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 10 mi; FAU: 0.3 mi; FAS: 26 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 36 mi; Collector: 1 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Placer, El Dorado.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 77] near Prado to [LRN 9] near San Bernardino" to the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 193, with the definition "[LRN 77] near Prado to [LRN 9] near San Bernardino". Later that year, Chapter 493 changed the route to:

"[LRN 43] at Corona northerly to [LRN 19]"

This change truncated both ends of the route. It moved the southern end to the northeast, from roughly the Route 91/Route 71 junction to Route 91/Hamner Av in Corona. The route then ran up Hamner and Milken, originally to US 66 (LRN 9), but that was truncated to US 60 (LRN 19).

In 1959, Chapter 1062 relaxed the routing and extended the route to [LRN 31] near Devore: "[LRN 43] at near Corona northerly to [LRN 19] [LRN 31] near Devore."

This was the route from present-day Route 91 near Corona to I-215 near Devore. This was the future freeway routing of I-15 (former I-15E). The pre-freeway surface routing of this was former Route 31.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 194



Routing

No current routing.

 

Suffixed Routings

The 1974-1982 routing was once signed as I-15E.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic As defined on July 1, 1964, Route 194 ran from Route 49 near Downieville to Eureka Mine Road near Saddleback Mountain.

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this routing.

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1974, Chapter 537 redefined the route: "Route 15 near Temecula to Route 15 near Devore via San Bernardino and passing near Riverside." This routing was signed as I-15E (Route 194 was created because legislatively one could not have suffixed routes). The 1974 renumbering was concurrant with the creation of a new definition for Route 15 to the west.

In 1982, Chapter 681 deleted this routing and renumbered it was "Route 215".

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield The 1964-1965 routing with the number (near Downieville) was LRN 36.

Interstate Shield The post-1974 routing was as follows:

  1. Between 2 mi N of Temecula and Riverside: The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 78, defined in 1933. This is now I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E.

  2. Between jct US 60/US 91 and jct US 60/US 395: The route was cosigned as US 60/US 395, and was LRN 19, defined in 1909. This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E.

  3. Between Riverside and San Bernardino: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 395, and was LRN 43, defined in 1931. This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E.

  4. Between San Bernardino and Devore: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66/US 395, and was LRN 31, defined in 1915. This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E.

Route 194 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 194 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Interstate Submissions

The portion from Devore to I-10 was accepted as 139(b) non-chargeable milage in 1972 as I-215, changed to I-15E in 1973, changed back to I-215 in 1982 when the route was renumbered as Route 215. The portion between Route 10 and Route 60 was accepted as 139(a) milage in 1973. The portion between Route 60 and Route 15 was accepted as 139(a) milage in 1972.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the routes from "The Descanso-Temecula Road near Aguanga to Hemet" and "Hemet to [LRN 19] near Moreno" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, these were added to the highway code as LRN 194, with the routing:

"[LRN 19] near Moreno to [LRN 78] near Aguanga via Hemet"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 changed the ends and relaxed the routing: "[LRN 19] near Moreno [LRN 78] east of Temecula to [LRN 78] near Aguanga [LRN 26] near Beaumont via the vicinity of Hemet". This is the routing of Route 79 along Lamb Canyon. The portion from [LRN 78] to Moreno (Gilman Springs Road) became LRN 186 in 1959 (Route 177) and was later deleted.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 195



Routing

From Route 86 near Oasis to Route 111 near Mecca via Pierce Street and Avenue 66. This route ceases to be a state highway when Route 86 Expressway is constructed from near Oasis to Route 10.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 195 was defined as "Route 86 near Oasis to Route 10 near Shaver's Summit via Pierce Street, Avenue 66, and Mecca."

In 1972, Chapter 1216 deleted the portion between Route 111 and Route 10, and added a sunset condition: "Route 86 near Oasis to Route 10 near Shaver's Summit Route 111 near Mecca via Pierce Street and Avenue 66 and Mecca. This route shall cease to be a state highway when Route 86 Freeway is constructed from near Oasis to Route 10."

In 1981, Chapter 292 changed "Freeway" to "Expressway"

By 2003, it appears that Route 195 had been decomisssioned, although it still remains on the books, and shields remain up.

In December 2012, Route 86S was officially resigned as Route 86. Given that Route 86S was former Route 195, it is likely that Route 195 is no longer a state highway.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The present route was LRN 203, defined in 1935 and the portion of LRN 204 (also defined in 1935) between Pierce Street and Route 111. The 1964-1972 portion of Route 195 was LRN 64, defined in 1919. It appears all were signed as Route 195 by 1963.

Pre-1964 State Shield US Highway Shield In 1934, Route 195 was signed along the route from Palo Verde to the California-Nevada State Line via Blythe and Needles. This was the original route of what became US 95 between Palo Verde and the Nevada border. When US 95 was allocated, the 1934 signage of state signed Route 195 (and state signed Route 95) was resigned to be US 95 and US 395, respectively. The originally signed Route 195 was LRN 146.

 

Status

The Route 86 expressway has been completed; as of 2003, however, the state highway signage for Route 195 has not been removed.

In July 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Riverside on: Route 86 between Route 86S and Avenue 54 including adjacent right of way along Route 86 for drainage purposes; Route 111 between Route 195 and Route 86S, and between Route 86S and the boundary line between Riverside County and the city of Coachella; and Route 195 between Route 86 and Route 86S, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 195, as of 1995:

  • Total Length (1995): 7 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,200 to 2,150
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 7; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Riverside.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 2] near Oceanside to Descanso-Temecula Road near Lake Henshaw" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 195, with the definition:

"[LRN 2] near Oceanside to [LRN 78] near Lake Henshaw"

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It ran from US 101 (present-day I-5) near Oceanside to Route 79 near Lake Henshaw. This is present-day Route 76.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 196



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 196 was defined as "Route 2 to Route 249 south of Palmdale". This would have run roughly along Pacifico Mountain Road and Horse Flats Road, between Route 2 and Route 249 (approximately LA County Route N3, Angeles Forest Highway).

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this route.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This segment was LRN 269, defined in 1959.

Route 196 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 196 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 2] near Oceanside to [LRN 77] near Vista" to the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 196, with the definition:

"[LRN 2] near Oceanside to [LRN 77] near Vista"

In 1947, Chapter 1233 changed the terminus to remove the reference to [LRN 77]: "…to [LRN 77] near Vista"

In 1951, Chapter 1562 extended the route: "…to Vista [LRN 77] near Escondido"

This route ran from US 101 (present-day I-5) near Oceanside to US 395 (present-day I-15) near Escondido. This is the portion of Route 78 between I-5 and I-15.


State Shield

State Route 197



Routing

From US 199 to Route 101 staying north of the Smith River.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route remains as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 81, defined in 1933.

Route 197 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 197 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

Route 197 and US <a href=199 Improvements" src="maps/197-199-Ruby1.jpg" style="float: right" align="right" hspace="5" vspace="5" width="500" height="343">In December 2012, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR related to improvements on Route 197 and US 199 and had no comments. The project will improve spot locations on Route 197 and US 199 in Del Norte County so that two Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) trucks passing in opposite directions can be accommodated. Within the project limits, Route 197 and US 199 are rugged, two-lane conventional highways with tight curves and steep-cut slopes providing narrow traffic lanes with narrow shoulders (if shoulders exist). Route 197 is the designated route for the movement of extralegal truck loads between US 101 and US 199 because it avoids traversing Jedediah Smith Redwoods Park. Known as North Bank Road, Route 197 was built in the 1930s. US 199 in the project limits traverses the Middle Fork Smith River and was built in the early 1920s and is a tightly curved alignment with spectacular views. The proposed work consists of roadway widening, shoulder widening, roadway curve improvements, bridge replacements and culvert replacements. The project will bring Route 197 and US 199 into compliance with federal and state legislations regarding access for STAA trucks. It is split into four projects: Ruby 1 (EA 48110, Route 197 PM 4.5) is fully funded in the SHOPP Minor A Program. It would lengthen the curve and increase shoulder width. Culverts and drainage would be adjusted. The total estimated cost is $2,499,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. Ruby 2 (EA 45490, Route 197, PM 3.2 to 4.0) is fully funded in the SHOPP Minor A Program. This would improve the existing road curve, roadbed elevation, and roadway width. Different alternatives have slightly different roadway and shoulder widths. The total estimated cost is $3,400,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. Patrick Creek Narrows (PPNO 1047) will improve US 199 from Post Mile 20.5 to 20.7, Post Mile 23.9 to 24.3, and Post Mile 25.55 to 25.65. Most of these involve improving curves and slight roadway widening. It would also replace the existing Middle Fork Smith River bridge with either an upstream or downstream alternative, or rework the existing bridge to allow large trucks to cross. The project is programmed in the 2012 STIP. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $21,302,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The Narrows and Washington Curve (PPNO 1073) will improve US 199 from Post Mile 22.7 to 23.0 (Narrows), and from PM 26.3 to 26.5 (Washington Curve). These involve lane widening and curve improvement. The project is programmed in the 2012 SHOPP. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $6,750,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015-16. For these four projects, there are a total 12 build alternatives being proposed as well as the no build alternative

In June 2013, the CTC accepted the environmental document for Ruby 1, Ruby 2, Patrick Creek Narrows, and Narrows and Washington Curve.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 197:

  • Total Length (1995): 7 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,600 to 1,950
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 7; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Del Norte.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 77] near Escondido to El Cajon-Santa Ysabel Road near Ramona" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 197 with the routing:

"[LRN 77] near Escondido to [LRN 198] near Ramona"

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. The route ran from US 395 (present-day I-15) near Escondido to the Route 67/Route 78 junction near Ramona. This is present-day Route 78.


State Shield

State Route 198



Routing
  1. From Route 101 near San Lucas to Route 33 at Coalinga.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    The portion of Route 198 between US 101 and San Lucas was the original routing of US 101. (The bypass of King City, San Lucas, and San Ardo was adopted in 1962.)

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was all LRN 10. The portion between Hanford and Route 99 was defined in 1909. The portion from US 101 to Hanford was defined in 1915, and the remainder (Route 99 to Sequoia National Park) was defined in 1919. In 1934, Route 198 was signed from Jct. US 101 at San Lucas to Sequoia National Park via Coalinga.

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 198 from the junction with Route 101 to the County of Fresno is officially designated the "John McVeigh, Jr. Memorial Highway". John McVeigh, Jr. was a California Highway Patrol officer who, on April 17, 1993, was killed in the line of duty while responding to an injury accident on Route 198 in the area of King City, in the County of Monterey. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 119, Chapter 147, in 1994.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.8] Entire portion.


  2. From Route 33 near Oilfields to Route 99 via Hanford.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was all LRN 10. The portion between Hanford and Route 99 was defined in 1909. The portion from US 101 to Hanford was defined in 1915, and the remainder (Route 99 to Sequoia National Park) was defined in 1919. In 1934, Route 198 was signed from Jct. US 101 at San Lucas to Sequoia National Park via Coalinga.

     

    Status

    Hanford ExpresswayIn May 2001, the CTC considered TCRP Project #111, which will build 10mi of 4-lane expressway from Route 99 to Hanford in Kings and Tulare counties. The basic approach will be to widen the two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane expressway on Route 198 from east of Route 43 near Hanford to west of Route 99 near Visalia. The project is estimated to cost a total of $55.3 million. The regional transportation planning agencies in both Kings and Tulare Counties and the State have already funded $17.5 million for environmental review, design and right of way phases. The project will be funded with $14.0 million in the Governor’s Transportation Congestion Relief Program (TCRP). In 2007, the CTC authorized an additional $22.912 million in funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account, out of $28.640 million requested) [for the Tulare County portion] and $48.688 million (ouf of $60.860 million requested) [for the Kings County portion].

    In October 2008, the CTC received a mitigated negative declaration regarding the widening of Route 198 in Kings and Tulare Counties from 0.5 miles east of Route 43 near Hanford to 0.4 miles west of Route 99 near Visalia. The project is programmed with Corridor Mobility Improvement Account, Regional Improvement Program, Interregional Improvement Program, Traffic Congestion Relief Program, and federal demonstration funds. The total estimated project cost, capital and support, is $124.5 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The project will involve construction activities resulting in a reduction in prime farmland and visual impacts that will be mitigated to less than significant levels.

    In April 2010 the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Kings County that will construct improvements to the interchange of 12th Avenue and Route 198 in the city of Hanford, including the widening of the existing overpass and ramps on Route 198. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local funds. Total estimated project cost is $23,300,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The project will involve construction activities resulting in impacts to the habitat of the San Joaquin kit fox, a Federally listed threatened species. In addition visual impacts in the form of tree removal are associated with the project.

    In December 2012, Caltrans celebrated the ceremonial completion of the Hanford Expressway project. The $60 million project converted 10 miles of Route 198 from a two-lane highway to a four-lane divided expressway, extending from Route 43 to Route 99 in Kings and Tulare counties. Construction began in November 2009.

    In July 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Kings, at Avenue 25, consisting of highway right of way easement no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In September 2005, the CTC considered a project for Route 198 in Kings County to convert at-grade intersection to partial interchange and upgrade from urban expressway to freeway between Route 41 and Vine St. in Lemoore.

    In September 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Tulare, at Avenue 296, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county road. (6-Tul-198-PM 21.9 (KP 35.23))

    In 2007, the CTC did not recommend funding the 19th Ave. interchange and freeway conversion in Kings County ($27,770K requested) from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA).

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2116: Route 198 Expansion, from Route 99 to Route 43. $2,400,000.

     

    Naming

    The portion that passes through the City of Hanford between Seventh Avenue and Twelfth Avenue in Hanford is named the "George Alan Ingalls Memorial Highway". George Alan Ingalls was born on March 9, 1946, in Hanford, California. He entered the United States Army at Los Angeles, California, obtained the rank of Specialist Fourth Class, and was assigned to Company A, Second Battalion, Fifth Calvary, First Calvary Division (Airmobile). He served in Vietnam, and on April 16, 1967, near Duc Pho, Republic of Vietnam, George Alan Ingalls, in a spontaneous act of great courage, which cost him his own life, threw himself on top of a hand grenade, thereby abating the grenade's full blast and saving the lives of the members of his squad. He was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously on January 30, 1969; on November 11, 2000, American Legion Post 3 of Hanford appropriately honored George Alan Ingalls' mother and family members at the tank memorial in the Hanford Cemetery. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 47, Resolution Chapter 60, filed June 4, 2001.

    The portion between 18th Avenue and 25th Avenue near Lemoore is named the "United States Navy Lieutenant Commander Otis Vincent Tolbert Memorial Highway". Named in honor of the United States Navy Lieutenant Commander Otis Vincent Tolbert, a long-time Lemoore resident who was killed during the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. The segment of highway named, from 18th Avenue to 25th Avenue in Lemoore, directly correlates to his life, starting at Lemoore High School, his alma mater, and ending at the Lemoore Naval Air Station. LTC Tolbert graduated from Lemoore High School in 1990, where he was a track and field star. He was awarded a football scholarship to California State University, Fresno (CSUF), where he played defensive end for the Fresno State Bulldogs football team. He graduated in 1985 with a degree in criminal justice, and joined the United States Navy, where he advanced to the rank of Lieutenant Commander for the Defense Intelligence Agency. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 35, Chapter 51, May 5, 2004.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.8] From Route 33 near Oilfields to Route 5.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] From Route 5 near Oilfields to Route 99. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. From Route 99 to the Sequoia National Park line via Visalia.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was all LRN 10. The portion between Hanford and Route 99 was defined in 1909. The portion from US 101 to Hanford was defined in 1915, and the remainder (Route 99 to Sequoia National Park) was defined in 1919. In 1934, Route 198 was signed from Jct. US 101 at San Lucas to Sequoia National Park via Coalinga.

     

    Status

    The portion between Route 99 and Mooney Blvd. has been upgraded to freeway standards. [A tip of the hat to Gary Araki for letting me know about this.]

    Freeway completion now goes from Route 99 to Road 168 near Farmersville.

    In July 2002, the CTC considered relinquishing the segment from PM R4.8 to R8.8 in the City of Visalia

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $508,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Lemon Cove, at the Lemon Cove Maintenance Station, that will excavate contaminated soil at one location to improve ground water quality and comply with local regulations.

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 198 between Route 99 and Route 245 near Lindcove is named the "Officer James Rapozo Memorial Freeway". Officer Rapoza was an officer of the Visalia Police Department who died in the line of duty during a police raid of an apartment on January 9, 1998. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 84, Chapter 118, on 9/20/1999.

    The portion of Route 198 between Road 204 and Mehrten Drive in the County of Tulare is officially designated as the “Detective Monty L. Conley and Detective Joe R. Landin Memorial Highway”. It was named in memory of Detective Monty L. Conley and Detective Joe R. Landin of the Tulare County Sheriff's Department, who were killed on August 5, 1985, while performing their duties on behalf of the citizens they swore to protect. Detective Monty L. Conley was born in Shamrock, Texas. He lived there until 1955, when he moved to Woodlake, California. He attended Woodlake High School and the College of the Sequoias. At 19 years of age, he became Woodlake's youngest police officer. In 1973, he joined the Tulare County Sheriff's Department, where he worked in the jail and patrol divisions and later as a detective in the narcotics units. Detective Joe R. Landin was born in La Mesa, Texas, where he lived until the eighth grade. He then moved to Woodlake, California, where he attended high school. After joining the United States Marine Corps, and serving in Vietnam, he returned to Woodlake in 1972 and attended the College of the Sequoias. He became a Woodlake Police Officer in 1974. Upon joining the Tulare County Sheriff's Department in 1981, Detective Landin worked in the jail and patrol divisions. As a detective, he was assigned to the Sheriff's Tactical Enforcement Patrol and the narcotics unit. On August 5, 1985, Detective Conley and his partner, Detective Landin, were investigating a narcotics case near the town of Pixley, California, in southern Tulare County. While the two were traveling in Detective Conley's vehicle, they collided with another motorist who ran a stop sign at over 85 miles per hour. Both detectives lost their lives as a result of this tragic incident. The other motorist was tried and convicted of vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence and served a prison term of five years and four months. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 15, Resolution Chapter 51, on July 13, 2011.

    The South Giddings Avenue overcrossing of Route 198 in the City of Visalia is named the "Corporal Jared Verbeek Memorial Overcrossing". It was named in memory of Corporal Jared Verbeek, who was born in 1989, in Visalia, California, to Travis and Rosalia Verbeek. Corporal Verbeek's father served in the United States Marine Corps until his retirement and his example of dedication impressed upon his son the need to also serve his country. From an early age, Corporal Verbeek sought the opportunity to wear a uniform in service of his country, including joining the Boy Scouts of America and earning 13 merit badges within his first month. Always striving to do more, and be more, than an average person, Corporal Verbeek participated in many team sports in high school, including baseball, basketball, football, track and field, and cross country. Corporal Verbeek maintained a high GPA in high school while working with the Tulare County Sheriff, where he assisted in background and training documentation, and attended Congressman Devin Nunes' military academy at night to learn more about obtaining a commission as a military officer. Corporal Verbeek was selected for a congressional appointment to Annapolis Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, but instead chose to enlist with the United States Marine Corps and went to Marine Corps recruit training in San Diego, California, immediately after his graduation from high school. Corporal Verbeek graduated recruit training on February 1, 2008, and was assigned as a recruiter assistant at the Visalia recruiting substation, which pleased Corporal Verbeek because he could stay near his family longer. Corporal Verbeek was assigned to Marine combat training at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in Santa Margarita, California, followed by an order to Fort Lenard Wood, Missouri, where he went through his military occupational speciality training for military police, his chosen field. He then received his first duty assignment with the Military Police (MP) Company at Camp Pendleton. Corporal Verbeek volunteered to be an MP liaison for the First Battalion of the Fifth Marine Regiment, which was deployed on March 17, 2011, to Afghanistan. Corporal Verbeek gave the ultimate sacrifice for our security and died on June 21, 2011, from wounds sustained while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Corporal Verbeek's family and friends recall his thoughtfulness, selfless acts, laughter, brutal honesty, love for his family, and determination to serve his country. Corporal Verbeek's service awards include the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the National Defense Service Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, and the Afghanistan Campaign Medal, and a nomination for a posthumous Purple Heart. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 129, Resolution Chapter 65, on July 5, 2012.

    The segment from Sequoia National Park to Kings Canyon National Park has historically been named the "Generals Highway".

    The portion of Route 198 between Sixth Avenue (milepost marker 23.32) and the County of Kings line (milepost marker 28.32) in the county of Kings is named the "Christian Vasquez Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Lance Corporal Christian Vasquez, who was born in the City of Hanford on July 11, 1987, and grew up in the City of Coalinga. Lance Corporal Vasquez attended Dawson Elementary School, Coalinga Middle School, and Coalinga High School, class of 2006. Lance Corporal Vasquez, like his brother Danny, always wanted to become a Marine and, enlisted in the United States Marine Corps one week after his high school graduation. Lance Corporal Vasquez joined the Marine Corps to enable his mother to stay at home and care for his baby brother. Lance Corporal Vasquez aspired to become a doctor, as others in his family had, and hoped to attend medical school in Texas. Lance Corporal Vasquez was killed in action in the province of Al Anbar, Iraq on August 2, 2007. It was named in recognition of Lance Corporal Vasquez’s service and sacrifice. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    The Cross Creek Bridge, Bridge No. 45-06, on Route 198, in the County of Kings, is officially named the "CHP Officer Dean Esquibel Memorial Bridge". It was named on 9/27/13 by ACR 69, Res. Chapter 143, Statutes of 2013. It was named in memory of CHP Officer Dean Jose Esquibel, who was born in July 1962 in Greensboro, North Carolina. Officer Esquibel graduated from Orosi High School in 1980, joined the Police Academy through the College of the Sequoias shortly thereafter, and was assigned to the Orange Cove Police Department upon graduation. Officer Esquibel worked as an Orange Cove Police Officer and did undercover work for the Dinuba Police Department prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Dean Esquibel married in June 1981. Officer Esquibel entered the Department of the California Highway Patrol Academy on April 2, 1984, and upon graduation was assigned to the Hanford Area Office, where he proudly served the department for approximately one year. While providing backup in a high-speed pursuit of a fleeing motorcyclist on Route 198, Officer Esquibel was forced to veer off the road, causing his patrol car to burst into flames. The impact of the collision pinned Officer Esquibel inside his patrol car, and, although he was rescued by fellow CHP Officer De La Cruz shortly thereafter, Officer Esquibel succumbed to his injuries two weeks later on August 21, 1985.

    The portion from Route 65 to Visalia is historically named the "Orange Belt Highway".

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.8] Entire portion.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Tulare 198 4.22 5.00
Tulare 198 5.00 10.97
Kings 198 R10.29 R11.18
Kings 198 R16.82 R20.98

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Between Route 5 and the Sequoia National Park.

 

Status

The following sections of this route are constructed to freeway standards: (1) from Lemoore Naval Air Station to Ave 16 near Armona; (2) from Ave 14 to Ave 9 east of Hanford; (3) from Ave 9 to Jct 43; (4) from 1 mile W of Route 99 to Plaza Blvd (1 mi E of Route 99); (5) from Mooney Blvd (downtown Visalia) to Rd 168.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 198:

  • Total Length (1995): 141 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 880 to 40,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 124; Sm. Urban: 8; Urbanized: 9.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 141 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 90 mi; Minor Arterial: 51 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Monterey, Fresno, Kings, Tulare.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the routes from "San Diego-Campo Road near Spring Valley to [LRN 12] near La Mesa", "[LRN 12] near El Cajon to the Descanso-Temecula Road near Santa Ysabel", and "Julian to [LRN 26] near Kane Springs" as part of the highway system. In 1935, these routes were added to the highway code as LRN 198 with the definition:

  1. [LRN 200] near Spring Valley to [LRN 12] near La Mesa
  2. [LRN 12] near El Cajon to [LRN 78] near Santa Ysabel
  3. Julian to [LRN 26] near Kane Springs

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 200 (Route 94) near Spring Valley to LRN 12 (US 80; later I-8) near La Mesa.

    This was signed as Route 67.

  2. From LRN 12 (US 80; later I-8) near El Cajon to LRN 78 (Route 79) near Santa Ysabel.

    This was signed as Route 67 and Route 78.

  3. From Julian to LRN 26 (US 99) near Kane Springs.

    This was signed as Route 78.


US Highway Shield

US Highway 199



Routing

From Route 101 near Crescent City to the Oregon state line via the Smith River.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route remains unchanged from its 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was part of the original set of planned routes in 1926, as was signed as US 199 in 1928 (although one report gives 1932). It is part of LRN 1, defined in 1919.

 

Status

A planned expressway (or freeway) alignment for US 199 appears in Compass's Redwood Coast map; this would begin 2 miles north of the current US 101/US 199 interchange, approximately at the intersection of US 101 and Arrowhead Drive, and continue on a meandering path east towards Route 197 at Low Divide Road. (It is unclear what will happen to the southernmost segment of Route 197 between the proposed routing and Route 199 should Route 199 be assigned to this new alignment.) This plan appears to be designed to avoid the Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park altogether (current US 199 cuts through the park).

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #2684: US 199 Narrow Enhancement to reduce active slides that cause significant road closures on primary connecting route from US 101 to I-5. $1,800,000.

Route <a href=197 and US 199 Improvements" src="maps/197-199-Ruby1.jpg" style="float: right" align="right" hspace="5" vspace="5" width="500" height="343">In December 2012, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR related to improvements on Route 197 and US 199 and had no comments. The project will improve spot locations on Route 197 and US 199 in Del Norte County so that two Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) trucks passing in opposite directions can be accommodated. Within the project limits, Route 197 and US 199 are rugged, two-lane conventional highways with tight curves and steep-cut slopes providing narrow traffic lanes with narrow shoulders (if shoulders exist). Route 197 is the designated route for the movement of extralegal truck loads between US 101 and US 199 because it avoids traversing Jedediah Smith Redwoods Park. Known as North Bank Road, Route 197 was built in the 1930s. US 199 in the project limits traverses the Middle Fork Smith River and was built in the early 1920s and is a tightly curved alignment with spectacular views. The proposed work consists of roadway widening, shoulder widening, roadway curve improvements, bridge replacements and culvert replacements. The project will bring Route 197 and US 199 into compliance with federal and state legislations regarding access for STAA trucks. It is split into four projects: Ruby 1 (EA 48110, Route 197 PM 4.5) is fully funded in the SHOPP Minor A Program. It would lengthen the curve and increase shoulder width. Culverts and drainage would be adjusted. The total estimated cost is $2,499,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. Ruby 2 (EA 45490, Route 197, PM 3.2 to 4.0) is fully funded in the SHOPP Minor A Program. This would improve the existing road curve, roadbed elevation, and roadway width. Different alternatives have slightly different roadway and shoulder widths. The total estimated cost is $3,400,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. Patrick Creek Narrows (PPNO 1047) will improve US 199 from Post Mile 20.5 to 20.7, Post Mile 23.9 to 24.3, and Post Mile 25.55 to 25.65. Most of these involve improving curves and slight roadway widening. It would also replace the existing Middle Fork Smith River bridge with either an upstream or downstream alternative, or rework the existing bridge to allow large trucks to cross. The project is programmed in the 2012 STIP. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $21,302,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The Narrows and Washington Curve (PPNO 1073) will improve US 199 from Post Mile 22.7 to 23.0 (Narrows), and from PM 26.3 to 26.5 (Washington Curve). These involve lane widening and curve improvement. The project is programmed in the 2012 SHOPP. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $6,750,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015-16. For these four projects, there are a total 12 build alternatives being proposed as well as the no build alternative

In June 2013, the CTC accepted the environmental document for Ruby 1, Ruby 2, Patrick Creek Narrows, and Narrows and Washington Curve.

 

Naming

This route is unofficially named the "Redwood" Highway.

This route was part of the "Winnemucca to the Sea Highway". This route was developed to establish a continuous, improved all-weather highway from US-40 (I-80) at Winnemucca, Nevada through Medford, Oregon and on to the Pacific coast at Crescent City, California. The Winnemucca to the Sea Highway Association proposed this as US 140, but the number was never assigned. Instead, it is represented by a combination of route numbers: US 95, Nevada 140 (originally Nevada 8A), Oregon 140, US 395, Oregon 62, I-5, US 199, and US 101. Winnemucca, named after a local Paiute chief, began as a bridge over the Humboldt River for emigrants taking the Applegate-Lassen trail into northern California and Oregon, and was a major point on the transcontinental railroad and is a stop over on the ocean-to-ocean highway US-40 (I-80).
[Information from an article by John Ryczkowski]

 

Named Structures

The Hardscrabble Bridge, located on Route 199 six miles east of Hiouchi Village in Del Norte County, is officially named the "Viggo "Vic" Meedom Memorial Bridge". Viggo "Vic" Meedom was born in Denmark, and died in October of 1995 at the age of 101. He served Del Norte County as a member of the Crescent City Council, a member of the Del Norte County Board of Supervisors, and an original member of the Del Norte County Local Hospital District Board of Directors. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 55, Chapter 22, in 1996.

Bridge 01-009 over the Smith River, 12 mi E of Crescent City in Del Norte county, is named the "Mary Adams Peacock Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1926 and rebuilt in 1985, and was named in 1932. Del Norte County pioneer school teacher, Mary Adams Peacock (1861-1946), established "Adams' Station" in 1898 and married stage drive Peter Peacock in 1908. Two native plants, Anemone Adamsiana and Valeriana Adamsiana, are named for "Aunt Mary Adams".

Bridge 01-016 over the Middle Fork of the Smith River in Del Norte county is named the "Allen Fredrick Lehman Memorial Bridge". It was constructed in 1985, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 87, Chapter 15, in 1986. Allen Frederick Lehman was a long time resident of Del Norte County and Chairman of the Crescent City Harbor Commission in 1949.

Bridge 01-019 over the Middle Fork of the Smith River (19.9 mi NE of Route 101) in Del Norte county is named the "Howard Griffin Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1962, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 13, Chapter 44, in 1963. Howard Francis Griffin, journalist and World War I veteran, founded the "Crescent City American" newspaper in 1926.

Tunnel 01-049, near the Oregon State Line in Del Norte county, is named the "Randolph Collier Tunnel". It was built in 1963, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 74, Chapter 246, in 1961. Senator Randolph Collier was elected to the State Legislature from 1938-1976 to represent Humboldt, Mendocino, Sonoma, Lake, Trinity, Del Norte and Siskiyou counties. Although he was recognized as a leader in many fields of legislation, Collier gained statewide and national fame in the planning and financing of highways. He was the principal author of the Collier-Burns Act of 1947 which brought about the California Highway Plan. The state's highway system served as a model throughout the nation in that the state assumed responsibility for state highways in cities. Other improvements came with the Highway Act of 1953 which stepped up the California freeway program and the adoption of the California Freeway and Expressway System in 1959. His interest in ecological preservation introduced legislation to provide proper regulation of California's timberlands and protection for wild rivers. He worked with local authorities in providing parks and recreational facilities for the public. The naming of the Randolph Collier Tunnel through Oregon Mountain was a tribute to its principal advocate. It provided the first direct route from northwest Nevada to the Pacific Ocean. It also eliminated the route over the summit's 128 curves and hairpin switchbacks, and made the highway passable in snowy weather. Senate committees on which Collier had served include Governmental Efficiency, Finance, Revenue and Taxation, Insurance and Finance Institutions, and Transportation.
[Biographical information excerpted from the California State Archives]

This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

  • Collier Tunnel, in Del Norte County, 3 mi S of the Oregon State Line.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; signed as US Highway. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Del Norte 199 T0.51 T0.70

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 199:

  • Total Length (1995): 36 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,700 to 4,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 36; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 36 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 36 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Del Norte.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "San Diego-Coronado Ferry in Coronado to [LRN 2] via Silver Strand" to the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 199, with the same definition. The definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering.

This route ran from the San Diego-Coronado Ferry in Coronado to US 101 (present-day I-5) via Silver Strand. This is present-day Route 75.


State Shield

State Route 200



Routing

From Route 101 to Route 299 staying north of the Mad River.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is unchanged from 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 85, defined in 1933. It appears to have not been numbered before 1964.

 

Status

It is a short connector between Route 299 and US 101. It is identified as Route 200 on the Calnexus site.

 

Naming

The interchange between US 101 and Route 200 in the County of Humboldt is officially named the "CHP Officer Kenneth E. Marshall Memorial Interchange." It was named on 9/27/13 by ACR 70,Res. Chapter 144, Statutes of 2013. It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Kenneth Edmund Marshall, whowas born in December 1936, in Vernonia, Oregon. Officer Marshall graduated from Napa High School, and attended California State University, Sacramento, shortly thereafter. Officer Marshall was employed in a lumber mill near Burney, California, prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Marshall married in September 1956, and had two children. Officer Marshall graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1963 and, upon graduation, was assigned to the Los Angeles Area and later transferred to the San Leandro Area and finally to the Humboldt Area, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer Marshall, badge number 3285, was killed in the line of duty on January 9, 1968, while pursuing a speeding motorist on US 101 in the County of Humboldt. As Officer Marshall was attempting to overtake the violator, he lost control of his patrol car on the wet roadway as he was traversing through a sweeping left curve and his vehicle slid off the roadway and struck a pole adjacent to the highway.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 200:

  • Total Length (1995): 3 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,650 to 1,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 3; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi; FAS: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 3 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Humboldt.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 2] near San Diego to [LRN 12] W of Jacumba via Campo" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code with the same routing. This routing remained the same until the 1963 renumbering.

This route ran from US 101 (present-day I-5) near San Diego to US 80 (present-day I-8) W of Jacumba via Campo. This is Route 94.



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