California Highways
www.cahighways.org

California Highways

Routes 153 through 160

 
powered by FreeFind

California Highways Home Page
State Highway Routes
Numbered County Highways
State Highway Types
Interstate Types and History
Highway Numbering Conventions
State Highway Renumberings
State Highway Chronology
Maps Trails and Roads Related WWW Links Site Change Log Sources and Credits

Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

153 · 154 · 155 · 156 · 157 · 158 · 159 · 160


State Shield

State Route 153



Routing

Unsigned From Route 49 near Coloma to Marshall's Monument.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 92, defined in 1933. It was not signed. This route exists in the State Historic Park.

Route 153 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 153 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

This route has only one sign, at its start. Below the sign is another sign noting this is California's Shortest State Highway (although it really isn't; another highway, Route 283, has that honor).

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 153:

  • Total Length (1995): 0.5 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 100 to 2,250
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0.5; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: None.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 0.1 mi; Rural Minor Collector/Local Road: 0.4 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: El Dorado.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "Hueneme to Montalvo-San Fernando Road near Somis via Oxnard and Camarillo" to be a state highway. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 153, with the following definition:

"Hueneme to [LRN 9] near Somis via Oxnard and Camarillo"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 changed the definition to delete the specific routing: "…near Somis via Oxnard and Camarillo".

This route is present-day Route 34.


State Shield

State Route 154



Routing

From Route 101 near Zaca to Route 101 near Santa Barbara via San Marcos Pass.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was originally signed as part of Route 150, but in 1961 it was resigned as part of Route 154 (in fact, the Route 154 designation applied not only to current Route 154, but also to what became Route 246 to Surf). Route 150 for some details of its history as Route 150.

According to a photo supplied by Joel Windmiller, at some time between 1957 and 1964 it ran through Lompoc proper, cosigned with Route 1, along what is currently Route 246.

The portion of the route between Santa Barbara and Zaca (near Los Olivos) on US 101 [LRN 2] was LRN 80, defined in 1931. It was created as a state highway to provide relief for LRN 2 (US 101). By creating it, the state hoped that it would indefinitely postpone radical widening of the present state highway through Gaviota Canyon and along the coast, which would destroy valuable landscape and property.

The portion that became Route 246 was LRN 149, defined in 1933. This was originally signed as Route 150; in 1961, it was signed as part of Route 154. It is present-day Route 246 between Surf (10 mi W of Lompoc) and Route 154 near Santa Ynez.

 

Status

In July 2009, the CTC approved vacation of right of way in the county of Santa Barbara along Route 154 on Railway Avenue in Los Olivos, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

In August 2011, an editorial indicated that Caltrans is exploring a roundabout at the intersection of Route 246 and Route 154.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #184: Reconstruct segments of Hollister Avenue between San Antonio Road and Route 154 in Santa Barbara County. Hollister Avenue is a main feeder street for Route 154, runs parallel to US 101, and may have been a former surface street routing of US 101. $2,000,000.

[Cold Springs]There are some initiatives to make changes to the 1,200 ft long Cold Springs Arch Bridge, which was constructed between June 1962 and 1964, and seismically retrofitted in 1998. The bridge opened in 1964. There have been numerous jumpers from the bridge, which is a 220-foot fall into a wooded ravine, always lethal. As of February 2008, there had been 44 suicides, including a 60-year-old doctor that left his car running and jumped over the thigh-high railing. In the Summer of 2007, Caltrans came up with a $1-million plan to install 6-foot-high safety barriers on top of the existing 30-inch-high concrete railing. The project has the backing of the Sheriff's Department, the California Highway Patrol and mental health experts. But some bridge supporters decry the barriers, saying they will spoil the view from the birdge, and that they won't work. In May 2008, the CTC looked at the announcment of the preparation of an EIR, which proposed 3 alternatives: (1) No Build; (2) Construct continuous metal barrier with inward sloping vertical steel rod pickets. (3) Construct continuous metal barrier with inward sloping grid/mesh steel wire pickets. In June 2008, the Draft EIR was on the CTC agenda. It noted the project is fully programmed in the 2008 State Highway and Operation Protection Program (SHOPP) for $3,183,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. According to USA Today, at least 49 people have leaped to their death from the Cold Spring bridge as of October 2009, five in 2009 alone. In October 2009, a 59-year-old woman used two canes and a foot stool to get over the bridge. However, not all favor the bridge. A group calling itself Friends of the Bridge filed suit in July 2009 to stop the barrier, which "threatens to deface the most beautiful long-span steel arch bridge in America," Marc McGinnes, a retired environment professor at the University of California-Santa Barbara and head of the group, said in an e-mail. Rather than prevent suicides, he said, a barrier would "merely divert occasional suicides from the bridge to other places in the community."
[Source: Los Angeles Times, USA Today]

In January 2012, construction resumed on the grid-mesh barrier being installed on both sides of the Cold Spring Arch Bridge. Construction had been stalled by court challenges, but a judge ruled in summer 2011 in favor of Caltrans resuming the $778,000 project. As of January 2012, the bridge had been the site of 55 suicides, according to Caltrans.

In September 2012, it was reported that the newly installed suicide barrier was... ineffective. Just six months after completion, a 30-year old man allegedly foiled the multi-million dollar cage and jumped to his death. That suicide marks the 55th time a person has jumped to his/her death since the bridge opened in in 1964 (hmmm, if the article was correct, it would have been the 56th time)

 

Naming

This has historically been named the "San Marcos Pass" Road from Route 101 near Santa Barbara to Los Olivos.

Historically, this route has also been named "El Camino Cielo" (The Road to the Sky).

Designated in its entirety as the "Chumash Highway". This segment was named in honor of the Chumas Indian tribe. In prehistoric times, the Chumash territory encompassed some 7,000 square miles, and today, this same region in southern central California takes in five counties, including Santa Barbara, Ventura, San Luis Obispo, Los Angeles, and Kern. While some place names in this geographic region reflect their Chumash language origins, the trails and routes that connected them remain unrecognized as the forerunners of today's highways. Route 154 follows an elaborate Chumash trail network, which linked several hundred early Chumash villages and towns, seasonal encampments, rock art sites, shrines, gathering places, and water sources, and these trails were vital to sustaining cultural longevity for over 8,000 years in this region as they formed the foundation for economic and social exchange among the Chumash. In historic times, routes through the Chumash territory were first recorded in the diaries of the Gaspar de Portola Expedition in 1769, in which it is noted that in many instances Chumash Indians led members of the expedition from one village to another, showing them the trails. Many notable works subsequently validate the location of the Chumash trail system, including along present-day Route 154. Numerous archaeological sites along Route 154 further support the historical significance of the area and the trails to the Chumash. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 75, Resolution Chapter 149, on October 2, 2007.

The interchange of Route 154 and US 101, in the County of Santa Barbara is named the "CHP Officer James C. O’Connor Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Officer James Christopher O’Connor, who was born on July 9, 1956. On December 23, 1982, Officer James Christopher O’Connor, graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy and was assigned to the West Valley area. He completed motorcycle training on February 28, 1985, and was transferred to the Ventura area, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer O’Connor was killed in the line of duty on November 15, 1990, at approximately 1524 hours. He and three fellow motor officers were traveling home from a divisionwide motorcycle training day in Santa Maria. A 1986 Ford Thunderbird, driven by a 78-year-old driver, failed to turn her vehicle at a curve and crossed over the center line into the group of officers. Officer O’Connor was struck head-on and thrown approximately 60 feet. During the impact, he was knocked out of his helmet and boots. Officer O’Connor’s fellow officers called for help and immediately began cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). He was transported to a nearby hospital, but succumbed to his injuries. Officer O’Connor was a good man and a good officer. He was known for his skill in riding motorcycles and his ability to get into accidents when driving an automobile. One day, while on patrol, Officer O’Connor managed to crash his patrol car into the center divider at approximately 75 mph while trying to split traffic. It was named in recognition of Officer James Christopher O’Connor’s contributions and sacrifice in serving the Department of the California Highway Patrol and the citizens of California.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

The intersection of Route 154 and Route 246 in Santa Barbara County is named the "Senior Investigator Laura Jean Cleaves Memorial Junction". It was named in memory of Laura Jean Cleaves, born on April 19, 1955, in Long Beach, California. In 1976, Ms. Cleaves joined the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, where she met her future husband, Deputy Stephen M. Cleaves, and they were married in 1978 and moved to northern California two years later, where she distinguished herself as the first female police officer for the City of Arcata. Relocating to Santa Barbara County in 1981, Ms. Cleaves accepted a position with the Santa Barbara Police Department and, in 1984, became an investigator with the Santa Barbara County District Attorney's Office where she excelled as a criminal investigator and was later promoted to senior investigator. She continually demonstrated honesty, integrity, professionalism, and leadership in all her varied assignments. An avid and accomplished horsewoman, Ms. Cleaves wrote articles on horse care, safety, and riding and provided riding instruction for those with a love of horses and, in 1988, she began sharing her expertise as a reserve deputy sheriff and instructor for the Sheriff's Mounted Unit. Ms. Cleaves had a passion for protecting others, and while on duty April 30, 2008, her vehicle was struck by a drunken driver and she suffered a fatal injury. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 147, Resolution Chapter 161, on 9/19/2008.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Note: A section of freeway exists in Santa Barbara for about 2 miles.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Santa Barbara 154 R31.48 R32.20

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.17] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 154:

  • Total Length (1995): 32 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 6,100 to 14,300
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 29; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 3.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 32 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2mi; Minor Arterial: 30 mi.
  • Significant Summits: San Marcos Pass (2225 ft)
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Barbara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the routes from "[LRN 2] near El Rio to Montalvo-San Fernando Road near Saticoy" and from "The Montalvo-San Fernando Road near Saticoy to [LRN 79]" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, LRN 154 was added to the highway code with the following routing:

  1. [LRN 2] near El Rio to [LRN 9] near Saticoy
  2. [LRN 9] near Saticoy to [LRN 79]

In 1951, Chapter 1562 added the segment from LRN 60 to LRN 2 as a new segment (a): "(a) The junction of [LRN 60] and Saviers Road in Ventura County, along the route of said road to [LRN 2] near El Rio."

In 1957, Chapter 1911 removed the portion of the routing north of [LRN 9] (Route 118), simplified the origin, and eliminated the discontinity: "[LRN 60] near El Rio to [LRN 9] near Saticoy."

This route (Route 1 to Route 118) is present-day Route 232.


State Shield

State Route 155



Routing

From Route 99 near Delano to Route 178 near Isabella via Glennville.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Chapter 385 ("Great Renumbering") defined this route as "Route 99 near Bakersfield to Route 178 near Isabella via Glennville.", although Chapter 1698 quickly changed "Route 99" to "Route 204", reflecting the rerouting of Route 99 onto the freeway routing.

In 1965, Chapter 1372 realigned the route and transferred a segment from Route 211, giving "Route 99 near Delano to Route 178 near Isabella via Glennville."

As defined on July 1, 1964, Route 155 began at Route 204 near Bakersfield. In 1965, the portion from Route 204 to Woody was deleted, and the portion from Route 99 to Woody added.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The original definition of this route was all of the original LRN 142, defined in 1933. See LRN 142 for the details of this version of the route. After 1965, a portion of LRN 136 (between Route 99 and the Famoso-Porterville Highway) was added. The remainder of this route (a direct route from the Famoso-Porterville Highway to Woody) was not defined before 1963.

Route 155 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 155 between 1934 and 1964.

 

National Trails

The segment of this route from Route 58 to Kernville via the Caliente-Bodfish Road) was historically named the "Lions Trail".

 

Status

Caltrans is exploring creating a roundabout on this route at the intersection of Route 155/Browning Road in Delano. Other potential/planned roundabout locations in the San Joaquin Valley include Route 145/Jensen near Kerman, Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather, Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran, Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 190/Road 152 east of Tipton. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

Note: There are extremely steep grades on the east end of this highway.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 155:

  • Total Length (1995): 63 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 160 to 8,200
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 62; Sm. Urban: 1; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi; FAS: 52 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 1.4 mi; Collector: 62 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kern.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the routes from "[LRN 60] near Aliso Canyon to [LRN 2] near Triunfo" and "[LRN 2] near Newbury Park to [LRN 79] near Fillmore" to the state highway system. In 1935, these routes were added to the highway code as LRN 155, with the following definition:

  1. [LRN 60] near Aliso Canyon to [LRN 2] near Triunfo
  2. [LRN 2] near Newbury Park to [LRN 79] near Fillmore

This routing remained unchanged until 1963. It was all signed as part of Route 23, and included portions of Decker Canyon Road and Westlake Road.


State Shield

State Route 156



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Castroville to Route 101 near Prunedale.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This entire routing was LRN 22. This segment was defined in 1933. It was signed as Route 156 by 1963, but was not part of the original 1934 state signage of routes.

     

    Status

    Constructed to freeway standards from Route 1 near Castrovile to Castroville Blvd.

    Until the early 1980s, Route 1 entered Castroville from the south via Route 156 eastbound (the current freeway), then exited at the diamond interchange for Merritt Street and continued northwest via Merritt. However, by the mid-1980s, the current Castroville bypass was constructed; as a consequence, the portion of freeway on Route 1 between Merritt Street and the bypass became an extension of Route 156, and Merritt Street became part of Route 183.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3804: Widening of Route 156 in Monterey County between Castroville and US 101. $5,000,000.

    In May 2013, the Transportation Agency for Monterey County released a report that indicated converting the outdated two-lane Route 156 into a nearby four-lane toll road between Route 1 and US 101 could be mostly paid for by modest tolls, ranging from $1.60 to $2.50 a trip. That would cover most of the $268 million in construction costs and other safety improvements along the Route 156 corridor. And most of the improvements could be completed in less than a decade, compared with the current 30-year-plus time frame.
    (Source: Mercury News, 5/20/13)

    In August 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen a portion of Route 156 from two lanes to four lanes and convert a portion of US 101 from an expressway to a freeway near the city of Castroville. The project is not fully funded. Design and Right of Way are programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $104,194,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19 or later. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The project would add two new lanes in both EB and WB directions S of the existing Route 156 (which will impact farmland), on a new alignment.


  2. From Route 101 to Route 152 passing near San Juan Bautista and Hollister.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(b) Route 101 near The Rocks to Route 152 via San Juan Bautista and Hollister."

    In 1968, Chapter 282 clarified the routing as "(b) Route 101 near The Rocks to Route 152 via passing near San Juan Bautista and Hollister."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This entire routing was LRN 22. The original portion of the route was defined in 1909 and ran from San Juan Bautista to Hollister. In 1919, the portion from Hollister to Route 152 was defined, and in 1933, the remainder of the route (between Castroville and San Juan Bautista) was added. It was signed as Route 156 by 1963, but was not part of the original 1934 state signage of routes.

     

    Status

    In 1997, a bypass was opened from the intersection of Route 156 and San Felipe Road angling bypassing the city of Hollister to point west of town near Union Road. This is a two-lane bypass built to expressway standards. The old routing through town is still signed as Route 156 and Route 25 for some of it. There are plans to widen this to four lanes; the EIR was completed in September 2002, per CTC September 2002 Agenda.

    In August 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Hollister on Route 156U (San Juan Road), being the city’s portion of the San Benito River Bridge, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    [Hollister]In December 2008, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that would widen the existing two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane expressway from The Alameda (PM 3.0) in San Juan Bautista to 0.2 mile east of Fourth Street/Business Route 156 (PM R8.2). The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program with Regional Improvement Program , Interregional Improvement Program, local, and federal funds. The estimated cost of the project is $69,611,000, capital and support, and is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Issues with the construction, permanently removing farmlands and the public controversy associated with the project resulted in an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) being completed for this project. Upon completion of the EIR, impacts related to farmlands are anticipated to be significant and unmitigable. As a result, a Statement of Overriding Consideration was adopted.

    Constructed to freeway standards from US 101 near San Juan Bautista to San Juan Road.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Benito along Route 156U at the San Benito River Bridge, consisting of superseded highway right of way, and along Route 156 at Buena Vista Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to widen Route 156 from a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane expressway on new alignment from the Alameda in San Juan Bautista to just east of Fourth Street. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local funds. Total estimated project cost is $69,961,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the FEIR has been provided to Commission staff. Resources that may be impacted by the project include; noise, biological resources, hydrology and floodplains, and farmlands. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance through proposed mitigation measures with the exception of farmlands. The proposed improvements, with all recommended mitigation measures, would still have significant adverse impacts to farmlands in San Benito County with 127 acres of prime farmland being converted to non-agricultural purposes. As a result, a Final Environmental Impact Report was prepared for the project.

    In December 2011, it was reported that the Monterey County Transportation Agency is considering funding the new alignment via toll lanes. The plan would be to charge drivers up to $2 to use the new lanes, with the price varying by time of day and traffic conditions. The money would be used to help pay for a project that could cost more than $106 million, of which only $13 million is in hand -- the impact of Monterey County's failure to get two-thirds support for a sales tax increase a few years ago. If the plan moves ahead, construction could start in 2016. If not, it may be 15 to 20 years before a bypass is built. The current route would be turned into a frontage road, one that could be used by residents so they would not have to pay a toll.

    2007 CMIA. Two projects on Route 156 in Monterey County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects were a 4 lane expressway, Alameda to Union-Mitchell ($37,987K requested) and the Route 156 Corridor west phase 1 ($166,700K requested) . Neither was recommended for funding.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed converting two major conventional roadway segments to four-lane expressway. Projects have major safety and mobility benefits for travel from the Bay Area to the Monterey Peninsula and from the Central Valley to US 101.

    In November 2007, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR for a project to construct roadway improvements that include widening, from two lanes to four lanes, a portion of Route 156 near Hollister. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program for project development and right-of-way for $22,203,000. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $78,300,000, capital and support. This project should be ready for construction in Fiscal Year 2009-10, depending on the availability of funds. The alternatives are basically (a) whether the roadway is divided or conventional, and (b) whether there are frontage roads, and on which sides of the highway. The project would be between The Alameda (PM 3.0) and San Juan Road (PM 8.2).

    According to vta.org, there are currently plans to build a flyover ramp intersection with Route 156. Estimated completion date is 2008. It opened for public traffic in late January 2009.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1759: Improvements to the Route 152/Route 156 Intersection. $800,000.

    • High Priority Project #1793: Reconfigure intersection at Route152 and Route 156 in Santa Clara County. $11,120,000.

     

     

    Naming

    The San Benito County Board of Supervisors explored sending a resolution to Sacramento in support of naming the Route 152/Route 156 flyover after Joseph Anthony Zanger. Zanger, who farmed more than 600 acres on Pacheco Pass and whose family started Casa de Fruta, died on Feb. 9, 2009. Zanger studied safety and economic interests related to the area's transportation system. In 1978, he served on the planning committee for the completion of Interstate 5 from Stockton to Santa Nella/Route 152. He also helped establish a new route from Route 152/Route 156 to connect US 101 south of Gilroy. According to the resolution, Zanger's work on highway safety has benefited hundreds, if not thousands, of Californians who travel on those highways.

    The 5-mile portion of Route 156 from Route 25 to US 101 is named the "CAL-FIRE Firefighter Matt Will Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL-FIRE) Heavy Fire Equipment Operator (HFEO) Fire Captain Matt Will, who passed away in the line of duty on October 9, 2007, at the age of 30, while battling a fire in Monterey County. Matt Will was born in El Cajon, California on March 13, 1977, and was raised in Campo, California. He attended elementary through high school in Campo where he participated in many sports including football, baseball, and wrestling. He enjoyed many outdoor activities, such as camping, fishing, hunting, and off-roading. After graduating from high school, Matt Will helped run his family business where he became proficient at operating heavy equipment. HFEO Gary Will, father of Matt Will, is employed by CAL-FIRE. Matt Will followed in his father's footsteps as he pursued the career of his dreams as a HFEO by applying his passions for heavy equipment and firefighting. He was always charismatic and caring, and his drive and motivation were displayed daily. Matt Will's leadership skills carried him to reach his goals and to encourage others to reach theirs. Matt Will was extremely knowledgeable, with abundant experience and excellent judgment that enabled him to be on the fireline operating alone. On October 8, 2007, HFEO Matt Will tried to get another bulldozer out of a precarious situation, placing Matt Will in a very dangerous location. The ground of the steep terrain gave way causing Matt Will's bulldozer to roll 154 feet down a steep drainage, in which Matt Will sustained injuries. On October 9, Matt Will succumbed to those injuries. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 106, 6/17/2010, Resolution Chapter 38.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 43-0044, the San Benito River Bridge, in San Benito County is named the "Ed Hanna Memorial Bridge". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 22, Chapter 65 in 1997. Ed Hanna was a long time San Benito County employee, having worked in the 1940's as county surveyor and later as County Engineer and Road Commissioner.

    The flyover ramp at the interchange of Route 152 and Route 156 is named the “Joseph A. Zanger Memorial Flyover”. This segment was named in honor of Joseph A. Zanger, who was born on December 28, 1927, in San Jose, California. After attending college, Joseph moved to the Pacheco Pass area to help manage his family's orchard operations. In 1943, the Zanger family founded Casa de Fruta to complement its farming business. The Casa de Fruta business started with a small cherry stand built in 1943 and grew to include a large fruit stand, a restaurant, a park for recreational vehicles, a lodge, wine tasting, a gift shop, a barnyard zoo, a candy store, a service station, and a dried fruit mail order business. Joseph studied safety and economic issues related to the transportation system of central California and served as an advocate for the improvement of transportation in that area. In 1978, Joseph served on the planning committee for the I-5 project from Stockton to Santa Nella/Route 152. In 2005, Joseph also worked to establish a new route from Route 152/Route 156 to US 101. Joseph's advocacy for safety and transportation improvements has affected thousands of motorists. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 85, Resolution Chapter 67, on 8/4/2010.

     

    Business Routes

    The old routing through the city of Hollister is signed as Business Route 156.

     

    National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.17] Between Route 1 and Route 152.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 156:

  • Total Length (1995): 25 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 8,800 to 25,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 19; Sm. Urban: 5; Urbanized: 1.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 25 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 18 mi; Minor Arterial: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 60] near Topanga Beach to Montalvo-San Fernando Road near Chatsworth" as a state highway. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 156, with the definition:

"[LRN 60] near Topanga Beach to [LRN 9] near Chatsworth"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 clarified the definition to be: "[LRN 60] near Topanga Beach but north of the intersection of Sunset Boulevard and [LRN 60] to [LRN 9] at or near Chatsworth"

This is present-day Route 27 (Topanga Canyon). At one time, it was proposed for the Reseda Freeway.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 157



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 157 was defined as "Route 805 near San Diego and south of Route 94 to Route 125 near Sweetwater Reservoir.".

In 1972, Chapter 1216 relaxed the routing: "Route 805 near San Diego and south of Route 94 to Route 125 near Sweetwater Reservoir."

In 1994, the routing (from Route 805 near Ocean View Boulevard near San Diego, through the Paradise Hills to Route 125 near Sweetwater Reservoir) was deleted per AB 3132, Chapter 1220. The route was added to the state highway system in 1959. A routing was adopted in 1962, but it was rescinded locally by SANDAG (San Diego Association of Governments, the regional planning agency) in 1974, and deleted from the state highway system 20 years later. The right-of-way purchased for the eastern portion of the route was sold in the mid-1970s. Together with Route 252 (the Southcrest or El Toyon Freeway) and I-5, the route would have provided direct access from East San Diego County to downtown.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was proposed LRN 285, defined in 1959. It was never signed.

Route 157 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 157 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Naming

This route would have been named the San Miguel Freeway.

 

Freeway

Originally to have been freeway; later deleted from SHC 253.1.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 4] near Tunnel Station to [LRN 9] near San Fernando" as a state highway. It was added to the highway code in 1935 as LRN 157 with that routing. This was the route from US 99 (I-5) to Route 118, and was the eventual routing of Route 210 between I-5 and Route 118.

 

Other WWW Links


State Shield

State Route 158



Routing

From Route 395 near June Lake to Route 395 near Rush Creek, via the vicinity of June Lake, Silver Lake and Grant Lake.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this was defined as the route from "Route 395 near Rush Creek to Route 395 via June Lake."

In 1965, Chapter 1371 clarified the routing: "Route 395 near Rush Creek June Lake to Route 395 near Rush Creek, via the vicinity of June Lake, Silver Lake and Grant Lake".

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 111, defined in 1933. It appears not to have been signed before 1963, although the route itself dates back to 1935.

Route 158 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 158 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 158:

  • Total Length (1995): 16 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 610 to 1,850
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 16; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 16 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 16 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mono.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 4] near San Fernando to [LRN 60] near Mines Field" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 158 with that routing.

In the 1947 1st ex. sess., Chapter 11 rewrote the route to be:

  1. (a) [LRN 4] near San Fernando to [LRN 60] near Mines Field Los Angeles Airport
  2. (b) [LRN 60] near Los Angeles Airport to a point on [LRN 167] near Signal Hill

This showed the growing planning for the San Diego Freeway, which now ran as far as the Long Beach Freeway.

In 1951, Chapter 1562 combined the segments and extended the route from the Long Beach Freeway to the El Toro Y: "[LRN 4] near San Fernando to [LRN 2] in the vicinity of El Toro; provided, however, that Section 600 of this code shall be applicable to that portion of said route southerly of [LRN 167] near Signal Hill the same as if said portion had been added by the Collier-Burns Act of 1947, and the Department of Public Works shall not be required to maintain any portion of said route until the same has been laid out and constructed as a state highway"

In 1955, Chapter 1488 removed the language relating to section 600 (actually, it just made that language a general condition as Section 2109 of the code).

LRN 158 is present-day I-405; before the freeway was constructed, this LRN also applied to pre-1963 Route 7 between the US 99/US 6 junction and Route 107. The original route was along Sepulveda to the intersection with LRN 60 (Lincoln Blvd).


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 159



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

1964 710 RoutingPost-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic As defined in 1963, Route 159 consisted of two parts:

  1. From Route 5 near the Los Angeles River to Route 134

  2. From Route 134 to Route 210 near La Cañada

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted (a) and added a condition: "This route shall cease to be a state highway when Route 210 freeway is completed from Route 134 to Linda Vista Avenue and the commission relinquishes that portion of present Route 210 from Route 134 to Linda Vista Avenue."

In 1992, part (2) was deleted per AB 3090, Chapter 1243. The route had been relinquished on 7/14/1989.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Part (1) of the 1964 Route 159 was Figueroa Blvd between I-5 and Route 134, and was originally signed as Route 11 and US 66 (and later, as US 66A). Part 2 was Linda Vista Avenue between Route 134 and eventual I-210 (likely, it ended at Foothill Blvd before). This was signed as Route 11. Both segments were part of LRN 165, defined in 1933.

One 1939 map shows Route 159 as being signed along the route along Lankershim Blvd between Route 134 (Alameda Avenue before the freeway) and US 99 (San Fernando Road). This appears to coincide with Lankershim's designation as LRN 159. Route 159 was not defined in the 1934 initial set of state signed routes.

 

Naming

Former part (1) of this route is signed as part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

 

National Trails

Arrowhead Trail Sign The former part (1) of this route (Figueroa) was part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

National Old Trails Road Sign The former part (1) of this route (Figueroa) was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign The former part (1) of this route (Figueroa) appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "Lankershim Blvd from [LRN 2] near Universal City to [LRN 4]" was defined as a state highway. In 1935, it was added to the highway code as LRN 159 with that routing.

In 1951, Chapter 1562 truncated and clarified the definition to be "[LRN 2] near Vineland Ave to [LRN 4] near Tujunga Wash"

In 1957, Chapter 1911 changed the origin to "[LRN 2] near Riverside Drive to …"

This route was Lankershim Blvd between US 101 and San Fernando Road. Some maps show it signed as Route 159, but that is clearly an error confusing the LRN with the signed rout number. The LRN was also applied to the present-day Route 170 freeway routing. Lankershim Boulevard was named for the town of Lankershim (first called Toluca, now North Hollywood) and its founding family. Isaac B. Lankershim grew wheat in a wide swath of the Valley.


State Shield

State Route 160



Routing
  1. Route 4 near Antioch to the southern city limits of Sacramento.


  2. The American River in the City of Sacramento to Route 51.

    (b) The relinquished former portion of Route 160 within the City of Sacramento is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 160, the City of Sacramento shall maintain signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 160.

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 160 was defined as "Route 84 near Rio Vista to Route 80 near North Sacramento via Sacramento."

In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the terminus of the route: "… to Route 80 near North Sacramento via Sacramento."

In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "Route 84" to "Route 12".

In 1981, Chapter 292 extended the route and corrected the references to reflect the change of I-80's routing: "(a) Route 4 near Antioch to Route 12 near Rio Vista. (b) Route 12 near Rio Vista to Route 80 near North Sacramento Route 51 via Sacramento." This change reflected the transfer of the portion from Route 4 to Route 12 from Route 84.

In 1984, Chapter 409 recombined the segments, giving "Route 4 near Antioch to Route 51 in Sacramento." Note that although until 1981 Route 160 was legislatively defined to start at Route 12 in Rio Vista, in actuality, Route 160 has always begun (signed) at Route 4 in Antioch. This means that while the Antioch Bridge may have been legislatively Route 84 from 1964-1981, it always was part of signed Route 160.

In 1999, Senate Bill 802, Chapter 172, authorized the California Transportation Commission to reliquish any portion of Route 160 in Sacramento County between PM 35.0 and PM 47.0 (i.e., the surface street portion) to the containing city upon request. As of November 2001, this segment (from the American River Bridge to 3/4 mile north of the town of Freeport) had been decomissioned, and according to reports in February 2002, officially relinquished. The state removed the shield on the overhead signs on US 50 in 2004.

In 2003, Assembly Bill 1717, Chapter 525, officially truncated the route to "(a) Route 160 is from Route 4 near Antioch to the southern city limits of Sacramento. (b) The relinquished former portion of Route 160 within the City of Sacramento is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81."

In 2010, SB 1318, Chapter 421, 9/29/10, split this into two segments. The previous definition was: "Route 4 near Antioch to the southern city limits of Sacramento."

The North Sacramento Freeway has an interesting quirk: Unlike all other freeways in California, there are no shields on the green sign gantries, only control cities (Downtown Sacramento and Roseville/Reno). According to Joel Windmiller, the signs were placed in the mid-1960s, in the midst of the Great Renumbering when US 40 was removed from this route; however, CalTrans was not sure what route would eventually assimiliate the North Sacramento Freeway at the time (now Route 160).

The original Antioch bridge was built in 1926. The current bridge was completed and opened to traffic in 1978. It measures 1.8 miles (2.9 km). According to Wikipedia, the original lift span bridge was plagued with problems throughout its lifetime. Heavy traffic could cross it at no more than 15 mph, and its narrow shipping canal led to collisions in 1958, 1963 and 1970. The Antioch Bridge is one of only three (the others being the Carquinez and Dumbarton bridges) state-owned toll bridges that currently have bicycle and pedestrian access. Statistics on the current span can be found at http://bata.mtc.ca.gov/bridges/antioch.htm.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The portion of thie route from Antioch to Broadway in Sacramento, via Freeport Boulevard and River Road was LRN 11, defined in 1933, and was originally signed as part of Route 24 starting in 1935.

The portion from Broadway west from Freeport to 16th: was LRN 4, and was signed as Route 24, US 50/US 99 (to 1954), and US 99W (1954-1964). The portion from 16th Street in Sacramento north from Broadway to N Street, Capitol Avenue was LRN 4 and was signed as US 50/US 99 (to 1954), and US 99W (1954-1964). The remainder of the route was LRN 3 (defined in 1909), and was signed as follows: the segment from 15th/16th Street north of Capitol Avenue to the 16th Street Bridge was signed as US 40 (to 1964) and US 99E (to 1954); the segment from 12th Street and F Street to 15th Street was signed as US 40 (1950s-1964); and the segment from the 16th Street Bridge and North Sacramento Freeway ws signed as US 40 (to 1964) and US 99E (1946-1954).

A 1939 map shows Route 160 being signed along Highland Blvd between Cahuenga Blvd and Santa Monica Blvd in Los Angeles. This route was LRN 160. Route 160 was not defined in the 1934 initial set of state signed routes.

 

Status

Route 160 is constructed to freeway standards from Route 4 near Antioch to the Antioch Toll Booth, and from Downtown Sacramento to Business Route 80 near Cal Expo.There are "END 160" signs at each crossing of the Sacramento City Limits.

In April 2012, it was reported that a project to build a freeway connector ramp between the Route 4 bypass and the Antioch Bridge is getting about $1.4 million in local developer funds. The additional funds will widen the bridge structure of the ramp from the bypass north to Route 160, allowing BART trains to pass underneath someday. The ramp, located on the Oakley-Antioch border, is estimated to cost about $50 million. The design change adds a sliver of road to the northeast of the ramp and improves the bridge's geometry for the BART tracks. Since the Route 4 bypass opened in 2008, drivers headed north toward Sacramento County have had to cut through Oakley side streets or drive two miles west to the Hillcrest Avenue exit, leave the freeway and enter in the other direction to cross the bridge. The overpass, which is funded by leftover money from a seismic retrofit of the bridge, will take about three years to complete and could start by spring 2014.

According to the San Jose Mercury News, there are plans in early 2009 to raise tolls on the Antioch Bridge, likely $1, and likely to be applied to carpoolers as well. They may also add congestion pricing. This is being done to help support the cost of retrofitting the Dumbarton and Antioch spans for earthquake improvements. In February 2010, the toll increased to $5 at all times on the Dumbarton, San Mateo, Richmond-San Rafael, Carquinez, Benicia-Martinez and Antioch bridges. In July 2010, the toll will be extended to carpoolers, who will pay $2.50.

Antioch BridgeIn July 2011, it was reported there is a plan to retrofit the Antioch Bridge. The current 1.8 mile-long steel plate girder bridge was opened in 1978 with one lane in each direction. The current retrofit strategy for the bridge includes relatively minor modifications to the approach structure on Sherman Island, the addition of isolation bearings and strengthening of the columns and hinge retrofits. Bids for the retrofit contract were opened on March 10, 2010. The contract was awarded to California Engineering Contractors, Inc. on April 22, 2010. The awarded contract was significantly less than the engineer's estimate for the work and has resulted in a significant cost forecast reduction.

In April 2012, it was reported that the seismic retrofitting project had completed. At the peak of the project, as many as 75 workers were out on the bridge every day, standing on huge scaffoldings along the bridge's 150-foot piers or on hanging platforms beneath its roadway deck. They installed massive bearings to let the deck of the bridge move independently of the piers, with the idea that this will prevent cracking or breaking in a quake. The deck itself was fitted with expansion joints that will let it stretch longer in a quake rather that snapping in pieces. The project was paid for with bridge toll revenue as part of a broader retrofit program funded by toll hikes that took effect in 2010. The contractor, Pleasanton-based California Engineering Contractors Inc., took great care to protect local wildlife throughout the retrofit. For example, they installed owl nesting posts nearby, in hopes owls would lay their eggs there. If an owl laid eggs on the bridge, work stopped for 250 feet inboth directions until the owlets hatched and could fly away, which could stall portions of the project for up to three months.
(Source: Contra Costa Times, 4/17/2012)

In April 1999, the city of Sacramento begin a study whether it should take over control of Route 160 from the state. The city wanted better access, and CalTrans was unwilling to add additional off ramps. This was expected to lead to the replacement of the bridges at Royal Oaks Dr. and Canterbury Rd with ground-level intersections. In February 2001, the city of Sacramento and Caltrans reached an agreement to relinquish a portion of Route 160 to the city. In particular, the portion from Stonecrest Ave. to the south abutment of the American River Bridge, where the freeway splits into 12th and 16th Sts, was to be relinquished. Stonecrest Ave. is the southern edge city of Sacramento (it's the road running parallel to the PG&E transmission line that passes over I-5 just south of Pocket Rd. next to the GTE/Verizon complex). Note that this excludes the American River Bridge; this be because the city believed the bridge to be falling apart. There are actually two bridges; the southbound bridge was built in 1921 and the northbound bridge in 1967.

At 16th and P Street, a very old BGS is present, pointing the way to San Francisco and Reno. This may date back to the days when this portion of Route 160 was the junction of Route 24 and US 40. The greenout on those signs that covers up the number 40; it's right next to the arrows. At one point, Route 160 and US 40 were cosigned.

According to the Sacramento Bee, plans are in the works to rebuild the intersection of Route 160, Sproule Avenue, Richards Blvd, 12th Street and 16th Street near downtown Sacramento. The problem is that one can't get from Richards Boulevard eastbound onto northbound Route 160, nor from northbound 16th Street to Richards Boulevard. The city of Sacramento is planning to construct a $4.8 million intersection there that will integrate a light-rail line through the intersection. The project should be complete in 2008.

 

Naming

A small portion of this route is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

The portion of this route that is former US 99 is, in local usage, called the "East Side Highway".

The portion of this route between Route 4 and Route 50 is historically part of "El Camino Sierra" (Road to the Mountains).

The portion of this route from roughly Del Paso Blvd and Route 51 (Business Route 80) (i.e., former US 40) was named the "North Sacramento Freeway". Sacramento refers to the City of Sacramento CA, which is based off of the name of the main river in the city. The Spanish name, "Holy Sacrament," was applied to the Feather River in 1808; it was later assumed that the lower Sacramento was the same stream. In 1817 the two main rivers of the valley were recorded as Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, but the course of the former was not identified with the name until the 1830s. The city was laid out in 1848-1849 and named after the river by John A. Sutter, Jr., and Sam Brannan. The county, one of the original 27, was named in 1850.

 

Named Structures

Bridge 28-009, the Antioch Bridge near Antioch is named the "Senator John A. Nejedly Bridge". It was built in 1979, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 146, Chapter 140 in 1978. California State Senator John A. Nejedly authored SB 25, enacted as Chapter 765 of the Statutes of 1972, to authorize the design and construction of the new Antioch Bridge.

 

Commuter Lanes

Special HOV rates exist on the Antioch Bridge. It appears that qualified HOVs can cross for free: three or more occupants (two occupants for two-seater vehicles) are required, and the operation hours are weekdays between 5:00-10:00am and 3:00-6:00pm.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.7] From Route 4 near Antioch to Sacramento.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Sacramento 160 44.94 45.30
Sacramento 160 46.06 46.34

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.7] From Route 4 near Antioch to Route 12 near Rio Vista; and from Sacramento to Route 51 (Business Route 80). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 40 was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.18] Between the north urban limits of Antioch-Pittsburg and the south urban limits of Sacramento.

 


Overall statistics for Route 160:

  • Total Length (1995): 59 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,450 to 56,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 46; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 13.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 12 mi; FAU: 13 mi; FAS: 34 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 14 mi; Minor Arterial: 11 mi; Collector: 34 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Contra Costa, Sacramento.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route "Highland Avenue, Los Angeles from Cahuenga Blvd to Santa Monica Blvd" as a state highway. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 160 with this routing.

In 1949, Chapters 909 and 1467 clarified the routing to be: "Highland Avenue, Los Angeles from Cahuenga Blvd [LRN 2] to Santa Monica Blvd [LRN 162]"

In 1953, Chapter 1253 simplified the definition to eliminate the specific routing: "Highland Avenue, Los Angeles from [LRN 2] to [LRN 162]in the Hollywood Area, Los Angeles"

In 1959, Chapter 1062 clarified and extended the routing: "[LRN 158] near Inglewood to [LRN 2] in Los Angeles to [LRN 162] in the Hollywood Area, Los Angeles"

This route ran from the future I-405 near Inglewood to US 101 in Los Angeles. This was a freeway that was never constructed; the "Laurel Canyon" freeway, Route 170, between the San Fernando Valley and Inglewood. It is the reason that the offramp from I-405 NB at La Cienega is constructed as it is; it is also the reason for the "La Cienega Expressway" between Centinela (former Route 107) and Rodeo. There are portions that still indicate the Route 170 presence. The only designated portion was along Highland between LRN 2 and Santa Monica Blvd.



Back Arrow
Highways 145-152
State Highway Routes
Return to State Highway Routes
Forward Arrow
Highways 161-168
© 1996-2012 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.