California Highways
www.cahighways.org

California Highways

Routes 161 through 168

 
powered by FreeFind

California Highways Home Page
State Highway Routes
Numbered County Highways
State Highway Types
Interstate Types and History
Highway Numbering Conventions
State Highway Renumberings
State Highway Chronology
Maps Trails and Roads Related WWW Links Site Change Log Sources and Credits

Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

161 · 162 · 163 · 164 · 165 · 166 · 167 · 168


State Shield

State Route 161



Routing

From Route 97 near Dorris to Route 139 near Hatfield.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was part of a 1959 extension of LRN 210. It was not signed before 1963.

Route 161 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 161 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Naming

Stateline Road.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

National Trails

[Volcanic Byways]This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 161:

  • Total Length (1995): 19 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 600 to 1,100
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 19; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 19 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 19 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Siskiyou.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the routes from "[LRN 2] near Cahuenga Park to [LRN 4] near Burbank" and from "[LRN 4] near Glendale to [LRN 9] near Monrovia" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, LRN 161 was added to the highway code with the following routing:

  1. [LRN 2] near Cahuenga Park to [LRN 4] near Burbank
  2. [LRN 4] near Glendale to [LRN 9] near Monrovia

In 1947 (1st ex. sess.), Chapter 11 added an additional segment and clarified the routing:

  1. [LRN 205] near Elysian Park in Los Angeles to a connection with [LRN 4] near Glendale.
  2. [LRN 2] near Vineland Avenue Cahuenga Park to [LRN 4] near Glendale Burbank
  3. [LRN 4] near Glendale to [LRN 9] near Monrovia

In 1957, Chapter 1911 reversed the order and changed (b): “[LRN 4] near Glendale to [LRN 2] near Riverside Drive Vineland Avenue

This route was signed as follows:

  1. US 66 near Elysian Park in Los Angeles to US 99 near Glendale.

    This was a segment of US 99.

  2. US 99 (present-day I-5) near Glendale to US 101 near Riverside Drive.

    This is the remainder of the Ventura Freeway, Route 134, between I-5 and US 101. Before the construction of Route 134, this ran N from US 101 (Ventura Blvd) along Fulton to Moorpark, along Moorpark to Alameda, and along Alameda to San Fernando Road. This avoided Griffith Park.

  3. US 99 near Glendale to Route 118 near Monrovia.

    This is the older surface street routing of Route 134 from San Fernando Road to Foothill Blvd along Colorado Blvd and Colorado Street. Between 1964 and 1992, it was Route 248. The LRN was also applied to the freeway routing of Route 134 between the present-day Route 710/I-210 junction and US 99 (present-day I-5).


State Shield

State Route 162



Routing
  1. From Route 101 near Longvale to Route 5 near Willows via the vicinity of Covelo and Mendocino Pass.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was transferred from Route 261 in 1972 by Chapter 1216: "(a) Route 101 near Longvale to Route 5 near Willows via the vicinity of Covelo and Mendocino Pass."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was not a state route before 1965. The route runs (signed as Route 162) along Covelo Road into Covelo. From that point, state maintenance end, but the traversable route then runs E along Mendocino Pass Road (unsigned, but marked FH-7) through the Mendocino National Forest. Mendocino Pass Road becomes Alder Springs Road in Glenn County. Signage of the road resumes near Elk Creek when Route 162 exits the National Forest. The route enters Willows along Wood Steet.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed Unconstructed from Covelo (Mendocino County PM34.05) to near Elk Creek (Glenn County PM37.65). The traversable local routing is Mendocino Pass Road and Alder Springs Road (both part of Forest Highway (FH) 7) and the unnamed portions of FH 7. As of October 1997, FWHA, Caltrans, and the USFS had decided not to reconstruct and pave 47 miles of FH 7. Mendocino Pass Road is primitive and unsuitable for use in a state highway. Alder Springs Road was improved in 1972 and repaired in 1978. Federal funds of $4M were allocated towards the improvement of Route 162 E of Alder Springs, but the road is still not to state standards.

    In January 2009, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Mendocino along Route 162 from Route 101 to 0.1 mile easterly, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

     

    Naming

    Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.


  2. From Route 5 near Willows to Route 45.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was defined in 1963 as the original (a).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was part of LRN 45, defined in 1919. It was not a signed route before 1964.

     

    Naming

    This segment is part of the "Biggs-Willows Road", named by Resolution Chapter 542 in 1919.


  3. From Route 45 to Route 99 near Biggs.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was defined in 1963 as the original (b).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was part of LRN 45, defined in 1919. It was not a signed route before 1964.

     

    Naming

    This segment is part of the "Biggs-Willows Road", named by Resolution Chapter 542 in 1919.


  4. From Route 99 near Richvale to Route 70 near Oroville.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was defined in 1963 as the original (c)

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was part of LRN 21, defined in 1909. It was not a signed route before 1964.


  5. From Route 70 near Oroville to Foreman Creek Road via the Bidwell Bar Bridge.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was added in 1970 by Chapter 1473: "(d) Route 70 near Oroville to Foreman Creek Road via the Bidwell Bar Bridge."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was not a state legislative route in 1963.

    In the late 1930s, there was a temporary routing of Alternate US 40 that took a more southern alignment than the current Route 70 routing, running through Berry Creek and Bucks Lake to Quincy along Orville-Quincy Highway, Spanish Ranch, and Bucks Lake Road. Much of that route is no longer part of the state highway system, although the portion from Oroville to Brush Creek is part of Route 162.

     

    Status

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #253: Rehabilitate Quincy-Oroville Highway (Route 162) in Plumas County. $800,000.

     

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 12-188 over Lake Oroville in Butte county is unofficially named the "Bidwell Bar Bridge". It was constructed in 1965.

    Bridge 12-0193, crossing Feather River, W of the Routes 162 and 70 Juncture, is named the "Randy Jennings Memorial Bridge". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 84, Chapter 100 in1998. Butte County Deputy Sheriff Randy Jennings was killed in the line of duty while investigating a domestic dispute on May 21, 1977.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 162 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. By 1939, Route 162 may have been signed along the route between York Blvd and Colorado St along Eagle Rock Blvd.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 162:

  • Total Length (1995): 112 miles traversable; 63 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 260 to 26,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 165; Sm. Urban: 10; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 50 mi; FAS: 62 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 8 mi; Minor Arterial: 42 mi; Collector: 61 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mendocino, Glenn, Butte.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "[LRN 60] at Santa Monica to Colorado Boulevard near Eagle Rock" was added to the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 162 with that definition.

In 1957, Chapter 1911 removed the portion east of LRN 61, making the definition "[LRN 60] near Santa Monica to [LRN 61] near Avenue 36"

This route ran from LRN 60 (Route 3; later US 101A; later Route 1) near Santa Monica to LRN 61 (US 66) near Avenue 36. This segment was the westernmost segment of both state Route 2 and US 66. Signed as Route 2, it ran SW on Alverado St to cosigned US 66/US 101 (along a path approximately equal to the Glendale freeway). It then briefly ran NW along US 66/US 101 (prior to the freeway, it ran along Sunset Blvd), then then along Santa Monica Blvd, signed as US 66 (present-day Route 2) to Lincoln Blvd, where it terminated. One Caltrans map shows LRN 162 as continuing from LRN 2 (US 101) along Hyperion, cutting over to Fletcher, and then along Eagle Rock Blvd to LRN 161 (Colorado Blvd).

.A 1954 issue of CHPW confirms that the widening of US 101 near Vermont was in anticipation for the future Route 2 freeway (LRN 162, called, at that time, the "Santa Monica Freeway" as it ran along Santa Monica Blvd, vice LRN 173, the Olympic Freeway (Route 26), which eventually became I-10): "The design finally adopted for the Hollywood Freeway at the crossing. with Vermont Avenue was influenced by the contemplated future construction of the Santa Monica Freeway and also the possibility of rail rapid transit facilities being installed on the future Santa Monica Freeway. This required the lengthening of the Vermont Avenue Bridge and other bridges in the vicinity. The added cost providing for future rail rapid transit facilities was financed by the City of Los Angeles from city funds. Similarly financed from city funds were the bus transfer facilities at Alvarado Street and Vermont Avenue and Western Avenue."


State Shield

State Route 163



Routing

From Route 5 near Balboa Park in San Diego to Route 15 near Miramar Naval Air Station.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 163 was defined as "Near Lacy Street and Avenue 26 to Route 5 in Los Angeles." This was a small segment of old US 99 that fed into I-5 near the I-5/Route 110 interchange near Dodger Stadium

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this routing. It is still signed in one place: on Avenue 26 crossing Route 110.

State Shield In 1969, Chapter 294 added a new routing for Route 163 (using a transfer from Route 395): "San Diego to Route 15 near United States Naval Air Station, Miramar and westerly of Route 15." When this was US 395, a portion was cosigned with US 80.

In 1984, Chapter 409 the routing was clarified: "Route 5 near Balboa Park in San Diego to Route 15 near United States Miramar Naval Air Station, Miramore and westerly of Route 15".

According to Andy Field, the portion from Route 5 to San Diego was originally going to connect with an interchange linking it to Route 94. He notes that a sign on SB Route 163 approaching I-5/Fourth Avenue/Park Boulevard was modified in 1999 to eliminate a reference to Route 94. His research showed that the original freeway plans called for Route 163 to continue as a freeway south of I-5 (which it did until 1984) until the area around F and G Streets. At that point, according to Andy, the freeway was intended to turn east to connect to the existing Route 94 freeway. The Floodgap site notes that Market St was cosigned US 395/Route 94 apparently in the late 1940s after the US 80 river routing was established and Route 94's routing consequently moved a couple blocks south. By 1972, this stretch was signed as Route 163, but Route 94 was also signed.

Additionally, on Route 163 South in San Diego, just as it connects to I-5, there is a stub of a ramp that comes from nowhere above the ramp off of Route 163 (just below the old city fire alarm reporting building) that would have connected to nothing in Balboa Park. This stub ramp was part of the planned but unconstructed expansion of CA 163 from four to eight lanes of freeway. The expanded freeway was canceled due to concerns about Balboa Park and the aesthetics of the freeway (local opposition). The concrete stub is all that remains of that planned expansion.

The route's original 1948 freeway section extended from the 10th-11th Street Split to the Friars Road junction. The Route163 designation was posted in 1969, but the US 395 designation remained posted up until 1973; and extended south along 10th/11th Street to Market, turned west and ended at Harbor Drive.

Historical Oddity: Coming north out of downtown San Diego on 11th Street (at the south end of Route 163, just south of I-5) there is a sign that says something like "Historic Route 163 Cabrillo Freeway" and shows a black on white 1957-1964 Route 163 shield. The odd thing here is that this route was designated as Route 163 in the late 1960s, so it never was signed with the old black on white shield; the historic route was actually US 395. The designation come from AB 3025 in March 2002. This bill stated:

That part of the California highway system frequently referred to as the Cabrillo Freeway, which is the segment of State Highway Route 163 between postmiles 0.5 and 3.0 through Balboa Park in the City of San Diego, is hereby designated a California Historic Parkway and is named the Cabrillo Parkway."

The portion of Route 163 has been found to be eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. That happened in 1996. The corridor management plan (CMP) notes:

The CMP roughly corresponds with the limits of the Cabrillo Freeway National/California Register Historic District. The Cabrillo Freeway Historic District was found eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and for placement on the California Register of Historical Resources in December 1996 as a result of research done on Route 163 for federally funded seismic retrofit projects that were being proposed at the time (Rosen 1996, 1997). Frank Lortie and Dorene Clement (1996), California Department of Transportation (Department) architectural historians, prepared the study documenting the historical importance of the freeway and its contributing elements. The Historic Property Survey Report (HPSR) that included the Lortie and Clement report was submitted to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) in November 1996 (Rosen 1996). Eligibility of the Historic District was confirmed by FHWA on November 22, 1996, and by the SHPO on December 20, 1996 (Attachment 1). The Historic District includes a 2.6km (1.6mi) segment of Route 163, from roughly 90m (300ft) south of the Cabrillo Bridge, to a point just south of the 6th Av. on-ramp Undercrossing (UC); the east and west boundaries of the Historic District are the Department’s right-of-way limits. The contributing elements to the Historic District include:

  • The Roadway
  • The Landscaping
  • Cabrillo (AKA Laurel Street) Bridge, #57-0215, 11-SD-163, P.M. 1.42, built in 1915
  • Quince Street Overcrossing (OC), Bridge #57-0216K, 11-SD-163, P.M. 1.62, built in 1947
  • Richmond Street OC, Bridge #57-0217Z, 11-SD-163, P.M. 1.8, built in 1947
  • Upas Street Pedestrian OC, Bridge #57-0218, 11-SD-163, P.M. 2.07, built in 1947
  • Robinson Av. OC, Bridge #57-0219, 11-SD-163, P.M. 2.49, built in 1942
  • University Av. OC, Bridge #57-0085, 11-SD-163, P.M. 2.61, built in 1947
  • Washington Street OC, Bridge #57-0220, 11-SD-163, P.M. 2.75, built in 1942
  • Washington Street/6th Av. Separation, Bridge #57C-0009 (City of San Diego bridge), P.M. 2.75, built in 1940
  • Pascoe Street on-ramp OC, Bridge #57-0221, 11-SD-163, P.M. 2.79, built in 1947

Non-contributing elements to the Historic District include: Traffic signs, Median barriers, Guardrails, the 6th Av. on-ramp UC, Bridge #57-0222, 11-SD-163, P.M. 2.9, built in 1947, modified in 1979, the Route 8/163 Separation North, Bridge #57-0239F, 11-SD-163, P.M. 3.81, built in 1947, and the San Diego River Bridge, #57-0126, 11-SD-163, P.M. 3.95, built in 1946, modified in 1970. The latter three bridge structures, while included in the original Lortie and Clement evaluation, fall outside the limits of the Historic District. Subsequently, the City of San Diego Historical Resources Board listed the Historic District as local landmark #441 in September 2000. Then in August 2002 Governor Gray Davis signed legislation (AB3035§3.284) that officially designated the portion of Route 163 from PM 0.5/3.0 (KP 0.8/4.8) as the Cabrillo Historic Parkway. This section of Route 163 is also an officially designated California Scenic Highway.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 routing of Route 163 was the original routing of US 99 between San Fernando Road and I-5. It was LRN 4.

The post-1969 routing was the old US 395 routing, LRN 77, defined in 1931. At this time I-15 was defined to use the LRN 283 routing. The Route 163 routing was completed in 1948 as part of US 395. Surprisingly, Caltrans has seen fit to sign the route with a "historic" (i.e., black and white) Route 163 shield, even though it was never signed that way during that time period.

Route 163 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 163 between 1934 and 1969.

 

Naming

This route is named the "Cabrillo" Freeway from Route 5 to Route 15. Juan Rodríquez Cabrillo was the leader of one of the first European expeditions to California. In 1542, Cabrillo led the first European expedition to explore what is now the west coast of the United States. Cabrillo was commissioned by Pedro de Alvarado, Governor of Guatemala, for a voyage up the California coast under the flag of Spain. Cabrillo hoped to find the fabulously wealthy cities known as Cibola, believed to be somewhere on the Pacific coast beyond New Spain, and a route connecting the North Pacific to the North Atlantic. Cabrillo reached "a very good enclosed port" which is now San Diego bay, on September 28, 1542, naming it "San Miguel". He probably anchored his flagship, the San Salvador at Ballast Point on Point Loma's east shore. Six days later, he departed San Diego sailing northward and exploring the uncharted coast line of California. The expedition reached San Pedro on October 6, Santa Monica on the 9th, San Buenaventura on the 10th, Santa Barbara on the 13th and Pt. Concepcion on the 17th. Because of adverse winds Cabrillo turned back, harboring at San Miguel Island, and did not progress beyond Santa Maria until November 11. With a favorable wind later that day they reach the "Sierra de San Martin," probably Cape San Martin and the Santa Lucia Mountains in southern Monterey County. Struck by a storm and blown out to sea, the two vessels are separated and do not rejoin until the 15th, probably near Año Nuevo north of Santa Cruz. The next day they drifted southward, discovering "Bahía de los Pinos" and "Cabo de Pinos." These are most likely Monterey Bay and Point Pinos. On the 18th they turned south, passing snow-capped mountains (the Santa Lucias), and on November 23 returned to their harbor at San Miguel Island, where they remained for nearly three months. Cabrillo died January 3, 1543, on San Miguel Island, and may have been buried on Catalina Island. He died from complications of a broken leg incurred from a fall during a brief skirmish with natives. It was named by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 569, in 1959, when this was still part of Route 15.

The portion of Route 163 between I-8 and I-805 in the City of San Diego is named the CHP Officer Dean E. Beattie Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Dean E. Beattie, a traffic officer with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) assigned to the San Diego area. Officer Beattie was a former Marine, who attended the CHP Academy in 1979, and was subsequently assigned to various parts of the state, including San Diego, El Cajon, Santa Cruz, and Santa Rosa. While serving in El Cajon, became one of the original members of that area's CHP motor squad and was a recipient of the Governor's Safety Award in 2001 for his safe riding skills. Officer Beattie was killed in the line of duty on November 19, 2003, when his motorcycle collided with the rear of a truck on Route 163 north of Mission Valley, thereby becoming the 199th CHP officer killed in the line of duty and the first CHP officer killed in San Diego County since 2001. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 162, July 16, 2004, Chapter 123.

The portion of Route 163 between Washington Street and I-8 in the City of San Diego as the "Esteban Bahena Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Esteban Bahena, who was employed as an emergency medical technician with the San Diego Medical Service/Rural Metro. Mr. Bahena graduated from Mount Miguel High School in Spring Valley, subsequently graduated from the University of California at San Diego, and was a resident of Lemon Grove. Mr. Bahena provided extraordinary public service and made an exemplary contribution to the public good. Mr. Bahena was killed in the line of duty on the morning of April 1, 2010, on Route 163 in the City of San Diego while providing emergency assistance to persons involved in two vehicle accidents. At the time of his death, Mr. Bahena was only 24 years of age. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 122, Resolution Chapter 132, on 9/7/2010.

There is an urban legend that Route 163 was assigned that number because President John F Kennedy had taken that route from Miramar Naval Air Station to Downtown San Diego in January of 1963. Then in 1969 when it came time to renumber that portion of US 395, it was decided that 163 would be appropriate. This legend is unlikely. If the legislature (which assigns the numbers) wanted to honor President Kennedy, it is more likely they would have named it the John F. Kennedy Highway or something like that instead of using an obscure and oblique numbering rationale, especially since naming has been the usual practice for honoring someone. However, there is no way to verify this.

This portion of this route that was part of US 395 is part of "Historic US Highway 395", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 98, Chapter 79, 7/8/2008.

 

Historical Route

As of March 2008, the California Transportation Committee unanimously approved the designation of former US 395 as a historic route from San Diego to the Oregon border. It is still pending approval by the legislature and the governor. However, anticipating approval, San Diego County Supervisor Bill Horn approved $4,000 for the 31 signs that now mark old 395 in his district -- from Vista to the Bonsall Bridge, through downtown Fallbrook, to Rainbow.

On July 8, 2008, Resolution Chapter 79 officially designated specified sections of former US Highway Route 395 as Historic US Highway 395. The resolution noted that former US 395 was a scenic stretch of highway that ran through historic areas of the County of Riverside and provided the only direct route from San Diego to the Lake Tahoe region and northern Nevada, before heading back into California on its way north to Oregon and all the way into Canada. While former US 395 remains largely intact through the Counties of Inyo, Mono, Sierra, Lassen, and Modoc, only sections of former US 395 still exist in portions of the County of San Diego and the high desert area of the County of San Bernardino; most of the former highway route has been replaced by I-15 and I-215 in the Counties of San Diego, Riverside, and San Bernardino. US 395, which remains as I-15 and I-215, was the major and most significant connection between San Diego, the Inland Empire, and the eastern Sierra Nevada region. US 395 was known as the Cabrillo Parkway (and later the Cabrillo Freeway) in San Diego, now Route 163, it was the first freeway to be constructed in San Diego and opened to traffic in 1948. Part of the original routing of former US 395 in northern San Diego County includes the old Bonsall Bridge, one of the earliest automotive crossings over the San Luis Rey River, later becoming part of Route 76. The portion of former US 395 between Temecula and Lake Elsinore was part of the Butterfield Overland Mail route, the first major overland delivery service to southern California, established September 16, 1858. After its realignment eastward, former US 395 became the first major expressway and freeway system in the southern portion of the County of Riverside in the early 1950s, servicing the Cities of Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Sun City, and Perris. Today this is I-215. The portion of former US 395 between the Cities of San Bernardino and Hesperia, near modern US 395, traverses the Cajon Pass with old US 66 and old US 91, most famously used by the Mormons in 1851 in their crossing into the valley where they subsequently founded the modern Cities of San Bernardino and Riverside. The heritage in the regions through which former US 395 passed was greatly diminished when the former highway was replaced by suburban streets and I-15 and I-215.The Legislature hereby recognizes the remaining segments of US 395 for their historical significance and importance in the development of California, and designates those segments as Historic State Highway Route 395. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 98, Resolution Chapter 79, on 7/3/2008.

 

National Trails

All of original US 395 (which includes all of Route 163) was part of the "Three Flags Highway".

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Commuter Lanes

An HOV lane, for busses only, exists for 0.4 mi between A Street and I-5. It opened in December 1975, and is always in operation.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.7] From Ash Street in San Diego to Route 8.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 163 0.69 3.15
San Diego 163 3.58 3.95
San Diego 163 4.14 9.00
San Diego 163 9.38 9.80
San Diego 163 11.03 11.66

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 163:

  • Total Length (1995): 11 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 24,800 to 161,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 11.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 5 mi; FAU: 6 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 11 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

163 in Santa MonicaIn 1933, Chapter 767 defined the following route as part of the state highway system:

"Continue Roosevelt Highway from the point where it intersects with Santa Monica Canyon Road at and in Santa Monica to a point where, if so continued, it would intersect with Windward Avenue in Venica, Los Angeles, California. Said road is now commonly known and designated as Ocean Front and parallels the Pacific Ocean a short distance therefrom."

In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 163, with the routing:

"[LRN 60] in Santa Monica, at the point where [LRN 60] leaves the ocean, to Windward Avenue in Venice via a road commonly known and designated as Ocean Park"

However, this was rapidly amended later in 1935 by Chapter 274 to be:

"[LRN 60] in Santa Monica, a a point southerly of the westerly extension of Wilshire Boulevard in Santa Monica to Windward Avenue in Venice via Prominade in Santa Monica and Ocean Front Walk in the City of Los Angeles"

In 1937, Chapter 50 reworded the definition again:

"[LRN 60] at a point near Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica to a connection with Windward Avenue in the city of Los Angeles"

The pre-1961 routing did not involve Venice Blvd. The route was a connection along the coast between the constructed LRN 173 (Olympic Blvd) and the alternate LRN 173 (Pico Blvd). It provides a highway closely following the ocean-front between Santa Monica and Venice. The 1937 routing involve the street currently called Moomat Ahiko Way (the curved road going under the bridge to the Santa Monica Pier, which was built by the state), and Ocean Blvd. The route continued S along Neilson and Pacific to Windward, which is a few blocks N of Venice.

In 1961, Chapter 1840 extended the routing to Route 173: "… to a connection with Windward Avenue in the city of Los Angeles LRN 173 via Pacific Avenue and Venice Boulevard"

At this time, LRN 173 was the eventual freeway routing of I-10. Thus, the final version of the route ran from Route 1 near Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica to I-10 via Pacific Avenue and Venice Blvd. This corresponded to the 1964 version of Route 187. Since then, Route 187 has been truncated and only the portion E of Lincoln corresponds to present-day Route 187. The remainder does not correspond to any current state highways, nor does it appear this highway was signed as a state route.


Unsigned

Unsigned State Route 164



Routing

(a) Rosemead Blvd from: (1) Gallatin Road near Pico Rivera to the northern city limit of Temple City in the vicinity of Callita Street and Sultana Avenue, and (2) Route 210 to Foothill Boulevard in the City of Pasadena.

(b) The relinquished former portions of Route 164 within the County of Los Angeles and the City of Temple City are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portions of Route 164, the County of Los Angeles and the City of Temple City shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 164.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, this route ran from "Route 605 near Pico Rivera to Route 210 near Pasadena." Planned as freeway in 1965. This is signed as Route 19 via Rosemead Blvd. The segment started at Route 605 and ran along Gallatin Road (now Beverly Blvd) to Rosemead Blvd, where it turned N. Note that one of the Foothill Freeway bridges has a marker indicating that it's the 210/164 separation. Another marker stating that that portion of "164" is signed on a white card on Route 60 in Whittier Narrows Park. The Calnexus site also indicates Rosemead Blvd as Route 164.

SB 1375, Chapter 396, September 9, 2004, changed the definition from the nebulous "From Route 605 near Pico Rivera to Route 210 near Pasadena" to specifically be "Rosemead Boulevard from: (1) Gallatin Road near Pico Rivera to the northern city limit of Temple City in the vicinity of Callita Street and Sultana Avenue. (2) The northern city limit of Temple City in the vicinity of Callita Street and Sultana Avenue to the southern city limit of the City of Pasadena. SB 1375 explicitly permits relinquishment to the County of Los Angeles that portion of Route 164 described as (2) pursuant to the terms of a cooperative agreement between the county and the department, upon a determination by the commission that the relinquishment is in the best interests of the state. Said relinquishment becomes effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment; at that point, the relinquished portion of Route 164 ceases to be a state highway, and cannot be considered for future readoption. Further, the County of Los Angeles shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 164." This was relinquished in October 2006.

SB 910, Chapter 218, chaptered September 21, 2007, authorized the relinquishment of the portion in the City of Temple City to that city subject to the approval of the CTC. The relinquishment becomes effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the portion of Route 164 relinquished ceases to be a state highway, and cannot be considered for future adoption as a state highway. Additionally, the City of Temple City is required to maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 164.

In 2010, Chapter 421, 9/29/10, SB 1318 changed the second part of the definition: "(2) Route 210 The northern city limit of Temple City in the vicinity of Callita Street and Sultana Avenue to Foothill Boulevard in the southern city limit of the City of Pasadena."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was a proposed routing as of 1963. It was LRN 271, defined in 1959, between the proposed I-605 routing (LRN 170) and Rosemead Blvd (Route 19; LRN 168), and LRN 168, defined in 1933, from Rosemead Blvd N to Route 9 (US 66; future I-210) near Arcadia. The approximate routing was along Whittier and Rosemead Blvds.

One 1939 map shows Route 164 as being signed along present-day Route 107, which was LRN 164. Route 164 was not defined in the 1934 initial set of state signed routes.

 

Status

Unconstructed Unconstructed from Route 605 to Route 19. Signed as Route 19 from Route 19 to Route 210.

In September 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Los Angeles, on Rosemead Boulevard, from Callita Street and Sultana Avenue to Foothill Boulevard. [7-LA-164-PM 8.8/11.0]

On October 27, 2006, the relinquished portion of roadway was formally turned over to the County of Los Angeles on October 27, 2006. The county plans to do road resurfacing, landscaping improvements, and utility undergrounding. The medians have already been weeded and some resurfacing has begun. The estimated cost for rehabilitation is $20 million. The portion of Rosemead Boulevard in Temple City and El Monte remains a state highway.

In April 2008, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Temple City, under terms and conditions as stated in the cooperative agreement, dated March 18, 2008, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 218, Statutes of 2007, which amended Section 464 of the Streets and Highways Code.

 

Naming

The proposed name for this freeway was the "Rio Hondo Freeway". Rio Hondo refers to a river that runs near the route. In 1867, the San Gabriel River changed its course, and the old channel became known as the Rio Hondo.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route (unconstructed). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 164:

  • Total Length (1995): 10 miles traversable; 1 mile unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 23,000 to 55,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 11.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 10 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 10 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route "[LRN 60] at Torrance via Hawthorne Avenue to Mines Field-San Fernando Road" to the highway system. In 1935, it was added to the highway code with the following routing:

"[LRN 60] at Torrance via Hawthorne Avenue to [LRN 158]".

In 1957, Chapter 1911 clarified the routing to: "[LRN 60] near at Torrance via Hawthorne Avenue to [LRN 158] near Culver City".

This route ran from Route 1 near Torrance to former Route 7 (I-405) near Culver City. This is Route 107. It ran along Hawthorne and La Brea to Centinela, then along Centinela to Sepulveda Blvd.


State Shield

State Route 165



Routing

From Route 5 south of Los Banos to Route 99 near Turlock.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 165 was defined as the route from "Route 5 to Route 60 via Indiana Street in Los Angeles County." This was a temporary routing to connect Route 60 and I-5 (see map). In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted this routing.

State Shield In 1970, Chapter 1473 redefined Route 165 as "Route 5 south of Los Banos to Route 99 near Turlock."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 incarnation of Route 165 was LRN 230. It ran along Indiana Street between I-5 and Route 60.

The post-1970 routing was not a state highway prior to its definition.

Route 165 was not included in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

 

Status

There are plans to rehabilitate Wolfson Road near Stevenson. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operations and Protection Program. The total estimated project cost, support and capital, is $25,087,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009-10.

There also appear to be plans for a re-routing near Hilmar. According to the Merced Sun-Star, rerouting the highway -- which now runs down Lander Avenue and directly through the core of Hilmar -- is vital to the area's future, as it has been a very accident prone area. At most, the project will reroute Route 165 from Route 140 in the south to Bradbury Road in the north. As of late 2007, there was a study under way to identify at least two specific proposals for where and how the highway should be moved, in addition to developing an approximate schedule for the project and a cost estimate. The study should completed by early 2009. The $500,000 study was paid for by a federal earmark, a $100,000 donation from local developer JKB Homes and $8,000 contributions from each of the local government agencies involved in the project. The local governments will also be responsible for raising the money to build the new highway.

In 2010, it was reported that the list of potential routes has been downselected to two preferred routes. Alternatives D2/D4 and I2 would each diverge from the existing Route 165 south of the Merced River, skirt to the east of Hilmar, and directly connect to Route 99 at their northern terminus. But their paths differ, with D2/D4 maintaining a more direct north/south path after a short northeastern jog following the Merced River. Alternative I2 weaves its way through farmland as it curves east to meet the Bradbury Road interchange. Both suggested routes are projected to alleviate problems with the current Route 165 — the stretch of Lander Avenue that cuts through Hilmar to connect Route 99 and Route 140. Each new route is expected to reduce traffic congestion, cut down on accidents, and ease the deleterious impacts of truck traffic on Hilmar’s downtown businesses — all while improving traffic circulation for drivers throughout the region. In terms of strengths and weaknesses, D2/D4 is projected to take a middle-of-the-road approach, being consistently good in several areas — ranking fourth in improved access to Route 99, third in local traffic circulation, fourth in right of way impacts and eighth in goods movement. The I2 alternative, conversely, split first place finishes in safety, right of way impacts, and design standards with low showings of eighth in improved access to Route 99, 16th in traffic circulation and 18th in goods movement. The community appears to prefer D2/D4. Project scoping, the current phase of the development, should wrap up in 2010, while the environmental review process may run through 2014. A final route won’t be selected for some time yet, and construction is not set to begin until 2017 at the earliest. No funding has been identified for the process to obtain right of way, design the highway, or for construction, which preliminary estimates project could cost $200 million. The large cost comes in part due to a new bridge over the Merced River, required by both preferred alternatives. Another large chunk of funding would be needed for a new interchange with Route 99 in the D2/D4 plan, near the existing Youngstown Road and W. Harding Road, while in the I2 plan the existing Bradbury Road interchange would be overhauled.
(Source: Turlock Journal, 4/30/10)

In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will rehabilitate roadway and replace bridge near the city of Los Baños, specifically between MER PM 11.7 and MER PM 26.9. The project is fully funded in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. Total estimated project cost is $25,773,000 for capital and support.

In July 2011, it was reported that Caltrans is initiating a $25.8 million project to lay 15 miles of new asphalt, realign Santa Fe Grade and Wolfson Road with Route 165, widen the San Joaquin River Overflow and Salt Slough bridges, and replace the San Joaquin River Bridge. This will result in Route 165 being closed for construction (tentatively) between Oct. 3, 2011 and Feb. 3, 2012 from Henry Miller Road to one-tenth of a mile south of Route 140.

In December 2012, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Merced along Route 165 at Santa Fe Grade Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

 

Named Structures

Bridge 39-211, at the San Joaquin River in Merced County, is named the "George T. Hatfield Bridge". It was built in 1959. When it was named, Route 165 was a county road (Lander Avenue). The County Board of Supervisors may have named the bridge in honor of George T. Hatfield, who was a State Senator. Merced County has also named a park in his honor.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 165:

  • Total Length (1995): 38 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,450 to 15,700
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 35; Sm. Urban: 3; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 38 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 3 mi; Minor Arterial: 35 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Merced, Stanislaus.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "San Pedro to [LRN 9] near La Canada via Figueroa Street" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to thie highway code as LRN 166, with the routing:

"San Pedro to [LRN 9] near La Canada via Figueroa Street"

Later that year, Chapter 274 amended the definition to add routing information: "…via Figueroa Street and Linda Vista Avenue"

In 1947, Chapter 1233 simplified the definition to drop any specific routing.

This ws the route from San Pedro to US 66 (eventually I-210) near La Cañada. Portions of this were Route 11. It was signed as Route 11; it was also signed as US 6 between San Pedro and downtown Los Angeles; as cosigned US 6/US 66 between US 101 and US 99. Portions N of US 99 were Route 159. This was later resigned as present-day Route 110 and I-110. It originally ran along Figueroa and Linda Vista.


State Shield

State Route 166



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Guadalupe to Route 101 in Santa Maria.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was originally part of LRN 148, defined in 1933.

     

    Naming

    "Main" Street in Santa Maria.


  2. From Route 101 near Santa Maria to Route 33 in Cuyama Valley.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 166 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 at Guadalupe to Jct. US 99 S of Bakersfield via Maricopa. It was part of LRN 57, defined in 1919.

     

    Naming

    This segment is named the "CHP Officers Irvine and Stovall Memorial Highway". California Highway Patrol Officers Britt T. Itvine and Rick B. Stovall died on the early morning of February 24, 1998 when their patrol unit plunged off the eastbound lane of Route 166 which had been washed out by heavy rains. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 79, Chapter 65, in 1998.

     

    Status

    In May 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will realign Route 166 just east of Cuyama River Bridge to just west of Carrizo Canyon Bridge. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011- 12. Total estimated project cost is $6,477,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. A copy of the ND has been provided to Commission staff. Due to potential impacts to visual resources, an Initial Study was completed for the project. Potential visual impacts will be reduced by replacing removed trees at a 10:1 ratio. New trees will be planted in clusters and will be monitored for at least one year. Based upon environmental studies and proposed environmental commitments, the project will not have a significant effect on the environment.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved $335,000 to construct 6½ miles of centerline rumble strips near New Cuyama.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 49-178, over the Huasna River in San Luis Obispo county, is named the "Senator John J. Hollister Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1962, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 40, in the same year. John Hollister was born in the old Hollister Adobe to an early Santa Barbara cattleman and his wife. His early education was at the Dean School in Santa Barbara, with later education at the Groton School in Massachusetts and Harvard University, where he graduated in 1925 with an AB degree in Economics, principally in the field of Agricultural Economics. Returning to California, he worked at Spreckles Bank in San Francisco and was engaged in the securities business until 1932. From 1932 to 1955, Jack was actively in charge of the Winchester Ranch of the Hollister Estate Company in Santa Barbara County. Jack was elected to the California State Senate in 1955 during a special election and was re-elected in 1956 and 1960. During his terms of office, he manifested a keen interest in legislation pertaining to agriculture, education, soil conservation, and harbor development. He served as chairman of the Senate Committee on Labor.
    [Excerpted from the Memorial Book of the Department of Animal Science at UC Davis]

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] Entire portion.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. From Route 33 near Maricopa easterly to Route 99.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 166 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 at Guadalupe to Jct. US 99 S of Bakersfield via Maricopa. It was part of LRN 57, defined in 1919.

     

    Naming

    This is currently named the "Maricopa Highway".

    Historically, the portion from Route 33 to Wheeler Ridge has been called "El Camino Viejo".

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] From Route 33 near Maricopa to Route 5. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 166:

  • Total Length (1995): 96 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,900 to 19,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 94; Sm. Urban: 0.4; Urbanized: 2.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 96 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 3 mi; Minor Arterial: 93 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Kern.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route "Los Angeles, Indiana and 3rd Streets to the Huntington Beach-Whittier Road near Santa Fe Springs" to the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 166 with the definition:

"[LRN 172], at the intersection of Indiana and Third Streets, in Los Angeles, to [LRN 171] near Sante Fe Springs"

This route, as originally defined, would likely have run down from 3rd St (US 60, LRN 172) and Indiana St and then across Telegraph Road (the future I-5 routing) perhaps as far as Buena Park, where it met a routing of Route 39, which was LRN 171.

In 1941, Chapter 142 changed both endpoints, making the route from "[LRN 172] at the intersection of Downey Road Indiana and Third Streets, in Los Angeles, to LRN 174 near Norwalk [LRN 171] near Sante Fe Springs".

After this change, the route ran from LRN 172 (3rd Street, eventual Route 60) at the intersection of Downey Road to former Route 42 (LRN 174) near Norwalk. This included the segment of 1964-1965 Route 245 along Downey Road between Route 60 (LRN 172) and US 101, and the segment of US 101 (freeway routing) from Downey Road to LRN 174 (intersection with former Route 42).


State Shield

State Route 167



Routing

From Route 395 north of Mono Lake to the Nevada state line in the vicinity of the Pole Line Road.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This definition is unchanged from the original 1963 routing.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 40, defined in 1953. It appears not to have been signed by 1963.

Route 167 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 167 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 167:

  • Total Length (1995): 21 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 360 to 410
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 21; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 21 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 21 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mono.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "Long Beach via Atlantic Boulevard to [LRN 26] near Monterey Park" was added to the state highway system. In 1935, it was added to the highway code as LRN 167, with the same routing.

In 1947 (1st ex. sess.), Chapter 11 kept the same endpoints, but introduced a discontinuity at (former) Route 245/US 101: "(a) Long Beach to [LRN 166]; (b) (a) above, near Los Angeles River to [LRN 26] via Atlantic Boulevard"

In 1949, Chapter 1467 combined the segments and extend the route to [LRN 205] (Pasadena Freeway): "Long Beach to [LRN 205] in South Pasadena"

In 1951, Chapter 1562 truncated the terminus to Huntington Drive: "… to Huntington Drive."

In 1957, Chapter 1911 extended the origin to [LRN 165] (Harbor Freeway): “[LRN 165] in San Pedro Long Beach to Huntington Drive via Long Beach

In 1958, Chapter 74 added the San Pedro-Terminal Island Bridge: "[LRN 165] in San Pedro to Huntington Drive via Long Beach, and including a bridge with at least four lanes from San Pedro at or near Boschke Slough to Terminal Island"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 extended to LRN 9: "[LRN 165] in San Pedro to Huntington Drive [LRN 9] in Pasadena via Long Beach, and including a bridge with at least four lanes from San Pedro at or near Boschke Slough to Terminal Island"

This is the route from US 6/Route 11, now I-110, in San Pedro to I-210 in Pasadena via Long Beach. This is present-day I-710 (former post-1964 Route 7; former pre-1964 Route 15) to Pasadena, as well as portions of present-day Route 47 ("Route 167 Freeway-Seaside Freeway").


State Shield

State Route 168



Routing
  1. From Fresno to Huntington Lake.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(a) Route 41 near Fresno to Huntington Lake.

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 changed the origin of this segment to simply "Fresno"

    It appears that, before the freeway version, this route started at Route 41 and ran along Shaw Ave to Clovis Road, as Clovis Road to Toll House Road, and as Toll House Road to Huntington Lake.

    It looks like, as of 1955, the highway went from Shaver Lake to Big Creek and Huntington Lake, and not around the south side of the lake, which is the current alignment of the highway. This is supported by the September/October 1956 issue of California Highways, which notes an improvement on this route near Shaver Lake and Huntington Lake. Thus, it is likely that movement to the S side of the lake occured around then.

    The road into and out of Big Creek is especially mountainous and narrow, with grades nearing 20% and many one-lane sections clinging precipitously to mountainsides. Route 168 also had some major alignment changes between Clovis and Pine Ridge between 1955 and 1974. A four-lane segment of about 9 miles was built to gain the approximately 2700 feet around Tollhouse, and the old routing through Humphreys and Tollhouse was replaced with existing Morgan Canyon (to Prather) and Auberry roads up to the beginning of what's locally called just "the four-lane." The old climb still exists as Tollhouse road and is a favorite of local bicyclists, a key part of the annual Climb to Kaiser ride.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 168 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 41 near Fresno to the California-Nevada State Line, via Huntington Lake and Bishop. This segment was originally LRN 76 for its entire route. LRN 76 was defined in 1931.

     

    Status

    A freeway version of this route is planned/under construction. It will be parallel to and east of Route 41, and will have its southern terminus at a point perpendicular to Route 180. The freeway is now open from the junction with the freeway version of Route 180 to Shepard Ave. The expressway will end in a remote and unurbanized portion NE of Clovis and will greatly save time for those headed into the Sierra Natl Forest.

    As part of this routing, some of the original routing has been relinquished. In particular, the original routings from PM R0.0 to R.08, from 0.4 to 2.0, and from R58.4 to R61.0 in Fresno County were under consideration for relinquishment in December 2000 by the CTC. The original routing from KP R14.8 to KP R19.6 in Feresno County was up for relinquishment in April 2002. The old segment from KP R6.4 to R14.8 was up for relinquishment in August 2002.

    Caltrans is exploring creating a roundabout on this route at the intersection of Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather. Other potential/planned roundabout locations in the San Joaquin Valley include Route 145/Jensen near Kerman, Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake, Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran, Route 190/Road 152 east of Tipton, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 155/Browning Road in Delano. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

    According to Joe Rouse in May 2001:

    The Route 168 freeway is open between Route 180 and Herndon Ave. Between Route 180 and Shaw the signs are button copy, nonreflective. North of Shaw they are reflective. The portion from Herndon to where it will meet Toll House Rd. is nearing completion (I saw signs and lighting were up) and I saw something later that says it will open in August. Because the freeway is incomplete, there is a small sign at Shaw Ave. directing motorists who want to stay on Route 168 to exit there. The controls for Route 168 on the Route 180 freeway are Clovis and Huntington Lake. On surface street approaches to the Route 41, Route 180, and Route 168 freeways, there are no controls, only cardinal directions.

    Much to my surprise, there are no signs on Route 41 that direct motorists to use Route 180 to get to Route 168. Route 168 shields have been removed from the signs on Route 41 at Shaw. SB on Route 168 there are no signs indicating a junction with Route 180; the advanced exit signage just lists Route 41 north and south. This makes sense since SB traffic joins WB Route 180. The connectors to EB Route 180 and from WB Route 180 are not in yet, although there are large fill sections in place for the future connectors.

    According to Gary Araki in January 2002, Route 168 is now completed from the intersection of Route 180 to the confluence of Toll House Road above Clovis.

    In November 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Fresno County that will construct new braided ramps between Route 41 and Route 168 in the city of Fresno. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $55,000,000 for capital and support. The project will mitigate potential impacts to noise to a less than significant level by building soundwalls at four locations.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Fresno County that will realign the Shephert Curve along Route 168 near the city of Fresno. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $5,108,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The project will require construction activities in the habitat of the California tiger salamander and the San Joaquin kit fox, both of which are federally listed endangered and state listed threatened species.

    [Public Road Connection - Clovis]In May 2008, the CTC considered a public road connection at Ness Ave. near Clovis. The City of Clovis (City) prepared a FEIR for the approval and construction of a 410 acre mixed use development and the eventual annexation of all of the unincorporated lands within the City’s sphere of influence situated northwest of Route 168, south of Shepherd Avenue and east of Temperance Avenue within the unincorporated area of Fresno County, adjacent to the northeast city limits of Clovis. As part of the Harlan Ranch Project, the City of Clovis is constructing an extension of DeWolf Avenue to Route 168. The extension will provide access from Harlan Ranch to Route 168 at an at-grade intersection. The existing intersection is fully developed with traffic signals, and striping for through and turn lanes in all four directions, and is ultimately planned for a future interchange. The project is fully funded by the City of Clovis and no state or federal funds will be used. Construction is estimated to begin within 2 years of authorization of the public road connection at an estimated cost of $731,000. This section of Route 168 is a four-lane expressway with 10-foot outside and 5-foot inside shoulders and an unpaved 85-foot median. Currently, Nees Avenue connects to Route168 from the south only, via Tollhouse Frontage Road. The proposed project includes an extension of Nees Avenue from its intersection with Route 168 northward until it intersects with a small southward extension of DeWolf Avenue. The new connection to Route 168 will convert this intersection to a full four-way intersection. A triangular area of approximately 350 acres, bounded by Shepherd Avenue on the north, Route 168 on the southeast, and DeWolf Avenue on the west is being developed for residential and commercial mixed uses. Most employment centers and shopping centers for this region are located south and west of this new area of development. Use of Route 168 to access these centers is limited to the Temperance Avenue interchange and the Shepherd Avenue intersection. These two access points are separated by over two and a half miles. Circuitous and lengthy routes must be used for those destinations which are not located in close proximity to these connections. This new connection will relieve local traffic congestion and provide an important transportation link between the expressway and the local road system, thus providing improved emergency and service vehicle access to surrounding residential and commercial areas north of Route 168.

    This was updated in April 2010. The City now intends to seek federal stimulus II TE funds for construction of a portion of the Sierra Gateway Trail (trail) as a part of the overall project. The environmental impacts of the trail are covered by the FEIR. The trail is estimated to cost $761,000.00 and is anticipated to be fully funded by federal TE funds. Construction is estimated to begin in 2010 if federal stimulus II TE funds are obtained.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #122: Traffic flow improvements to Willow Avenue and Herndon Avenue in the City of Clovis. These are both feeder local streets to Route 168. This was noted in the Porterville Recorder. $240,000.

     

     

    Naming

    The segment in Fresno County from Route 180 to Armstrong Avenue is named the "Sierra" Freeway. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, in 1997.

    The Bullard Avenue Interchange in the City of Clovis is named the "Peter Hillman Memorial Interchange". Peter Hillman was a Deputy United States Marshal serving in the federal Eastern District of California (Fresno) when he was killed in the line of duty. He was a 14-year veteran of the United States Marshal's Service, having entered that service in the federal Northern District of California in 1986 and serving in the Fresno office since 1988. He was known as the "Hillmanator" because of his relentless pursuit of narcotics fugitives throughout Merced and Stanislaus Counties. A native of Montana, he received a bachelor's degree in criminal justice and sociology from Fresno State University in 1976, and served eight years with the United States Forest Service as a firefighter prior to joining the U.S. Marshal's service. He also took many out-of-district special assignments, including, but not limited to, Operation Sunrise, assisting in the Virgin Islands after Hurricane Marilyn, and assisting at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, Georgia. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 28; Resolution Chapter 59; filed on June 4, 2001.

    The segment within the City of Clovis, from the Herndon Avenue Interchange to the Temperance Avenue Interchange is officially named the "Deputy Sheriff Erik Jon Telen Memorial Highway". Deputy Erik Jon Telen was born in Clovis, California, to Don and Sharon Telen. He attended the Fresno City Police Academy, where he excelled, receiving top of the class honors in 1997. Upon graduating from the Fresno City Police Academy, Deputy Telen joined the Ontario, California, Police Department in August of 1997. In the fall of 2000, he returned home to his family in the Clovis area, where he joined the Fresno County Sheriff's Department. Deputy Telen was mortally wounded when he was gunned down while protecting the public on August 21, 2001. He was survived by his wife, Shelley, his daughters, Bethany and Brooke, his son, Erik Jon Telen, Jr., his mother, Sharon Telen, and his brother Danny Telen. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 43, Chapter 70, May 31, 2002.

    The Herndon Avenue Interchange in the City of Clovis is named the "William H. "Harry" Armstrong Interchange". William H. "Harry" Armstrong was a Council Member of the City of Clovis between 1970 and 2002, and served as Mayor of Clovis for four terms: 1982-84, 1990-92, 1994-97, and 1999-01. He was born in Merced, California, and lived in Clovis since 1962. He is a Korean War Veteran, Member of American Legion Post 147, and Life Member of VFW Post 3223. He served the League of California Cities as President, First Vice President, Second Vice President, Board Member, Executive Committee, Transportation, Communication, and Public Works Policy Committee, and has served the South San Joaquin Division of the League of California Cities as President, Environmental Quality Committee, Human Resources Development Committee, Chairman of the Legislative Committee, First Vice President, Labor Relations Committee, and Revenue and Taxation Committee. He is also the Chairman of the Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies, the Chairman of the Fresno County Democratic Central Committee. More significantly with respect to Route 168, he was the Chairman of the Fresno County Transportation Authority, and worked diligently to bring the Route 168 freeway project to fruition. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 45, Chapter 46, on August 15, 2002.

    The Route 168/Shaw Avenue interchange is named the "Robert L. Binger Interchange". Robert Binger was a graduate of California State University, Fresno (Fresno State). He began his career with the Department of Transportation as a Junior Civil Engineer in 1953 by 1992, after working his way through the ranks in the department, became the District Director for District 6. He retired from the department in 1997, he left behind a legacy of transportation improvements, including more than $250,000,000 worth of construction projects in the Fresno metropolitan area. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 102, Chapter 170 in 1998.

    The portion from the Temperance Avenue interchange to Shepherd Avenue in the City of Clovis is officially named the "Deputy Sheriff Dennis E. Phelps Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of Deputy Sheriff Dennis E. Phelps of the Fresno County Sheriff's Department, who was killed on May 19, 2002 while in the performance of his duty to the citizens he was sworn to protect. Deputy Sheriff Phelps had served with the Fresno County Sheriff's Department in the early 1980's as a sheriff's bailiff assigned to the Fresno County Superior Court, and after later working as a locomotive engineer with the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway, he returned to the Fresno County Sheriff's Department as a Level I Reserve Deputy Sheriff. In order to spend more time with his family and to fulfill a lifelong dream, Deputy Phelps was sworn in as a deputy sheriff on October 30, 2000 and after completing a tour serving in the courts, Deputy Phelps was assigned to the Field Training Program where he successfully completed his training. During his second week of patrol, Deputy Sheriff Phelps stopped a suspicious vehicle and was gunned down by the driver, a 21 year-old Clovis man who had been involved in a shooting incident in the City of Clovis a short time before. Deputy Sheriff Phelps was transported to Clovis District Hospital for treatment but his wounds proved fatal. The shooter escaped with Deputy Sheriff Phelps' sidearm and patrol vehicle. After a six day search and pursuit involving hundreds of officers from numerous agencies, the gunman was shot and killed. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 17, Chapter 106, 7/24/2003.

    The portion of Route 168 from the intersection of Dragonfly Lane and Tollhouse Road to Ockenden Ranch Road in Fresno County is officially named the "Deputy Sheriff Joel B. Wahlenmaier Memorial Highway" This segment was named in honor of Deputy Sheriff Joel B. Wahlenmaier of the Fresno County Sheriff's Office, who was killed on February 25, 2010, while in performance of his duties to the citizens he was sworn to protect. Wahlenmaier was born in Bakersfield and raised in Fresno, attending local schools and Reedley College. Upon joining the Fresno County Sheriff's Office in 1998, Wahlenmaier worked in the Patrol Division and as a detective assigned to the Robbery/Property Crimes and Homicide units. He was also a long-time member of the Sheriff's Search & Rescue Team. Deputy Sheriff Wahlenmaier was a dedicated officer who served his community and loved his profession. On February 25, 2010, Deputy Sheriff Wahlenmaier was investigating a felony assault case in the town of Minkler, California, in eastern Fresno County. While Deputy Sheriff Wahlenmaier was serving a search warrant, the suspect ambushed the law enforcement officers with gunfire. Wahlenmaier suffered gunshot wounds that resulted in his death upon his arrival at Community Regional Medical Center. The subsequent investigation found that the suspect, a 51-year-old Minkler man, was angry with other residents of the town and had planned to ambush law enforcement officers if they attempted to contact him. The suspect committed suicide during the incident. Reedley Police Officer Javier Bejar was also killed in the gun battle. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 164, 9/14/2010, Resolution Chapter 152.

     

    exitinfo.gif

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] Entire portion.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] From Route 65 near Clovis to Huntington Lake.


  2. From Camp Sabrina to Route 395.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963

    "(c) Big Pine to the Nevada state line via Oasis."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 168 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 41 near Fresno to the California-Nevada State Line, via Huntington Lake and Bishop. This route was originally LRN 76 for its entire route. LRN 76 was defined in 1931.

     

    Status

    The state documents state "Note that the traversable road from Huntington Lake to Camp Sabrina is not part of the legislative route." However, there is no traversable road connecting Huntington Lake to Camp Sabrina. Sabrina (and North Lake just north of Sabrina, and South Lake just southeast) is the end of the road on the east side of the Sierra.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] Entire portion.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.18] Between the east urban limits of Fresno and Route 168 at Florence Lake Road, and between Route 168 near Lake Sabrina and Route 395.


  3. From Route 395 at Big Pine to Route 266 at Oasis.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(c) Big Pine to the Nevada state line via Oasis."

    In 1986, Chapter 928 clarified (c): "Route 395 at Big Pine to Nevada State Line via Route 266 at Oasis." The portion from Oasis to the Nevada State Line was transferred to Route 266.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield In 1934, Route 168 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 41 near Fresno to the California-Nevada State Line, via Huntington Lake and Bishop. This means that originally (i.e., as part of the original signage of Route 168 in 1934), the portion from US 395 east (this segment) was not designated as Route 168; instead, the current Route 168 followed what is now Route 6 (US 6) between Bishop and the Nevada State Line. This route was originally LRN 76 for its entire route. LRN 76 was defined in 1931.

    The new routing between Big Pine and Oasis (originally the Nevada state line) was LRN 63, defined in 1919. It appears to have not been signed before 1964.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] From Route 395 at Big Pine to Route 266 at Oasis.

     

    National Trails

    Midland Trail Sign The portion of this segment over Westgard pass was part of the "Midland Trail.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Fresno 168 0.00 9.43

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 168:

  • Total Length (1995): 124 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 200 to 79,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 115; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 9.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 106 mi; FAS: 18 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 10 mi; Minor Arterial: 96 mi; Collector: 18 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Westgard Pass (7,271 ft)
  • Counties Traversed: Fresno, Inyo, Mono.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

This route was defined in 1933 as part of a route running from “[LRN 60] near Long Beach to [LRN 9] near Lamanda Park”. In 1935, it was assigned the number LRN 168, with those same words. In 1961, Chapter 1146 clarified the terminus of the route to “[LRN 9] near Lamanda Park Pasadena”, and by 1963 and the "great renumbering", the definition was “[LRN 60] near Long Beach to [LRN 9] near Pasadena”.

This was Route 19 between Long Beach and Route 164 in Pico Rivera, and then Route 164 into Pasadena. The Route 164 portion, however, has always been signed as Route 19.



Back Arrow
Highways 153-160
State Highway Routes
Return to State Highway Routes
Forward Arrow
Highways 169-176
© 1996-2012 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.