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California Highways

Routes 121 through 128

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

121 · 122 · 123 · 124 · 125 · 126 · 127 · 128


State Shield

State Route 121



Routing
  1. From Route 37 near Sears Point to Route 29 near Napa.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Between the original signage of state routes in 1934 and 1964, this was part of Route 37. It was LRN 8, defined in 1909.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.6] From Route 37 near Sears Point to Route 12 near Sonoma; and from Route 221 near Napa State Hospital to near the vicinity of Trancas Street in northeast Napa.

     

    Naming

    Route 121 from Route 37 to Route 29 in Sonoma and Napa Counties is named the "Carneros Highway". The road is named for the wine-growing region south of the Napa Valley. Carneros refers to the area's cattle ranching history. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 62, Chapter 29 in 1992. Note that route is called "Arnold Drive" between Route 116 and Route 37, at least as far as residents and the post office is concerned.

    The portion of this route running through Sonoma County is called the "Valley of the Moon Scenic Route". "Valley of the Moon" was the name Jack London, resident of Glen Ellen, coined for this area.

    Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 21-075, at Imola Avenue in Napa, is named the "George M. Francis Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1932, and was dedicated in May, 1932. George M. Francis was the editor of the Napa Register beginning in 1872. In 1889 he called a town meeting in Napa and organized the town's first city government.
    [Information from Napa Chamber of Commerce, found by Phillip Pacier]

    In South Napa is the Maxwell Bridge. It was named in honor of nurseryman Thomas Maxwell, longtime Napa County Supervisor (1917 to 1948) and Napa County's first representative on the board of directors of the Golden Gate Bridge District. This bridge is being replaced by the Imola Avenue Bridge, and is being renamed the New Maxwell Bridge. This bridge will have plaques for 1) Mr. Maxwell, and 2) the Lodi construction worker who was killed during the building of the new structure late in 2003.
    [Information from a Napa Valley Register history article by Louis Ezettie, dated December 3, 1988, page 7-A]

     

    Status

    Evidently, there is a new bridge being built in South Napa over the Napa River. Called the "Imola Avenue Bridge", it will replace the "Maxwell Bridge" (no further information available) and was the site of a collapse in November 2003 that killed four and injured four.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Napa County that will replace the Capell Creek Bridge (Bridge Number 21-0009) on Route 121. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $10,880,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to aesthetics to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to the vegetation in the project area will be mitigated through hydro-seeding with appropriate plant species. Oak trees removed will be replaced at a 3:1 ratio. Non-native trees will be replaced at a 1:1 ratio. Potential impacts to aesthetics will be mitigated by requiring the new bridge railing to have a finish pattern, surface texture, and coloration that mimic the original railing.

    Route <a href=12/121 interchange" src="maps/012-121.jpg" style="float: right" width="321" hspace=10 vspace=10 height="250">In 2012, the intersection of Route 12 and Route 121 was reconfigured. Prior to 2012, the intersection had a number of angular junctions. After reconstruction, the intersection of Route 12 and Route 121 was a traditional T-interchange, with nearby Fremont road being turned into a westbound only spur. The changes were prompted by an higher-than-average accident rate at the intersection. The cost of the project is $2.4 million.

    In March 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on Route 121 04-Son-121 3.4/6.5 Near Sonoma, within the San Francisco Bay Trail (PM 3.4/6.5 and PM 8.6/11.6) on Route 121. $350,000 to install centerline rumble strips to reduce the number of cross-centerline collisions and improve safety.


  2. From Route 29 in Napa to Route 128.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(b) Route 29 near Napa State Hospital to Route 128."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 changed the definition to originate as "Route 29 in Napa" The portion from Route 29 in Napa to Route 29 [now Route 221] near Napa State Hospital was transferred from Route 29. This was a side effect of the opening of the new Route 29 freeway. This bypassed the older segment of Route 29 than ran from Suscol Ave N to Imola (State Hospital), and then along Imola to Solano Avenue. The bypassed segment was split between Route 221 (Route 29 to Imola, the number coming from a deleted bypass N of Napa) and Route 121 (State Hospital along Imola to Solano (Route 29)).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Between the original signage of state routes in 1934 and 1964, this was signed as part of Route 37. It was part of the 1933 extension of LRN 6.

     

    Naming

    "Imola" Avenue; "Silverado" Trail, "Monticello" Road.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 121 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 121 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 121:

  • Total Length (1995): 33 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 1,850 to 24,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 27; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 6.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 32 mi; FAU: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 6 mi; Minor Arterial: 27 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Sonoma, Napa.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 32] W of Los Banos to Fresno-Tracy West Side Highway near Centinella" to the highway system. In 1935, this was defined as LRN 121 in the highway code with the definition:

[LRN 23] West of Los Banos to [LRN 41] near Centinella

In 1961, Chapter 1268 changed the terminus to simply "[LRN 41]".

This was an unsigned segment connecting Route 152 to Route 33. It is part of present day Route 33.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 122



Routing
  1. From Route 14 south of Palmdale to Route 138.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    122/58As defined in 1963, Route 122 ran from "Route 249 south of Palmdale northeasterly to Route 58." In some 1963 planning maps, this route appears to have started at the Route 196/Route 249 junction, with Route 196 continuing N as Route 249, and Route 249 continuing E as Route 122. At this time, Route 58 was planned as freeway, as was Route 122.

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 changed the origin to be "Route 14 south of Palmdale", deleting the segment from Route 249 N of La Cañada to Route 14. This eliminated Route 196, moved the start of Route 122 to the Route 14/Route 249 junction. This junction is where Pearblossom Highway exits Route 14, so Route 122 would have run from that junction roughly to around the SE corner of Edwards AFB, near Ave E and the SBD county line. From the Route 14/Route 249 junction, it would have continued mostly northeast to end at Route 48 (now Route 138) several miles north of Hi Vista just shy of the Los Angeles/San Bernardino County line. According to the photolog, the current planned Route 122 would follow Pearblossom Highway to 25th Street, but then diverged from the historical plan after crossing existing Route 138 near 50th Street and Palmdale Boulevard. Route 122 now is planned to continue northbound paralleling 50th Street before turning northeast a mile or so from Route 48, ending at Route 48 west of Redman (just south of the Los Angeles/Kern county line and the south boundary of Edwards AFB).

    In 1972, Chapter 1216 split the route into two segments: "(a) Route 14 south of Palmdale to Route 138. (b) Route 138 northeasterly to Route 58."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was part of LRN 266, defined in 1959.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed The traversable routing report identifies no traversable routing. The route concept report recommends a Route 14 to Route 138 alignment.


  2. From Route 138 to Route 48.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As noted above, the 1963 definition of Route 122 ran from "Route 249 south of Palmdale northeasterly to Route 58." In 1965, Chapter 1371 changed the origin to be "Route 14 south of Palmdale". In 1972, Chapter 1216 split the route into two segments: "(a) Route 14 south of Palmdale to Route 138. (b) Route 138 northeasterly to Route 58."

    In 1976, Chapter 1354 split (b) again into "(b) Route 138 to Route 48. (c) Route 48 northeasterly to Route 58."

    Planned as freeway in 1965; never constructed.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was proposed LRN 266 (defined in 1959) in 1963.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed The traversable highways report identifes 50th St. East as the traversable local routing. There are no plans for improvement.


  3. From Route 48 northeasterly to Route 58.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As noted above, the 1963 definition of Route 122 ran from "Route 249 south of Palmdale northeasterly to Route 58." In 1965, Chapter 1371 changed the origin to be "Route 14 south of Palmdale". In 1972, Chapter 1216 split the route into two segments: "(a) Route 14 south of Palmdale to Route 138. (b) Route 138 northeasterly to Route 58."

    In 1976, Chapter 1354 split (b) again into "(b) Route 138 to Route 48. (c) Route 48 northeasterly to Route 58."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was proposed LRN 266 in 1963.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed There is no traversable local highway. There are no plans to upgrade this.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 122 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 122 between 1934 and 1964.

 


Overall statistics for Route 122:

  • Total Length (1995): 61 miles unconstructed
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 61; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, San Bernardino.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "Fresno-Tracy West Side Highway near Newman to [LRN 4] near Livingston" as a state highway. In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 122, with the definition:

[LRN 41] near Newman to [LRN 4] near Livingston

In 1937, Chapter 36 moved the routing away from River Road, making it "[LRN 41] at Gustine to [LRN 4] near Merced via the John C. Fremont Ford Road".

In 1959, Chapter 1062 extended the origin to Route 238, and eliminated the specific routing, giving: "[LRN 238] near Gustine to [LRN 4] near Merced".

This was the route from I-5 near Gustine to US 99 near Merced. It is present-day Route 140. The design of the highway was approved in 1953, and it was constructed in 1954.


State Shield

State Route 123



Routing

From Route 580 at San Pablo Avenue in Oakland to Route 80 in Richmond at Cutting Boulevard.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 123 was defined as the route from "Oakland to Route 80 in Richmond at Cutting Boulevard."

In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified the definition: "Route 580 at San Pablo Avenue in Oakland to Route 80 in Richmond at Cutting Boulevard."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Business Route Shield This is the old surface street routing of US 40 along San Pablo Ave. between Peralta Street and Cutting Blvd. It was LRN 14, defined in 1909. This was signed as Business US 40 until 1964.

Note that Route 123 doesn't cover all of the older surface street routing of US 40. In particular, N of El Cerrito, former US 40, bypassed in 1958, is not part of the state highway. This is probably because the Eastshore Highway originally fed straight into San Pablo Avenue just south of Cutting Boulevard in El Cerrito (next to the current El Cerrito Del Norte BART station); that intersection was the original northern terminus of the 1940 Business US 40. In 1958, the Interstate 80 bypass north to the Carquinez Bridge was built and signed as I-80/US 40; the orphaned portion of Eastshore Highway south of Cutting Boulevard and San Pablo Avenue became a city street, while Business US 40 was extended to San Pablo Avenue north of Cutting all the way to Crockett and Rodeo. So why wasn't Route 123 designated on all of former Business US 40? This has to do with the legislative numbering history. Before the Crockett bypass portion of the Eastshore Freeway was built, the Eastshore Highway was LRN 69 from Eastshore/San Pablo in El Cerrito south to the Macarthur Maze, and San Pablo Avenue was LRN 14 from Eastshore/San Pablo south to then-US 50 (now I-580), connecting back to US 40 (now I-80) via Macarthur Boulevard and Freeway. North of the original Eastshore/San Pablo split, San Pablo Avenue was all LRN 7 to the Carquinez Bridge. But when the Crockett bypass was built for I-80/US 40, LRN 7 was completely moved over to that new freeway and did not apply to the now-business route. Thus, state maintenance did not carry over on the former alignment and only former LRN 14 (plus Cutting Boulevard, which was never part of the US 40 route and only serves to connect San Pablo Avenue with I-80.) Also orphaned by the construction of the 1958 freeway was a very small segment of the Eastshore Highway from Potrero Avenue (at its interchange with I-80) north to San Pablo Avenue; this had formerly been LRN 69 but LRN 69 was redesignated to apply specifically to the freeway in that area. That segment is now known as Eastshore Boulevard and serves to connect eastbound I-80 with northbound Route 123 past the El Cerrito Del Norte BART station. In 1964, when the great renumbering occured, the portion of Business US 40 which was now no longer covered by LRN 7 became local street; the portion of Business US 40 which was still LRN 14 is now Route 123 (which is signed at least at the Cutting/San Pablo and I-80 junction).

Route 123 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 123 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Naming

Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 123:

  • Total Length (1995): 7 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 15,500 to 34,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 7.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda, Contra Costa.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added two segments to the state highway system:

  • [LRN 4] near Merced southerly to [LRN 32]
  • [LRN 4] near Merced to Snelling

In 1935, this was added to the highway code as LRN 123, with the following definition:

  1. Snelling to [LRN 4] near Merced
  2. [LRN 4] near Merced southerly to [LRN 32]

This route remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as Route 59.


State Shield

State Route 124



Routing
  1. From Route 88 south of Ione to Route 104.


  2. From Route 104 to Route 16 near Waits Station.

Post 1964 Signage History

The routing of Route 124 is unchanged from 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this was part of Route 104; however, it was not part of the original 1934 signage of Route 104. It was LRN 97, defined in 1933. Route 124 was not defined in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 124:

  • Total Length (1995): 10 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,300 to 3,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 8; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 10 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 1 mi; Minor Arterial: 9 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Amador.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 4] at Chowchilla, via Robertson Boulevard to [LRN 32]" to the highway system. In 1935, this route was added to the highway code as LRN 124. It ran from US 99 near Chowchilla via Robertson Boulevard to Route 152. It is present-day Route 233.


State Shield

State Route 125



Routing
  1. From Route 905 near Brown Field to Route 54.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 125 was defined as the route from "Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 56 passing near La Mesa."

    125 75 adoptionIn 1965, the CHC adopted a freeway routing for Route 125 and Route 75.

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 split the route into three segments: "(a) Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 54. (b) Route 54 to Route 94 near La Mesa. (c) Route 94 near La Mesa to Route 56."

    In 1972, Chapter 1216 changed the origin of this segment to "The international boundary southerly of Brown Field".

    In 1986, Chapter 928 transfered the portion added to in 1972 to Route 905, making (a) "(a) Route 905 near Brown Field to ..."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was "routing determined" proposed LRN 282, defined in 1959, to the junction with present-day Route 905.

    Route 125 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 125 between 1934 and 1964.

     

    Status

    [SB Expressway]Toll Road This is a 11.2-mile, north-south toll road between Route 905 and Route 54. It was originally to be constructed by California Private Ventures, Inc. However, as of September 2002, according to a report by Eric Armourer from the Union Tribune, California Private Ventures sold those rights to an Austrailian firm that had many successful similar projects. He reported that the article seemed to imply that though there have been three lawsuits against the project since the rights were granted in July 2001. It seems that the major hold up was the ability to get construction financing, a problem that was not an issue with the new firm. The article states that the tollway is expected to break ground in January 2003. Tolls may be collected until 2047.

    According to Don Hagstrom in October 2002, the Route 125 Toll Freeway between Route 54 (South Bay Freeway) and Route 905 was to be completed by 2005. This toll freeway will initially be 4 lanes, with an ultimate plan for 8 lanes in the northern section and 6 lanes from southern Chula Vista to the Route 905 Freeway.

    According to Sign On San Diego in April 2003, construction was to begin shortly on the Southern Extension of this route. According to the article, "Planners first envisioned state Route 125 more than 40 years ago. It took another 20 years, as Chula Vista began to annex land to the east and residential developers created new neighborhoods, for local officials to declare the route a necessary part of the regional transportation plan.". The article notes that toll road portion was held up by legislation for a while, but is now cleared for construction. This is due to the fragile ecosystem, which contains several threatened species, including fairy shrimp, the Quino checkerspot butterfly and the Otay tarplant. Developers have spent $2.5 million to acquire more than 1,000 acres of land, including parcels northeast of Sweetwater Reservoir and east of Otay Reservoir, where those species will be protected.

    In November 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of San Diego, from Swap Meet Road to Palm Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads, and cul-de-sacs.

    In November 2007, the 10 mile South Bay Expressway opened between Route 905 and Route 54. As of May 2008, the toll road draws an average of 30,000 drivers each weekday, about what state transportation officials expected. Many cash-paying customers have complained about the automated toll machines, while some Chula Vista merchants say it has not fueled the business boom they were hoping for. Tolls range from 75 cents to $3.75, depending on the length of the trip and how it is paid – with cash or through an electronic toll system called FasTrak. According to the Macquarie Infrastructure Group, the parent company of South Bay Expressway, the tollway generated an average of $54,600 in daily revenue from mid-January through March, or about $2 per vehicle. The road attracts an average of 26,500 vehicles daily, including weekends. Nearly four out of five motorists pay through FasTrak. As a result of construction of the route, according to Caltrans, the volume of morning traffic on northbound I-805 in Chula Vista has dropped 11% since opening. Congestion has increased, however, at two interchanges north of the tollway: at Route 125 and Route 94, and at Route 125 and I-8 in La Mesa.
    [Source: SD Union Tribune]

    In Mid-January, the cost of driving the South Bay Expressway, increased by as much as 75¢. Tolls for cash-paying customers will increase 50 to 75 cents, to a range of $2.50 to $4.50 per trip, depending on length. Just under 30,000 vehicles travel at least part of the 10-mile roadway each weekday.

    In March 2010, the South Bay Expressway (SBE) company filed for a reorganization in Chapter 11 US bankruptcy, writing off around $200m in shareholder equity. The project suffered from being in an area affected by the subprime mortgage meltdown, as well as major ongoing litigation over huge claims made by Fluor/URS, the contractors who built the road but spent over a year longer than contracted at the job. SBE are proposing to the US Banktuptcy Court that it address both the reorganization and write-off of debt and the Fluor/URS litigation claims, which are cited as a major reason for the Chapter 11 filing.
    [Source: "South Bay Expressway company files for bankruptcy in San Diego", Tollroad News, 3/24/2010]

    In July 2011, it was reported that the San Diego Assn. of Governments agreed to purchase the bankrupt Route 125 toll road near the U.S.-Mexico border for approximately $345 million. Under the new ownership, the road won't be free but tolls will be reduced.

    In October 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 125 near Fletcher Parkway on East Lake Drive between Flume Road and Lake Angela Drive, consisting of relocated and reconstructed city streets.

    There have been some plans to connect Route 125 with Route 79, making an east-side freeway corridor to I-10.

     

    Naming

    "South Bay Expressway"

     

    Other WWW Links


  2. From Route 54 to Route 94 near La Mesa.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 125 was defined as the route from "Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 56 passing near La Mesa."

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 split the route into three segments: "(a) Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 54. (b) Route 54 to Route 94 near La Mesa. (c) Route 94 near La Mesa to Route 56." This is the 1965 segment (b).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was "routing determined" proposed LRN 282, defined in 1959, to the junction with present-day Route 905.

    Route 125 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 125 between 1934 and 1964.

     

    Status

    This is part of the "Inner Loop" route. The Route 125 southern extension along Sweetwater Road opened in early May 2003. There is a gap between the end of the Route 54 freeway and the start of Route 125 fwy, but there is construction along this portion. However, Route 54 eastbound does directly turn into Route 125 northbound—there's just one signalized intersection at Sweetwater Rd southbound. Farther north on Route 125, the freeway is open continuously from Route 94 all the way to Route 52 in both directions. And the Route 52/Route 125 freeway to freeway interchange was completed some time ago. There is still construction on Route 125 at Grossmont College Dr with traffic in both directions squeezed onto the northbound lanes. But all intersections and stoplights have been eliminated. Note: when heading southbound on Route 125 thru the Route 94/Route125 interchange, you have to exit far right to "stay" on Route 125, as the freeway maintains its legacy of the "thru" direction being onto westbound Route 94.

    The construction noted above was completed with the opening of the toll road section to the south; the final phase of the construction was the interchange with Route 54. Since Route 125 was designed as part of a loop route, the main lanes connect though as follows - Route 125 South to Route 54 West, Route 54 East to Route 125 North. The section from Route 94 north to Route 52 is also complete, and has been since 2005. Signs have recently been posted near the Route 52/Route 125 interchange for the extension of Ropute 52 further east, which will require some work on the interchange at the northern end of Route 125. These signs indicate a projected completion date of 2011. There appears to be no any movement toward the extension of Route 56 or for the extension of Route 25 further north. It currently (2008) ends at an at-grade T intersection beneath the Route 125 North-Route 52 West flyover ramp.

    IntersectionIn September 2000, the California Transportation Commission considered a $1.7 million phase 1 proposal (TCRP Project #87) for two new freeway connector ramps at the Route 94/Route 125 interchange. Total estimated cost is $90 million. This funding was extended in September 2005 as the project is ready to proceed. In April 2007, the CTC amended project 87.2 to orogram an additional $3,610,000 in TCRP funds for Project Approval & Environmental Document (PA&ED). This project will construct the ultimate two-lane freeway-to-freeway connectors from westbound Route 94 to northbound Route 125 and from southbound Route 125 to eastbound Route 94. The project will also widen Route 125 providing additional lanes from Spring Street to Lemon Avenue, and provide auxiliary lanes from the connectors to the next interchange at Lemon Avenue. The additional $3,610,000 for PA&ED was needed to study impacts to the large number of residential, commercial, and resource rich areas that will be impacted by this project. It is estimated that four years will be required to complete the needed environmental studies, complete the draft environmental document, circulate it for public comment, and gain final approval. The project is now schedule for construction between FY 2012 and FY 2017.

    In October 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of La Mesa, from Alvarado Avenue to Blue Lake Drive, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets and frontage roads.

    In December 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of La Mesa along Routes 94 and 125 between Grove Street and Spring Street, consisting of relocated and reconstructed county roads and frontage roads. The County of San Diego, by freeway agreement dated September 30, 1968, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State to roads which on that date were within an unincorporated area of the county and have since been annexed by the City.

    In April 2010, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Lemon Grove along Route 125 between Ildica Street and Sweetwater Way, consisting of collateral facilities. The County of San Diego, by freeway agreements dated September 30, 1968 and January 2, 1969, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State to roads which on that date were within an unincorporated area of the county and have since been annexed by the City of Lemon Grove. The 90-day notice period expired January 12, 2010, without exception.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Ramona Freeway". It is part of the "Inner Loop" with Route 52 and Route 54. Ramona was the central character in the Helen Hunt Jackson novel Ramona, which was a seminal novel in the early 20th century in creating the romance of California.

    The horse bridge that crosses Route 125 and is located in Bonita, west of the Summit Park Campground in San Diego County, is named the "Mary Augustine Bridge". This segment was named in honor of Mary Augustine, a long-time resident of Bonita, California, and an equestrian and trail advocate. In 1969, Mary was a founding member of a new horse club in Bonita called Equestrian Trails, Inc. (E.T.I.), a national club with a southwestern base in Los Angeles whose purpose was to build a network of trails throughout the country. The Bonita Club, E.T.I. Corral 89, concentrated its efforts in Bonita and worked in concert with other corrals throughout San Diego County. From its early days through the subsequent reorganization and creation of Bonita Valley Horsemen (BVH) in February 1975, through approximately 1989, Mary worked tirelessly on various trails projects in Bonita and San Diego County. Mary was instrumental in getting the first large trail project in Bonita started and completed. It is the current trail around the Chula Vista Golf Course used by, among others, riders, bikers, and hikers, During the critical years of the 1970s and 80s, Mary worked with state and local agencies and persuaded developers to give land easements for dedicated trails, or to preserve existing trails, through Bonita Downs, Bonita Woods Park, Bonita Ridge, and Ranchito Robinwood. These trails were to eventually feed into other trails planned for Sweetwater Regional Park. At that point there were an estimated 1,300 horses in Bonita, and San Diego County had the largest per capita population of horses in the U.S.A. As time went on developers began to see the wisdom of calling Mary for advice regarding trails through their developments or rerouting existing trails. As interest and success in local and county trails grew, horse camps at Cuyamaca Rancho State Park had come into being and the Anza-Borrego horse camp was on the horizon. Mary was one of the first volunteers on the Mounted Assistance Unit, designed to aid park rangers on search and rescue missions, patrol the areas of the park that the rangers could not get to easily, uphold park rules, interpret the park regulations, and many other duties. In the late 1970s, Mary headed up the new Sweetwater Summit Park east towards Jamul and the trail was built with the aid of a Comprehensive Employment and Training Act grant in the amount of $40,000. This trail was dedicated July 17, 1980, and on that day Mary led the first trail ride on the new trail, which is still used today regularly by riders, bikers, and hikers. Mary's ultimate goal, which she fulfilled, was to ride from the Pacific Ocean to Cuyamaca State Park and beyond to the desert regions of Cleveland National Park. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 17, Resolution Chapter 59, on 6/22/2007.

     

    Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes are planned between 0.2 mi N of Tyler Street to Route 94.


  3. From Route 94 near La Mesa to Route 56.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 125 was defined as the route from "Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 56 passing near La Mesa."

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 split the route into three segments: "(a) Route 75 near Brown Field to Route 54. (b) Route 54 to Route 94 near La Mesa. (c) Route 94 near La Mesa to Route 56." This is the 1965 segment (c).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was "routing determined" proposed LRN 282, defined in 1959, to the junction with present-day Route 905.

    It appears that the segment between Route 94 and I-8 was originally part of Route 67.

    Route 125 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 125 between 1934 and 1964.

     

    Status

    Under Construction Unconstructed Completed between Route 94 and Fletcher Parkway. The segment between Fletcher Parkway and Route 52 is currently under construction. The remainder, from Route 52 to Route 56, is proposed but no completion date has been set. The section between Amaya Drive and Fletcher Parkway opened on 1/3/2001.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Ramona Freeway". It is part of the "Inner Loop" with Route 52 and Route 54. Ramona was the central character in the Helen Hunt Jackson novel Ramona, which was a seminal novel in the early 20th century in creating the romance of California.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 57-972R over Fletcher Parkway in San Diego county is named the "Benjamin E. Polak Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1991, and was named (before construction) by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 120, Chapter 64, in 1990. Benjamin E. Polack, President of Harbor Management, was active in the United Way and instrumental in its establishment in Costa Rica in the 1970's.

     

    Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes are planned for the portion from I-8 to Route 52. These are scheduled to open by 2011.

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Other WWW Links

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.6] From Route 94 near Spring Valley to Route 8 near La Mesa.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 125 9.59 12.68
San Diego 125 12.77 13.71
San Diego 125 14.12 18.45
San Diego 125 R18.54 22.14

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 125:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles traversable; 34 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 71,000 to 91,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 14; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 22.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 2 mi; FAU: 15 mi; FAS: 4 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 34 mi; Minor Arterial: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the segments from "[LRN 56] near Moro to [LRN 4] near Fresno via Stratford" and "[LRN 4] near Fresno to Yosemite National Park" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this was defined in the highway code as LRN 125, with the definition:

  1. [LRN 56] near Moro to [LRN 4] near Fresno via Stratford
  2. [LRN 4] near Fresno to Yosemite National Park

In 1937, Chapter 841 removed the explict routing via Stratford and fixed some spellings in segment (a), giving "[LRN 56] near Morro to [LRN 4] near Fresno"

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 56 (Route 1) near Morrow to LRN 4 (US 99) near Fresno.

    This was US 466 (present-day Route 41) between Morrow Bay and Cholame, and Route 41 between Cholame and US 99 in Fresno.

  2. From LRN 4 (US 99) near Fresno to Yosemite National Park.

    This was Route 41.


State Shield

State Route 126



Routing

From Route 101 near Ventura to Route 5.

The relinquished former portion of Route 126 within the City of Santa Clarita is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 126 was defined as "(a) Route 101 near Ventura to Route 5. (b) Route 5 to Route 14 near Solemint."

On June 26, 1964, a 9.4-mile section of the Route 126 Freeway was adopted between the Golden State and Antelope Valley Freeways, estimated to cost $18 million.

Prior to 2001, there was an additional segment that ran from Route 5 to Route 14 near Solemint. Relinquishment of this segment was authorized by AB 635, Chapter 575, 10/11/2001. The bill required that Santa Clarita keep signs showing the way for travelers to get to the rest of Route 126. The section (which is from PM R5.8 to T12.707) was up for relinquishment in September 2002. There were plans to construct this as freeway; if it had been constructed, there would have been an interchange at Rye Canyon, McBean, and Bouquet Canyon.

In 2003, AB 1717 (Ch. 525, 9/25/2003) updated the legislative definition to reflect the relinquishment.The relinquished former portion of Route 126 within the City of Santa Clarita is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption as a state highway.

The segment from Route 5 to Route 14 was planned as freeway but never upgraded. When they built the Antelope Valley Fwy (Route 14), they also built a stub of this freeway, which juts out as a long overpass on Via Princesa. You can only get on that stub by going northbound on Route 14. The exit is called "Canyon Country/Sierra Hwy".

The segment from Route 5 to Route 14 will be replaced with the Cross Valley Connector (see below). According to the City of Santa Clarita, The Cross Valley Connector (CVC) is an 8½ mile roadway that connects to various streets, running from the I-5/Route 126 to Route 14. It is a $230+ Million project, and should be completed in 2006.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 126 was signed along the route from Jct. US 101 near Ventura to Jct. US 99 at Castaic, via Santa Paula. It was LRN 79. The portion between Castaic Junction (US 99/I-5) and US 101 (LRN 2)) was defined in 1931. The portion from US 99/I-5 to Route 14 was originally part of the 1909 definition of LRN 4; it was routed off LRN 4 in 1939. It was adopted as a conventional highway by California Highway Commission on June 3, 1938. It was adopted as a freeway on April 19, 1956 from US 101 S of the City of Ventura NE-ly to the City of Santa Paula.

 

Status

Much of this is freeway. As of 4/94, only the portion from Route 101 to Santa Paula, and from about .5 mi E of Route 5 to Route 5, was freeway. As of 2001, the entire route is, at minimum, 4 lanes.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $500,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Camarillo, at Wells Road off ramp, that will rebuild the slope and place rock slope protection at one location to minimize erosion.

In May 2010, the CTC approved for route adoption a project in Los Angeles County that will construct a grade-separated interchange at the existing signalized interchange of Route 126 and Commerce Drive near the city of Santa Clarita. As part of the project, Route 126 would be realigned to the south over a recently constructed embankment. The project is entirely funded from Metro Proposition C funds and private funds from Newhall Land and Farming Company. Total estimated project cost is $40,900,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The project will involve construction activities that will result in potential impacts to water quality and noise. In addition, construction activities will be occurring in the habitat of the Peirson’s morning glory, a federal species of concern. As part of this, the CTC designated Route 126 in Los Angeles County from Castaic Creek to Route 5 west of City of Santa Clarita as a Controlled Access Highway. The proposed improvements will increase highway capacity, improve traffic operations, enhance driver safety and accommodate planned growth within the project area. Adoption of the proposed segment as a freeway is not practical because it would eliminate the Fire Department required emergency entrance/exit from an adjacent property owner. Attempts to maintain the required exits would severely reduce the commercial value of the property.

In July 2013, it was reported that a partnership of state and county agencies planned to break ground in mid-July or early August on a $50 million project to expand and reroute Route 126 near the Valencia Commerce Center. As designed, the project would entail construction of a bridge to lift Route 126 over Commerce Center Drive in Castaic, improving traffic flow on both routes. The projectwould also add new lanes on the highway, expanding it to three in each direction. The project also includes adding on- and off-ramps from Route 126 to Commerce Center Drive and Henry Mayo Drive, realigning and extending Henry Mayo Drive, adding new traffic signals at the intersection of Commerce Center and Henry Mayo drives and at the intersection of Route 126 and the access road to the Valencia Travel Village RV park. It also entails planting new landscaping to help stabilize the bank of the Santa Clara River near Route 126 and removing some invasive species to improve water flow in the river. The project is slated to be complete in late 2016. $9 million in funding for the project comes from a Metro grant, the remainder is in the form of bridge and major thoroughfare construction fees. Those fees are part of the costs that accompany residential and commercial development, such as the Newhall Ranch residential development project, which would add more than 20,000 homes along Route 126.

In January 2002 and April 2002, the CTC voted on relinquishment of the portion of the route in the City of Santa Paula that was bypassed by the new freeway portion, PM 13.5.

Cross-Valley Connector

According to Don Hagstrom, in 1990, Caltrans offered to build a 126 Freeway from Route 14 to I-5. Santa Clarita declined the offer. Instead, they planned to make up for this by constructing a "Cross Valley Arterial." This would work as follows: Starting at the interchange between I-5 and Route 126, Santa Clarita will construct Newhall Ranch Road, a 6 and 8 lane arterial that will be a de-facto extension of Route 126. The road itself will not be a freeway and it will not carry the CA-126 designation (in fact, the CTC planned back then to decommission this segment). On the other side (near Route 14), Golden Valley Road would be extended westward to meet up with Newhall Ranch Road. Somewhere in here the Santa Clara River would have to be crossed. There also would be a grade-separated interchange built between Golden Valley and Soledad Canyon Road.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #216: Construction of a cross-valley connector between I-5 and Route 14. This important transportation project will connect I-5 and Route 14, significantly easing traffic in and around the city and increasing the efficiency of commerce in the area. The Cross Valley Connector will consist of 8.5 miles of new six- and eight-lane arterial roadways, bridges, grade-separated crossings and intersections, including the connection of Newhall Ranch Road and Golden Valley Road. It will provide a direct link between I-5 and Route 126 on the west and Route 14 and the Golden Valley interchange on the east. HPP #3786 seems to provide significant additional funding. $4,000,000.

  • High Priority Project #3786: Construction of a cross-valley connector between I-5 and Route 14. This seems to be additional funding for the connector. $5,000,000.

Note that the Cross Valley Connector is a surface artery across Santa Clarita, 25 miles further south, consisting of Newhall Ranch Road, about half of which is complete, and Golden Valley Road, which was recently finished. It won't be a freeway, and will probably never be used by anyone to get between I-5 and Route 14 (except maybe if an accident bogs down the freeways), as it will have at least a dozen traffic lights along its length.

Funding for the I-5 to Route 14 portion of the CVC was included in the SAFETEA-LU legislation passed in August 2005.

 

Naming

The portion from Route 101 to Route 5 is designated as the "Santa Paula Freeway". The first segment opened in 1963. It was named by Senate Bill 835, Chapter 223, in 1967.

Additionally, the portion of Route 126 between the City of Santa Paula and Route 5 is officially designated "The Korean War Veterans' Memorial Highway". Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 41, Chapter 131, in 1994. The portion between the City of Santa Paula and US 101 has a similar designation, being named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 135, Chapter 89, on June 27, 2002.

The portion of Route 126 from Hallock Drive to the city limit of the City of Fillmore in the County of Ventura is named the "California Highway Patrol Officer David W. Copleman Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of David W. Copleman, who was March 7, 1958, in Little Rock, California. David W. Copleman entered the California Highway Patrol Academy on the October 18, 1982; after graduation, he was assigned to the Ventura Area Highway Patrol. Officer Copleman was killed in the line of duty on the April, 6, 1985, when he was in pursuit on Route 126 and was struck head-on by an uninvolved vehicle. Officer Copleman was a dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people he worked with. He was a wonderful father and husband and his greatest joy was spending time with his family. In his spare time, David W. Copleman served the community of Little Rock, California, as a volunteer firefighter. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 46, Resolution Chapter 66, on 7/7/2005.

 

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Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Ventura 126 0.00 0.21
Ventura 126 R10.20 R12.71

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.16] Between the east urban limits of Oxnard-Ventura-Thousand Oaks and Route 5.

 


Overall statistics for Route 126:

  • Total Length (1995): 47 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 2,100 to 36,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 29; Sm. Urban: 6; Urbanized: 12.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 40 mi; FAU: 5 mi; FAS: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 47 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Ventura, Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the routes from "Fresno-Tracy West Side Highway near Kerman to [LRN 4] near Madera" and from "[LRN 4] near Madera to Fresno-Yosemite Road" to the highway system. In 1935, LRN 126 was added to the highway code with the definition:

  1. [LRN 41] near Kerman to [LRN 4] near Madera
  2. [LRN 4] near Madera to [LRN 125]

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as Route 145, and ran from Route 180 to Route 41, with a discontinuity on Route 99 near Madera.


State Shield

State Route 127



Routing

From Route 15 near Baker to the Nevada state line via the vicinity of Death Valley Junction.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 127 was signed from Jct. US 91 at Baker to the California-Nevada State Line near Death Valley Junction. It was LRN 127 between Baker and Death Valley Junction (junction Route 190), and LRN 128 from Death Valley Junction to the Nevada state line. Both routes were defined in 1933. This is one of those rare routes (Route 58 is another) where the pre-1963 legislative number and the signed number are the same.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.6] From Route 15 near Baker to Route 190 near Death Valley Junction (not upgraded). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.16] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 127:

  • Total Length (1995): 91 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 380 to 4,700
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 91; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 91 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 91 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Ibix Pass (2250 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: San Bernardino, Inyo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the following routes to the state highway system: "

  • [LRN 4] near Tipton, via Porterville and Camp Nelson to [LRN 23] near Lone Pine
  • [LRN 31] to Death Valley and connection to the California-Nevada State Line
  • [LRN 23] near Lone Pine to Death Valley

In 1935, LRN 127 was added to the highway code with the following definition, which covered most of these routes:

  1. [LRN 4] near Tipton, via Porterville and Camp Nelson to [LRN 23] near Lone Pine
  2. [LRN 23] near Lone Pine to Death Valley
  3. [LRN 31] to Death Valley

The "connection to the California-Nevada State Line" was added as part of LRN 128.

In 1959, Chapter 1355 rerouted segment (a) combining it with (c), and clarified (b), giving:

  1. [LRN 4] near Tipton to [LRN 31] near Baker via the vicinity of Porterville, Camp Nelson, Olancha, Death Valley, and Death Valley Junction.
  2. From [LRN 23] near Lone Pine to a junction with the route described in part (a).

This was signed as follows:

  1. From Route 99 (LRN 4) near Tipton to I-15 (US 91, US 466, LRN 31) near Baker via the vicinity of Porterville, Camp Nelson, Olancha, Death Valley, and Death Valley Junction.

    This segment was signed, along the constructed portions, as Route 190 to Death Valley Junction, and as Route 127 from Death Valley Junction to I-15. (and dates back to the initial 1934 signage of state routes).

  2. From US 395 (LRN 23) near Lone Pine to a junction with the route described in part (1).

    This segment appears to have been unsigned; it is present-day Route 136.


State Shield

State Route 128



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near the mouth of the Navarro River to Route 101 near Cloverdale.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was "(a) The mouth of the Navarro River to Route 101 near Cloverdale via McDonald." Later in 1963, Chapter 1698 removed "via McDonald"

    In 1994, Chapter 1220 relaxed the origin: "(a) Route 1 near the mouth of the Navarro River to Route 101 near Cloverdale."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 48, defined in 1919. It was originally signed as signed Route 28, and in 1952 was renumbered as signed Route 128 (permitting the route around Lake Tahoe to be numbered as Route 28 in coordination with Nevada 28. Between McDonald and US 101, this was originally part of LRN 1, but became part of LRN 48 in 1935 when LRN 1 was moved. Route 128 was not an original state signed route (although Route 28 was).

     

    Status

    In June 2011, the CTC approved $9.9 million to repave about 24 miles of Route 128 from near Boonville south to the Sonoma County line.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Mendocino County that will repair a segment of roadway and the adjacent slope on Route 128, from Shearing Creek to 0.7 mile west of Maple Creek Bridge, near Boonville. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $16,318,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to riparian and waters of the U.S to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to wetlands in the project area will be mitigated by replacing impacted wetlands at a 1:1 ratio. Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA) fencing will also be used in appropriate areas. Water quality impacts will be mitigated through implementation of Best Management Practices (BMP).

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 101 to Route 29 in Calistoga.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(b) Route 101 near Geyserville to Route 29 near Calistoga."

    In 1965, Chapter 1371 changed the origin to be "(b) Route 101 near Geyserville..."

    In 1990, Chapter 1187 clarified the terminus: "...to Route 29 near in Calistoga."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 103, defined in 1933. It was originally signed as signed Route 28, and in 1952 was renumbered as signed Route 128 (permitting the route around Lake Tahoe to be numbered as Route 28 in coordination with Nevada 28. Portions of this may have been cosigned with US 101. Route 128 was not an original state signed route (although Route 28 was).

     

    Status

    Robert Cruickshank noted that, on the road leading to the River Rock Casino (off of Route 128 in this area, known as the Alexander Valley) is a shield marking the road as Indian Route 93.

    In November 2011, it was reported that Caltrans announced completion of two new bridges on Route 128 between Healdsburg and Calistoga. The Redwood and Maacama Creek bridges, which had been under construction since summer 2010, are wider than the bridges they replaced. Total cost for both new bridges was $7 million.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. From Route 29 near Rutherford to Route 113 near Davis via Sage Canyon.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    Unconstructed Unconstructed from Route 113 to Route 505. This segment is unchanged from 1963. Note: The 2002 Traversable Highways Report indicates this segment will be considered for assumption of maintenance after a two-mile section of Russell Blvd just east of Route 505 is reconstructed. Yolo County will improve the roadway as funds permit. It is unclear if this ever happened.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 102 between Rutherford and the junction with Route 37 (present-day Route 121; Steele Canyon Road, defined in 1933). It was LRN 6 (1933 extension) between Steele Canyon Road and I-505, and LRN 6 (1959 extension) from I-505 to Route 113 (former Alternate US 40). It was originally signed as signed Route 28, and in 1952 was renumbered as signed Route 128 (permitting the route around Lake Tahoe to be numbered as Route 28 in coordination with Nevada 28. It may also have been signed as part of Alternate US 40. Route 128 was not an original state signed route (although Route 28 was).

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] From Route 121 to Route 113 near Davis. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.16] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 128:

  • Total Length (1995): 121 miles traversable; 11 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,150 to 9,100
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 132; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 102 mi; FAS: 19 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 102 mi; Collector: 19 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Mendocino, Solano, Napa, Yolo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route "[LRN 31] to Death Valley and connection to the California-Nevada State Line" to the highway system. In 1935, the portion from [LRN 31] to Death Valley was added as LRN 127. LRN 128 was added to the highway code with the following routing:

[LRN 127] to the Nevada State Line

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It ran from the Route 190/Route 127 junction to the Nevada state line, and is part of present day Route 127.



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