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California Highways

Routes 145 through 152

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

145 · 146 · 147 · 148 · 149 · 150 · 151 · 152


State Shield

State Route 145



Routing
  1. From Route 5 near Oilfields to Route 99 near Madera, passing near Five Points and Kerman.

    (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Madera the portion of Route 145 located between Gateway Drive and Lake Street within the city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interest of the state.

    (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective on the first day of the next calendar or fiscal year, whichever occurs first, after the effective date of the commission's approval of the terms.

    (3) The relinquished section shall cease to be a state highway on the effective date of the relinquishment.

    (4) The portion of Route 145 described in this subdivision may be relinquished to the City of Madera only upon the condition that the city agrees to both of the following: (A) Maintenance of signs directing motorists to the continuation of State Highway Route 145. (B) No reduction of the number of lanes within the relinquished section.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(a) Route 180 near Kerman to Route 99 near Madera."

    In 1970, Chapter 1473 extended the route from I-5 to Route 180, making the definition: "(a) Route 5 near Oilfields Route 180 near Kerman to Route 99 near Madera, passing near Five Points and Kerman".

    In 1996, the state added to the legislative definition the ability to relinquish to the City of Madera the portion of Route 145 located between Gateway Drive and Lake Street within the city, provided suitable terms are negotiated. The agreement must required the maintenance of signs directing motorists to the continuation of State Highway Route 145, and no reduction of the number of lanes within the relinquished section. (AB 2246, Chapter 540, 9/16/96)

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This entire routing was LRN 126, defined in 1933, except for the portion of segment 1 added in 1970. It was not part of the original 1934 signage of state routes, but was signed by 1953.

     

    Status

    In October 2011, it was reported that Caltrans has selected the intersection of Route 145 and Jensen Avenue near Kerman for the first roundabout in the San Joaquin Valley. This intersection was chosen because it has had a high rate of accidents. Caltrans is also considering three sites in Tulare County and one each in Fresno, Kings and Kern counties for roundabouts (specifically, Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather, Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake, Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran, Route 190/Road 152 east of Tipton, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 155/Browning Road in Delano). The Route 145 roundabout is anticipated to cost $1.1 million, and is scheduled to begin in mid-2013 and expected to take about a year to complete. The major concern was from growers and producers, who were worried that larger trucks hauling produce could not negotiate the circular intersections. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Fresno County that will construct a single-lane roundabout at the intersection of Route 145 and Jensen Avenue in the city of Kerman to reduce traffic collisions. The project is programmed in the 2010 SHOPP. The total estimated project cost is $2,903,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1830: Improve the Route 99/Route 145 interchange in the City of Madera, CA. $2,400,000.

     


  2. From Route 99 near Madera to Route 41.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This entire routing was LRN 126, defined in 1933, except for the portion of segment 1 added in 1970. It was not part of the original 1934 signage of state routes, but was signed by 1953.

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 145:

  • Total Length (1995): 67 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,500 to 18,200
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 62; Sm. Urban: 5; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 67 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 5 mi; Minor Arterial: 62 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Fresno, Madera.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 31] near Cajon Pass to [LRN 23] near Little Lake" to the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 145 with that definition. The route remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It is US 395 between US 91 (present-day I-15) and the US 395/US 6 (present-day US 395/Route 14) junction. This was defined in 1933.


State Shield

State Route 146



Routing
  1. From Route 101 near Soledad to Pinnacles National Monument.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

    In 2009, AB 344 (Chapter 238, 10/11/2009) authorized relinquishment of the portion in Soledad by adding:

    (b) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the City of Soledad the portion of Route 146 within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (2) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the County of Monterey the portion of Route 146 within the limits of that county, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (3) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the County of San Benito the portion of Route 146 within the limits of that county, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (4) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (5) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 146 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

    (6) For portions of Route 146 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Soledad and the Counties of Monterey and San Benito shall maintain within their jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 146 until the entire route has been relinquished.

    This portion of the route in Soledad was relinquished in September 2010.

    In 2012, AB 2679 (Chapter 769, 9/29/2012) updated the wording to reflect the relinquishment in Soledad:

    (b) (1) The Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the City of Soledad the relinquished former portion of Route 146 within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state. City of Soledad is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 146, the City of Soledad shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 146 until the entire route has been relinquished and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 146, including any traffic signal progression.

    (2) (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the County of Monterey the portion of Route 146 within the limits of that county, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (3) (2) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the County of San Benito the portion of Route 146 within the limits of that county, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (4) (3) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (5) (4) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 146 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

    (6) (5) For portions of Route 146 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Soledad and the Counties of Monterey and San Benito shall maintain within their jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 146 until the entire route has been relinquished.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This entire route was LRN 120, defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1964.

    Route 146 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 146 between 1934 and 1964.

     

    Status

    Near Soledad, this route seems to run along Business Route 101 and Broadway.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Soledad on Route 146, from the city limits at Route 101 to the city limits at Tiburon Street. Authorized by Chapter 238, Statutes of 2009, which amended Section 446 of the Streets and Highways Code.


  2. From Pinnacles National Monument to Route 25 in Bear Valley.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This entire route was LRN 120, defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1964.

    Route 146 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 146 between 1934 and 1964.

     

    Status

    Note that the two segments of this route are not contiguous; this is made clear in the National Park Service Map for Pinnacles National Monument. They are connected by the Old Pinnacles Trail.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] Entire portion.

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.17] Between Route 101 and Pinnacles National Monument.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 146:

  • Total Length (1995): 13 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 130 to 8,100
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 11; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi; FAS: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 1.5 mi; Collector: 4.5 mi; Rural Minor Collector/Local Road: 6.6 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Monterey, San Benito.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the following routes to the highway system:

  • County Line near Palo Verde to [LRN 64] near Blythe
  • [LRN 64] near Blythe to [LRN 58] near Needles
  • [LRN 58] W of Needles northerly to the California-Nevada state line

In 1935, LRN 146 was added to the highway code with the following routings:

  1. County Line near Palo Verde to [LRN 64] near Blythe
  2. [LRN 64] near Blythe to [LRN 58] near Needles
  3. [LRN 58] W of Needles northerly to the Nevada state line

In 1959, Chapter 1062 changed the origin of (a): "County Line near Palo Verde [LRN 187] east of Brawley to …"

In 1961, Chapter 1387 allowed construction to begin earlier: “Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 89 of Chapter 1062, Statutes of 1959, the department shall proceed with the construction of the unconstructed portion of said route described in subdivision (a) between the junction of [LRN 187] and the Imperial-Riverside county line with the lowest practical cost for a hard surfaced road and as an interim project pending the later construction of the route to proper limited access standards; provided that prior thereto the County of Imperial enters into a co-operative agreement with the department wherein the county agrees to maintain the road between the junction of [LRN 187] and the Imperial-Riverside County Line until a limited access highway is constructed by the department between said points. Upon the completion of construction of said interim road and pursuant to said agreement, the county shall assume jurisdiction and all responsibilities of maintenance for the period above provided. The road shall be known and designed as the "Ben Hulse Highway"”

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 187 (Route 86) E of Brawley to LRN 64 (US 60/US 70; present-day I-10) near Blythe.

    This is present-day Route 78, some of which is unconstructed. Before 1964, the portion between Route 86 and Palo Verde was a proposed routing, and the remainder was part of US 95 (originally Route 195). The US 95 portion as defined in 1933; the remainder was defined in 1959.

  2. From LRN 64 (US 60/US 70; present-day I-10) near Blythe to LRN 58 (US 66; present-day I-40) near Needles.

    This is US 95, defined in 1933.

  3. From LRN 58 (US 66; present-day I-40) W to Needles northerly to the Nevada line.

    This is US 95, defined in 1933.


State Shield

State Route 147



Routing

From Route 89 near Canyon Dam to Route 36 near Westwood.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

The definition of this route is unchanged from 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 183, defined in 1961. This route was not signed before 1963.

Route 147 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 147 between 1934 and 1964.

 

National Trails

[Volcanic Byways]This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 147:

  • Total Length (1995): 12 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 830 to 2,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 12; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 12 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 12 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Plumas, Lassen.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 2] near Arroyo Grande to [LRN 2] near San Luis Obispo" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, LRn 147 was added to the highway code with the definition. The route remained unchanged until 1963. It ran from US 101 near Arroyo Grande to US 101 near San Luis Obispo, and is present-day Route 227.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 148



Routing
  1. Unconstructed From Route 5 near Sacramento to Route 143 south of Route 16.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, the entirety of Route 148 was defined as "Route 5 near Sacramento to Route 143 south of Route 16." Segment (b) was added in 1985.

    This was a proposed routing, and was LRN 248, defined in 1959, between LRN 238 (I-5) and LRN 247 (proposed Route 143). It is reported that Consumes River Road is an approximate routing for this, but it is not an adopted routing. Caltrans is apparently involved, however, with a street extension along Consumes River Road (for more information, see the entry for I-5). The following is from the approval for the I-5/Consumes River Road interchange:

    Construction of the I-5/Cosumnes River Boulevard interchange was originally identified in a study of the Route 148 corridor conducted by the Department in the early 1960s. On February 27, 1963, the Department adopted the Route 148 freeway corridor segment between I-5 and Route 99. In 1974, the Commission withdrew the freeway designation of Route 148 due to financial constraints.

    In a memorandum dated July 1, 1974, the County of Sacramento’s Department of Public Works recommended that the City of Sacramento maintain the adopted route as an east-west transportation corridor that would be less than freeway status. The City of Sacramento then embarked on the necessary steps to begin preserving right-of-way within the Route 148 corridor.

    On November 4, 1981, the Sacramento City Council certified an Environmental Impact Report for the Route 148 Arterial Plan and adopted the route alignment for the arterial. That approval allowed the City to begin reserving the right-of-way for the future development of Route 148 and to construct segments of the approved route as funds became available. After approval of the Route 148 Arterial Plan, the name of the proposed facility was changed to Cosumnes River Boulevard. The names Route 148 and Cosumnes River Boulevard are synonymous and refer to the same proposed facility within the city of Sacramento.

    The freeway route adoption was rescinded in 1975. The City of Scramento planned an arterial street (Consumes River Road) within the alignment; this precluded any state construction. E of Route 99, the city included a short portion of Calvine Road. As of 2002, Caltrans was recommending deleting the route from the state highway system.

     

    Status

    In March 2006, Sacramento released its draft environmental analysis for its planned $80 million Cosumnes River Boulevard extension. The project would extend Cosumnes River Boulevard from its current end point at Franklin Boulevard west to I-5 with a major interchange, and a short distance farther to Freeport Boulevard. Officials said construction is targeted to start in 2008, with a finish date in 2010.

    According to an article in the Sacramento Bee, SACOG (Sacramento Area Council of Governments) is exploring a 30-plus-mile route that would start at I-5 in the south, head east across Route 99 in Elk Grove, and angle up the east county to US 50 in El Dorado County, skirting the edges of Rancho Cordova and Folsom. They are exploring the name "Cosumnes Parkway." The most often mentioned potential alignment would be along an extension of Kammerer Road between I-5 and Route 99, then along Grant Line Road and a straightened White Rock Road. Tuttle said the road would be four lanes, with a limited number of intersections. It probably would have an overpass at Highway 16. Chris Sampang guesses this might be a revival of Route 148.

    In August 2010, Sen. Feinstein requested funding for the Capital Southeast Connector, a proposed 37-mile downtown Sacramento bypass, from I-5 in Elk Grove to US 50 in El Dorado Hills. The requested funding would support the construction of an initial phase in the City of Elk Grove at Route 99, which will be completed in 2012. The total cost of the Elk Grove segment is $36 million, towards which the City has secured $34 million. This is approximately the Route 148 routing.

    In May 2013, it was reported that the Cosumnes River Boulevard Extension and I-5 Interchange Project had broken ground. The project will provide east-west connectivity between Route 99 and I-5, as well as open up room for an 800-acre Delta Shores development. The cost is about $82M. Sacramento officials say this project is expected to take around two years complete and should be finished by 2015. The project will also include more traffic lanes, on street bike lanes, and provide access to two future regional transit light rail stations to Cosumnes River College.
    (Source: CBS Sacramento, 5/2/13)

     

    Interstate Submissions

    Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1958; not accepted.


  2. Unconstructed From Route 143 south of Route 16 to Route 65.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, (a) was the entirety of Route 148. In 1985, Chapter 46 added segment (b): "(b) Route 143 south of Route 16 to Route 65." In 1990, Chapter 1187 fixed the formatting.

    In 2002, the Traversable Highways report noted that some studies have been conducted but further analysis is needed regarding a route adoption. There is no traversable highway and the area is built-out precluding any new alignment. Caltrans recommended removing the route from the state highway system.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 148 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 148 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 148:

  • Total Length (1995): 14 miles unconstructed
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 5; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 9.
  • Counties Traversed: Sacramento.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "Guadalupe to Sisquoc via Santa Maria" to the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 148 as follows:

"[LRN 56] near Guadalupe to Sisquoc via Santa Maria"

The definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This is present-day Route 166 between Route 1 and Santa Maria, and was 1964-1984 Route 176 between Santa Maria and Sisquoc. The highway continued from Sisquoc (although not as part of the present state highway system) to Los Olivos. The route from Santa Maria was along Main Street to Philbric Road, then to Foxen Canyon Road, and along Foxen Canyon Road through Sisquoc into Los Olivos.


State Shield

State Route 149



Routing

From Route 70 near Wicks Corner to Route 99 south of Chico.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 70 near Wicks Corner to Route 99 near Chico."

In 1984, Chapter 409 clarified the terminus to be "… to Route 99 south of near Chico."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 87, defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1967.

Route 149 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 149 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

[Route_70 near Route_149 and Route_191]This route is not currently constructed as freeway, but studies are underway to upgrade it to freeway. Specifically, Route 149 has been upgraded in Butte County to a four-lane expressway, with interchanges at the Route 70/Route 149 and the Route 99/Route 149 intersections, and a reconstructed Route 70/Route 191 intersection. For more information, see http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist3/projects/butte/.

According to Dominic Ielati, as of July 2006 they were well underway. The worst part of the project, is the destruction of some of the original pavement of the Oroville-Chico Highway, just NE of the Route 99/Route 149 intersection. The Oroville-Chico Highway preceded the current routings of Route 99, Route 149, Route 70 and Table Mountain Blvd as the main route between Chico & Oroville. The Oroville-Chico Highway still exists in name and asphalt between Durham Dayton Highway & Midway (old US 99E). It may be integrated into Openshaw Road (the new section of frontage road on the east side of Route 149) but that section of pavement has sat isolated and disconnected from the road network for probably the last forty years. Some photos may be found at http://www.chicoer.com/indepth/hwy149.

By July 2007, some of the fly-overs for the interchanges were nearing completion. Traffic on Route 149 is currently on the newly added lanes as the construction team tears up the 1975 lanes and rebuilds them. One peculiarity is the so-called "Warren-Brown Overcrossing", a one-lane overpass that allows private road access to properties on the south side of Route149.

By November 2007, construction was progressing on the Route 70/Route 149 junction. All four lanes are built and paved for the entire length of the route. On the eastern section of Route 149, all traffic utilizes the future westbound lanes and on the western section, all traffic utilizes the eastbound lanes. The parts of signbridges are sitting near each end of the project on Route 149. They are not assembled and actual signage has not arrived yet. The junction of Route 99 and Route 149 is more complete in terms of the flyovers and new sections of roadway. Left turns are no longer permitted from Route 149 west to Route 99 south, and all Route 99 traffic is now utilizing the new sections of roadway. On SB Route 99, signs and sign bridges are up—thru lanes are marked for Route 149 & "To Route 70". Route 99 south to Yuba City is a two-lane exit including an auxilary lane. On NB Route 99, there is a flyover ramp over the old alignment, with a merge onto that old alignment to continue north. There are no signbridges up on NB Route 99 at this time.

By November 2008, the project was completed well ahead of schedule. The project moves traffic in four lanes on Route 149 between Route 70 and Route 99 with interchanges that funnel traffic onto and off the two highways seamlessly. The widening and interchanges cost $90 million There are also plans to widen Route 70 to 4 lanes from Marysville to the junction of Route 99 in Sutter County. It will also be 4 lanes in the Oroville area and north to the junction of Route 191. About 2 more miles will be widened to 4 lanes immediately south of Oroville.

In July 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way on Route 149 on Shippee Road, consisting of superseded highway and collateral facilities.

 

Naming

The junction between Route 70 and Route 149 near the City of Oroville, in the County of Butte, is named the "Wick's Corner Interchange". This segment was named in memory of Moses Wick, born in Ohio in 1822. Moses Wick served in the Mexican War under the command of General Zachary Taylor, who eventually became President of the United States. In 1852, Moses Wick moved to California with his wife Maria in a wagon train pulled by his team of oxen on a journey that took six months. The land in the area of the current cloverleaf junction between Route 70 and Route 149 was deeded in 1852 to Moses Wick as a reward for his military service. On September 3, 1852, Moses Wick made a homestead of the 160 acre territory and began raising cattle as a pioneer cattle rancher. Through purchases and other land grants, he eventually owned about 800 acres adjacent to "Wick's Corner". Wick made a modest living as a butcher by selling and supplying beef to gold miners and merchants in the area. He also used his faithful team of oxen to haul freight and cargo back and forth to the mines between Oroville and Sacramento. Moses Wick died in 1888 at the age of 66 years and was survived by his second wife Roxie Ann, his son Charles, and daughter Ella Wick Crum. He cattle ranch was operated until his son Charles sold most of the ranch to Senator Thomas Rockhill in 1906 for $25,000. The cattle ranch became a tavern and an early stagecoach stop for the Central Pacific Railroad. Although Wick's historic home was demolished in 1947, this area continues to be known as "Wick's Corner". The modern Route 70 was constructed in the 1960s when the former highway was submerged beneath the rising waters of Lake Oroville. Mrs. Merle McAndrews, the great granddaughter of both Moses Wick and Senator Thomas Rockhill, still lives on the property in a portion of one of the original ranches that was built more than 70 years ago. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 39, Resolution Chapter 71, on 7/3/2007.

The portion of Route 149 in Butte County is named the "Lt. Leonard B. "Larry" Estes and Deputy William R. "Bill" Hunter Memorial Highway" This segment was named in honor of Butte County Sheriff's Department Lt. Leonard B. "Larry" Estes and Deputy William R. "Bill" Hunter. Lieutenant Leonard B. "Larry" Estes was born June, 10, 1940 and died in the line of duty July 26, 2001. Lt. Estes joined the Butte County Sheriff's Department in 1973, worked in patrol for 12 years, and at the Butte Interagency Narcotics Task Force for four years. He was promoted to sergeant in 1991 and transferred to investigation in 1994. A year later he was promoted to lieutenant and named chief deputy coroner. In 1998, Lt. Estes was promoted to assistant sheriff; the highest nonelected position in the department. Deputy William R. "Bill" Hunter was born November 10, 1974 and also died in the line of duty on July 26, 2001. Deputy Hunter joined the Butte County Sheriff's Department in 1998 and had been selected to join the K-9 team. These officers were tragically killed by gunfire in the line of duty on July 26, 2001, when they were ambushed by a suspect in the Inskip area of Paradise Ridge. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 63, Resolution Chapter 14, on 4/4/2008.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.17] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 149:

  • Total Length (1995): 5 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 10,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 5; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 5 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Butte.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "Surf to [LRN 80] near Santa Ynez" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 149, with the same routing. The routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This was originally signed as Route 150; in 1961, it was signed as part of Route 154. It is present-day Route 246 between Surf (10 mi W of Lompoc) and Route 154 near Santa Ynez.


State Shield

State Route 150



Routing

From Route 101 near the Ventura-Santa Barbara county line to Route 126 near Santa Paula.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 150 was defined as "Route 101 near Rincon to Route 126 near Santa Paula."

In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the origin to "Route 101 near Rincon the Ventura-Santa Barbara county line to …"

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 150 was signed along the route from Surf to Jct. Route 126 at Santa Paula, via Santa Barbara and Ojai. It consisted of the following segments:

  1. Present-day Route 246 between Surf and Santa Ynez. This was LRN 149, defined in 1933. Although originally part of Route 150, in 1961 it was resigned as Route 154. It was resigned as Route 246 in 1964.

  2. Present-day Route 154 between Santa Barbara (US 101, LRN 2) and LRN 2 (US 101) near Zaca (near Los Olivos). This was LRN 80, also defined in 1931. Certain sections of old Route 150 are covered by Lake Cachuma. The old bridge crossing the Santa Ynez River is still there serving as a cow crossing. A section of Route 150 runs off of Route 154 and heads up to Bradbury Dam. There it disappears underneath the dam and heads up the middle of Cachuma Lake. Stagecoach Road is the old Route 150 from the days before the large bridge across Cold Springs Canyon. It was created as a state highway to provide relief for LRN 2 (US 101). By creating it, the state hoped that it would indefinitely postpone radical widening of the present state highway through Gaviota Canyon and along the coast, which would destroy valuable landscape and property.

  3. Present-day Route 192 between Route 154 and present-day Route 150. This is LRN 80, defined in 1933.

  4. Present-day Route 150 between Route 192 and Route 126, passing through Ojai. This was LRN 151, defined in 1933.

The route was opened in 1897. Before the construction of US 101, it was part of the main highway between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara.

 

Status

In August 2011, the CTC approved $753,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Santa Paula, at Reeves Road and at Rafferty Ranch Road, that will restore 8.5 acres of riparian and upland habitat as required on and off site mitigation for environmental impacts on previous emergency projects at two locations. (FCO)

 

Freeway

Planned as freeway in 1965; never upgraded. Not in the Freeway and Expressway system.

 

Naming

This was once planned as part of the Santa Paula Freeway.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 150:

  • Total Length (1995): 36 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,900 to 23,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 28; Sm. Urban: 8; Urbanized: 0.3.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 36 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 8 mi; Minor Arterial: 28 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Ventura, Santa Barbara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 2] near Montecito to [LRN 2] W of Santa Barbara via the Coast" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 150, with the routing:

"[LRN 2] near Montecito to [LRN 2] west of Santa Barbara via the coast."

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It is present-day Route 225.


State Shield

State Route 151



Routing

From Shasta Dam to Route 5 near the City of Shasta Lake..

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 2010, SB 1318, Chapter 421, 9/29/10, changed the terminus of the definition to "Route 5 near the City of Shasta Lake."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 209, defined in 1939; it was not signed before 1964.

Route 151 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 151 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 151:

  • Total Length (1995): 7 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 310 to 12,600
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 7.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Shasta.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 2] near Rincon to [LRN 79] near Santa Paula" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 151 with that definition. The definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering.

The route ran from US 101 near Rincon (roughly Rincon Beach Park, just below Carpinteria) to Route 126 near Santa Paula. This is present-day Route 150.


State Shield

State Route 152



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Watsonville via Hecker Pass to Route 101 in Gilroy.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(a) Route 1 near Watsonville to Route 101 via Hecker Pass."

    In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified the definition to be: "(a) Route 1 near Watsonville via Hecker Pass to Route 101 in Gilroy."

    There were once plans to construct a bypass of Watsonville that would have traversed a path from Freedom to College Lake.

    In 2012, Chapter 769 (AB 2679, 9/29/12) authorized relinquishment in Watsonville:

    (c) The commission may relinquish to the City of Watsonville the portion of Route 152, beginning at Route 1 and ending at Beverly Drive or some segment thereof, within the city limits of the City of Watsonville, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

    (d) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective immediately following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (e) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur:

    (1) The portion of Route 152 relinquished under this section shall cease to be a state highway.

    (2) The portion of Route 152 relinquished under this section shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (f) The City of Watsonville shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 152, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

    (g) For those portions of Route 152 that are relinquished, the City of Watsonville shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 152.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This entire route was LRN 32. The original portion of the route, defined in 1915, was between US 101 and Route 99. The portion between Route 1 and US 101 was defined in 1933, and the remainder was defined in 1959. In 1934, Route 152 was signed along the route from Route 1 in Watsonville to Jct. US 99 at Califa via Los Banos.

     

    Status

    152 Heckler PassIn August 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct roadway improvements in five locations on Route 152 near the city of Gilroy. The project is programmed in the 2012 StateHighway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $37,141,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] From Route 1 to the Santa Clara county line at Hecker Pass.

     

    Naming

    Hecker Pass Highway


  2. From Route 101 near Gilroy to Route 65 near Sharon via Pacheco Pass.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was "(b) Route 101 to Route 65 near Sharon via Pacheco Pass."

    In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified the definition to be: "(b) Route 101 near Gilroy to Route 65 near Sharon via Pacheco Pass."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This entire route was LRN 32. The original portion of the route, defined in 1915, was between US 101 and Route 99. The portion between Route 1 and US 101 was defined in 1933, and the remainder was defined in 1959. It was signed as part of the original 1934 signage of state routes.

    152 RelocationIn 1963, there was an extensive relocation of Pacheco Pass. This was a side effect of the construction of the San Luis Dam, part of the Central Valley Project. The San Luis Reservoir, formed by construction of the new dam, will provide the only lake of any significant size on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley. When the reservoir is filled, it will cover more than 13,000 acres and will have a capacity of over 2,000,000 acre-feet of water. Construction of the new location requireed moving 11,400,000 cubic yards of earth and rock, paving 12 miles, and constructing two 560' long bridges... within a 2 year period!

     

    Status

    Unconstructed Unconstructed from Route 99 to (unconstructed) Route 65 near Sharon. There is no traversable local routing in this segment, and no recommendations for a routing.

    In April 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Santa Clara along Route 152 and Casa De Fruta Parkway, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In May 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Santa Clara along Route 152 at Walnut Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct roadway improvements on Route 152 at Lover’s Lane near the city of Gilroy. These improvements will include expanding sight distances, upgrading portions of the shoulders to current standards, and providing a left turn lane at the intersection of Route 152 and Lover’s Lane. The project is fully funded in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $22,770,000 for capital and support.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $985,000 in SHOPP funding to reestablish highway planting to mitigate the damage done during the bridge replacement construction activity at one location near Gilroy, at Uvas Creek.

    Based on a meeting with Governor Grey Davis and the San Joaquin Valley counties, there are now plans to fund the construction of a four-lane freeway along Route 152 between I-5 and US 101. There are also plans for a bypass around Los Baños.

    In 2008, Gary Richards of the Mercury News reported that there is some movement toward replacing Route 152 with a four-lane bypass. The Valley Transportation Authority is seeking a $5 million grant from the state to begin studying a new route, with funds from the state bonds approved by voters in 2007 to improve trucking corridors. The cost of a new road could be $500 million or more, so this is a drop in the bucket but a necessary first step. Also under consideration is making this a toll road from Route 99 to US 101.

    This is an extremely dangerous highway. The accident rate along the 13-mile stretch of concrete is as much as 58% higher than on similar two-lane highways in California. In 2005, there were 225 crashes on the road, causing 115 injuries and 9 deaths. Truckers number one of every five vehicles on this road. Several solutions are planned; more are being discussed. Caltrans will add truck passing lanes on Route 152 in 2007, the same time the Valley Transportation Authority will begin work on a flyover ramp at the Route 152/Route 156 interchange. Estimated completion date is 2008. The two efforts will cost around $60 million. Note that it is impractical to turn Route 152 directly into a freeway: Crews would have to cut into the mountain to convert the highway into a freeway, build costly ramps from the many side roads that feed into Route 152, and cross numerous creeks requiring more bridges. Also, the land surrounding the entrance to Route 152 from US 101 is now home to a mega-shopping center.
    (Condensed from SJMercury News)

    Although it is difficult to build (as noted above), in 2007 momentum for a Pacheco Pass Freeway increased. The San Benito County Council of Governments has proposed an eight-mile, four-lane freeway that would run parallel to and south of Route152, and would be the first new highway built in the region since Route 85 opened in 1994. It would almost completely bypass the two-lane, 13-mile route to Pacheco Pass (i.e., the segment between US 101 and the Route 152/Route 156 junction). Traffic would flow from US 101 to I-5 via a short jog on Route 25 before linking with either Route 156 or Route 152 in the southern part of Santa Clara County. The Valley Transportation Authority will seek money in March for a study of the new plan. Officials from VTA and San Benito County have not voted on the plan, but meetings over the past year have virtually ruled out widening Route 152 or, making extensive upgrades to other highways to the south. The project would be expensive, perhaps $500 million (which is less than it would cost to improve the existing Route 152). The concerns of property owners along the eight-mile stretch that is now mostly farms would have to be addressed, and there is potential impact to Soap Lake, a drybed that handles heavy rains that would otherwise flood the Pajaro River. Of the $4.5 billon in bonds for transportation recently approved, VTA is seeking $108 million to widen US 101 south of Gilroy and upgrade ramps at Route 25. In the next couple of years, another $3 billion in transportation bonds will be dished out across the state on key trade corridors. Another $13 billion will be available during the next decade from sales tax receipts on gas purchases. The idea of rebuilding and widening Route 152 has always been considered a tall task. There are about 140 access points between US 101 and Route 156, from driveways to exits to farm fields to rural roads. Building frontage roads, tearing into the hillside and straightening the highway would probably cost more than $900 million. In addition, Gilroy has developed the area east of 101 at 152, making it almost impossible to start a new highway at that location. The proposed new road would convert Route 101 to a freeway and add a third lane in each direction from Gilroy to south of Route 25. It would also include new ramps at the Route 25-US 101 interchange. Route 25 would be widened for a mile or so to four lanes. A new four-lane road would veer east almost in a straight line. One idea would be to turn north to Route 152 at a point west of San Felipe Road. Another would continue pavement east to Route 156, just south of Route 152-Route 156. There would be no other interchanges between Route 25 and the eastern end the new highway. Construction on the planned US 101 changes could begin by 2012, with work on a new road starting shortly after if funding is approved.
    (Condensed from SJ Mercury News)

    GilroyIn late January 2010, the Gilroy Dispatch reported that two county agencies are planning a $200-plus million project to build a new connector from US 101 to Route 99. The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and Council of San Benito County Governments formally created a memorandum of understanding 10/15/2010 regarding the project, which is expected to cost $215 million to $284 million, according to the San Benito COG. The new road - which could be a toll road or built through a public-private partnership among other options - would obviate Route 152 (it is unclear whether, at this point, it would be renumbered Route 152 or be a parallel route). So far, the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority has secured $10 million for the project, including $5 million of its own money and $5 million from the state, but future funding for the project—slated to be built within the next decade - is still uncertain. Although, Santa Clara County Supervisor Don Gage said there has been talk about realigning Route 152 for nearly 20 years, this is the first time an alignment route has been determined to connect US 101 and Route 156 in northern San Benito County. According to the article, the current two-lane portion of Route 152 near Gilroy would likely be converted into a county roadway. The goal is to have the project completed in the next 10 years, but she said that is not likely because of the size and cost of the project. After the current study is done, she said the next step is looking at alternatives for environmental work.

    In February 2010, it was reported that regional transportation authorities hope to align the Route 152 realignment project with the future California High-Speed Rail system

    [CTC February 2002 Agenda Item 2.3c]. The following segments of the original routing may have been relinquished: PM 11.3 to PM 11.7 in the County of Merced; PM 19.6 to PM 21.3 in the City of Los Baños.

    [Map]With respect to the Los Baños bypass, the CTC in November 2007 considered a project for future funding. The project would construct a new bypass along a portion of Route 152 near Los Baños. A route adoption has been proposed, and the project has been approved for construction. Route studies to construct a bypass on Route 152 around the City of Los Baños were initiated in 1962. As a result of these studies, a southern bypass route was adopted by the California Highway Commission on April 28, 1965. Due to funding concerns, a portion of this adopted route (from Baños Creek to San Luis Canal) was rescinded in 1981. In 1987, as congestion and safety became concern along Route 152, the bypass concept was reinitiated. In 1988, a Major Investment Study ( was prepared by the Merced County Association of Governments (MCAG) with support from the County of Merced, City of Los Baños, the Department (D10), FHWA, and other agencies. Many alternatives were considered and rejected. In 1999, initial funding was obtained and environmental studies were initiated. Finally, on June 25, 2007, the environmental document was approved and proposed northern bypass route alternative was selected. This alternative avoids wetlands, historic properties, the City’s planned industrial park, and the proposed airport relocation site. Portions of the freeway route adoption from April 28, 1965, will be rescinded as part of this proposed freeway route adoption as shown on the route location map. The proposed project is to construct a four-lane freeway bypass within an ultimate six-lane right of way for Route 152 around and through the city of Los Baños. The freeway would begin approximately at Post Mile 16.0, east of Volta Road, and end approximately at Post Mile 24.8, east of the Old Santa Fe Grade Road. Three spread diamond type interchanges are proposed. The first interchange will be located just east of Ramos Road, the second interchange will be at the intersection of Route 152 with Route 165, and the third interchange will be located just west of Old Santa Fe Grade Road. Frontage roads would be constructed as needed to provide access to landlocked parcels. Relinquishment of the existing Route 152 would occur after construction of the new bypass. Relinquishment would transfer the State’s right of way, title, and interest of a section of Route 152 to the City of Los Baños and to Merced County.

    [Los Banos - 3 Segments]In February 2009, the CTC approved splitting the Los Baños into three segments for funding reasons. The problem is that the construction estimate for the Los Baños Bypass (including construction support) is $409 million, which was too large to program in a single STIP cycle. Rather than design the entire bypass, which cannot be constructed as a single project, the opted to design and acquire right of way for a fundable segment with independent utility (Segment 1). As such, they split the project into three segments as follows:

    • Segment 1 (PPNO 5707A): Construct a four-lane expressway from Route 165 to 0.5 mile west of Santa Fe Grade Road.

    • Segment 2 (PPNO 5707B): Construct a four-lane expressway from 0.3 mile east of Volta Road to Route 165.

    • Segment 3 (PPNO 5707C): Construct new interchanges at West Pacheco Boulevard, Route 165, and East Pacheco Boulevard.

    As of February 2009, only PPNO 5707A (Segment 1) was funded.

    In February 2012, it was reported that the Los Baños bypass may be a toll road. In particular, the California Transportation Commission is considering a plan to add toll booths to the highway in order to pay for a new four lane road between Casa De Fruta and Gilroy, and also a long-awaited bypass around Los Banos. The Merced County Association of Governments says toll booths may be the only way to pay for the $420 million bypass. But first, it's being asked to contribute $7 million toward the overall environmental review process, money that was set aside specifically for the bypass.

    In January 2007, the CTC considered a project to construct an eastbound truck climbing lane with rumble strip on Route 152 from east of San Felipe Lane to west of Route 152/156 Junction.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1759: Improvements to the Route 152/Route 156 Intersection. $800,000.

    • High Priority Project #1793: Reconfigure intersection at Route152 and Route 156 in Santa Clara County. $11,120,000.

     

     

    Naming

    Pacheco Pass Highway

    The San Benito County Board of Supervisors explored sending a resolution to Sacramento in support of naming the Route 152/Route 156 flyover after Joseph Anthony Zanger. Zanger, who farmed more than 600 acres on Pacheco Pass and whose family started Casa de Fruta, died on Feb. 9, 2009. Zanger studied safety and economic interests related to the area's transportation system. In 1978, he served on the planning committee for the completion of Interstate 5 from Stockton to Santa Nella/Route 152. He also helped establish a new route from Route 152/Route 156 to connect US 101 south of Gilroy. According to the resolution, Zanger's work on highway safety has benefited hundreds, if not thousands, of Californians who travel on those highways.

    The portion of Route 152 between its intersection with Route 233 and its intersection with Route 99 (Postmile 10.799 to Postmile 15.622) in the County of Madera is named the Bill Whitehurst Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of William “Bill” S. Whitehurst,a prominent Fresno businessman, civic leader, philanthropist, and devoted and generous member of the community, actively involved in local organizations such as the Boy Scouts of America, the Knights of Columbus, the Fresno Arts Center, and Veterans of Foreign Wars. Whitehurst was born in 1922 in Sacramento, and that same year the family moved to Los Banos to open a funeral home. Bill Whitehurst, his brother, Joel, and his sister, Betty, graduated from Los Banos High School, where he lettered in football, basketball, and baseball while maintaining straight As. Whitehurst received a football scholarship from St. Mary’s College of California in Moraga, which is administered by the De LaSalle Christian Brothers. He cherished his time at St. Mary’s College and throughout his lifetime provided scholarships to the students of St. Mary’s and San Joaquin Memorial High School, which is also administered by Christian Brothers. In 1973, Bill Whitehurst received the Christian Brothers’ prestigious award of Signum Fidei for his outstanding participation in the goals of higher education. After assuming ownership of his family’s Whitehurst Chapel at 18 years of age, Bill Whitehurst served two years overseas during World War II in the United States Army and was honorably discharged. Bill Whitehurst has demonstrated a lifetime of public service and a commitment to his community, beginning with his election to the Los Banos City Council at 21 years of age. He was selected county campaign chairman for Governor Edmund G. Brown’s bid for Governor in 1962, and as county campaign chairman for John F. Kennedy in 1960 and Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 in their bids for the presidency. Whitehurst was appointed to the State Highway Commission in 1963 and served until 1970, where he spearheaded a drive to transform Route 152, then a dangerous two-lane highway known as “Blood Alley” due to numerous traffic accidents, into a safer four-lane highway. In 1970, Bill Whitehurst was given the Department of Veterans Affairs Citation of Merit for his ongoing generosity shown by his performing burials of disabled veterans who died at a Veterans Affairs hospital at a cost not exceeding the Veterans Administration’s allowance. In 1970, and through the year 2012, Bill Whitehurst extended that courtesy to any veteran who died under difficult financial circumstances. From 1971 to 1972, Bill Whitehurst served two terms as President of the American Cancer Society. From 1973 to 1982, Bill Whitehurst served as a member of the Saint Agnes Medical Center Board of Trustees and helped drive the movement to relocate the medical center to its current location in north Fresno. To do this, Bill Whitehurst helped secure the donation of the 30-acre property and generously donated his own money to the building fund. In 1973, Bill Whitehurst developed the Safe-D Program to help young teenagers improve their driving skills and become more aware of the obligations and responsibilities of driving a motor vehicle. Throughout his lifetime, Bill Whitehurst remained devoted to his church, and in 1989 received the prestigious Benemerenti medal from Pope John Paul II, for outstanding service to his church, his community, and to families in need. On July 20, 2000, Bill Whitehurst and his wife, Ann, conveyed to the Fresno County Office of Education the property known as Scout Island, a parcel that was key in developing the San Joaquin River Parkway and is now used as an outdoor education center. Bill Whitehurst continued his commitment to the community by serving on the St. John’s Cathedral Restoration project, helping to raise the needed moneys necessary to keep the historic cathedral, which is located in Fresno, a jewel for the entire San Joaquin Valley. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 36, August 15, 2013. Resolution Chapter 71.

     

    Named Structures

    The flyover ramp at the interchange of Route 152 and Route 156 is named the “Joseph A. Zanger Memorial Flyover”. This segment was named in honor of Joseph A. Zanger, who was born on December 28, 1927, in San Jose, California. After attending college, Joseph moved to the Pacheco Pass area to help manage his family's orchard operations. In 1943, the Zanger family founded Casa de Fruta to complement its farming business. The Casa de Fruta business started with a small cherry stand built in 1943 and grew to include a large fruit stand, a restaurant, a park for recreational vehicles, a lodge, wine tasting, a gift shop, a barnyard zoo, a candy store, a service station, and a dried fruit mail order business. Joseph studied safety and economic issues related to the transportation system of central California and served as an advocate for the improvement of transportation in that area. In 1978, Joseph served on the planning committee for the I-5 project from Stockton to Santa Nella/Route 152. In 2005, Joseph also worked to establish a new route from Route 152/Route 156 to US 101. Joseph's advocacy for safety and transportation improvements has affected thousands of motorists. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 85, Resolution Chapter 67, on 8/4/2010.

    Bridge 39-0036 over the California Aqueduct in Merced County, east of the intersection with Route 5, officially designated the "Sandvig-Scanlon Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1965, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 92, Chapter 97, in 1994. Sergeant Vernon Dale Sandvig was a casualty of the Vietnam War. As a member of the Army Selective Service, SGT Sandvig served our country until March 28th, 1968 in Binh Duong, South Vietnam. He was 20 years old and was not married. Vernon died from suffocation. Vernon was born on October 17th, 1947 in Los Baños, California. Sergeant William Manuel Scanlon, was also a casualty of the Vietnam War. As a member of the Army Selective Service, SGT Scanlon served our country until August 8th, 1970 in Quang, Ngai, South Vietnam. He was 21 years old and was not married. William died from an undetermined explosion. William was born on March 11th, 1949 in Los Baños, California.

    Bridge 39-0145 over the O'Neill Forebayin Merced County is officially designated the "Celano-Norris Memorial Bridge. It was built in 1964, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 92, Chapter 97, in 1994. Sergeant Frank Anthony Celano was a casualty of the Vietnam War. As a member of the Army, SGT Celano served our country until January 22nd, 1971 in Binh Hoa, South Vietnam. He was 21 years old and was not married. Frank died when his helicopter crashed into the land. Frank was born on July 19th, 1949 in Los Baños, California. Second Lieutenant John Alexander III Norris was also a casualty of the Vietnam War. As a member of the Marine Corps Reserve, 2LT Norris served our country until October 4th, 1967 in Quang Nam, South Vietnam. He was 25 years old and was married. John died from small arms fire. John was born on June 20th, 1942 in Los Baños, California.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] From Route 156 near San Felipe to Route 5.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.7] From Route 101 to Route 65 near Sharon via Pacheco Pass. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. There are no plans to construct this as freeway between Route 99 and (unconstructed) Route 65 near Sharon.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between the junction with Route 156 at the Don Pacheco "Y" and the intersection with Ferguson Road. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.17] Between Route 101 and Route 99.

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 152:

  • Total Length (1995): 105 miles traversable; 15 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 5,000 to 26,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 101; Sm. Urban: 19; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 84 mi; FAU: 6 mi; FAS: 15 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 89 mi; Minor Arterial: 3 mi; Collector: 13 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Hecker Pass (1309 ft); Pacheco Pass (1386 ft)
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Cruz, Santa Clara, Merced, Madera.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 2] near Carpinteria to the Carpinteria Beach State Park" to be a state highway. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 152. The route remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It ran from US 101 near Carpinteria to the Carpinteria Beach State Park. This was Route 224 between 1964 and 1996.



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