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California Highways

Routes 113 through 120

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

113 · 114 · 115 · 116 · 117 · 118 · 119 · 120


State Shield

State Route 113



Routing
  1. From Route 12 to Route 80 near Dixon.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The definition of this segment is unchanged from 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 101, defined in 1933. It was not signed before 1964.

     

    Status

    Solano County is conducting a study regarding bypassing downtown Dixon. Dixon made a push in the mid-1990s to have the state relocate the highway to rural Midway and Pedrick roads. But widening and improving Pedrick Road and improving the interchange at I-80 was too expensive, and Caltrans indicated they didn't have the funds. They offered to let Dixon pay, but the city declined. Now Dixon wants the Solano Transportation Authority to do a study on Route 113.

    In June 2008, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Dixon, between West Chestnut Street and 0.1 mile north of West F Street, consisting of non-motorized transportation facilities, namely sidewalks.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Solano 113 R21.65 R21.94
    Solano 113 R21.99 R22.22


  2. From Route 80 near Davis to Route 99 passing near Woodland.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The definition of this segment is unchanged from 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Between I-80 and I-5, this was part of LRN 7 (defined in 1909), and was cosigned as US 99W/Alternate US 40. Between I-5 and Route 99, this was part of LRN 87, defined in 1933. It was originally part of Route 24, and was later part of US 40A. Route 113 was not defined in the initial set of signed routes in 1934.

    The portion of Route 113 that bypasses Davis (between Russell Bouelvard and current I-80) goes through land that was originally part of UC Davis agricultural research. When this segment was upgraded to freeway around 1976, part of Hutchison Drive, a university street, had to be rerouted for an interchange; the old segment now stubs off on the west side of the freeway.
    [Information provided by Chris Sampang]

    The full Route 113 freeway from Davis to Woodland was completed in 1990 after lobbying by the City of Woodland and Woodland's Chamber of Commerce. It appears that the segment from I-5 to Main Street (former Route 16/current Business I-5) was built first, in 1973. The segment from I-80 in Davis north to County Road 27 was constructed from 1974-1976. So until 1990, Route 113 continued north on East Street from County Road 27 to the current north I-5/Route 113 junction, through downtown Woodland. This explains why one large sign gantry still exists at East and Main (former Route 16) for Route 113; the sign itself dates back to the early 1960s and has shieldout for US 99W. After the Route 113 freeway was completed, East Street's connection to County Road 27 via Rose Lane (over a Southern Pacific railroad crossing halfway betwen County Road 25A and County Road 27) was severed.

     

    Status

    Freeway is completed from Davis to Woodland (Route 80 to Route 5), approx 12 miles.

    Recently, the portion between the segments has been co-signed as Route 113/I-80. A Route 113 shield has been added to the eastbound I-80 trailblazer assembly just past the junction of Route 113 in Dixon, and a similar arrangement can be found on WB I-80 just past the Route 113 junction in Davis. There are no Route 113 shields on the trailblazer assemblies at the interchanges in between Dixon and Davis.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $7,500,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs from Davis to Woodland that will rehabilitate 45.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

     

    Naming

    The interchange of Route 5 and Route 113 is named the "CHP Sergeant Gary R. Wagers Memorial Interchange" This interchange was named in memory of CHP Sergeant Gary R. Wagers, who died in a patrol vehicle collision in the line of duty while pursuing a traffic violator at high speed in the early morning hours of March 15, 2001, on Route 113 at the interchange with Route 5, in Woodland. Sergeant Wagers graduated high school in Allegan, Michigan and was a graduate of California State University, Sacramento. He joined the California Army National Guard in 1970 and retired in 1998 at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, after receiving many awards, including the Army Achievement Medal, Reserve Commendation Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, and the National Defense Medal. He graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy and was appointed as a State Traffic Officer on August 9, 1979; he was promoted to the rank of State Traffic Sergeant on March 1, 1992. He served in the West Los Angeles, Westminster, South Sacramento, Riverside, Santa Ana, and Woodland Areas as well as at CHP Headquarters and California Highway Patrol Air Operations. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 16, Resolution Chapter 70, on 07/07/2005.

    The portion of Route 113 between I-5 and I-80 is named the "Vic Fazio" Highway. Vic Fazio, a United States Representative for ten consecutive terms beginning in 1978, secured funds to provide a continuous four lane freewayfor the portion of Route113 between I-5 and I-80, replacing a prevoius "blood alley". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Chapter 124, in 1998.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 18-0032, the Sutter Causeway Bridge in Sutter county, is named the "Leslie A. Lowden Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1968, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 34, Chapter 65, in 1991. Leslie A. Lowden, descendant of California pioneers, community activist, mother and grandmother, was killed by a drunk driver on July 25, 1989.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] From from Route 80 near Davis to Route 99 near Tudor. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1963.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Yolo 113 R0.25 R0.57
    Yolo 113 R0.95 R1.26
    Yolo 113 R1.94 R2.20
    Yolo 113 R10.29 R10.67

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.15] Between Route 80 and Route 5.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 113 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 113 between 1934 and 1964. It appears that Route 113 came about as the result of removing the Alternate US 40 designation from the Woodland to Tudor, and removing the Alternate US 40/US 99W designation from the portion S of Woodland.

 

Historical Route

Assembly Concurrent Resolution 180, 1998, designated those portions of US 40 that are still publically maintained and not already designated as part of Historic US 40 as "Historic US 40".

Senate Concurrent Resolution 66, Chaptered May 18, 2006 (Resolution Chapter 51), designated, upon application by an appropriate local governmental agency, any section of former Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 that is still a publicly maintained highway and that is of interest to the applicant, as Historic Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40. This recognizes the role that Former Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 played in the development of the transportation routes into California over what is now known as the Davis "Y". Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 is currently Route 113 from Davis to Woodland and Yuba City, and Route 70 through Marysville, Oroville, and the Feather River Canyon to Hallelujah Junction on Route 395, a route that today serves 27 towns and the six counties of Yolo, Sutter, Yuba, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen. The Feather River Scenic Byway is a 130 mile segment of Route 70, which was part of Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Interstate Submissions

In April 1958, it appears that the designation I-113 was proposed for the route that is now I-680. This was part of the first attempt to assign 3-digit interstates n California. The number was rejected by AASHTO.

 


Overall statistics for Route 113:

  • Total Length (1995): 59 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,600 to 28,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 52; Sm. Urban: 5; Urbanized: 2.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 45 mi; FAU: 3 mi; FAS: 11 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 32 mi; Minor Arterial: 18 mi; Collector: 9 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Solano, Yolo, Sutter.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 2] near Mountain View to [LRN 5] near Milpitas" to the highway system. In 1935, it was codified into the highway code as LRN 113 without change. The route remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It ran from US 101 near Mountain View to present-day I-680 near Milpitas. It was originally part of Route 9; it is present-day Route 237.


Unsigned

Unsigned State Route 114



Routing

From Route 101 in East Palo Alto to Route 84

 

Post 1964 Signage History

084-114As defined in 1963, this route ran from “Route 280 near Woodside to Route 101 at the Harbor Boulevard Interchange in Redwood City.”

In 1984, Chapter 409 swapped a portion of Route 114 and Route 84, moving Route 84 to the northern (LRN 214) alignment, and giving Route 114 the old Route 84 alignment. This made the definition of Route 114 "Route 280 in Menlo Park to Route 84." The current routing runs along Willow Road.

In 1990, Chapter 1187 truncated the route, changing the origin to Route 101 in East Palo Alto"

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This is a proposed routing of LRN 107. The constructed routing of LRN 107 is to the NW, and was surface Route 84. A new Route 84 was built in the early 1980s as part of the Dumbarton Bridge project, and the old portion was resigned as Route 114. The unbuilt portion of Route 114 was at one time designated as Route 84, and present-day Route 84 between US 101 and I-280 was Route 114. The current Route 84 portions were defined in 1959.

Pre 1964, Route 114 would've taken a different route between the Dumbarton Bridge and US 101 than it (as signed Route 84) does now: it would've cut between current Route 109 and current Route 114/signed Route 84, then continued west about a mile south of Willow Road, before subsuming Willow Road west of current Route 82, ending near current I-280.

Route 114 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 114 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 114 (this reflects only the portion from US 101 to Route 84):

  • Total Length (1995): 1 mile
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 44,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 1.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 1 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Mateo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 68] near Sunnyvale to Los Gatos-Saratoga Gap Road" as a state highway. In 1935, this was codified as LRN 114 with the following definition:

[LRN 68] near Sunnyvale to [LRN 42]

In 1959, Chapter 1841 changed the definition to originate at [LRN 5] (Route 17).

In 1961, Chapter 1146 changed the definition to begin as [LRN 2] (US 101) near Ford Road.

This route ran from US 101 near Ford Road to Bypass US 101 near Mountain View. This is present-day Route 85.


State Shield

State Route 115



Routing
  1. From Route 8 southeasterly of Holtville to Route 78.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was the original segment (b) of Route 115, and (a) and (b) were defined as "(a) Route 98 near Bonds Corners to Route 8 near Holtville. (b) Route 8 near Holtville to Route 78."

    In 1972, Chapter 742 deleted (a) and changed the origin of (b): (a) Route 8 southeasterly of Holtville to Route 78. This reflected relocation of a portion of this route to a former alignment of Route 8. This former part (a) was once US 80.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 187, defined in 1933. A portion was LRN 27. This segment was signed as Route 115 sometime after 1934 but before 1963. Route 115 was not defined in the initial set of signed routes in 1934.

     

    Status

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #951: Improve bridge 58-7 on Route 115 that crosses the Alamo River in Holtville. Additionally, this project funds design and environmental analysis of a new bridge over the same river. $800,000.

     


  2. From Route 78 east of Brawley to Route 111 at Calipatria.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 201, defined in 1933. This segment was signed as Route 115 sometime after 1934 but before 1963. Route 115 was not defined in the initial set of signed routes in 1934.

Other WWW Links

 

Interstate Submissions

In April 1958, it appears that the designation I-115 was proposed for the route that is now I-505. This was part of the first attempt to assign 3-digit interstates n California. The number was rejected by AASHTO.

 


Overall statistics for Route 115:

  • Total Length (1995): 34 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,150 to 10,300
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 34; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAS: 34 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Collector: 34 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Imperial.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 5] near San Jose to Mount Hamilton" to the highway system. In 1935, this was defined in the highway code as LRN 115 with that definition.

In 1959, Chapter 1062 changed the definition to:

  1. The intersection of [LRN 5] and [LRN 239] near Moorpark Avenue to [LRN 68] near Story Road.
  2. [LRN 68] near San Jose to Mount Hamilton

Later in 1959, Chapter 2065 and 2144 extended the second segment to "Patterson via the vicinity of Mount Hamilton."

In 1961, Chapter 1146 deleted segment (a)

This route ran from Bypass US 101 near San Jose to Patterson via the vicinity of Mount Hamilton, and is present-day Route 130.


State Shield

State Route 116



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Jenner to Route 101 near Cotati.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was signed as Route 12 between the original signage of routes in 1934 and 1964. It was LRN 104, defined in 1933.

     

    Status

    In January 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishement of right of way along Route 116 from Drake Road to Mays Canyon Road near the town of Guerneville, in the county of Sonoma, consisting of collateral facilities.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.6] Entire portion.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] From Route 181 near Forestville to Route 101 near Cotati. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 101 near Petaluma to Route 121 near Schellville.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 104, defined in 1933. It does not appear to have been a signed route prior to 1964.

     

    Status

    In October 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will install left-turn pockets in both directions from Route 116 to Madrone Avenue; including widening the roadway, modifying part of the existing unlined drainage gutter, and installing a new longitudinal pipe. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $1,560,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Proposed mitigation measures include pre-construction surveys for the California Tiger salamander, a California listed endangered species. A qualified biological monitor will be on site to insure practices are put in place to best protect the California Tiger salamander. As a result, a MND was completed for this project.

    In December 2012, Caltrans wrapped up a six-month safety improvement project on Route 116 and Madrone Avenue in Cotati. The $690,000 project added 350-foot left-turn pockets in each direction of Route 116 at Madrone Avenue and a 5-foot shoulder on the south side of the intersection.

    In February 2013, it was reported that there are plans to install roundabouts at Route 116 at Mirabel Road in Forestville and at Arnold Drive at Agua Caliente Road at the entrance to the Hanna Boys Center in Sonoma. A roundabout also is being considered for the three-way intersection of Route 116 and Route 121/Route 12 in Carneros, south of Sonoma. The modern roundabout usually features a one-lane traffic circle in which vehicles move counterclockwise around a center circular island, entering and exiting to the right. The motorist entering the roundabout usually must yield to traffic already circling.
    (Source: Press-Democrat, 2/8/2013)

    In May 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project project in Sonoma County that will repair embankment on a portion of Route 116 near the city of Petaluma. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $2,420,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 116 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 116 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

In February 2012, the CTC authorized $2,999,000 to provide Environmental Mitigation for the Stage Gulch Road Curve Correction and Realignment project near Petaluma, from Adobe Road to west of Arnold Drive. EA 04-28381, PPNO 0832 to meet the requirements of permits issued by the regulatory agencies.

 

Naming

Route 116 in Sonoma County from Sebastopol to Forestville is named the "Willard F. Libby Memorial Highway. Dr. Williard F. Libby, a native of the Sebastopol area, received the 1960 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the "carbon 14" radioactive dating process. He was a nuclear scientist and member of the Atomic Energy Commission. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 149, Chapt 128 in 1984.

The portion between the intersection with River Road in Guerneville and US 101 in Cotati is called lots of confusing things. East of US 101 in Petaluma to its terminus at Route 121 near Schellville, the picture is a little clearer. Route 116 is called "Stage Gulch Road" until the intersection with Arnold Drive, then most people call it, and receive mail on it, as "Arnold Drive" until the terminus.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.15] Between Route 1 and Route 12.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 116:

  • Total Length (1995): 46 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,800 to 30,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 39; Sm. Urban: 5; Urbanized: 2.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 46 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 6 mi; Minor Arterial: 40 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Sonoma.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "Santa Cruz to [LRN 42] near Waterman Gap" as a state highway. In 1935, it was codified in the highway code as LRN 116 with that definition.

In 1961, Chapter 1146 changed the origin to "[LRN 5] near Santa Cruz".

This route runs from Route 17 near Santa Cruz to Route 9 near Waterman Gap, and is present-day Route 9.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 117



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

186 and 117Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 117 was defined as the route ran from "Crystal Springs Road in the City of San Bruno northerly to Route 280 in Daly City." Its definition also noted that " Joint Highway District No. 10 is dissolved in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 20 of Part 1 of Division 16 of the Streets and Highways Code, and all property, assets, and liabilities of said district are the property of the State."

In 1965, that definition of Route 117 was deleted by Chapter 1372. Some speculate that this might have included the portion of Junipero Serra Boulevard south of Serramonte Boulevard, which did not have the parallel I-280 until the early 1970s. This segment is built to expressway standards, complete with CalTrans green signs at intersections, jersey barriers, and even a CalTrans maintenance station at Junipero Serra and Westborough. This may also have been what is the current routing of I-280, as in 1967 some maps show Route 280 as continuing along Skyline to Sneath in San Bruno before cutting up to S San Francisco and Daly City.

A document on the Millbrae Spur Property noted that:

In early 1955 the proposed route of the Junipero Serra Highway was reoriented in San Bruno to go to Skyline Boulevard and south to Ralston Avenue in Belmont. This new route was located considerable west of the original route; it no longer divided the Peninsula cities. In the 1960s the route was again modified, and the proposed Junipero Serra Highway was absorbed into the Interstate Highway System which created I-280 connecting San Francisco and San Jose.

Chris Sampang has surmised this might confirm that former Route 117 is leftover right of way.

Chris Sampang noted that at Seton Hospital there is an overhead picture of Daly City from 1955 that shows two grade separations on the Junipero Serra Boulevard corridor (Route 117), which correspond to current exits on the Serra Freeway: Alemany Boulevard/John Daly Boulevard and Washington Street. There are some intriguing difference.

  • For Alemany Boulevard, the current southbound-to-southbound flyover was in place, but current John Daly Boulevard east of this junction (to Mission Street, former US 101 and current Route 82) was not constructed at the time. Instead, eastbound John Daly (then an extension of Alemany Boulevard and part of Route 1) coming from the Westlake area fed directly into Alemany northbound. It appears that the configuration of the current northbound Route 1 to northbound Alemany ramp was probably adjusted in the mid-1960s when the interchange with the Southern Freeway (current I-280) was built. At that time, John Daly Boulevard was extended east to current Route 82 (and also taken out of the state system after Route 1 was placed on a new alignment from Pacifica to Colma, a result of the 1957 earthquake in Daly City). A flyover was then constructed for John Daly; thus, the southbound flyover now feeds into a collector/distributor road for the John Daly Boulevard interchange with the Route 1 portion of the Junipero Serra Freeway. Note that this portion of the Serra Freeway was I-280 between the advent of the interstates and 1968, although it is unclear if it was signed as such. It has always been part of Route 1 north of John Daly however. Also, the portion of Alemany Boulevard directly from this interchange up to San Jose Avenue may have been a pre-freeway routing of LRN 225, which later became part of the Southern Freeway I-280 route.

  • For Washington Street: The 1955 picture shows a diamond interchange at Washington Street in Daly City. However, this original interchange has been almost completely removed: the only vestige being the ramp from Washington to northbound I-280/Route 1. The old southbound ramps to Washignton seem to correspond to the current Briggs Street near a former Safeway site (now In-N-Out Burger). The northbound offramp was removed when this portion of the freeway was upgraded to I-280, and Junipero Serra Boulevard realigned to cross over I-280. The nearby exit here is now labeled "Mission Street/Eastmoor Avenue"; northbound, this interchange is currently tied into the complex for Route 1 and I-280 and also provides access to the Colma BART station.

125 75 adoptionPost-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1972, Chapter 1216 recreated Route 117 as "the international boundary near Borderfield northeasterly to Route 5."

In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "Borderfield" to "Border Field" and added "(b) Route 5 near the south end of San Diego Bay to Route 125 near Brown Field." This was a transfer from Route 75.

In 1986, Chapter 929 renumbered Route 117 as (non-chargable interstate) Route 905.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

The 1964-1965 routing was LRN 237, but was never constructed or signed.

The post-1972 routing was new, although the portion added from Route 75 was approximately LRN 281, although its proposed routing was slighly N of the current Route 905.

Route 117 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 117 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "Monterey to [LRN 2] near Salinas" to the highway system. In 1935, this was codified as LRN 117 in the highway code with that definition, which remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. The route ran from Monterey to US 101 near Salinas, and is present-day Route 68.


State Shield

State Route 118



Routing
  1. From Route 126 near Saticoy to Route 210 near San Fernando.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    In 1954, route studies were conducted for the Simi Valley Freeway (Route 118) from Desoto Avenue to the proposed Foothill Freeway (public hearing held January 9, 1964); and from the Route 126 Freeway near Saticoy to First Street near Moorpark. The first segment to be constructed was between Kuehner Drive in Simi Valley and Santa Susanna Avenue (likely current Topanga Canyon). In July 1964, the CHC adopted a freeway routing for the western portion of Route 118. The routing ran E-ly to beyond Winnetka Ave, then NE-ly to where it is north-of and adjacent to the DWP power transmission lines S of Rinaldi St. It continues E along this right of way, bending SE-ly E of Balboa Blvd to E of Woodley Ave, then E-ly across I-405 and I-5. It then swings NE-ly beyond Laurel Canyon Blvd, and continues N of and parallel to Paxton St. to join to I-210 just E of Foothill. This routing affected 174 fewer families while costing $2.9 milllion less than the next most favored routing. Later in 1964, a 19.3-mile freeway routing for Route 118 was adopted between six-tenths mile west of La Vista Avenue near Saticoy and three-tenths mile east of First Street near Simi.

    Construction of the Simi Freeway required excavation of 8.5 million cubic yards of earth for roadway, and over 34,000 cubic yards for structure excavation. Fills ranged up to 220' in depth, requiring special drainage structures. In some areas the unique rock strata required a 3-to-1 cut, and the right of way at its widest point is 1,100' from top of cut to top of cut. The summit between Ventura County and Los Angeles county is at 1,568', with the grade being 3.6% on the Ventura side, and 5% on the Los Angeles side

    The following freeway-to-freeway connections were never constructed:

    • EB Route 118 to NB I-5. Rationale: The interchange is only 1½ miles from the I-405/Route 118 interchange. Caltrans wanted drivers to connect to the I-405 northbound to get to I-5.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 9 and was signed as Route 118 as part of the original signage of routes in 1934 (Jct. US 101 near El Rio to Jct. US 66 at Pasadena, via San Fernando). Before the freeway, it ran along Los Angeles Avenue, Santa Susanna Pass Road, and Devonshire Blvd. It then ran N along Sepulveda to Brand, N on Brand into the city of San Fernando. It jogged N on San Fernando Rd a bit to Maclay, and then N on Maclay to Foothill Blvd. The portion between Route 126 and I-5 was defined in 1933; the remainder was defined in 1909. A small portion in Ventura was LRN 154 until 1957. See below for information on the routing from Route 210 to US 66 in Pasadena.

    A 12.5-mile portion of the route between Los Angeles Avenue at Madera Road in Ventura County and De Soto Avenue in the City of Los Angeles was adopted by the California Highway Commission in 1962. The remaining portions to the west and to the east of this adopted segment are currently under planning study with a target date for adoption late in 1963. First construction was planned for the five-mile unit of the adopted route between the easternmost end of Simi Valley and De Soto Avenue in the West San Fernando Valley. An estimated $12,000,000 was believed necessary to finance that construction.

     

    Status

    Freeway from Route 23 to Route 210; planned as freeway from Route 126 to Route 23 but never upgraded.

    [118 at Rocky Peak]There are currently plans to add new on and off ramps at Rocky Peak Road: an EB off-ramp and a WB on-ramp. This western half of the interchange was graded and gated at the time of initial construction in 1968. This is a $9.1 million project. In August 2008, Caltrans released a bid to construct the EB off-ramp and the WB on-ramp at Rocky Peak Road. Today, there are just dirt ramps. This construction was completed in 2009.

    [Burned 118 sign]In October 2003, the Simi Freeway served as a major firebreak for a fire that started up near Route 126 in Piru, and burned as far south as Browns Canyon and Chatsworth, as far East as Moorpark, and as far West as Stevenson Ranch. The fire burned a number of signs on the freeway, including the sign shown to the right.

    The Ventura County Star, in December 2009, had a nice article on "smiley face hill". This is/was a 120-foot creation on the side of a hill in eastern Simi Valley created originally by Sonny Klamerus, 58, of Northridge. By creating the giant smile, it was his intention to invoke the same in drivers who passed by the area near Yosemite Avenue and Kuehner Drive. The hill, which sits on a 10-acre site, was purchased by Palmdale 47th LLC in September 2009 from the bank. The previous owner, Larwin Co., filed for bankruptcy protection after putting a housing development project on hold in 2007. The face was originally established in 1998 without the permission of its then-owner, Mount Sinai Memorial Park (they later gave permission, as did Larwin). Palmdate 47th finally granted permission in early 2010. The property has changed hands several times and the area next to the hill is now marked to be developed with 66 town houses according to the city of Simi Valley. The new units will not obscure the grinning symbol. In 2014, Steve Apostolof, who operates a pizza restaurant in Chatsworth, went out and bought $100 worth of solar lights, recruited some friends and illuminated Happy Face Hill. The hillside grin has also gotten its own Facebook page, which has been "liked" nearly 7,000 times, according to page creator Brian Dennert, a world history teacher at Simi Valley's Royal High School.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #124: Landscaping Enhancements along the Ronald Reagan Freeway, Route 118, for aesthetic purposes. $2,320,000.

    118-Widening MapIn late March 2007, ground was broken on a $46M project to add a lane to the freeway in Simi Valley. The work, expected to take more than two years, includes not only widening the roadway from Tapo Canyon Road as it heads east into the San Fernando Valley, but also the construction of sound walls along the highway and fiber optics to better regulate the flow of traffic onto freeway onramps. The second phase of the work is to begin in mid-2008 and includes widening the westbound portion.
    (Source: Ventura County Star, 3/30/2007)

    In June 2007, Ventura County officials applied for an additional $32.7 million to complete the improvements to WB Route 118. The California Transportation Commission initially allocated $50 million for the project but higher construction costs left only enough to add an eastbound lane from Tapo Canyon Road in Simi Valley to the Los Angeles County line. When the county officials originally asked for the additional funds, the state Transportation Commission staff erroneously classified it as a new project rather than a cost increase and recommended that the request be rejected. If funding is turned down for the second phase, the widening project will probably be delayed several years and the cost will significantly increase. Local planners hope state commissioners will agree to use a portion of funds from Proposition 1B — a $19.9-billion statewide bond measure approved by voters last November — to finish the widening project. Traffic on the stretch of the 118 Freeway increased from 110,000 vehicles daily in 1998 to 117,000 today. With no improvement, traffic planners estimate two-hour delays during morning and evening peak periods each weekday will double by 2025. Ventura County is at a disadvantage because it is the largest in the state without a local sales tax earmarked for transportation projects.
    (Source: Los Angeles Times, 6/6/2007)

    In November 2007 and December 2007, the CTC considered a proposal to reprogram $1,206,000 for Environmental (PA&ED) for the Route 118 Widening project (New Los Angeles Avenue to Tapo Canyon Road, PPNO 3002) in Ventura County to the new Route 118 Widening Phase 2 project (Tapo Canyon Road to the Los Angeles County Line, PPNO 4006). The Route 118 Widening project between New Los Angeles Avenue and Tapo Canyon Road (PPNO 3002) was programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for $4,660,000 for PA&ED with an unfunded need of over $110 million to complete the project through construction, but significant construction cost increases to higher priority projects in the region have resulted in the Caltrans and the VCTC deciding to delete the project from the STIP. The new Route 118 Widening Phase 2 project (PPNO 4006) is a much higher priority but requires funding for Design (PS&E) and Right of Way (R/W) Support. The adopting resolution of the 2006 STIP Augmentation, dated June 2007, included recognition of the high priority given by the VCTC to early programming of this project if capacity is available.

    In May 2009, the Ventura County Transportation Commission approved the allocation of $6.5 million to the ongoing widening of eastbound Route118 through Simi Valley. It indicated that construction will start in 2010 on phase 2: widening westbound Route 118 from three to four lanes between Tapo Canyon and Kuehner Drive. It was funded earlier in 2009 as part of $1 billion in transportation spending approved in Sacramento, which will also go to other transportation projects in the county. An engineer’s estimate for the westbound Route 118 project was $21.7 million dollars, and the Ventura County Transportation Commission allocated the funds. However, when the California Department of Transportation opened construction bids for the project on 11/5/2009, the lowest qualifying bid was only $13.8 million by Sun-Valley based Security Paving Co. The first phase of the widening project cost $46.5 million with State Transportation Improvement Program funds, and included the addition of sound walls, the widening of four bridges, and the addition of communication and fiber-optic cables.
    (Source: Ventura County Star, 11/19/2009)

    In November 2009, the Ventura County Star reported the completion of the first widening phase of the project (from Tapo Canyon to the Los Angeles County line).

    In February 2010, the CTC approved an adjustment to the allocation amount for the Route 118 Widening, Tapo Canyon to the Los Angeles County Line (Phase 2) project (PPNO 4006) in Ventura County, from $18,493,000 to $8,961,000, in accordance with Assembly Bill 608. Specifically, on May 14, 2009, the Commission approved Resolution STIP1B-A-0809-019 allocating $18,493,000 for the Route 118 Widening, Tapo Canyon to the Los Angeles County Line (Phase 2) project programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) with Regional Improvement Program (RIP) shares. The project was awarded on November 24, 2009, for $15,468,000 ($8,961,000 RIP and $6,507,000 Regional American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 [Recovery Act]), including supplemental work, state furnished materials, and contingencies. Section 188.8 of the Streets and Highways Code allows the Commission to adjust an allocation amount for a capital outlay project in the STIP if the construction contract award amount for the project is less than 80% of the engineer’s final estimate. As a result, Caltrans and Ventura County Transportation Commission requests a downward adjustment of the allocation from $18,493,000 to $8,961,000, with $9,532,000 to return to Ventura County’s regional share balance.

    In March 2011, it was reported that the Route 118 Widening project was complete and open for traffic. Construction of phase one of the project, widening the eastbound highway from three to four lanes over a five-mile stretch from Tapo Canyon Road to the Los Angeles County line, began in 2008. Construction of phase two didn't begin until early 2010 because of funding issues. It added a new westbound lane along the same stretch, and completed the widening of the final two sections of the new eastbound lane. The second phase cost $19.1 million and was funded by Proposition 1B funds, state gasoline sales tax revenue and federal stimulus money. Phase one was completed strictly with state funds. A third phase of the project, which would widen the highway to Moorpark, is not even on the drawing board because of a lack of funds.

    [118/34 Jct]In February 2009, the CTC received notice of preparation of an EIR for reconstruction of the Route 118/Route 34 interchange in Somis. The proposed project would construct roadway improvements that include relocating and realigning Route 118 at Donlan Road, and adding a westbound left-turn lane in the westbound direction of Route 118, an eastbound auxillary lane, and interchange ramp improvements along portions of Route 118 and Route 34 intersection in the community of Somis in Ventura County. The project is included in the State Highway Operation and Protection Program Long Lead Project List. Future funding for project design, right of way, and construction will be programmed later pending completion of the environmental clearance. The alternatives being considered are:

    • No Build Alternative: The No-Build Alternative proposes to maintain the existing conditions without any alterations.

    • Intersection Improvement Alternative: This alternative closes the existing Donlon Road from Route 118 to La Cumbre Road. The new alignment of Donlon Road would begin at the Route 118/34 intersection and run north along the west side of Coyote Canyon Creek up to the spillway of the Ventura County Watershed Control District debris basin. At this point, Donlon Road would cross over the spillway in a northeasterly direction with a bridge structure. The southbound lane for Donlon Road would have a mixed thru/left-turn/right-turn lane at the intersection with Route 118. The realigned northbound lane of Donlon Road would not change. It would also add an additional left-turn lane in the westbound direction of Route 118 (east leg), an auxiliary lane in the eastbound direction of Route 118 (east leg), and a right-turn only lane in the eastbound direction of Route 118 (west leg). An auxiliary lane would be added on the southbound direction of Route 34 and a left-turn through-lane only on the northbound direction of Route 34. The existing drainage culvert and large catch basin (north side) for Coyote Canyon would be modified to accommodate the extra left-turn lane and auxiliary lane on Route 118 (east leg).

    • Bridge Alternative: This alternative proposes the same intersection improvements as the Intersection Improvement Alternative with the exception of the realignment of Donlon Road. The new Donlon Road would be a straight alignment due north of the Route 118/Route 34 intersection and would cross Coyote Canyon via a bridge structure. The Department of Transportation Division of Structures has estimated that a bridge structure of 156 feet by 55.5 feet would be required.

    • Roundabout Alternative: This alternative consists of a one-way, one-lane circulatory roadway in a counter-clockwise direction with a width of 24 feet. An additional structural pavement, 8 feet in width, would abut the inner radius of the roadway, which would function as a truck apron. A raised curb would border the inner radius of the truck apron and delineate the central island. The roundabout would replace the existing signalized intersection. The east leg approach of Route 118 would consist of a four-lane roadway (two lanes for ingress and two lanes for egress). The west leg approach of Route 118 would consist of a three lane roadway (two lanes for ingress and one lane for egress). The south leg approach of Route 34 would consist of a three-lane roadway similar to the west leg approach of Route 118. The realigned Donlon Road would travel north over the outlet of the debris basin with a two-lane roadway (one lane for ingress and one lane for egress).

    • Somis Bypass Alternative: This alternative was presented by local residents of the Somis community. This alternative would attempt to alleviate truck and commuter traffic going through this community by constructing a new two-lane highway. The proposed roadway would start at the present Union Pacific railroad crossing with Route 118 on the east side of Somis, continue south parallel to the railroad alignment, and connecting to Route 34 at a point south of the community of Somis.

    • Save Our Somis (SOS) Alternative: JR Consulting Engineers, LLC, was retained by the Save Our Somis (SOS) community organization and proposed a smaller intersection design for the project. This design would be similar to the lntersection Improvement Alternative with the following exceptions: only one left-turn lane for the westbound direction of Route 118, lengthened to almost 350 feet; the east leg of Route 118 would not have an eastbound auxiliary lane; and no auxiliary lane for the southbound direction of Route 34.

    Moorpark officials reviewed the draft EIR, and believe that it fails to take into account a plan by Ventura County to realign Donlon Road so that it joins to make a four-way intersection where the two state highways meet. They also believe that it does not provide mitigation of an expected increase in truck traffic and related air quality, noise and safety impacts on Route 118 as a result of projects planned by Caltrans.

    In October 2012, it was reported that Caltrans has dropped plans to revamp the Somis interchange. Caltrans will include its decision in the project's environmental impact report that will be issued by the end of November 2012. The county now wants to realign Donlon to make a four-way intersection at Route 118 and Somis Road. According to the county, Caltrans can make "easy, quick and cheap fixes" in conjunction with the county project, such as lengthening a left-turn lane from westbound Route 118 to Somis Road.

     

    Commuter Lanes

    Commuter lanes exist on Route 118 between the Ventura County line and Route 5. These lanes were opened in March 1997, require two or more occupants, and are in operation 24 hours a day.

     

    Naming

    Officially, the portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Ronald Reagan" freeway (as of 1994). The original proposal for this name was introduced by Willie Brown on August 30, 1994 and amended August 31, 1994, as Assembly Concurrent Resolution 156. However, this version of the bill died on the desk in November 1994. The name was reintroduced by Senators Lockyer, Maddy, and Wright as Senate Resolution 7, amended and enrolled December 5, 1994. Since it was neither a concurrent resolution nor a joint resolution, it was not filed with the Secretary of State. Ronald Reagan, for those who don't know, was the 40th President of the United States. He was Governor of the State of California between 1967 and 1975. The rationale for choosing Route 118 is that the western end of the Route 118 Freeway, at the time the bill was passed, is very close to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. [Thanks to Shirleigh Brannon and her team of researchers at the Caltrans Library for uncovering this information.]

    Until 1994, the official name for the portion in Los Angeles County was the "Simi Valley-San Fernando Valley" Freeway, and the portion in Ventura County was the "San Fernando Valley-Simi Valley" Freeway. This portion was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 145, Chapter 185, in 1970. The first segment opened in 1968. Simi is probably from a Chumash Indian designation for "place" or "village"; it was recorded with the present spelling as early as 1795. San Fernando refers to both the community and the mission. The mission was established in 1797 to honor Saint Ferdinand, King of Castile and Leon in the 13th century. The city was named in 1874.

    The interchange of I-5 and Route 118 in the City of Los Angeles is named the "David M. Gonzales Medal of Honor World War II Memorial Interchange". It is named in memory of David M. Gonzales, Private First Class (PFC), United States Army. Gonzales was born in 1923 in East Los Angeles and raised in Pacoima, California. David M. Gonzales joined the Army during World War II on March 31, 1944, at Fort MacArthur, and was deployed to the Philippines as an infantry replacement in December 1944. PFC Gonzales’ heroic service on the Villa Verde Trail in Luzon, Philippines, on April 25, 1945, earned him, posthumously, the Congressional Medal of Honor. On April 25, 1945, PFC Gonzales and his unit, Company A, 127th Infantry, 32nd Division, were pinned down by enemy fire when a 500-pound bomb exploded in the company’s perimeter, burying five men of Company A. Without hesitation, PFC Gonzales seized an entrenching tool, and, under a hail of fire, crawled 15 yards to his entombed comrades, while his commanding officer, who also rushed forward to help, was struck and instantly killed by machine gun fire. Undismayed, PFC Gonzales set to work swiftly with the entrenching tool, and continued to dig out the five trapped men, while enemy sniper fire and machine gun bullets struck him. After PFC Gonzales had successfully freed one of the men, he stood up to be able to dig faster, despite the fact that such a position exposed him to greater danger, and while he successfully freed another man, PFC Gonzales was mortally wounded by enemy fire as he finished liberating the third trapped man. In the words of President Harry Truman, “Private Gonzales’ valiant and intrepid conduct exemplified the highest tradition of the military service”. The other two buried soldiers were later saved when the intense enemy fire subsided. PFC Gonzales was killed on April 25, 1945, while serving our country and saving the lives of his comrades on the field of battle during World War II. PFC Gonzales was survived by his then 25-year-old widow, his one-year-old son, and his mother. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 72, Resolution Chapter 148, September 05, 2014.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.6] From Route 23 to DeSoto Avenue near Browns Canyon.


  2. From Route 210 near Sunland to Route 249 north of La Cañada.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    Unconstructed This segment remains as defined in 1963. Planned as freeway in 1965, but never constructed. Technically, this is signed along Route 210 from Paxton Street to Sunland. The traversable local routing was along Big Tujunga Canyon between Foothill and LA County Route N3 (which appears to what would have become Route 249). There are no plans for improvement.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This routing was LRN 266 (defined in 1959) in 1963. It was not signed as Route 118.

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route is one of the original signed routes dating back to 1934. It originally did not have the present segment 2. Instead, it continued from Devonshire Street across Brand and Maclay in the City of San Fernando to Foothill. Devonshire Street was named for the Devonshire area of Britain, after beginning life in 1917 as Santa Susana Pass Road. Brand was named after Leslie Brand, a street car magnate and developer who lived in the Glendale area and subdivided Mission Hills. Maclay was named after Charles Maclay, town builder and former state Senator, who was the founder of San Fernando.

It then continued down Foothill Blvd. Around the Devils Gate Reservoir, there was a small freeway segment (the pre-freway routing is unclear) [since bypassed], connecting it to Montana. It then ran along Montana to Lincoln Ave, then to Colorado St. in Pasadena, where it ended at US 66. It was LRN 9. Portions of Foothill Blvd have been known as Horsethief Trail, Michigan Avenue, Tujunga Valley Avenue and Mulholland Street. Before that freeway segment was built, it appars to have run (this is in the reverse direction): N up Lincoln Avenue to Montana, turned W to Arroyo Blvd, N to La Canada Verdugo Road, W over the dam, continued NW past Oak Grove Park on the R, skirted Flintridge Country Club on the E, joined Michigan Ave (now Foothill Blvd), continued W. The entire portion from the intersection of Cañada Ave and Montana to Foothill Blvd is now under I 210; the former Country Club is now the site of two high schools. As of the late 1950s, Route 11 (now Route 110) turned NW from Lincoln on Cañada Ave to Montana, then followed (according to the map) Montana two blocks to Arroyo. The present Cañada Ave. still joins Montana at approximately the same place, but I-210 is built over the continuation W to La Cañada Verdugo Road, now under the overpass at Arroyo Blvd.

A portion of this (from Foothill Blvd. near Gould Ave. east to near the intersection of Montana Ave. and Cañada Ave.) was constructed to freeway standards in 1957, but was bypassed and decommissioned as "freeway" in 1974, when I-210 was constructed over the Arroyo Seco.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 118 R2.66 R8.65
Los Angeles 118 R8.70 R12.39
Los Angeles 118 R12.43 R13.93
Ventura 118 R18.92 R20.35
Ventura 118 R24.16 R28.96
Ventura 118 R30.21 R30.70

 

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Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 118. This information reflects Route 118 before the Route 118/Route 23 flyover connector was constructed; hence, there might be a mile or two difference in the traversable miles:

  • Total Length (1995): 47 miles traversable; 7 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 10,500 to 187,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 19; Sm. Urban: 0; Urbanized: 35.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 46 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 43 mi; Minor Arterial: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Ventura, Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "[LRN 2] near Salinas to Coast Road near Castroville" as part of the highway system. In 1935, it was codified as LRN 118 with the definition:

[LRN 2] near Salinas to [LRN 56] near Castroville

This definition remained unchanged until 1963. It ran from US 101 near Salinas to Route 1 near Castroville, and is present-day Route 183.


State Shield

State Route 119



Routing

From Route 33 at Taft to Route 99 near Greenfield.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

The definition of this route is unchanged from 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield This was LRN 140 (defined in 1933), and was signed as part of US 399 starting in 1935.

Route 119 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 119 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Naming

This route is part of the "Bakersfield, Maricopa, and Ventura" Highway.

The portion of Route 119 between Route 184 and Enos Lane, in the County of Kern is officially designated the "Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway". It was named to recognize the strong commitment and courage demonstrated by veterans of the Vietnam War. It was spearheaded by The Veterans of the Vietnam War, Inc. and The Veterans Coalition, who welcome members from all branches of service, Navy, Marines, Army, Air Force or Coast Guard, from all eras, wars and conflicts. The Bakersfield Post of The Veterans of the Vietnam War, Inc. was established in 1993 and the first Commander was Barney Cadena and The Bakersfield Post of The Veterans of the Vietnam War, Inc. was named in his honor in April 2004. The members of The Bakersfield Post of The Veterans of the Vietnam War, Inc. have been involved in the Kern County Honor Guard for veteran's funerals and have attended over 750 funerals in 2005. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 68, Resolution Chapter 95, on 8/15/2006.

The interchange of Route 99 and Route 119 is named the "Deputy Daniel Lee Archuleta Memorial Interchange". Named in memory of Daniel Lee Archuleta, who was born in Huntington Beach, California. Daniel Lee Archuleta attended Golden West College, where he received an Associate of Arts degree on October 20, 1996, and subsequently attended California State University at Long Beach, where he received a bachelor's degree on May 28, 1999. Daniel Lee Archuleta attended, and graduated from, the academy of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department at East Los Angeles College on February 20, 2001, and began employment with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department in February of 2001. Archuleta was hired by the Kern County Sheriff's Department on October 5, 2002, and was assigned to the Support Services Bureau, the Training Division, and the Resource Pool, and also worked temporarily in the Court Services Division. Daniel Lee Archuleta transferred to the Law Enforcement Bureau, South Area Substation Division, Taft Court on November 2, 2002, and on May 27, 2003, he entered the Field Training Officer Program and was promoted to Deputy Sheriff II on October 4, 2003. Daniel Lee Archuleta was killed on September 12, 2004, when his patrol vehicle rolled over on Tupman Road, just north of the west Kern County town of Tupman, while he was traveling south on Tupman Road responding to an emergency call. A deputy from the Kern County Sheriff's Department driving north on Tupman Road found the battered patrol vehicle in the southbound lane of Tupman Road, and Daniel Lee Archuleta was found dead at the scene. California Highway Patrol investigative units from Bakersfield and Fresno were called to the scene but were unable to ascertain the cause of the accident. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 50, Resolution Chapter 86, on August 24, 2012.

 

Status

The state is planning a $70 million upgrade along seven miles of Route 119 E of Taft, as phase one of a $250 million, 30-year road-widening project.

In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a four-lane bypass near the city of Taft. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program for Project Development only. The total estimated cost is $67,716,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding construction can begin as early as Fiscal Year 2015- 16. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological and paleontological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to biological resources in the project area will be mitigated in accordance with the Biological Opinion rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Potential impacts to paleontological resources would be mitigated by implementing a paleontological resource plan. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

 


Overall statistics for Route 119:

  • Total Length (1995): 30 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 3,800 to 11,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 23; Sm. Urban: 2; Urbanized: 5.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 30 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 7 mi; Minor Arterial: 23 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kern.

 

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Naming

This route is currently named the "Taft Highway".

This route is also named the "Bakersfield, Maricopa and Ventura Highway". It was named by Resolution Chapter 610 in 1913.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route from "State Highway near Gilroy to [LRN 10] in Priest Valley" as part of the state highway system. In 1935, it was codified in the highway code as LRN 119 with that definition. In 1953, Chapter 1836 changed the definition to clarify the origin and relax the terminus, making it "[LRN 2] near Gilroy to [LRN 10]".

The route ran from US 101 near Gilroy to Route 198, and is present-day Route 25.


State Shield

State Route 120



Routing
  1. From Route 5 near Mossdale to the west boundary of Yosemite National Park via the vicinity of Manteca and Oakdale, and via Big Oak Flat and Buck Meadows.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition. There is a adopted but unconstructed 20 mile portion from Route 99 to Oakdale that is parallel to the existing traversable route.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Route 120 was LRN 66 between US 50 (LRN 5; approximately present-day I-5) near Mossdale to Oakdale. The portion between I-5 and Route 99 was defined in 1921; the remainder was defined in 1933. Historically, this segment was cosigned as US 50.

    The portion between US 99 and Yosemite was signed as Route 120 as part of the initial signage of routes in 1934 (Jct. US 99 at Manteca to Jct. Route 168 (later US 6) at Benton, via Groveland and through Yosemite National Park).

    Route 120 was cosigned with Route 108 between Oakdale and 6 mi SW of Jamestown. This was LRN 13, defined in 1909.

    Route 120 was cosigned with Route 108 (and was LRN 40) between SW of Jamestown and Moccasin. It was then Route 120 into Yosemite National Park. This portion was defined in 1899.

     

    Status

    As of 1995, the section from I-5 near Mossdale to the junction with Route 99 is a four-lane freeway.

    Near Groveland, there are some interesting markers that have similar physical characteristics to a postmile marker, but instead read "ESA Begin" and "ESA End". This mark Environmentally Sensitive Areas. The sign code is G11-10, and it is illustrated here. These markers are used to mark the limits of an environmentally sensitive area within the State highway right of way. In this case, these are likely lengths of the highway where runoff has the potential to end up in the Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct.

    In June 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Escalon, on McHenry Avenue, Escalon Bellota Road, and Yosemite Avenue, consisting of superseded highway and reconstructed and relocated city streets.

    In September 2012, the CTC vacated right of way in the city of Escalon along Route 120 at Plaza Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The City of Escalon was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate, without protesting such action.

    In May 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Manteca along Route 120 on Austin Road, consisting of a collateral facility.

    In November 2002, the CTC began exploration of construction of an expressway near Oakdale. In December 2002, the CTC considered a route adoption for a freeway location from 0.1 mi W of Valley Home Road to 2.8 mi E of Lancaster Road (10-STA-120 PM 3.0/R13.3).

    Route 120 Recission in OakdaleIn January 2012 (and again in April 2012), the CTC approved a notice of consideration to rescind a freeway adoption (the actual recission occured in May 2013). As background, in the early 2000s, a consensus was reached to construct a freeway on a new alignment along Route 120 to bypass the City of Oakdale, also known as the Oakdale Bypass/Expressway. On December 11, 2002, the Commission adopted the current Route 120 corridor. Numerous parcels, but not all, were purchased to obtain the necessary right of way for the adopted Route 120 Oakdale Bypass. Since that time, a lack of funding and changing traffic patterns have resulted in a community and Department agreement to drop the pursuit of the Oakdale Bypass in favor of an alternative route. Consequently, the Department is proposing to rescind the Route 120 freeway route adoption, from Valley Home Road to a point approximately 2.8 miles east of Lancaster Road in Stanislaus County. Route 120 and Route 108 are the main routes to the fast growing Tuolumne County, carrying a adediverse mixture of commercial, agricultural, recreational, commuter, truck and local traffic. Traffic on both Route 120 and Route 108 into and through Oakdale has been growing for several decades which led to a growing traffic congestion problem. The Department and the local community have been struggling to address it for many years. Congestion is most severe on weekends due to recreational traffic traveling to Yosemite National Park, the Jamestown and Sonora areas, and points east. The elevated interregional traffic demand often conflicts with local demand resulting in congestion, increased noise and air pollution. The area most severely affected is at the junction of Route 120 and Route 108 (Yosemite Avenue and F Street) in downtown Oakdale where the level of service in 2001 was classified as “F”, representing heavily congested traffic with long delays. The level of service was projected to continue to degrade to „very high delays‟ by the year 2020 in the absence of any system improvements.

    North County ConnectorIn 1990, a Value Engineering study for the Route 120 Oakdale Bypass project identified a need to further study the development of a Route 108 southern bypass as well as the need for the Route 120 Oakdale Bypass itself. The Department and local entities identified the preferred alternative for the Oakdale Bypass as a northern corridor expressway starting across the Stanislaus River near Twenty Six Mile Road and ending eight miles east of Oakdale. The Route 120 Oakdale Bypass was adopted by sthe Commission in 2002. During this same time period, changing traffic patterns in Stanislaus County were fostering a growing realization that a southern bypass of Riverbank and Oakdale (i.e. the NCC) was in critical need and should perhaps be given a higher priority than the northern Oakdale Bypass. As a result, StanCOG, the Cities of Modesto, Riverbank, and Oakdale, and the County of Stanislaus identified the NCC as a priority corridor. In 2007, following several years of project delay due to inadequate funding of the Oakdale Bypass, the Commission redirected the Oakdale Bypass project Interregional Transportation Improvement Program (ITIP) funds under the authority of the resolution approving the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Augmentation, with the understanding these funds would be restored to a viable replacement project in the future. In May 2008, the Commission deleted all programming from the Oakdale Bypass project under the authority of Resolution G-08-08 approving the 2008 STIP adoption and recognizing the NCC project as the viable replacement project. In May 2010, the Commission approved the Route Adoption of the NCC Route 108 East under authority of Resolution HRA 10-02 Commiand HRA 10-03.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1775: Construct full-access interchange at Route 120 and McKinley Avenue, with auxiliary lanes, Manteca. $3,200,000.

     

     

    Business Routes

    Although there is no mention of Business Route 120 through Manteca, all portions of Yosemite Avenue through Manteca that are not currently signed as Route 120 are actually old Route 120.

     

    Suffixed Routings

    The portion of this segment that was cosigned as US 50 was once part of I-5W.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route from the San Joaquin county line near Escalon to Yosemite National Park is named the "Northern Yosemite Highway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 69, in 1989.

    Historically, the portion of this route between Route 108 and the Yosemite Valley was named the "Big Oak Flat and Yosemite Road". The portion betwen Oakdale and Yosemite via Groveland was locally called the "Big Oak Flat Road.

    The portion of Route 120 from the Mariposa/Tuolumne County line to the Rim of the World Vista is named the "CDF Firefighter Eva Marie Schicke Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) Firefighter Eva Marie Schicke, who passed away in the line of duty on September 12, 2004, at the age of 23, while battling a fire in the Stanislaus National Forest. Schicke was born in Turlock, California, in 1980 and moved to Placerville with her family in 1988. She was a two-sport standout in basketball and volleyball at Ponderosa High School in Shingle Springs, California. In 1998, Schicke returned to Turlock, California, to attend California State University, Stanislaus (CSUS), where she received a degree in criminal justice in 2002. Schicke was an outstanding collegiate athlete. She played basketball at CSUS for four years, was a three-year starter for the CSUS Warriors, and was the second leading team scorer during her senior year. A highly versatile player, Schicke played forward, point, and off-guard positions. On the court, Schicke showed the toughness, drive, and physical prowess that made her a leader among her teammates and later contributed to her successful firefighting career. Schicke began her career with CDF in June 2000; her first assignment was at the CDF station in Arnold, California. Schicke proved to be an outstanding employee and quickly developed into a topnotch firefighter. Her sense of humor, determination, work ethic, and mental and physical toughness all contributed to her success with CDF. Schicke was held in high regard by all who worked with her and was proud to have earned the respect of her fellow firefighters. In recognition of her outstanding abilities as a firefighter, Schicke was selected to join the crew of Copter 404 in June of 2004. These highly coveted assignments are typically reserved for the most experienced firefighters who demonstrate outstanding job knowledge, work ethic, and physical conditioning. Schicke thrived on the challenges presented by fighting wildland fires and loved the camaraderie that she found in the station and airbase. On September 12, 2004, Schicke and the crew of Copter 404 were engaged in firefighting efforts on a fire near Groveland, California, when Schicke and six other firefighters were overrun by the fire. Schicke was completing her fifth season with CDF at the time of her death and was the first female firefighter from CDF to die in the line of duty. Schicke personified the professionalism, work ethic, and dedication for which CDF firefighters are known. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 156, Resolution Chapter 166, on 9/19/2008.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 32-018, at the Tuolumne River in Tuolumne county, is named the "Jacksonville Bridge". It was built in 1971, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 99, Chapter 124 the same year. The Jacksonville Bridge is named for the historic gold rush town of Jacksonville, founded by Col. Alden A.M. Jackson in 1849.

    The Tuolumne River Bridge on Route 120 in Tuolumne County is named the "James E. Roberts Memorial Bridge". It was named in memory of James E. "Jim" Roberts, in recognition of his exemplary career with the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) as a structural engineer for a half-century. James Roberts had a BS Civil Engineering, and began his engineering career with Caltrans in the summer of 1953, but was deployed six weeks later to active duty in Korea as a commissioned 2LT in the Army, where he was involved in the rebuilding of damaged bridges after the war ended. He remained in the Army Reserves until he retired as a colonel in 1985 after 33 years of active and reserve duty. He returned to Caltrans in the summer of 1955 to what was then the Bridge Department, Construction Branch, and began working on the US 101 Bypass in Cotati and eventually was moved to work on the "Grapevine" project in Bakersfield, where he began a four-year trek over the hill after work, to the University of Southern California (USC), returning home around midnight, to earn his MS Structural Engineering from USC in 1966. Jim Roberts worked his way up through the ranks at Caltrans, until in 1981 he was promoted to Deputy of Engineering, and then became the project director representing Caltrans in working with the City and County of Sacramento and the Sacramento Regional Transit District to build the light rail project. Roberts returned to Caltrans in 1985 as the manager of bridge design, and on July 1, 1987, became the Division Chief of the Division of Structures, equivalent to Assistant State Highway Engineer. Jim Roberts then became the Chief Bridge Engineer, and was instrumental in establishing seismic performance criteria following the Loma Prieta Earthquake of 1989. Jim Roberts recognized the need for a better training program for young engineers and established the Bridge Design Academy, and was instrumental in creating opportunities for women to promote into higher positions in engineering. He was active in over 17 professional organizations, including State President of the Professional Engineers in California Government in 1972; wrote over 50 papers and publications on bridges and other transportation issues; and was the recipient of over 20 professional awards during his career. He retired in 2001 from Caltrans, and died on July 6, 2006. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 4, Resolution Chapter 83, on 7/10/2007.

     

    National Trails

    Lincoln Highway Sign Victory Highway Sign This portion of this segment from I-5 to Route 99 (i.e., former US 50) was part of the coast-to-coast "Lincoln Highway" and the "Victory Highway".

    The portion of this segment from Route 108 to Yosemite National Park has historically been part of the "Mark Twain-Bret Harte Trail".

     

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    Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.6] From Route 49 near Chinese Camp to Route 49 near Moccasin.


  2. From the east boundary of Yosemite National Park to Route 395 near Mono Lake.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was signed as Route 120 in the initial signage of state routes in 1934 (Jct. US 99 at Manteca to Jct. Route 168 (later US 6) at Benton, via Groveland and through Yosemite National Park). It was LRN 40, defined in 1915. It includes Tioga Pass.

     

    Naming

    This route was officially designated the "Great Sierra Wagon Road" and "Tioga Road". It was named by Chapter 306 in 1915.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.6] Entire portion.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.6] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. From Route 395 near Mono Lake to Route 6 near Benton Station.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was signed as Route 120 in the initial signage of state routes in 1934 (Jct. US 99 at Manteca to Jct. Route 168 (later US 6) at Benton, via Groveland and through Yosemite National Park). It was an extension to LRN 40 defined in 1933.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this segment from Route 395 to the site of Mono Mills is named the "Mono Lake Basin Road". It was named by Resolution Chapter 704 in 1917. Mono is derived from the word "Monache," a division of the Shoshonean Indians.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Joaquin 120 R0.07 R4.09
San Joaquin 120 R4.54 R6.33

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.16] Between Route 5 and Route 395.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 120:

  • Total Length (1995): 153 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 500 TO 44,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 146; Sm. Urban: 7; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 153 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 95 mi; Minor Arterial: 58 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Tioga Pass (9945 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tuolumne, Mariposa, Mono.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the route "[LRN 2] near Soledad to Pinnacles National Monument and Pinnacles National Monument to Hollister-Priest Valley Road in Bear Valley" as part of the highway system. In 1935, this was codified in the highway code as LRN 120 with the definition:

  1. [LRN 2] near Soledad to Pinnacles National Monument
  2. Pinnacles National Monument to [LRN 119] in Bear Valley

This is the route from US 101 near Soledad to Pinnacles National Monument, and then to Route 25. It is present-day Route 146.



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