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California Highways

Routes 137 through 144

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

137 · 138 · 139 · 140 · 141 · 142 · 143 · 144


State Shield

State Route 137



Routing

From Route 43 near Corcoran to Route 65 near Lindsay via Tulare.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this was defined as the route from "Route 43 at Corcoran to Lindsay via Tulare."

In 1965, Chapter 1371 clarified the terminus to be "…to Route 65 near Lindsay via Tulare."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 134, defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1964.

Route 137 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 137 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

Caltrans is exploring creating a roundabout on this route at the intersection of Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran. Other potential/planned roundabout locations in the San Joaquin Valley include Route 145/Jensen near Kerman, Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather, Route 155/Browning Road in Delano, Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 190/Road 152 east of Tipton. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.7] From Route 99 near Tulare to Route 65 near Lindsay. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 137:

  • Total Length (1995): 29 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,850 to 16,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 24; Sm. Urban: 5; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 11 mi; FAU: 3 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 5 mi; Minor Arterial: 24 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kings, Tulare.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 2] near Santa Margarita to Moro-Fresno Road near Creston" to the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 137, with the definition:

"[LRN 2] near Santa Margarita to [LRN 125] near Creston"

In 1957, Chapter 36 changed the origin to "[LRN 58] [LRN 2] near Santa Margarita to …"

This route ran from Route 178 near Santa Margarita to present-day Route 41 (US 466) near Creston. It was Route 229 until 1994.


State Shield

State Route 138



Routing
  1. From Route 5 near Gorman to Route 14 near Lancaster.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(a) Route 5 near Gorman to Route 15 near Cajon Pass."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 combined the two segments to make this a continuous route: "Route 5 near Gorman to Route 18 near Crestline."

    In 1996, Chapter 10 moved the route onto the former Route 48 routing, which created the need for a discontinuity again: "(a) Route 5 near Gorman to Route 14 near Lancaster. (b) Route 14 near Palmdale to Route 18 near Crestline." This reflected the deletion of a portion of former Route 48 to Route 14 near Palmdale, and the transfer of the portion of Route 48 from Route 138 to Route 14 near Lancaster. There is a 16 mile unconstructed, but adopted portion from Route 138 to Route 14, parallel to the existing traversable route, for the proposed freeway routing. There may be some postmiles near Neenach that still show the pre-1995 designation of this as Route 48.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1919, the third highway bond act established a state highway between Bailey's (near what is now Gorman) and Lancaster. It was an E-W routing from near Gorman to N of Lancaster, passing through Neenach. It was LRN 59, and was signed as Route 138 after 1934. After 1959, a new routing for LRN 59 from about 10 mi E of Gorman through Lake Hughes directly to Palmdale was defined for Route 138 ("Metropolitan Bypass"), and the older routing from that point to Lancaster was renumbered LRN 267. Post 1964, the LRN 267 routing was renumbered as legislative Route 48, although it was signed as Route 138 (presumably, that signage would move once the bypass was completed). However, in 1996, the Route 138 to Lancaster portion of Route 48 was returned to Route 138, essentially restoring Route 138 back to the LRN 59 routing.

    In 1931, LRN 59 was extended between Lancaster and LRN 31 near Cajon Junction (US 66, what is now I-15).

    In 1934, Route 138 was signed along the route from Jct. US 99 at Gorman to Jct. US 66 at Cajon, via Lancaster.

     

    Naming

    Officially, the "long offramp" is named the "Metropolitan Bypass Freeway"; it was built in 1970. This naming comes from the fact that the route would serve as a bypass to the Los Angeles Metropolitan area.


  2. From Route 14 near Palmdale to Route 18 near Crestline.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(b) Route 15 near Cajon Pass to Route 18 near Mt. Anderson."

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 changed the terminus of (b) to "… to Route 18 near Mt. Anderson Crestline."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 combined the two segments to make this a continuous route: "Route 5 near Gorman to Route 18 near Crestline."

    In 1996, Chapter 10 moved the route onto the former Route 48 routing, which created the need for a discontinuity again: "(a) Route 5 near Gorman to Route 14 near Lancaster. (b) Route 14 near Palmdale to Route 18 near Crestline." This primarily affected segment (a), but did create this new definition of (b).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Route 138 was the original state signed routes from 1934. It originally ran from US 99 (present-day Route 5) near Gorman to US 66 (present-day I-15) at Cajon, via Lancaster. This was LRN 59 from Palmdale to Cajon. The portion between I-5 and Route 48 was defined in 1919; the remainder was defined in 1931.

    Hample Avenue and 116th Street SE are the former routings of Route 138 in Pearblossom. Also, immediately after the Antelope Valley Freeway was finished, former US 6/Route 14 (Sierra Highway) between Lancaster and Palmdale retained Route 138 signage for some years.

    Note: Generally, LRN 59 is viewed as the route for the "Pear Blossom Highway" portion of Route 138. There is a slight possibility that LRN 186 might have had that designation: it certainly had the name for a few years, although it didn't have the route number. In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 23] near Palmdale to Swartout Valley" as a state highway. This was codified in the highway code as LRN 186 with the definition "[LRN 23] near Palmdale to [LRN 61] in Swartout Valley" (i.e., from Route 14 to Route 2), but the routing was repealed later that year by Chapter 426. This occurred as part of a compromise to create the Arroyo Seco Parkway. The following is a quote from the Historical American Engineering Record on the Arroyo Seco Parkway:

    Because gas tax funds were going to be needed to build the road, another formidable political force joined the alternately strident, persuasive, and aggrieved stakeholders: the State Highway Commissioners. Unless the Arroyo Seco Parkway could qualify as a state highway, it would not receive the tax funds that would maintain it. As guardians of the 1 ¼ cent highway gas tax fund doled out to counties and cities, however, the commissioners opposed adding any more mileage to the state highway system.

    To solve the problem, Los Angeles County Supervisor Roger Jessup offered a swap: the county would take back ten to fifteen miles of the Pear Blossom Highway, which ran from Palmdale to Cajon Pass at the northeastern edge of Los Angeles County, allowing that mileage to be granted to the Arroyo Seco Parkway. The State Highway Commission balked at this idea, requiring the county to assume control of the entire thirty-four miles of the Pear Blossom Highway. To keep the scheme alive, the county agreed to this.

    Miller amended her bill by inserting a provision that effectively removed the Pear Blossom Highway from the state system. The coalition of South Pasadena and Highland Park residents who supported the parks for which they had been assessed, led by Thrasher, sought an amendment to return previously levied park assessment funds in the Arroyo Seco to the cities losing the land to highway right-of-way. This amendment was defeated. Assembly Bill 2345 authorizing the Arroyo Seco Parkway passed the state assembly and senate by a large margin, and Governor Frank Merriam signed it into law on July 13, 1935. The bill did not specify the exact route.

    The portion of the route from Cajon to Crestline was not part of the original signage. This portion was LRN 59 (1957 extension) between Cajon and Summit Valley (junction present-day Route 173), and LRN 188 (defined in 1933) from Summit Valley to Crestline. This latter segment was originally signed as part of Route 2.

     

    Status

    In December 2004, the CTC considered funding a project on Route 138 that received a negative EIR; specifically, a realignment of the highway in the Cajon Pass.

    In July 2005, the CTC considered funding to widen from 2 to 4 lanes with median turn lane the segment near Pearblossom at the Twin Bridges over Big Wash.

    There are plans to widen Route 138 to four lanes - two in each direction - from Avenue T in Palmdale to Route 18 in Llano, pending funding (some of this was in the 2007 CMIA, but rejected). The $68.2 million project is divided into seven phases, with widening from Longview Road to 146th Street East completed last February. Construction is under way from 146th Street East in Pearblossom to 165th Street East in Llano. The last leg of construction is scheduled to begin in fall 2009.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $17,632,000 in State Administered STIP Project funding for a project near Llano, from 175th Street East to Largo Vista Road, that will widen the segment from two to four lanes with a median turn lane and standard shoulder.

    In December 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to widen a portion of Route 138 from two lanes to four lanes, construct a median, and realign portions of the highway. The project will be constructed in two phases, and is fully funded for Phase 1 only. Phase 1 is in San Bernardino County from Phelan Road to I-15. This phase is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $88,420,000 for capital and support. Construction for Phase 1 is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. Phase 2 begins in Los Angeles County at State Route 18 and extends into San Bernardino County, ending at Phelan Road. This phase is not yet funded, but is anticipated to be programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $72,500,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding, construction for Phase 2 is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. Environmental mitigation measures include, but are not limited to, a vista point being developed in the vicinity of Route 138 and Lone Pine Canyon Road, rock faces shall be provided with a similar surface as the nearby Mormon Rocks formation, and Joshua trees removed during construction will be replanted away from proposed pavement areas.

    There are plans to add truck lanes and shoulders near Wrightwood. April 2005 CTC Agenda.

    In late 2007, Caltrans advertised bids to widen Route 138 to four lanes near Littlerock from 96th Street East to 106th Street East.

    2007 CMIA. Two projects on Route 138 in Los Angeles County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects were widening the route to 4 lanes between 175th St and Largo Vista Road ($15.8 million) and between Ave T and Route 18 ($95.1 million). Neither were recommended for funding.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #624: Begin construction of a road from US 395 west towards Route 14. The specifics of this aren't given, but it could relate to the High Desert Corridor and the Cross-Valley Connector (see below), which when combined with the I-5 to Route 14, and US 395 to I-15 segments, would complete the Metropolitan Bypass Freeway. The funding, however, is insufficient to complete this. $800,000.

    • High Priority Project #1342: Construction of new freeway between I-15 and US 395, including new interchange at I-15. This is the last part of the High Desert Corridor (see Route 138). This will provide new highway access to the Southern California Logistics Airport. $4,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #2542: Replace twin two-lane bridges with single four-lane bridge on Route 138 over Big Rock Wash. $400,000.

    Metropolitan Bypass Freeway/High Desert Corridor

    Route 138 was to have been the "Metropolitan Bypass" freeway; only the Route 5/Route 138 interchange was constructed to freeway standards. If built, it would have continued past Route 18 to Route 15. It is unconstructed between Routes 14 and Route 48. However, the Metropolitan Bypass isn't dead. The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Agency (MTA) are exploring a plan to construct a new east-west highway that roughly follows the current path of Route 138. This would not only serve north county communities but also divert truck traffic now pouring into the Los Angeles Basin via I-5. In August 2001, the MTA launched a study of north county highway corridors. The first phase focused on the Golden State and Antelope Valley freeways and such proposed improvements as widening and adding lanes. The study's second part, which began in May 2002, examined Route 138, also known as Lancaster Road and Avenue D in the western portion, and Pearblossom Highway in the east. The MTA's proposal for the roadway includes widening the western portion, which connects the Golden State and Antelope Valley freeways, into a divided highway with three lanes in each direction. In the eastern portion, the MTA proposes constructing a freeway with as many as four lanes in each direction along Avenue P-8, between the Antelope Valley and Mojave freeways, a few blocks north of the Pearblossom Highway. A Pearblossom Highway routing was rejected because of community opposition and anticipated construction difficulties.

    [High Desert Corridor Map]There may still be plans to build the Metropolitan Bypass Freeway, now called the High Desert Corridor. Some of the funding for this may be provided by the state of Nevada, according to an LVRJ article. According to the article, the California Department of Transportation recently completed its study of a proposed six-lane highway, dubbed the High Desert Corridor, to link Palmdale and Victorville. By facilitating travel between I-15 and I-5, the $1.5 billion project would help alleviate congestion on I-15, which is a major concern to area tourism officials. The State Senate has approved legislation (which still requires assembly concurrance and the Governor's signature) authorizing Caltrans to look for a private company to build a new east-west highway across the eastern Antelope Valley as a toll road. This toll road would be located a few miles north but parallel to Route 138. The route number is uncertain: it could end up being a rerouting of Route 138; it could end up as Route 48; or it could get a new number. Caltrans materials refers to it as a Route 138 project.

    According to Chris Sampang, the Palmdale bypass for Route 138 is apparantly planned to begin at where Route 14/138 crosses over Avenue P8 southeast of the Antelope Valley Mall; the new route would then follow Avenue P8's corridor east (passing south of the Desert Aire Golf Course) staying north of Palmdale Boulevard (and bypassing Antelope Center as well in the process). At the Rock Creek, the Route 138 bypass would curve to the south and then cross Avenue T and the railroad tracks southbound, before curving southeast to meet up with existing Route 138 halfway between Pearblossom and Llano.

    According to Jonathan Goff, the HDC will be routed along Ave P-8 (Technology Drive) from Route 14 to I-15 in Adelanto. It will be full freeway from the Route 14 till 50th East. There will be offramps serving the airport and Plant 42. There will a 6 lane freeway/expressway spur running N/S along 50th East to Palmdale Blvd that will meet with the HDC. The portion from 50th East to the 240th East will be mix of 6 lane freeway/express way. The HDC will be 6 lane expressway from 240th East till US 395. Past US 395 it will be 4 lane expressway and it will cross the I-15 and run into Apple Valley for another 8-10 miles. The MTA is planning on purchasing sufficient ROW to allow for future expansion. They are allowing for future conversion to full freeway on many of the AV's highways beyond what is currently proposed. However, there are no plans on making a northern extension route of Route 138 to US 395 or to I-15; however, Route 58 could have some additional work on it allowing for more traffic.

    The AV Daily Press had an article on the HDC where they discussed the routing in the Victorville area, and provided a small map. The article notes that the corridor is a freeway that would connect US 395 to a new interchange on I-15 north of Stoddard Wells Road, along a route closely paralleling Air Expressway. East of I-15, the route would travel through Apple Valley north of Route 18, curving south to join Route 18 near Joshua Road. Note that this is significantly N of Route 138. The article goes on to note that, according to SANBAG, the corridor's first section, connecting US 395 and I-15, could be finished by 2010. Approval of the first phase is under way and is contingent on a satisfactory environmental analysis, which should be completed by 2006. A recent agreement between Caltrans and Los Angeles World Airports for a right of way through the Palmdale Airport, after years of negotiations, was a key moment in the project. However, the California budget questions may slow down the schedule.

    The HDC will cut to the south of the Southern California Logistics Airport (formerly George AFB) site. The former George AFB site is becoming a massive air and rail cargo facility. Information on how the SCLA will be affected can be found at http://www.logisticsairport.com/page.aspx. There might be a realignment of Route 18 in the Victor Valley to become the eastern portion of the HDC.

    In late March 2007, as the first step of a newly created joint powers authority, Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties officials sought $23M in federal funding for the HDC. The High Desert Corridor Joint Powers Authority sent funding requests to the region's congressional representatives, arguing that the project would ease traffic congestion, help turn the High Desert into an "inland port," and bolster efforts to promote the growth of L.A./Palmdale Regional Airport and the conversion of the former George Air Force Base for civilian use. The $23M was for FY07-08, and there are plans to seek an additional $26M in FY08-09. The requested funds would be used for preliminary engineering, environmental clearance and the creation of a financial plan that could be used to attract potential private investment. As of March 2007, the plans were for one segment of the proposed highway to run along Avenue P-8 from Route 14 to 50th Street East. That alignment would allow the highway to serve the L.A./Palmdale Regional Airport. At the eastern end, the highway would connect with the planned Southern California Logistics Airport - a project to convert the former George Air Force Base into a hub for air, rail and truck traffic - and I-15.
    (Source: Los Angeles Daily News, 3/27/2007)

    In September 2010, it was reported that the project has $33 million in Measure R funds to pay for the environmental studies already secured out of an overall estimated $6 billion required. As part of the process, Caltrans held a series of public hearings in September 2010. The HDC will construct a new 50-mile east-west freeway/expressway and possible truck toll facility between Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties. The east-west segment would be an eight-lane freeway [including a High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction] from Route 14 past the Palmdale Airport to 50th St East along an alignment paralleling P-8 in Palmdale; a six-lane freeway/expressway from 50th St East to 240th St East past the planned Southern California Logistics Airport to I-15. Estimated completion is 2010, and more information can be found at the High Desert Corridor Joint Powers Authority website.
    [Source: LA Streets Blog, 9/20/10]

    In March 2011, it was reported that Metro is planning to construct a brand new 63-mile east-west freeway between Route 14 in Los Angeles County and Route 18 in San Bernardino County. It would create a shortcut for goods movement from the Central Valley to the rest of the United States and trim back goods congestion through the L.A. basin. The proposed freeway would replace long stretches of existing Route 138 and Route 18, which are two-lane roads across open desert with notoriously-high fatality rates. Current maps show the proposed Route 138 freeway branching off the Antelope Valley (14) Freeway near Rancho Vista Boulevard. After skirting northern Palmdale, it would curve south two miles, then head east to Victorville along the Palmdale Boulevard alignment. It would join I-15 at Stoddard Wells Road, north of the notorious weekend bottlenecks on I-15 at Victorville and Hesperia. The one alternative route would loop the freeway even further south, to run east and west along the existing alignment of Route 138 at Pearblossom, and then east along Route 18 to Hesperia. The center median of the proposed freeway is a possible roadbed for the proposed "DesertXpress" high speed rail line that Las Vegas interests plan to build between Las Vegas and Southern California. That line presently would terminate in a giant parking lot at Victorville, but could be extended down the new freeway 63 miles west to Palmdale. There, it would connect to the proposed California High Speed Rail line to provide 200-mph rail service between Las Vegas and downtown Los Angeles or San Francisco.

    In November 2011, the LA Metro received a report looking at the various alternatives regarding the corridor, which proposes a new 63-mile freeway from Palmdale to Route 18 in San Bernardino. Metro staff has recommended variations along the corridor for further analysis in order to avoid, minimize or mitigate environmental concerns. In addition, staff recommended no further study of having the project concentrate solely on improvements to Route 138, saying that the environmental costs are considered to be too high compared to the transportation benefit that would be achieved.

    [HDC Interactive Map]In August 2012, it was reported that LA Metro planners and other agencies have announced a website with maps of the project: http://interactive.metro.net/projects/high-desert-corridor/. The map is interactive,allowing viewers to post photos with comments and even link to the map on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook. It allows one to see the specifics of each variation, the proposed on- and off-ramps, the physical variations, and the communities along the route. The map makes clear that the HDC is not the same route as Route 18 or Route 238; it is unclear what the route will be designated when (if) it is completed.

    In July 2013, LAMTA and Caltrans unveiled various concepts for the proposed High Desert Corridor from the Antelope Valley to San Bernardino County that would allow travelers to bypass some of the busiest freeways in Los Angeles County, and potentially link the California High Speed Rail project to Las Vegas. The proposed corridor would stretch 63 miles from east to west across Palmdale, Lancaster, Adelanto, Victorville as well as the town of Apple Valley. Planners are considering a freeway only or a freeway and railway that would connect to the California High Speed Rail system, which is envisioned someday to span the length of the state, and to the XpressWest bullet train from Victorville to Las Vegas. Currently, there is only funding available to finish the environmental review in 2014 and nothing else. Aside from public-private partnerships, Metro and Caltrans plan to seek state and federal funding for the project.
    (LA Daily News, 7/10/13)

     

    Naming

    "Palmdale" Blvd; "Fort Tejon" Road; "Antelope" Highway.

    Portions are known as the Pearblossom Highway or Pear Blossom Highway. Pearblossom refers to the community of Pearblossom, which was named by Guy Chase for its once abundant pear orchards. The orchards died off in blight. This was named in April 1926 by the Los Angeles County Supervisors, for recorded "Pear Blossom Highway" as the official name of the thirty-mile road now connecting Palmdale with the County Park (Swartout Valley was then known as the Los Angeles County Park) and formally opened this Antelope Valley route from Los Angeles to the park.

    The portion from 136th Avenue to 195th Avenue is named the "Deputy Sheriff Steven Sorensen Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Deputy Sheriff Stephen Sorensen of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, who was killed in the line of duty on August 2, 2003, in Llano, while responding to a routine trespassing investigation on his "day off". Deputy Sorensen, who was known as the "town sheriff", was the resident deputy for the Lake Los Angeles area and patrolled several sparsely populated communities at the edge of the Mojave Desert. He was the only full-time deputy responsible for 150 square miles. Deputy Sorensen was renowned for working to better the community and for helping the people living there and performed his duty not for press or glory but for the betterment of his community. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 135, Chapter 42, May 3, 2004.

    The portion of Route 138 from Lone Pine Canyon Road to Kruse Road is named the "Abiel Barron Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Los Angeles Police Department Detective Abiel Barron who was killed in the line of duty during the evening hours of June 25, 2003. Detective Barron was conducting a follow-up investigation in the Palmdale/Lancaster area and was traveling on Route 138 near its junction with I-15 at Mormon Rocks when a driver attempting to pass slower moving vehicles on the two-lane highway collided head-on with Detective Barron's police vehicle. Detective Barron succumbed to injuries as a result of the collision. Abiel Barron began his career with the Los Angeles Police Department after graduating from the police academy in 1983, and after successfully completing probation was assigned to field duties in Newton Street Division in South Los Angeles. He made significant contributions to public safety while assigned to the Newton Street Division for the next 12 years. He was promoted to the rank of detective in 1995 and served in the capacity of an investigator in the Los Angeles Police Department's Gun Detail. After successfully completing his detective probationary period, Detective Barron returned to his assignment of choice, that of a homicide investigator in the Newton Street Division. In this capacity, he provided distinguished service to that community until he attained a new assignment as a detective at the Los Angeles Police Department's northeast area in 2000. He then continued to serve with distinction as a sex crimes investigator until his assignment to the Northeast Area homicide detail in 2001. He continued as a homicide investigator in 2002, and was nominated for an award for bravery in saving the life of a despondent woman attempting to commit suicide by jumping from a bridge at the Los Angeles River. Detective Barron was awarded the Los Angeles Police Department's "Police Medal" for bravery that was presented to his wife posthumously. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 5, Resolution Chapter 64, on 07/07/2005.

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between the intersection with Avenue T and Pearblossom Highway and Route 15. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

Freeway

[SHC 253.7] From Route 5 near Gorman to Route 15 near Cajon Pass. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.7] From Route 2 near Wrightwood to Route 18 near Mt. Anderson.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.16] Between Route 5 and Route 18.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 138 (this reflects information from before the 1995 transferrence of Route 48 between Route 138 and Lancaster to Route 138, and the deletion of the routing to Palmdale):

  • Total Length (1994): 86 miles traversable; 24 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 300 to 35,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 95; Sm. Urban: 6; Urbanized: 9.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 73 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 38 mi; Minor Arterial: 40 mi; Collector: 8 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Mountain Summit (4804 ft)

  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1913, Chapter 610 declared and established a state highway from the city of Bakersfield through a portion of the counties of Kern, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura to the city of San Buenaventura, to be designated and known as the "Bakersfield, Maricopa and Ventura state highway." This highway was referenced as:

"A certain highway now partly constructed and partly in the course of construction by the several counties through which the same passes and running substantially along the following lines, courses, and distances: Commencing at a point on the proposed California state highway between Bakersfield and Los Angeles [LRN 4] thence following the present county road W 6 mi, then S 12 mi, thence W ½ mi, thence S ¾ mi, thence W 8 mi, thence SW 4 mi, thence W 5 mi to the town limits of the city of Maricopa, thence ... SW 13 miles to the W boundary of Kern County..., thence from a junction at the Kern Cty line with the proposed road as surveyed by Buffington ... for a distance of approx. 5 mi in the county of San Luis Obispo W about 1 mi through the lands of the Kern Cty Land Company and Cuyama Ranch, thence SW-ly 1½ mi, thence E-ly ¾ mi, thence SE-ly about 1 mi through the lands of the Santa Barbara Forest Reserve and of S.B. Miller, said line of proposed road ... following along the E-ly side of the Cuyama River and in the valley of said Cuyama river to the S border of SLO Cty. Thence from a junction point ... being in Sec. 11 T9N R25W SBM and running in a generally SE-ly direction, following the valley of the Cuyama river for a distance of 8.1 mi to a point in the E boundary of Santa Barbara Cty in Sec 17 T8N R24W SBM. Thence from ... the W boundary of Ventura Cty in the valley of the Cuyama River...beginning at a point in Sec 17 T8 R24W SBM approx. 1100 ft S of the N boundary of Sec 17, thence SE-ly along the NE bank of the Cuyama river a distance of 10 mi to a point near the center of Sec 19 T7N R23W on the S-ly bank of the Cuyama river thence E about ¾ mi to a point in the W half of Sec 20 T7N R23W, thence S through the W half of the W half of Sec 20 T7N R23W, and the W half of the W half of Sec 29 T7N R23W on the E side of Boulder Cyn, thence S on the W side of Boulder Cyn through the E half of the SE qtr of Sec 30 and the W half of Sec 32 T7N R23W, thence SW passing the great saddle rock to a point on the summit of Pine Mtn at the quarter corner between Sec 5 and 6, T6N R23W, thence S along the W side of Chorro Chiquito Cyn through Sec 6, 7, 8 and 18 T6N R23W to the valley of the Sespe River, thence crossing the Sespe River and S up the E side of Cherry Ck Cyn through Sec 19, 30, and 31 T6N R23W to the summit of Ortega Hill in Sec 31 T6N R23W, thence from the top of Ortega Hill and following along the Wheeler Ridge passing through the SW corner of Sec 32 T6N R23W, through the NE corner of Sec 1 T5N R24W, through the center of Sec 6 T5N R23W, to the SE corner of Sec 5 T6N R23W, thence S through Sections 8 and 9 T6N R23W, to a point near the ¼ corner on the S side of Sec 8 T5N R23W, to a point in the Matilja Rd near the Matilja Hot Springs in said Sec 29.... thence SE-ly with the Matilja and Meiners Rds ... to the town of Nordhoff ... thence S-ly with the San Antonio Crk Rd, the Nordhoff Rd, and the Ventura Avene to the N-ly limits of San Buenaventura."

In 1929, Chapter 541 amended this definition to be:

“…is amended to read as follows: A certain highway now partly constructed by the several counties through which the same passes and by joint highway district number six of the State of California and running substantially along the following lines: Commencing at a point in the Cuyama river valley on the state highway running between Santa Maria, Maricopa, and Bakersfield, and known as [LRN 57] of the state highway system, and running thence SE-ly up the Cuyama river valley to a point in Ventura County; thence S-ly over the Coast Range mountains and through the Santa Barbara national forest to Matilja Hot Springs; thence SE-ly to the city of San Buenaventura. The entire length from San Buenaventura (Ventura) to [LRN 57] of the state highway in the Cuyama valley is hereby declared to be, and is hereby constituted, a state highway... provided that said highway shall not become a state highway ... until said highway shall have been fully completed.”

However, both were repealed in 1935 by the act that created the highway code. In 1915, Chapter 748 did something similar, with an act for the survey, location, and estimate of cost of a state highway from a point on the present located state highway in Kern County S of Bakersfield to the town of Nordhoff, Ventura County. Again, this was repeased in 1935 by the act that created the highway code. It is possible these early routes were LRN 57, but portions may have shown up in the eventual definition of LRN 138 in 1933.

Chapter 767 in 1933 provides a clearer origin, for it defined the following segments as part of the highway system:

  • [LRN 2] near Ventura to [LRN 57] in Cuyoma Valley
  • [LRN 57] near Maricopa to [LRN 10] near Coalinga

In 1935, the state highway code was created, and it defined LRN 138 as follows:

  1. [LRN 10] near Coalinga to [LRN 57] near Maricopa
  2. [LRN 2] near Ventura to [LRN 57] in Cuyoma Valley

In 1955, Chapter 1912 extended LRN 138 and reworked the definition to be:

  1. [LRN 41] near Mendota to [LRN 10] near Oilfields.
  2. [LRN 10] near Coalinga to [LRN 57] near Maricopa.
  3. [LRN 2] in Ventura to [LRN 57] in Cuyoma Valley.

This route is signed as follows:

  1. From Route 180 near Mendota to Route 198 near Oilfields.

    This is a portion of Route 33, but parts of the routing could also be considered part of I-5.

  2. From Route 198 near Coalinga to Route 166 near Maricopa.

    This is present-day Route 33; before 1964, it was signed as Route 33 between Route 198 near Coalinga and present-day Route 119 (former US 399) near Taft, and as US 399 from Taft to Route 166 near Maricopa.

  3. From US 101 in Ventura to Route 166 in Cuyoma Valley.

    This segment was signed as US 399. It is part of present-day Route 33.


State Shield

State Route 139



Routing
  1. From Route 36 in Susanville to Route 299 near Adin.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was "(a) Route 36 near Susanville to Route 299 near Adin."

    In 1981, Chapter 292 changed the origin to "(a) Route 36 near in Susanville to …".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Between Susanville and Horse Lake Road, this segment was a 1957 extension of LRN 20. Horse Lake Road was originally part of LRN 20, but is now not part of the state highway system.

    Route 139 was LRN 216, defined in 1959, to Route 299. It was not signed as part of the 1934 initial state signage of highways, but was signed by 1963.

     

    Naming

    For some reason, this is named Joint Highway 14. There appears to have been no connection with a route 14.

     

    National Trails

    [Volcanic Byways]This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road.


  2. From Route 299 near Canby to the Oregon state line near Hatfield.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 210, defined in 1939. It was not signed as part of the 1934 state signage of highways, but was signed by 1963.

    Note that SE of Newell, a route diverges N called "Old Alturas Highway", rejoining Oregon 39 (a continuation of Route 139) E of Merrill.

     

    Status

    In May 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the county of Siskiyou, at Osborne Road, Havlina Road, Akins Road, Tschirky Road, and Walsh Road (Road No. 0U018), consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads.

    This route continues into Oregon as Oregon 39.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] Entire portion.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 139 was not defined in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.16] Between Route 299 and the Oregon state line.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 139:

  • Total Length (1995): 122 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 500 to 6,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 121; Sm. Urban: 1; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 122 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 56 mi; Minor Arterial: 66 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Lassen, Modoc, Siskiyou.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "Taft-Greenfield Road to [LRN 33] near Wasco" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, it was added to the highway code as LRN 139, with the definition:

“[LRN 14] to [LRN 33] near Wasco”

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. The route ran from US 399 (present-day Route 119) to US 466 (present-day Route 46) near Wasco. It was signed as Route 43.


State Shield

State Route 140



Routing
  1. From Route 5 near Gustine to Route 99 near Merced.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was "(a) Route 5 near Gustine to Route 99 near Merced." This definition has remained unchanged.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was not part of the original routing of Route 140, but was signed by 1963. It was LRN 122. The portion between Route 33 and Route 99 was defined in 1933. It was moved off of River Road in 1937. The remainder was defined in 1959.


  2. From Route 99 near Merced to Yosemite National Park near El Portal via Mariposa.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment ran from "(b) Merced to Yosemite National Park near El Portal via Mariposa."

    In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed the origin to "(b) Route 99 near Merced to …"

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 140 was signed along the route from Merced to Jct. Route 120 through Yosemite National Park via Mariposa. It was part of LRN 18. The segment from Merced to Mariposa was defined in 1909. From Mariposa to Yosemite National Park was defined in 1916. The portion from the old boundary of Yosemite National Park near Crane Flat to Route 120 was originally part of the route, defined in 1915, but was removed in 1943. There are points where this road has been rebuilt, and the old roadbed is still visible.

     

    Status

    Portions of what appears to be this route within the National Park are maintained by the Federal Government. They have some interesting highway signs, illustrated at http://wwtl.info/ca-140.html.

    On April 29, 2006, there was a huge landslide that covered about 300 feet of highway between Mariposa and Yosemite National Park. It is unclear if the original alignment can be repaired. On July 20, CalTrans started building a limited bypass around the slide area, and this was finished on July 31, 2006. Yosemite tourists are urged to enter the park via Route 120 from Oakdale or Route 41 from Fresno. More information, including hours of usage for the Route 140 bypass, can be found on a blog at http://yosemitenews.info/forum/read.php?f=1&i=1032&t=1032.

    In October 2006, the CTC had on its agenda a resolution for approval for future consideration of funding a project on Route 140 in Merced County for which a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) has been completed. The project is partially funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) and Plans, Specifications and Estimate (PS&E) for $2,712,000 in the Regional Improvement Program (RIP). The total estimated project cost is $41,500,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2008-2009. The project is referred to as the "Bradley Overhead and Replacement Project", and is just E of Merced.

    In August 2012, the CTC approved an additional $1,763,000 in funding in the city of Merced, from Marthella Avenue to Santa Fe Avenue at the Bradley Overhead. The goal is to widen from 2 to 4 lanes with 2-way left turn lane and sidewalks. The funding should add 2.2 lane miles.

    In January 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Merced, at Glen Avenue, consisting of a reconstructed and relocated city street.

     

    Naming

    Between the Merced county line near Planada and Yosemite National Park, this segment is named the Central Yosemite Highway. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 69, in 1989.

    This segment is also named the "All Year Highway". This is a historic name.

     

    Named Structures

    There is a historical monument and plaque dedicated to the community of Agua Fria placed within the right-of-way of Route 140, in Mariposa County, at a site that is located near the junction of State Highway Route 140 and Agua Fria Road. Agua Fria was the first county seat of Mariposa County. The monument and plaque was placed by the Matuca Chapter of the Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus. Authorized by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 140, Chapter 96, July 12, 2000.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.7] From Route 49 at Mariposa to Yosemite National Park near El Portal.

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 39, Ch. 23 in 1984.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.17] Between the east urban limits of Merced and Yosemite National Park.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 140:

  • Total Length (1995): 102 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 850 to 14,300
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 96; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 6.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 102 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 69 mi; Minor Arterial: 33 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Merced, Mariposa.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the routes from "Taft to [LRN 4] near Greenfield" and "[LRN 4] S of Bakersfield to [LRN 58] via Arvin" to the highway system. In 1935, this was captured in the definition of LRN 140 in the highway code, which was:

  1. Taft to [LRN 4] near Greenfield
  2. [LRN 4] south of Bakersfield to [LRN 58] via Arvin

In 1959, Chapter 1062 changed (b) to eliminate the specific routing (i.e., "…to [LRN 58] via Arvin").

It was signed as follows:

  1. From Taft to Route 99 near Greenfield.

    This segment as originally signed as US 399; it is present-day Route 119.

  2. From Route 99 south of Bakersfield to Route 58.

    This segment appears to have been unsigned before 1963. It is present-day Route 223.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 141



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, this route was defined as " Route 80 to Route 29 in Vallejo."

In 1965, Chapter 1371 reworded the definition to be "the westerly extension of Route 680 from Route 80 into Vallejo."

In 1975, Chapter 1078 extended the route: "into Vallejo to Route 37."

In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "Route 680" to "Route 780". This tied to the changes in I-680 and Route 21 that year.

In 1988, SB 177, Chapter 106 deleted the route. This route approximates the current Cuesta Parkway and Mare Island Parkway between Route 37 and I-80/I-780. Relinquishment may have occured as a condition of the construction of Mare Island Parkway.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The original (1963) route was originally part of LRN 74.

Route 141 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 141 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 4] via Brundage Lane and Oak Street to [LRN 4] near Beardsley School" as a state highway route. In 1935, it was added to the highway code as LRN 141 with that routing:

In 1963, Chapter 1698 changed the routing to be "[LRN 4] via Brundage Lane, Union Avenue and Golden State Avenue and Oak Street to [LRN 4] near BakersfieldBeardsley School", although this change didn't take effect due to the 1963 Renumbering (Chapter 385); instead that routing was assigned to Route 204.

The original routing for LRN 141 is in Bakersfield, and is no longer part of the state highway system, although Brundage Lane roughly parallels present-day Route 58, and Oak Street parallels the post-1964 routing of Route 99. This appears to be the planned rerouting for US 466 to bypass downtown Bakersfield (back when LRN 4/US 99 (and US 399) was on the Route 204/Business Route 99 alignment) back in 1933; this rerouting only occured in the 1960s however with the construction of the freeways which are now Route 58 and Route 58/Route 99 (explaining why the definition of the route is from LRN 4 to LRN 4: from Brundage at Route 204 to the current Route 99/Route 58/Route 178 interchange at Rosedale Highway/24th Street, where Oak Street ends). Looking at the bridge log, the Route 204/Business Route 99 (former LRN 4) freeway in downtown Bakersfield between LRN 141's two termini (current Route 58 and Route 99) was built in stages: the first section, the Union Avenue Y, was finished in 1957, followed by the Truxtun Avenue crossing in 1959. Most of the section north of L Street and the Chester Avenue traffic circle was also built in 1957; so the construction of the LRN 141 (99/58) freeways occured only once CalTrans decided that the old downtown bypass was more suitable for the through routes. The interchanges connecting Business Route 99 with Route 99 were built in 1962 and 1963, as part of the Bakersfield bypass. Thus by 1964, former LRN 141 had been upgraded to freeway between Brundage Lane and Rosedale Highway; however, the portion from Union Avenue (Route 204/Business Route 99) west to Route 99 would not be built until 1976, at which point Route 58 was moved off of former US 466/LRN 58 (Edison Highway) and onto the new freeway, which is part of the Bakersfield-Tehachapi Highway.

Until 1963, LRN 141 was a bypass of Bakersfield at which time it was to be swapped with LRN 4, but Brundage Lane remained part of it because the new LRN 4 went to its west end. Of course, this 1963 change was obviated by the 1963 renumbering, which put Route 58 and Route 99 on the LRN 141 bypass, with Route 204 taking the original Route 99 (LRN 4) routing.


State Shield

State Route 142



Routing
  1. From Route 90 near Brea to Route 71 near Chino.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was "(a) Route 42 near Brea to Route 71 near Chino."

    In 1972, Chapter 1216 changed "Route 42" to "Route 90".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was originally LRN 177, defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1964. This is Carbon Canyon Road, with a portion on Valencia Avenue.

     

    Status

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $3,025,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Brea, from Brea Hills Ave to the San Bernardino County Line, that will rehabilitate 7.6 lane miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality.


  2. Unconstructed From Route 71 near Chino to Route 210 near Upland.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was "(b) Route 71 near Chino to Route 30 near Upland."

    In 1999, this segment was changed to end at Route 210, reflecting the 1998 change of Route 30 to Route 210 (AB 1650, Ch 724, 10/10/99).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment is proposed LRN 274, defined in 1959. Its routing has not been determined, and it does not appear to correspond to a surface street route.

     

    Status

    Central Avenue and a grid of local streets could be used but the roads do not adequately fit the definition of a traversable highway. A route is in the very preliminary planning stages.

     

    Naming

    "Carbon Canyon Freeway". Named by location.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 142 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 142 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.7] From the Orange-San Bernardino county line to Peyton Drive.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.7] From Route 71 near Chino to Route 210 near Upland. (Change from Route 30 to Route 210 by AB 1650, Ch. 724, 10/10/99). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 142:

  • Total Length (1995): 12 miles traversable; 9 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 7,200 to 22,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 21.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 12 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 12 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Orange, San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 4] near Bakersfield to [LRN 57] near Isabella via Glennville" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the code as LRN 142 with that definition. In 1963, Chapter 1698 would have changed LRN 4 to LRN 141, but that change didn't occur due to the passage of the "great renumbering" (Chapter 385).

This route originally was the Bakersfield-Glennville Road into Glennville and thence to Isabella via Woody. Portions of this are present-day Route 155, although the present-day Route 155 runs along a direct routing from Delano to Woody along Garces Highway. The portion of the direct routing (between Delano and the Famoso-Porterville Highway) was LRN 136.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 143



Routing

Unconstructed From Route 99 near Elk Grove to Route 244 near Carmichael.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 99 near Elk Grove to Route 102 near Antelope."

In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted the portion from Route 244 to Route 102, making the definition "Route 99 near Elk Grove to Route 244 near Carmichael."

The 1975 act also noted:

“The department and State Transportation Board shall cooperate with the County of Sacramento and the Sacramento Regional Area Planning Commission in the transportation corridor study conducted by the county and the commission on the adopted route for Route 143. Such cooperation by the state shall be limited to furnishing existing data.

The department shall not, prior to July 1, 1976, or such later date as adopted by the California Highway Commission, dispose of any real property acquired for the construction of Route 143 as a freeway from Route 50 to Route 244, except for such real property which, as mutually agreed by the department and the county, is not required for any transportation purpose. If, at such a date, the transportation corridor study indicates the other real property is required for any transportation purpose, the department shall not dispose of the real property prior to January 1, 1977.”

Note: The Route 244 definition was changed in 1994, leaving the terminus of this route as not being Route 244, as Route 244 now ends at Auburn Blvd in Carmichael (the difference is about 3/4 mi). Caltrans is treating the new termination as Auburn Blvd in Carmichael, and has designated that portion of former Route 244 as Route 143.

There was a freeway routing adopted for this segment, but it was deleted in 1975. Existing arterials approximating the route are currently utilized, and in 2002 Caltrans recommended removing the route definition from the state highway system (but this never appeared to happen). Approximate roads includes Grant Line Road and Bradshaw Road, but no local roads fit the total description of a traversable highway.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was proposed (routing determined) LRN 247, defined in 1959. It split off Route 244 near Cypress Avenue, continued to near Rita St., and then ran S along Mayhew Road. Route 143 was not defined in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

 

Status

According to an article in the Sacramento Bee in May 2004, a connection from the Mayhew area to I-80 is proposed along what appears to be the same routing as unbuilt Route 143. The big difference in the May 2004 proposal, which would cost $1.25 billion is that it would have no exits and be built as an underground tunnel from US 50 at Mayhew to I-80 north of Auburn Boulevard. The plan is for a 5.8-mile underground expressway, crossing below the river near the Mayhew drain near Rancho Cordova and making a beeline under Eastern Avenue, linking freeway to freeway. The tunnel is just one of dozens of ideas officials are considering in an effort called "Mobility Strategies for County Corridors". The corridors being studied include Watt Avenue, Greenback Lane, Hazel Avenue, Madison Avenue, Sunrise Boulevard, Howe Avenue, Florin Road and El Grove-Florin Road.

 


Overall statistics for Route 143:

  • Total Length (1995): 21 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 11; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 10.
  • Counties Traversed: Sacramento.

 

Interstate Submissions

Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1958; not accepted.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "Arvin Road near Weed Patch to [LRN 57] near Loma Park" to the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 143, with the definition:

"[LRN 140] near Weed Patch to [LRN 57] near Loma Park"

In 1959, Chapter 1841 deleted the "near Loma Park" from the definition, giving "… to [LRN 57] near Loma Park".

This route ran from Route 223 near Weed Patch to Route 178. This is present-day Route 184.


State Shield

State Route 144



Routing

From Alameda Padre Serra in Santa Barbara to Route 192 via Sycamore Canyon.

(b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish Route 144 to the City of Santa Barbara, if the city has agreed to accept it. The relinquishment shall be effective on the day immediately following the commission's approval of the terms and conditions.

(c) This section shall remain in effect only until the date the relinquishment authorized under subdivision (b) becomes effective, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted statute, which is enacted on or before that date, deletes or extends that date.

(d) The relinquished former portion of Route 144 in the City of Santa Barbara between Route 101 and Alameda Padre Serra is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For that relinquished former portion of Route 144, the City of Santa Barbara shall maintain signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 144.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, this route was "Route 101 near Santa Barbara to Route 192 via Sycamore Canyon."

In 1992, Chapter 1243 changed the origin to be "Route 101 near in Santa Barbara to …"

In 1999, SB 557 Chapter 99 (July 13, 1999) authorized the California Transportion Commission to reliquish Route 144 to the city of Santa Barbara. Once that is approved, the route is reliquished as of the following day. The relinquishment was on the agenda for the California Transportation Commission in June 2000, Agenda Item 2.3c, for Santa Barbara PM 0.0-0.9.

In 2010, SB 1318, Chapter 421 (9/29/10) changed the route definition: "From Route 101 Alameda Padre Serra in Santa Barbara to..."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This appears to have been unsigned before 1964. It was segment (2) of LRN 80, defined in 1933.

Route 144 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 144 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

In January 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Barbara along Route 144 just north of Ranchito Vista Road, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The City of Santa Barbara was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate, without protesting such action.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 144:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 3,400 to 34,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 2.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 0.2 mi; Minor Arterial: 0.2 mi; Collector: 1.5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Barbara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "Cummings Valley State Institution to [LRN 58] near Old Town" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 144 with that definition.

In 1949, Chapters 909 and 1467 changed "Old Town" to "Tehachapi".

This route runs from Route 58 to the California Correctional Institution, formerly the Cummings Valley State Institution. This is present-day Route 202.



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