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California Highways

Routes 97 through 104

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

97 · 98 · 99 · 100 · 101 · 102 · 103 · 104


US Highway Shield

US Highway 97



Routing

From Route 5 in Weed to the Oregon state line near Dorris.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route was defined in 1963 as the route from "Route 5 at Weed to the Oregon state line near Calor."

In 1965, Chapter 1402 changed the origin to "Route 5 at Highway Avenue Interchange in Weed"

In 1984, Chapter 409 relaxed the routing to "Route 5 at Highway Avenue in Weed to the Oregon state line near Calor Dorris."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was signed as part of the original signage of US routes in October 1934. It was LRN 72 defined in 1931. Originally, this was proposed to start in Oregon. The rationale for the route (as noted in the April 1931 CHPW) was that geography dictated the routing for the Pacific Highway (US 99/I-5) through the north-central portion of California. To reach the Klamath Lake basin from LRN 3 (US 99, later I-5) near Weed required a salient easterly path through Oregon. The logical course for this path was a northeasterly diagonal departing from the Pacific Highway (US 99/I-5) after the latter passes north of the summit near Mount Shasta. This was an established course for both railroads and highways. The 1931 proposed routing was 44 miles shorter than a routing via the Shasta Canyon Highway over the Siskiyou Mountains. The proposed routing departed from LRN 3/US 99/I-5 near Weed, and took a direct course to the Orgon Highway near Calor. The route was felt to be an important interstate connection that would carry a large volume of state traffic.

 

Status

Caltrans is working on a project to realign Route 97 near Dorris. This project will bypass three 90° turns in the city, and provide a grade separation with the railroad. In February 2003, the CTC had on its agenda the route adoption of a freeway location for Route 97 near the City of Dorris, in Siskiyou County from 0.7 km south of Richardson Rd. to Sheepy Creek Rd. 02-Sis-97 KP 79.3/84.3 (PM 49.3/52.4). This is probably related to the realignment.

 

Named Structures

This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

  • Grass Lake, in Siskiyou County, 19.8 mi N of Weed.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; signed as US Highway. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

National Trails

Pacific Highway Sign California To Banff Highway Sign This was part of the Pacific Highway and the California-Banff "B" Route.

[Volcanic Byways]This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Resolution 64 in 1961.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.15] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for US 97:

  • Total Length (1995): 54 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 3,100 to 11,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 54; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 54 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 54 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Siskiyou.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route from "[LRN 4] near Stockton to [LRN 54] near Waite's Station" was added to the state highway system. In 1935, this was codified as LRN 97 in the code, with the same definition.

In 1959, Chapter 1062 added "a connection to [LRN 34] south of Ione".

This route ran from US 99 near Stockton to Route 16 near Waite's Station including a connection to Route 104 south of Ione. This was Route 88 between Stockton and Route 88 2 mi SE of Ione (present-day Route 88/Route 104 junction). It was also Route 104 from 2 mi SW of Ione to Route 16. This is present-day Route 124.


State Shield

State Route 98



Routing

From Route 8 near Coyote Wells to Route 8 via Calexico.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 98 was defined as the route from "Route 8 near Coyote Wells to Route 8 near Midway Wells via Calexico."

In 1972, Chapter 1216 relaxed the terminus to be "Route 8 via Calexico."

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 98 was signed along the route from Jct. US 80 (I-8) at Seeley to Jct. US 80 near Midway Wells, via Calexico. It was LRN 202, defined in 1933.

There were slight differences in the route in 1953. According to Chris Sampang, instead of taking the direct path from US 80 (now I-8) near Coyote Wells to Mt. Signal, Route 98 started at Seeley and went south to Mt. Signal (this segment is now San Diego County Route S29). The portion from Coyote Wells east to Mt. Signal seems to have been unpaved, and not a state highway at the time.

 

Status

In May 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Imperial County near Calexico that will widen Route 98 from Rockwood Avenue to Dogwood Road. The project will be constructed in multiple phases. Phase 1B will widen Route 98 from Ollie Avenue to V. V. Williams Avenue. This phase is programmed in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost for this phase is $12,323,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015-16. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program. Phase 1C1 will widen Route 98 from Rockwood Avenue to Route 111. This phase is fully funded with federal dollars. The estimated cost is $4,000,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. Phase 1C2 will widen Route 98 from Route 111 to Ollie Avenue. This phase is not yet funded. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $8,400,000. A Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery grant application has been submitted for this project phase. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. Phase 1A will widen Route 98 from V.V. Williams Avenue to the All American Canal. This phase is not yet funded. The total estimated cost for capital and support is $31,000,000. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2018-19. Phase 2 will widen Route 98 from the All American Canal to Dogwood Road. This phase is not currently funded. The total estimated cost is $19,000,000 for capital and support. This phase will be constructed only if private funding becomes available. The CTC also funded $1,804,000 for the Phase 1 widening.

TCRP Project #148 will widen this route from 8 miles from Route 111 to Route 7. There is also a regional transportation improvement project to widen the highway from one to two lanes in Calexico. In October 2000, environmental studies for the widening of the existing alignment, and consideration of alternative alignments, began. State Budget shortfalls, combined with increased growth and significant land use changes (with concurrant speculation that this growth could dramatically accelerate) occurred shortly thereafter. Additionally, at that time, the traffic models indicated only the widening of the existing alignment was warranted. However, regional advocates, including the County of Imperial and the City of Calexico, believed that future growth patterns and expected land use changes would require a new alignment. This resulted in delays in the environmental work until more refined future traffic projections, growth, and land use information became available. Since then, much of the previously speculated growth has occurred. Major land use developments have provided a foundation for revised traffic modeling and identification of interregional trips. As a result, the project has been reallocated, and the current scheduled completion date is the 2013/2014 fiscal year.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1039: Widen Route 98, including storm drain developments, from Kloke Road to Route 111, Calexico. $2,400,000.

  • High Priority Project #1040: Widen Route 98 from Route 111 to Route 7, Calexico. This is additional funding for TCRP Project #148. $4,000,000.

Route 98 in CalexicoIn June 2012, the CTC amended the 2012 STIP for the Route 98 Widening (West of Route 111) Phase 1 project (PPNO 0549A) in Imperial County to (a) Program $4,500,000 of Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Border Infrastructure Program (BIP) funds to Construction in Fiscal Year (FY) 2014-15; (b) Down scope the project limits; and, (c) Revise the funding plan. The Route 98 Widening project in Imperial County will widen the freeway from two to four lanes for approximately 2.6 miles. The project is currently funded for Right of Way Capital and Support only with $1,457,000 from STIP - Interregional Improvement Program funds and $2,400,000 from federal demonstration funds. The Environmental phase was completed under a separate project (PPNO 0549) in 2009. The design and construction phases are currently unfunded. The General Services Administration and Department of Homeland Security are partners working to reconfigure the Calexico Port of Entry which is located south of Route 98 on Cesar Chavez Boulevard at the border of Mexico. As a result, the City of Calexico (City) is developing a separate project in the vicinity of the Route 98 project. It is anticipated that the City’s project will negatively impact the Route 98 Widening project by diverting additional traffic onto Route 98 earlier than expected. This amendment proposes to down scope the unfunded Route 98 Widening project by segment of the project. This will mitigate the anticipated traffic congestion on Route 98 in a timely manner. The Department plans to request a construction allocation in advance of the programmed delivery year.

In August 2012, the CTC amended the scope for the Route 89 project as follows: In Calexico from just East of the All American Canal to Rockwood Avenue. VV Williams Avenue to Ollie Avenue.

 

Other WWW Links

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 


Overall statistics for Route 98:

  • Total Length (1995): 57 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 840 to 19,200
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 53; Sm. Urban 4; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 57 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 9 mi; Minor Arterial: 48 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Imperial.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 4] S of Sacramento to [LRN 3] near Ben Ali" to the state highway system. In 1935, it was added to the state highway code with this definition.

In 1957, Chapter 1911 related the definition to change the terminus to "[LRN 3] near N Sacramento".

This route ran from the junction of cosigned US 50/US 99 and US 99W in Sacramento to US 40 near N Sacramento. It was cosigned as US 50/US 99E. It is present-day Route 51 between the US 50/Route 99 junction and Route 160, and is signed as Business Route 80. Previously, the route ran from 16th Street to H Street, then over the American River. After crossing the bridge, the route became Fair Oaks Blvd. The route turned left at Howe, and then left on El Camino Ave to Auburn Blvd. According to Joel Windmiller, LRN 98 (and the H Street Bridge) were designated and constructed to provide an alternate route for US 40 and 99E when the southern section of Del Paso Boulevard was flooded by the American River. When the Natomas Viaduct on what is now the North Sacramento Freeway (Route 160) was built, bypassing that low-level portion of Del Paso, the flooding issues were reduced.

Portions of the route were signed as US 50 Bypass. Specifically, the segment that ran north on 65th Street to rejoin US 50/then-Route 16 at Folsom Boulevard.


State Shield

State Route 99



Routing
  1. From Route 5 south of Bakersfield to Route 50 in Sacramento.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this was segment (a) and ran from "Route 5 south of Bakersfield to Route 80 in Sacramento."

    In 1981, Chapter 292 changed "Route 80" to "Route 50", reflecting the renumbering of routes in Sacramento (i.e., I-80 moved to a new alignment that had been I-880; the old I-80 alignment became Route 51 and US 50 (FAI 305), but was signed Business Route 80).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This route was part of the original US highway plan in 1926, and was signed as US 99 from the signage of US highways in 1928 (the original route ran as far S as El Centro -- more information below). Currently, there is a movement to have this cosigned as historic Highway 99. Such signage is authorized by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 19, Chapter 73, approved in 1993. This resolution requests the Department of Transportation, upon application by an interested local agency or private group, to identify any section of former U.S. Highway 99 that is still a publicly maintained highway but is not designated as having formerly been U.S. Highway 99 and to designate that section as "historic U.S. Highway 99."

    The business routes off of Route 99 are portions of the original routing of US 99. This was LRN 4, defined in 1909 into Sacramento; it was cosigned with US 50 from Manteca (present day junction with Route 120) into Sacramento.

    Through Bakersfield, the route originally ran along present-day Union Avenue and Golden State Avenue. Portions of this are now present-day Route 204. In 1962, Route 99 was shifted westward to its current routing (at which point, it appears the old routing became part of LRN 141).

    Before the establishment of the Golden State Blvd. bypass of downtown Fresno, Route 99 took a routing of (from the south) Railroad Avenue, Church Street, E Street, Cherry Avenue, and Broadway into town, and then north to Railroad Avenue (now Motel Drive/Business Route 99) via H Street. Broadway is now cut off by Grizzly Stadium.

    In Traver, California, there appears to be an "Old State Route 99" between Avenue 360 and Avenue 368. This was bypassed, apparantly, because a diamond interchange for Merritt Drive (and freeway upgrade) could not be done right next to the Southern Pacific line. Thanks to Chris Sampang for this information.

    An June 2012 article in the Los Angeles Times provided an update on the "Mammoth Orange" stand that used to be a fixture on US 99 in Chowchilla. As of June 2012, the onetime attraction sat in the Chowchilla storage yard. There's still a key in its cash register and a soda fountain that might work. But spider webs drape the ice bin, bird droppings paint the floor and the orange dimple paint is peeling. However, the Chowchilla City Council was in the process of deciding between competing bids for ownership of the stand. The orange had originally been on a two-lane road in Chowchilla but was moved to the side of US 99 in 1954, a year before the first McDonald's opened. Its final owners were Doris and Jim Stiggins of Chowchilla, who bought the stand in 1981. A $40-million Caltrans project at Fairmead had widened the highway, closed the exit and put the Stigginses out of business in 2007. The orange, which was on the California Register of Historical Resources and a candidate for the National Register of Historic Places, was then moved into storage. In 2008, Chowchilla's redevelopment agency bought the 10-foot orange for $5,000, planning to restore it to mint condition and move it near the original site as part of a museum. That never happened, and as of 2012, two individuals were competing for the orange. One was an individual who wanted to restore the shell and set up an orange juice stand next to their antique windmill and cotton-hauling trailer planted with petunias. The other was the Chowchilla District Historical Society. The eventual winner was not in the article.
    (Los Angeles Times, 6/3/2012)

    Chris Sampang has also attempted to reconstruct the history of Route 99 in the Sacramento area:

    • 1926. US 99 established, following what appears to be Stockton Boulevard into town, Broadway to 16th Street, 16th north to L Street, and L/M Streets west out of town co-signed with US 40. In Davis, US 99 and US 40 entered via current Olive Drive, Richards Boulevard (going under the railroad tracks on the Richards Subway), First Street, B Street, and Russell Boulevard, splitting at the current Route 113/Russell Boulevard junction. From there, US 99 continued north up on Route 113 to Main Street in Woodland, then west on Main Street to County Road 98, and County Road 98 north to current County Road 99W near the town of Yolo. However, a different routing may have existed in Sacramento in 1926, where US 99 met up with US 50 near the current Folsom Boulevard/Business Route 80 (hidden Route 51) interchange and continued west into town on M Street.

    • 1933 (perhaps July 1932). US 99E and US 99W are established; this map shows the routings. US 99W north and US 40 westbound followed the older M Street routing out of town. US 99E began at the junction of L Street (US 40 west of 16th; US 50 east of 16th) and followed US 40 eastbound north on 16th Street to cross the American River (eventually continuing up (former) Route 256, current Route 65, Route 70, Route 20, and Route 99 to Red Bluff). Note: the Auburn Boulevard name was being applied to the northernmost portion of 12th Street (Auburn Boulevard now begins slightly north of North Sacramento), and Stockton Boulevard north of 5th Avenue (now Broadway), as well as Alhambra Boulevard and US 50 west into downtown via L Street may have been part of the routing of US 99 at the time.

    • 1934. State signed routes established; a portion of US 99W in Woodland (from East Street west to Road 98) is now co-signed with Route 16. Meanwhile, as work on the M Street Bridge's replacement begins, US 99W and US 40 are temporarily routed on the I Street Bridge with Route 16. It is unknown if Route 16 was co-signed with US 99 on L Street with US 50. Also in 1934, the first portion of the existing 16th Street Bridge was constructed across the American River; this is now the southbound bridge for the North Sacramento Freeway (originally US 40/99E, now Route 160). Additionally, Alternate US 99 is resigned over US 99W from Manteca to Stockton and US 99E from Sacramento to Red Bluff.

    • 1935. Tower Bridge (replacement for the older M Street Bridge) is built; US 99W and US 40 are diverted off of the I Street Bridge.

    • 1942. As seen here, by 1942, US 99 was most definitely not routed on Stockton Boulevard north of 5th Avenue (now Broadway), but rather followed 5th, Sacramento Boulevard (this portion is also now part of Broadway) and Broadway west to 16th Street. Also, Route 24 had been extended from Woodland to Sacramento (into Oakland) by this time; a portion of US 99 and US 50 (from 16th Street east to Freeport Boulevard) was co-signed with Route 24. The US 99E/W split now began at the junction of 16th Street and N Street, as L Street was removed from the state system in favor of M Street (which was now US 50/Route 16). US 99W and US 40 were likely co-signed with Route 16 down N, 9th, and M Streets west to the junction of 5th and M, where Route 16 was joined by Route 24 and continued up 5th and I to the I Street Bridge.

      Also in 1942, an older section of Del Paso Boulevard was bypassed due to flooding issues from the nearby American River and Natomas East Main Drainage Canal/Steelhead Creek (the road level is low because of two railroad bridges overhead at the junction of Del Paso and Railroad); this section runs from Northgate Boulevard north to about Globe Avenue (site of a Sac RT light rail station). The Natomas Viaduct was built; this includes part of the current Del Paso Boulevard Y interchange and some of the current freeway lanes of the North Sacramento Freeway.

    • Mid-1940s. US 40 bypass of Davis built; as a consequence, only US 99W now enters Davis on the Olive-Richards-First-B-Russell routing under the railroad tracks.

    • 1953. US 40A is established on the routing of Route 24 from Reno Junction to Woodland; however, unlike Route 24, US 40A is routed to bypass Sacramento by a co-signage on US 99W between Main Street in Woodland and Russell Boulevard in Davis (on what is now Route 113). Between Marysville and Yuba City, US 40A is co-signed with Route 20 and US 99E.

    • 1955: US 40A/US 99W bypass of downtown Davis built, bisecting lands owned by the University of California; the downtown Davis routing of US 99W is decomissioned, as well as the Pedrick Road/Road 98/Russell Boulevard portion of US 40A on what is now locally termed "Cactus Corner". Both US 40A and US 99W in the area are former segments of US 40. US 40A now begins within US 99W's route, at the junction of the US 40 and US 99W Davis bypasses. Also, US 99E was moved out of downtown Sacramento in favor of a routing through Midtown on 29th and 30th Streets, co-signed with US 50 from Broadway north to Folsom Boulevard, as a result of construction of the Elvas Freeway (now the Capitol City Freeway, hidden Route 51/signed Business Route 80) bridge over the American River. Thus, the North Sacramento Freeway from Arden Way southwest, as well as 12th/F and 16th Streets, were all no longer part of US 99E (and became solely US 40).

    • 1963. Major changes to several routes in downtown Sacramento, as a response to freeway construction and the adjustment of several streets to become one-way thoroughfares. First, US 50 no longer enters downtown Sacramento (also negating the need for Bypass US 50 on 14th Avenue and Power Inn Road. Instead of entering downtown via US 99W's routing on Broadway and 15th/16th, US 50 is now routed up 29th and 30th, before meeting up with Folsom Boulevard (Route 16) and continuing eastbound. Also, US 50 and US 99 no longer use Stockton Boulevard and the portion of Broadway east of 29th Street, instead being placed on the South Sacramento Freeway from Broadway south (US 50 remained signed on the South Sacramento Freeway until the early 1970s). US 99W retains its co-signage with Route 24 at Broadway and 16th, but runs by its lonesome on 15th and 16th and on most of Broadway. M Street had been renamed Capitol Avenue in the 1950s (although according to one local, Capitol Avenue had been a colloquial name for the whole street as early as the 1940s, and West Capitol Avenue had been present in West Sacramento on US 99W/US 40 before the name change in Sacramento.) US 99W and US 40 (as well as Route 16) no longer reached Capitol Avenue via 9th Street, but via 7th and 6th. Instead of just using 5th Street to reach I Street, Route 16 now used the couplet of 3rd and 5th, both converted to one-way. West Capitol Avenue was no longer part of US 99W/US 40, as the West Sacramento Freeway (an early signed portion of I-80) and decomissioned Route 275 now supplanted it. US 40 now ran by its lonesome across the American River (rather than with US 99E), 12th Street being added to this route as a one-way coupling.

      With the construction of the North Sacramento Freeway, former US 40/99E (Del Paso Boulevard, El Camino Avenue, and Auburn Boulevard) were reverted to local jurisdiction. For US 99E itself, it followed the constructed portion of the 29/30 Freeway and the Roseville Freeway across the American River through North Sacramento, and then followed the Roseville Freeway northeast with US 40 (and I-80). Route 24 no longer continued to Woodland and Marysville (via Route 16, US 40A, and Route 20), but rather continued north to Marysville more directly via Jiboom Street, Garden Highway, El Centro Road, and US 99E. Also, the Yolo Causeway underwent a complete tear-down and reconstruction to accomodate traffic for I-80.

    • Between 1963 and 1964. N Street, which had been a part of the US 40, Route 16, US 99W, and US 50 routings, becomes a one-way street, necessitating all signed highways headed east-west to now use the couplet of P and Q Streets.

    • 1964. The Great Renumbering. As a result, US 99E and 99W (plus US 40) are officially decomissioned, but not immediately de-signed (unlike US 40A). Route 24 is removed northeast of Antioch, with Route 160 replacing it into downtown Sacramento; US 99W between Broadway and P Street is replaced by Route 160 as well (plus former US 99E/then-current US 40 on the North Sacramento Freeway and on 12th/16th Streets). US 99W and US 40 west between Sacramento and Davis are removed officially in favor of Interstate 80; US 99W north of Davis (as well as US 40A) is replaced with Route 113 and I-5, with the co-signed portion in Woodland becoming solely Route 16. US 50 is officially dedesignated south of the under-construction Oak Park Interchange, though also not immediately de-signed. Route 70 is established as a replacement for Route 24 between Sacramento and Marysville and US 40A between Marysville and Reno Junction; with the elimination of US 99E and 99W, (State) Route 99 now follows the old Route 24 routing with Route 70 north out of town, then split off 10 miles north on a new routing to Tudor, meeting up with Route 113 (former US 40A); Route 99 now continues north to Yuba City via old US 40A, and then to Chico via old US 99E.

    • 1967. The Pioneer Bridge is completed for I-80 (now Business Route 80/US 50/I-305), and while US 99W is still signed on the portion of the West Sacramento Freeway from the Tower Bridge west, this is now officially hidden Route 275. US 99W and 99E are still signed (with US 99W signage continuing west to Davis and north to Woodland, then intermittently along the I-5 corridor to Red Bluff). Former US 99W/US 40 in West Sacramento (West Capitol Avenue) had been designated BR US 40 in the early sixties, as well as former US 99E/US 40 in North Sacramento via Del Paso Boulevard, El Camino Avenue, and Auburn Boulevard. Former US 99/50 on Broadway (to the now-defunct State Fair site) south via Stockton Boulevard to Florin is now Business US 50. As a result of US 99W's vestigal signage, Route 16 is co-signed with US 99W between P Street and Capitol Avenue; Route 160 may have been co-signed with US 99W between 16th Street and P Street, and probably with US 40 between there and current Business I-80. The 29/30 Freeway (now Business I-80/hidden Route 51) was co-signed for US 99E and I-80 (with a small portion co-signed with US 50 from Folsom Boulevard south to Broadway). Route 99 was routed on former Route 24 via Broadway and 3rd/5th to I Street (Route 16) as the WX and West Side (I-5) freeway reroutings of Route 99 through downtown were not completed. The Oak Park interchange was scheduled to be finished by 1968; Interstate 5 construction on the riverfront had not begun. As for (State) Route 99, it began co-signed with Route 70 at the Jiboom Street/I Street (Route 16) junction, which may explain the old Route 99/70/16 Marysville green sign still (2003) present, sans Route 16 shield, on Capitol Avenue (former US 99W/US 40) near 3rd Street.

    • Late 1960s. While (State) Route 99 is established south of Sacramento, US 50 continues its co-signage to Stockton.

    • 1969. Stockton Boulevard from P Street south is now designated as Business US 50 (this was the possible 1933 routing of US 99 and 50).

    • Early 1970s. Route 70 signage into downtown removed; a few straggler signs still remain at the junction of I and 4th Streets (2003).

    • 1980. I-5 construction either in progress or completed in Sacramento; as a result, Route 99 and Route 70 are now moved off of the Jiboom/Garden/El Centro routing south of the area near Sacramento International Airport, and co-signed on I-5 into downtown. Also, Route 99 is now no longer signed for "Los Angeles", but rather "Fresno", with I-5 now being labeled as the primary route for Los Angeles (it had been signed for South Sacramento for a few years). With the completion of the Oak Park Interchange (current junction of US 50, Business I-80, hidden I-305, hidden Route 51, and Route 99), Route 16 is de-designated from Old Town to Perkins (creating an implied multiplex with I-5 and I-80), and with the completion of the El Dorado Freeway, US 50 is removed from Folsom Boulevard and Capitol Avenue; around this time, US 50 is completely removed south/west of Sacramento, orphaning Business US 50. (Both Business US 40 routes are probably gone as well.) Route 99 no longer uses surface streets, but now follows I-80 west to I-5 north to the Route 70/99 split near the airport.

    • 1982. Due to the dedesignation of the downtown bypass as I-880 (and the commissioning of Business Route 80 due to the substandard former US 99E/40 29/30 and North Sacramento freeways), Route 99 is now co-signed with US 50 and Business Route 80 on the WX Freeway portion of former I-80 (and secretly co-routed with Interstate 305); no changes on the actual route occur however.

    • 1984. Route 16 is dedesignated between Woodland and Sacramento, taking the I Street Bridge (the temporary routing of US 40 and 99W in 1934) out of the state system. As a result, the implied co-routing of Route 16 with I-5 now extends to the entire portion of the signed Route 99/I-5 co-signage. Also, US 50/99 shields are finally removed from Stockton Boulevard.

    • Late 1980s. Route 65 freeway bypass of Roseville constructed. While the corridor through Roseville via Washington Boulevard was given to Route 256, it remained signed Route 65 into the early 1990s; this routing was US 99E from the 1930s to the mid 1960s.

    • 1994. Route 256, a former routing of Route 65 and US 99E in Roseville, was deleted. While the eventual freeway version of it (a west routing past town) was new alignment, the corridor followed Washington Boulevard, which was former Route 65 and 99E.

    • 1996. Business Route 80 offically named "Capitol City Freeway", in an attempt to reduce usage of colloquial names (WX Freeway, 29/30 Freeway). Except for the Pioneer Bridge, all of the Capitol City route has been a part of Route 99 at one time or another: West Sacramento Freeway (I-80 bypass (former I-880) east to then-Route 275): US 99W from 1954 to 1968, WX Freeway (Interstate 5 to Oak Park Interchange): 1968- present 29/30 Freeway, North Sacramento Freeway, and Roseville Freeway (Oak Park Interchange north to Roseville): US 99E from 1962 to 1967 Also, that year, Route 275, the portion of the West Sacramento Freeway between Jefferson Boulevard and the Tower Bridge (originally constructed in 1954 as US 40/99W) was decomissioned.

    • 2000. Route 99 is now no longer acknowledged on trailblazers from the 99/5 split near the Sacramento International Airport southeast to the Oak Park Interchange (as seen by personal experience and noted on Andy Field's site); but many interchange signs showing the co-routing are present (known examples are at the I Street and Richards Boulevard junctions off of I-5, I-5's junction with the WX Freeway, and the Oak Park Interchange - most strikingly the accurate "Route 99 TO I-5 I-80" gantry on the WX Freeway right before the Oak Park Interchange), and some of the Route 99 shields in those areas have recently been replaced with newer specimens. Also, Route 70's co-signage with Route 99 south to I-5 is taken down for good; this southern portion of the route was never official but was probably originally designated by CalTrans to directly replace the 1960-1964 portion of Route 24.

    Nathan Edgars looked at traffic counts, and came up with the following:

    • 1964: Route 16: I Street Bridge, down 3rd-5th and over Broadway to Route 160, then a break until the split from US 50

      Route 80: Tower Bridge, over Capitol/N to 29th-30th, then a break to Broadway at 29th-30th and up 29th-30th

      Route 99: from the south to Broadway, then west on Broadway, then a break to the east end of the I Street Bridge and up Jibboom Street

    • By 1966: Another piece of Route 99 added along P and Q Streets between Route 160 and Route 16. The changes to Route 80 are unclear.

    • By 1968: Route 80 moved to the new route, with the west part becoming Route 275

      Route 16 cut back to I-5 at the east end of the I Street Bridge

      Route 99 removed from P and Q Streets and instead routed back west on Broadway, replacing Route 16, but only to Route 275, where it broke until Jibboom Street

    • By 1970: Route 99 removed from Jibboom Street etc.

    Route 99 S of Sacramento (South Sacramento Freeway) has several cut-outs for bus stops. These were installed for Sacramento Transit's bus service in the 1960s; the bus-usage signs were removed in the early 1990s (and the current Sacramento transit system, Sacramento Reigonal Transit, only has one daily line on the South Sacramento Freeway).

    SignThere are still times when Caltrans still missigns the route as US 99. An example from October 2009 involves a sign replacement project on eastbound US 50 on the W/X Freeway portion, as illustrated to the right. As of December 2009, this sign has already been corrected.

    In Fresno, conversion of the highway to expressway and thence to freeway required moving of a historic church. The January/February 1948 issue of CHPW has a fascinating article on the moving of the church.

     

    Status

    I-5/Route 99 Split to Bakersfield

    In May 2014, the CTC vacated right of way in the city of Delano along Route 99 just north of Woollomes Avenue, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The City was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate and did not protest such action.

    In May 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Kern County that will correct the seismic deficiencies of four bridges on Route 99 and Route 178 in Kern County, including the Airport Drive Overcrossing (Bridge Number 50- 0266) and the Golden State Avenue Separation (Bridge Numbers 50-0326 Right, 50-0326 Left, and 50-0326 Center). The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $10,139,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17.

    [Hosking Interchange]In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a new interchange and public road connection at Hosking Avenue, just N of Taft Highway, on Route 99 in the city of Bakersfield. The project is funded with local developer funding. However, the project is being considered for both state and federal funding if they become available. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $27,329,000. Specifically, the City of Bakersfield, in cooperation with Caltrans is proposing to replace the existing Hosking Avenue overcrossing with a new interchange and create a new public road access to Route 99 at Hosking Avenue. The construction of a new interchange at Hosking Avenue will improve the operations of the adjacent interchanges and arterial roads by providing existing traffic a new point of direct access to Route 99. This new interchange will also support planned development and growth in the southwest area of Bakersfield. The current interchange at Hosking Avenue is an existing 2-lane overcrossing located approximately 6 miles south of downtown City of Bakersfield, providing no Route 99 access. Through the project area, Route 99 is a 6-lane freeway. Three miles north of Hosking Avenue, Route 99 widens to an 8-lane freeway through the City center. The adjacent interchanges, Panama Lane to the north and Route 119 (Taft Highway) to the south, are major east-west arterials through Bakersfield. The proposed project includes the construction of a spread diamond interchange with two-loop on-ramps to Route 99 and replacing the existing 2-lane Hosking Avenue overcrossing with a new 6- lane structure. Upgrading the existing Hosking Avenue overcrossing to a 6-lane facility will be consistent with planned local improvements and will match the City's 6-lane major arterial standard cross section. Other City and developer-initiated projects both east and west of the interchange will widen Hosking Avenue concurrently with this proposed project. The new Hosking Avenue interchange will provide better access to Route 99 for residential development in the southwest quadrant of the interchange, currently under construction, and for the proposed large commercial development in the northeast quadrant. The southeast quadrant of the interchange is vacant and zoned for residential. Construction of the Hosking Avenue interchange will lessen future traffic demand at the adjacent interchanges and local arterial intersections. The 2035 traffic forecast for the Hosking interchange build alternative indicates that improvements of levels of service at Route 99 mainline and adjacent interchanges will be modest. It is assumed that the capacity freed by the Hosking interchange will be backfilled with the increased traffic demands due to growth in the area. Furthermore, traffic operations at the neighboring arterial intersections are expected to significantly improve.

    TCRP 103TCRP Project #103 will improve the interchange at Seventh Standard Road, north of Bakersfield. The goal of TCRP Project #103 is to alleviate congestion and eliminate safety hazards associated with existing geometrics and an at-grade railroad crossing by providing operational improvements and constructing interchange modifications. The scope of work includes improvements to the existing interchange on Route 99, an additional bridge over Route 99, ramp modifications, widening to four lanes, realignment of the 7th Street Road, signalization of ramp intersections, as well as an adjacent grade separation over the Union Pacific Railroad. The project schedule was updated due to the temporary suspension of the project until additional funding was identified for right of way acquisition. With the Public Utilities Commission and the Union Pacific Railroad providing alternate funding for both Right of Way and Construction phases, right of way acquisition is now nearing completion and construction is underway. In August 2007, the CTC amended the project schedule to indicate completion in FY08/09.

    In November 2010, the CTC approved amending the STIP to program two new projects: Route 99 from Route 204 to Beardsley Canal project (PPNO 6267) and the Route 99 from Route 119 to Wilson Road project (PPNO 6268). The former will widen the freeway from 6 lanes to 8 lanes between Route 204 and Beardsley Canal; the latter will do the same between Route 119 and Wilson Road.

    In March 2011, the CTC received notice of a prospoal to amend the 2010 STIP to reduce the programming for KCOG’s Planning, Programming and Monitoring (PPNO 6L03), and revise the funding plans for the Route 99 from Route 204 to Beardsley Canal project (PPNO 6267) and the Route 99 from Route 119 to Wilson Road project (PPNO 6268).

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $88,179,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Bakersfield, between Beardsley Canal Bridge and Route 46, that will rehabilitate 62 lane miles of existing Portland Cement concrete pavement to improve safety and ride quality.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen Route 99 from six lanes to eight lanes from Route 204 to Beardsley Canal Bridge. The project proposes to add a 12-foot lane and a 10-foot inside shoulder in each direction, separated by a concrete median barrier within the existing median.The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program for Project Development only. Total estimated project cost is $13,260,000. Depending on the availability of funding construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to the San Joaquin kit fox, a federally listed endangered species, will be mitigated through a combination of measures including training sessions for construction crews, limited speeds for construction vehicles and daily inspection of potential areas of entrapment. As a result, an MND was completed for this project. In October 2012, the CTC approved $11,300,000 in funding for this project.

    In May 2013, the CTC approved deallocation of $1,072,000 in Proposition 1B Route 99 bond funds from the North Bakersfield Widening project (PPNO 6267) in Kern County, thereby reducing the original construction capital allocation of $9,600,000 to $8,528,000, to reflect contract award savings

    In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen Route 99 from six lanes to eight lanes in Bakersfield from Route 119 to Wilson Road. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program for Project Development only. The total estimated cost is $45,200,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to the San Joaquin kit fox, a federally listed endangered species, will be mitigated through a combination of measures including training sessions for construction crews, wildlife crossings, and other kit fox avoidance practices. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

    Bakersfield to Tulare

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $10,500,000 in SHOPP funding near the city of Tulare, from Avenue 152 to Elk Bayou Bridge, that will rehabilitate 10.4 lane miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality.

    In November 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of 6-Tul-99-PM 40.6: right of way in the County of Tulare, at Avenue 308, consisting of a cul-de-sac.

    In August 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Tulare adjacent to Route 99 on South “K” Street, consisting of a frontage road and adjacent appurtenant drainage facilities.

    In January 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Tulare County that will modify the existing interchange at Route 99 and Cartmill Avenue in the city of Tulare. The CTC also approved $7,000,000 for construction capital for the exchange modification.

    Tulare to Fresno

    In September 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to widen Route 99 from four to six lanes between Prosperity Avenue and north of the North Goshen Overhead, and construct roadway improvements on Route 99 in the city of Tulare. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program for Plans, Specifications and Estimate, and Right of way. The total estimated project cost is $114,800,000, capital and support. The begin construction date is unknown, pending funding availability.

    Another project included in the December 2011 TIP update is a project to widen Route 99 from six to eight lanes from Caldwell Avenue, west of Visalia, south to Avenue 264, near the former Tagus Ranch. Caltrans will commit $12.2 million to cover most of the construction and administrative costs. TCAG would provide matching funds totaling $8.3 million from state transportation funds allocated to the county. Construction would start in 2015.

    A project to construct a Tagus-Goshen 6-lane (Ave 264 to Goshen) was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account ($96,800K requested), but was not recommended for funding.

    TCRP Project #140 will add an overpass in the city of Goshen.

    There are plans for roadway improvements near Kingsberg. The CTC, in January 2007, considered a resolution to approve for future consideration of funding a project on Route 99 in Tulare and Fresno Counties that will construct roadway improvements near Kingsburg. This project is not fully funded. The project is fully funded for Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) in the Interregional Improvement Program for $2,202,000. Full funding for the project is being proposed from the State Route 99 Infrastructure Bond Program. The total estimated project cost is $172,600,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The Fresno Bee reported that work was scheduled to begin in October 2010 at the southern end of the county on a project to widen the highway to six lanes between Kingsburg and Goshen, a stretch that varies between four and five lanes at present. The Kingsburg-to-Goshen segment also involves adding new lanes in the median, except at the Kings River crossing, where the highway will be moved slightly west and the southbound bridge replaced. Project manager Phillip Sanchez said sections of pavement also will be replaced on the northbound side, most of which already is three lanes.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved $500K for mitigation landscaping between Goshen and Kingsburg, from the Goshen Overhead to Route 201. In April 2012, the CTC adjusted this project. The current project limits are from 0.2 mile north of the North Goshen Overhead in Tulare County to 0.2 mile north of Route 201 in Fresno County. There is no need to landscape the southernmost 7 miles of the Goshen to Kingsburg project, and it is not possible to provide sufficient landscape mitigation for the Goshen to Kingsburg 6-Lane project within the current project limits. Therefore, the project was amended to move the southern project limit 7 miles to the north and extend the northern project limit 1.4 miles to the north. The revised project limits will be from 0.3 mile south of Merritt Drive in Tulare County to 0.7 mile north of Bethel Avenue in Fresno County.

    In December 2011, the Tulare County Association of Governments (TCAG) updated its Regional Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). The TIP is submitted it to the California Department of Transportation and the California Transportation Commission by March 28 of each year in order for TIP's projects to be included in the state’s TIP funding. The update added a project to start in 2016 that would construct a loop freeway on-ramp to Route 99 at Betty Drive in Goshen. The on-ramp is intended to prevent traffic from backing up at the Betty Drive interchange by installing a loop that cars heading south on the freeway can drive into without stopping, eliminating the need for traffic to stop and turn left to access the on-ramp. Projects to widen Riggin Avenue in the area and to build an overpass above commercial railroad tracks at Betty Drive to reduce traffic congestion around the interchange are under way or complete. About $30 million in construction costs would be covered with money raised through Tulare County’s Measure R half-cent sales tax. Another $5 million in state funds would cover construction administration.

    In October 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the Betty Drive/Route 99 Interchange in Goshen. Betty Drive will become a through-road connecting to the realigned Riggin Avenue on the east side of the interchange and Avenue 308 on the west side.

    In January 2013, the CTC approved de-allocation of $1,273,000 in Proposition 1B State Route 99 (SR99) bond funds for the Tulare to Goshen 6-Lane North Segment project (PPNO 6400A) in Tulare County, thereby reducing the original Route 99 construction capital allocation of $40,000,000 to $38,727,000 to reflect contract award savings.

    In May 2013, the CTC approved deallocation of $500,000 in Proposition 1B Route 99 bond funds from the Sutter 99 Segment 2 project (PPNO 8361B) in Sutter County; $822,000 in Proposition 1B SR99 bond funds from the Goshen to Kingsburg 6-Lane project (PPNO 6480) in Tulare County; $529,000 in Proposition 1B SR99 bond funds from the Freeway Upgrade & Plainsburg Road I/C project (PPNO 5401) in Merced County; and $341,000 from the Arboleda Road Freeway project (PPNO 5414) in Merced County to reflect final expenditures. The Arboleda Road Freeway project will widen 5.9 miles of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Buchanan Hollow Road to Miles Creek Overflow, and construct an interchange at Arboleda Road. The construction contract was awarded on April 6, 2012, with construction completion scheduled for March 2016. The Mission Avenue Interchange/Freeway project (PPNO 0528D), which is immediately north of the Arboleda Road Freeway project, widened Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Owens Creek Bridge to 0.3 mile south of Childs Avenue, and constructed an interchange at Mission Avenue. Construction was completed in April 2008. However, the newly widened freeway was not striped as a 6-lane freeway because it is only two miles long and it connects to a 4-lane freeway on both ends. With the completion of the Arboleda Road Freeway project and the adjacent Freeway Upgrade & Plainsburg Road I/C project (PPNO 5401), Route 99 will be six lanes from the Madera/Merced County line to 0.3 mile south of Childs Avenue, a distance of over 12 miles. Therefore, in October 2013 it was proposed to increase the limits of the Arboleda Road Freeway project to include restriping of the Mission Avenue Interchange/Freeway project.

    TCRP Project #90 widened the freeway to six lanes from Kingsberg to Selma in Fresno County. Additional funding was up in July 2005. In December 2005, state transportation officials broke ground the $62-million 6-mile project. Field reports indicated it was completed by December 2008.

    Fresno to Merced

    New connection at VeteransIn December 2013, the CTC approved a new public road connection to Route 99 at Veterans Boulevard in Fresno. In 1984, the City of Fresno first introduced the potential need for Veterans Boulevard to serve the local community along Route 99. Veterans Boulevard was to serve as a north-south “super” arterial for the planned developed land uses in north Fresno. The interchange would provide additional north-south access from Route 99 to connect the local community within the project area. This idea was refined in 1986 with a feasibility study conducted to analyze potential interchange/grade separation configurations, with the intention of determining the alternative best suited to the site and the proposed Veterans Boulevard. In 1991, a Project Initiation Document was completed, and in 1996, the official plan line for Veterans Boulevard was adopted.

    TCRP Project #88 will improve the Shaw Interchange in northern Fresno.

    Route 99 Fresno ShiftIn April 2012, it was reported that construction of California's High Speed Rail project will require relocating a two-mile stretch of Route 99 in west-central Fresno. Between Ashlan and Clinton avenues, the six-lane freeway snuggles up against a Union Pacific Railroad yard on the east side, leaving no room to shoehorn the proposed high-speed rail line into its planned route. The rail authority's plans call for shoving the freeway westward by 100 feet or so -- onto property now occupied by a string of businesses. They include a pair of mini-storage companies, several motels, a mobile-home park, an RV dealership, a truck stop and an assisted-living facility. Three off-ramps on that stretch of the southbound highway -- Dakota, Shields and Princeton avenues -- also would be displaced.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 4/18/2012)

    In August 2012, it was reported that the work to shift Route 99 in Fresno would not start until at least 2014. This was the conclusion after the California High-Speed Rail Authority voted in August 2012 to approve an agreement with Caltrans for moving the 2.5-mile stretch of the highway between Ashlan and Clinton avenues. The agreement, worth up to $226 million, calls for Caltrans to work as a contractor for the rail authority. The state highway agency will be responsible for design and construction to nudge the highway over by about 100 feet to accommodate new high-speed train tracks between the highway and the adjacent Union Pacific Railroad freight tracks. The rail authority board authorized a budget of $225,900,000 for the work, which includes acquiring property from businesses located in the project's path. Caltrans will be responsible for designing the project, which will displace a string of businesses that sit along the west side of the highway. A frontage road and three off-ramps will also be affected.
    (Source: Fresno Bee, 8/3/2012)

    In October 2009, the CTC adjusted the baseline agreement related to a project that will widen approximately 6.6 miles of Route 99 from four to six lanes from Ashlan Avenue in the city of Fresno to 0.6 mile north of Avenue 7 in Madera County. The Department proposed to amend the Island Park 6-Lane project baseline agreement to split the scope into two projects, the North Fresno 6-Lane project (PPNO 6274A) and the Island Park 6-Lane project (PPNO 6274), and to reflect changes to the financial plan. The split will permit Caltrans to deliver the North Fresno 6-Lane project two years early, and deliver the Island Park 6-Lane project on the original schedule as specified in the project baseline agreement. The Department has determined that a project split will allow early delivery of the southern 3.9 miles of the project, starting at the existing 6-lane freeway at Ashlan Avenue and continuing through the regionally significant Grantland Avenue interchange. The updated schedule shows the first part completing in 2014, and the second part completing in 2018. In May 2010, Caltrans put out a request for bid a project that would widen the freeway and bridges from 4 to 6 lanes in Fresno from 0.2 mile North of the Ashlan Avenue overcrossing to 0.1 mile North of the Grantland Avenue undercrossing. It was reported that the project would start construction in August 2010. Also in the pipeline were the widening of Route 99 to six lanes from Herndon Avenue north to Avenue 7 in southern Madera County, expected to begin in April 2012, and the Veterans Boulevard interchange, to start construction in August 2014.

    In April 2012, the CTC approved broadening the scope of this project to increase the limits of the Island Park 6-Lane project to include landscaping of the North Fresno 6-Lane project. The revised project limits of the Island Park 6-Lane project will be from 0.2 mile north of Ashlan Avenue to 0.6 mile north of Avenue 7. The cost of the increased scope is included in a revised construction cost presented in April 2012.

    In August 2010, the CTC approved for foture consideration of funding a project that will widen Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Grantland Avenue to Avenue 7 near the city of Herndon (FRE PM 30.3 to MAD PM 1.6). The project is programmed in the State Route 99 Bond Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $66,050,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement.

    In February 2012, the CTC authorized funding a locally-administered STIP project on Route 99, in Madera County, 06N-Mad-99 10.7/11.2 Route 99/4th Street Interchange Improvements. In the city of Madera, on Fourth Street, from Sunset Avenue to Gateway Drive. $5,148,000 to widen Route 99 bridge to 6 lanes and widen ramps, widen Fourth Street to 4 lanes with median, and add traffic signals coordinated with interchange signals. The project will modify one bridge, install one new traffic signal, construct 0.6 new lane miles, and improve level of service from F to C.

    Avenue 12In December 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen Avenue 12 Interchange on Route 99 from two to four lanes, add an onramp to Route 99, and construct roadway improvements in the city of Madera. The project is programmed in the State Route 99 Bond Program and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. Total estimated project cost is $68,000,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

    In June 2012, the CTC amended the Route 99 Corridor Bond Program baseline agreement for the Avenue 12 Interchange project in Madera County to increase Right of Way Capital from $6,700,000 to $20,000,000, increase Right of Way Support from $500,000 to $2,000,000, increase Construction Support from $4,800,000 to $7,500,000, and revise the project limits. The project will reconstruct the Route 99/Avenue 12 Interchange in the city of Madera. The Right of Way Capital estimate has increased by $13,300,000, from $6,700,000 to $20,000,000. Detailed engineering has identified the need for full acquisition of three parcels that were originally anticipated to be partial acquisitions. The first parcel includes a gas station with mini mart, the second parcel includes a fast food restaurant, and the third parcel is a vacant commercial property. In order to provide sufficient vertical clearance over Route 99, the profile of Avenue 12 must be raised such that direct access to these businesses from Avenue 12 will be eliminated, thereby necessitating full acquisitions at an additional cost of $7,100,000. All 25 required parcels have current property appraisals, and nine parcels have been settled. The result of the appraisals and settlements to date is an increase of $3,700,000. In addition, potholing has revealed the need for additional utility relocations totaling $2,500,000. It is proposed to fund the Right of Way Capital cost increases from Madera County’s Regional Improvement Program (RIP) shares. The project limits were also revised: Specifically, the off-ramp merge and on-ramp diverge locations were revised during final design, which required a change in postmile limits. The beginning postmile has changed from R7.1 to R6.9, and the ending postmile has changed from R7.9 to R8.2. The revised project location is “from 0.6 mile south of Avenue 12 to 0.7 mile north of Avenue 12”. The project scope has not changed. In December 2012, the CTC approved allocating an additional $1,402,000 in Proposition 1B Route 99 Corridor Bond Program funds and amend the Route 99 Corridor Bond Program baseline agreement for the Avenue 12 Interchange project (PPNO 5346) in Madera County.

    I-<a href=5 Madera Interchanges" ALIGN="right" WIDTH="250" HEIGHT="235" BORDER="0" HSPACE="5">In October 2008, the CTC received notice of a negative environmental impact declaration for construction of two interchanges near Madera. The project proposes to reconstruct the existing Route 99/Route 145 and Route 99/Gateway Drive interchanges within the City of Madera. The purpose of the project is to relieve congestion at the Route 99/Route 145 Interchange, to provide better access from Ropute 99 to the Madera Community Hospital on Almond Avenue and to provide an additional two-way crossing of Route 99 in South Madera. The project is needed to provide sufficient capacity for the interchanges to improve existing level of service deficiencies and to meet Year 2025 traffic projections, as well as to improve traffic safety by reducing the accident potential. The proposed modifications will improve both the current and predicted levels of service for both interchanges. Two alternatives were considered in the Initial Study. One alternative, the no build alternative, did not meet the project purpose and need since concerns regarding traffic congestion at the Route 99/Route 145 Interchange as well as access to Madera Community Hospital on Almond Avenue from Route 99 would remain unresolved. The second alternative, the preferred alternative includes:

    • Route 99/Gateway Drive Interchange — widening the existing over crossing to accommodate two lanes of traffic, creating new on and off ramps, and extending Gateway Drive to connect to Almond Avenue.
    • SR-99/SR 145 Interchange — widening of the overpass from two to six lanes. These modifications will decrease traffic congestion by providing additional through lanes across the bridge, as well as dedicated turn lanes for entrance to northbound Route 99.

    The cost estimate for both interchanges totals $18,037,000. According to Caltrans, in May 2005, the project was split into two projects for programming and construction. The Route 99/Gateway Drive Interchange Project was completed in 2006. The project costs totaled $8,138,000. Funding was provided through Regional Improvement Program Funds ($4,700,000) and Local Measure A Funds ($3,438,000). The Route 99/Route 145 Interchange Project, estimated to cost $9,899,000 is scheduled for construction in FY 2008/09 and is fully funded with Regional Improvement Program Funds ($6,400,000), Local Measure A Funds ($1,099,000) and Federal High Priority Projects Program Funds ($2,400,000).

    In July 2011, the CTC approved funding for a project to repave four miles of Route 99 in both directions, from the South Madera Overcrossing to the Avenue 16 Overcrossing. Existing guardrails, signs, lights and drainage will also be upgraded as part of the project. Design work for the project is currently underway with construction set to begin in the fall. The entire project is expected to be complete by spring 2013.

    In June 2008, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Madera, on Almond Avenue easterly of South Gateway Drive, consisting of a reconstructed and relocated city street.

    I-<a href=5 Ellis St. Overcrossing" ALIGN="right" WIDTH="300" HEIGHT="270" BORDER="0" HSPACE="5" VSPACE="5">In May 2009, the CTC accepted the mitigated negative declaration for the Ellis Street Overcrossing Project. The project includes construction of an overcrossing on Route 99 between Avenue 17 and Cleveland Avenue in the City of Madera and a new roadway connecting Ellis Street on the east side of Route 99 with Avenue 16 on the west side of Route 99. The project will include a crossing over the freeway and railroad tracks to provide vehicular and pedestrian access to the residential and commercial areas east of the freeway and reduce the congestion at the Cleveland Avenue/Gateway Drive/County Club Drive intersection and at the Route 99/Cleveland Avenue Interchange. The project is estimated to cost $16,596,000 and is funded with STIP ($8,534,000), Proposition 1B Local Streets and Roads ($1,746,000) and Local ($6,316,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2009/10.

    There are plans to construct a freeway near Fairmead.

    In 2007, it appeared there was construction ongoing on Route 99 from Route 152 to Fairmead/Brenda, near Chowchillla.

    In February 2012, the CTC authorized $1,605,000 in SHOPP funding for work near Chowchilla, from Avenue 24 to Le Grand Avenue to construct two single thrie beam median barriers along 4.4 centerline miles to reduce cross median collisions and improve traffic safety

    In March 2006, the CTC approve for future consideration of funding a project in Merced County that will improve a 10.5 mile section of Route 99 from a four lane highway to a six lane expressway. The project is programmed in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The overall project is not fully funded. Project development and right of way, however, are fully funded in the Interregional Transportation Improvement Program and Traffic Congestion Relief Program for $35,787,000. The total estimated project cost is $270 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The project is proposed in the State Route 99 Bond Program. The project runs from the Chowchilla River to McHenry Road, and includes interchanges at Arboleda Dr. and Plainsberg Rd.

    In Spring 2012, Caltrans put out for bid a project to reconstruct the freeway, interchanges, and bridges near Chowchilla from the Chowchilla River bridge to Buchanan Hollow Road. This is replacement and repair of one of the last nice expressway sections on Route 99. There are also a couple of sections of single-slab concrete visible near Buchanan Hollow Road where the expressway bends away from the tracks.

    Merced to Modesto

    In July 2005, the CTC received a notice of EIR preparation for Route 99 in Madera County to realign and widen to six lane freeway near Merced (NOP). This project consists of two sections: the Plainsburg section and the Arboleda section. In the Plainsburg section there are four alternatives in addition to the No Build Alternative; in the Arboleda section there are two alternatives in addition to the No-Build Alternative. The four build alternatives currently under consideration for the Plainsburg Section (Alternatives 1A, 1B, 2, and 3) would provide the following features using different alignments:

    • Construct a six-lane freeway on an eight-lane right-of-way.
    • Construct a diamond interchange at Sandy Mush/Plainsburg Avenue.
    • Construct an eastern frontage road resulting in alterations to Plainsburg Avenue.
    • Convert the existing southbound lanes into the proposed western frontage roads.
    • Realign a section of Sandy Mush Road to tie in to the proposed interchange.
    • Realign a section of Plainsburg Road to tie in to the proposed interchange.

    The two build alternatives currently under consideration for the Arboleda Section (Alternatives 4 and 5) would provide the following:

    • Alternative 4 — Construct an interchange at Arboleda Drive.
    • Alternative 5 — Construct an interchange at Le Grande Drive.

    [TCRP 104-105]An Environmental Impact Report is in preparation for widening this route from 4 to 6 lanes, and to replace all existing bridges, in San Joaquin County [April 2002 CTC Agenda Item 2.2a.(1)]. This is likely TCRP Project #104, which will build 7 miles of new six-lane freeway from Buchanan Hollow Road to Healey Road in Merced Country. There is also TCRP Project #105, which will build 2 miles of new six-lane freeway from the Madera County line to Buchanan Hollow Road in Merced County. However, these projects had their TCRP funds deallocated in September 2005 due to inactivity. In April 2007, the CTC considered amendments to projects #104 and #105. These amendments would build seven miles of new six-lane freeway south of Merced, Buchanan Hollow Road to Healey Road in Merced County (#104) and build 4.5 miles of new six-lane freeway, Madera County line to Buchanan Hollow Road in Merced County (#105). Specifically, TCRP Project #104 will upgrade a four-lane expressway to a six-lane freeway with an interchange at Arboleda Road. The project will close at-grade median crossings and improve capacity on Route 99 and is programmed with $5,000,000 of TCRP funds for Plans, Specifications and Estimates (PS&E) and Right of Way (R/W) support and capital. Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) and Construction are programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program for $144,900,000. TCRP Project #105 will upgrade Route 99 from a four-lane expressway to a six-lane freeway. This project is also funded with $5,000,000 from the TCRP for PS&E and R/W support. The project schedule and funding changed due to environmental issues that delayed the project. This delay escalated construction costs and delayed project delivery. These projects are now estimated for completion in FY 2012/2013.

    In February 2012, it was reported that the Right of Way cost on TCRP Project #105 increased from $700,000 to $1,200,000. This project experienced an unexpectedly high level of condemnation-related activity. Of 11 parcels, ten required the initiation of condemnation activities. The parcel that did not require condemnation involved railroad negotiations, which took as much time to settle as the other parcels. Negotiation and condemnation activities were protracted and consumed more support effort than was planned. With the remaining parcels, it became necessary to obtain Resolutions of Necessity for all ten parcels. Condemnation suits were filed on five of the parcels. The appraisal staff encountered several parcels with unexpectedly complicated appraisal questions requiring unique solutions, and appraisal staff performed rework on several parcels as a result of required design changes. In addition, due to heavy workload demand in the Department’s Stockton office, the appraisals and acquisition work was performed by Fresno Right of Way staff, which resulted in unanticipated travel costs. On the other hand, the Right of Way capital cost has decreased from $6,477,000 to $5,977,000. In terms of schedule, the End Design milestone was delayed by ten months due to negotiations with the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) regarding a permit required by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. Several mitigation options and parcels were investigated before ACOE approved the permit. The End Right of Way milestone was delayed by eight months due to condemnation of several parcels as just described. As a result, the Begin Construction and End Construction milestones are being delayed by 17 months. Why 17? Ten months are a direct result of the End Design delay. The other seven months of delay are caused by the immediately adjacent and interrelated Arboleda Road Freeway project (PPNO 5414). The Arboleda Road Freeway project must begin eight months before the TCRP Project #105 project. The Arboleda Road Freeway project experienced several delays, which were described under Resolution R99-PA-1112-017 approved in December 2011 and resulted in an additional seven-month delay to this project. There were further delays inthe closeout, resulting in a new closeout date of August 2016.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved to construct the Arboleda Road Freeway near Merced, on Route 99 from Buchanan Hollow Road to Miles Creek overflow. Convert to 6-lane freeway and construct interchange at Arboleda Road. (TCRP #104).

    In December 2011, the CTC approved revision of the funding plan for the Arboleda Road Freeway project (PPNO 5414), which will widen 5.9 miles of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Buchanan Hollow Road to Miles Creek Overflow. The right of way support cost increased from $1,570,000 to $2,570,000, as the project experienced an unexpectedly high level of condemnation-related activity. Of 38 parcels, 27 required the initiation of condemnation activities. Negotiation and condemnation activities were protracted and consumed more support effort than was planned. The appraisal staff encountered several parcels with unexpectedly complicated appraisal questions requiring unique solutions. In addition, due to workload demand in the Department’s Stockton office, some of the appraisal and acquisition work was done by Fresno staff, which resulted in unanticipated travel costs. The right of way capital cost, on the other hand, decreased from $24,900,000 to $23,900,000, as the baseline agreement was based on a worst case estimate for potential right of way requirements. The final design of the preferred alternative resulted in a reduction of right of way requirements and lower costs. Of the 46 parcels that were originally anticipated, only 38 were acquired. Additionally, the schedule required revision. The End Design milestone was delayed by 17 months due to negotiations with the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) regarding a permit required by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. Several mitigation options and parcels were investigated before ACOE approved the permit. The End Right of Way milestone was delayed by 22 months due to condemnation of several parcels. In particular, one group of three parcels was highly contested by the owner and required 14 signatures. These parcels impacted the first stage of the project, so a workaround was not feasible. The design was re-evaluated to minimize impacts, and the parcels were re-appraised. These parcels alone account for more than a year of the delay. The Begin Construction and End Construction milestones are being delayed by 22 months as a direct result of the right of way delay described above. The Begin Closeout milestone is being delayed by 15 months because it is directly related to the End Construction milestone. The baseline schedule incorrectly showed closeout starting eight months after the End Construction milestone. Closeout will actually begin one month after the End Construction milestone, which explains why the delay is 15 months instead of 22 months. The End Closeout milestone is being delayed by 21 months, 15 months of which is a direct result of the Begin Closeout delay described above. The other six months of delay is caused by a mistake in the baseline schedule, which showed a duration of six months for closeout. Closeout requires a duration of 12 months. The updated schedule has the project completing construction in April 2015.

    In July 2005, the CTC considered funding to convert 4-lane expressway to 6-lane freeway and construct interchange at Mission Avenue in Merced from Owens Creek Bridge to south of Childs Avenue.

    In July 2009, the CTC approved adjusting the funding for a TCRP #106, which will construct a new four-lane, limited access expressway (Campus Parkway) on the east side of the City of Merced from Route 99 to Yosemite Avenue. The work has been divided into three segments: [Segment 1] Route 99 to Childs Avenue; [Segment 2] Childs Avenue to 0.25 mile north of Route 140; [Segment 3] From 0.25 mile north of Route 140 to Yosemite Avenue.

    In March 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Merced along Route 99 from Mission Avenue to Parsons Street, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    [TCRP 106]TCRP Project #106 will develop a new four-lane, limited access expressway from Mission Avenue to Yosemite Avenue on the east side of the city of Merced, to support the new University of California, Merced. In June 2006, the CTC considered TCRP Application Amendment to redistribute $4,486,000 from Construction to R/W for this project, as well as updating the project schedule and funding plan. The project is currently scheduled for completion in FY 2014.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $24,991,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in the city of Merced, at Merced Overhead and 15th Street Undercrossing, that will widen the 15th Street Undercrossing and replace East Merced Overhead to restore structure’s integrity.

    In April 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 from 0.1 miles south of McHenry Road (near Merced) to Mission Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 from the Atwater city limits to 0.3 mile northwesterly of Cressy Way, consisting of collateral facilities. It also authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Atwater along Route 99 on Olive Avenue from the westerly city limits to 0.05 mile easterly thereof, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In June 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Atwater along Route 99 on Olive Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In March 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of Merced between Sycamore Avenue and Early Dawn Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

    The CTC in July 2002 considered for future funding converting Route 99 from a four lane expressway to a six lane freeway near Atwater. [2.2c.(4)]. As of early 2007, construction was underway on this segment, between Atwater and Livingston.

    In March 2013, the CTC authorized $52,000,000 to widen Route 99 to 6-lane freeway, including demolition of Buhach Road interchange, and construct new interchange near Atwater, from 1.0 mile south of Buhach Road to 0.1 mile north of Buhach Road..

    In October 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 from 0.3 mile east of Arena Way to the Livingston city limits, consisting of reconstructed county roads and frontage roads. They also approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Livingston along Route 99 from the east Livingston city limits to 0.05 miles east of Hammett Avenue, consisting of a frontage road.

    In December 2012, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Merced along Route 99 at North Pacific Avenue (near Livingston), consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Ceres along Route 99 near the Whitmore Avenue Over-Crossing, consisting of collateral facilities.

    Modesto to Stockton

    In September 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of San Joaquin, at Olive Avenue (near Modesto) and Austin Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $72,611,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Modesto, from the San Joaquin County Line to the Merced County Line, that will rehabilitate 148 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality and prevent further deterioration of the road surface.

    In August 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that County will reconstruct the Route 99/Pelandale Avenue Interchange the city of Modesto. in the city of Modesto. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program for Right of Way only. The project is anticipated to be programmed with Route 99 bond program savings for Construction and Construction Support. The total estimated cost is $57,356,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will result in no significant impacts to the environment. Avoidance and minimization measures would reduce any potential effects on noise and paleontological resources. These measures include noise abatement along Route 99 south of Pelandale Avenue and the preparation of a paleontological Mitigation Plan.

    In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the interchange at Route 219 (Kiernan Avenue), including the overcrossing, on- and off-ramps, and certain roadway segments within the interchange limits. The project is not fully funded. The total estimated project cost is $46,548,000 for capital and support. The project is anticipated to be programmed with Route 99 bond program savings in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13.

    In January 2013, the CTC approved de-allocation of $3,699,000 in Proposition 1B State Route 99 (SR99) bond funds for the Kiernan Avenue Interchange project (PPNO 9463) in Stanislaus County, thereby reducing the original SR99 construction capital allocation of $37,100,000 to $33,401,000 to reflect contract award savings.

    The Arch Road interchange in San Joaquin County (groundbreaking: 6/17/02) will be the first SPUI in the central valley and the third in California. It was completed in 2005.

    [Stockton]In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Joaquin County will widen the highway from four to six lanes in each direction and construct roadway improvements between Arch Road and Route 4 in the city of Stockton. The project is programmed in the State Route 99 Bond Program and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. The total estimated cost is $250,500,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen a portion of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes in the cities of Manteca and Stockton, between S Austin Road (PM 4.9) and Arch Road (PM 15.0). The project is programmed in the Route 99 Bond Program and the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $250,000,000 for capital and support.

    It was also reported that the Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin project is programmed in the Route 99 Bond Program. The project consists of widening Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes from Route 120 west to 0.4 mile north of Arch Road, and reconstructing the French Camp Road and Lathrop Road interchanges. The baseline project limits would leave a short section of 4-lane highway, from Austin Road to Route 120 west, between two sections of 6-lane highway. It was proposed to extend the southern limit of the project by 0.4 mile to Austin Road to allow for a continuous 6-lane highway. The approved environmental document covers the proposed project limits. It was also noted that according to the baseline schedule, this project would begin construction within three months of the adjacent Route 99 (South Stockton) Widening project (PPNO 7668). This could limit the number of bidders available to perform the work, which could result in higher bids, and increase construction-related traffic impacts. It was proposed to split the Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin project into five projects, an environmental only project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin (Environmental Only), PPNO 7634), a widening project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin Phase 1, PPNO 7634A), a French Camp Road interchange project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin Phase 2, PPNO 7634B), a Lathrop Road interchange project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin Phase 3, PPNO 7634C), and a mitigation planting project (Route 99 Widening in Manteca and San Joaquin Mitigation Planting, PPNO 7634D). The environmental phase has already been completed. The combined cost of the five projects equals the baseline cost of the original project.

    In December 2011, it was reported that the state has released $50 million to start the first phase of a $250 million project to widen Route 99 between south Stockton and Manteca. The project will go out to bid in January, and construction could begin as early as spring 2012. The project will widen the freeway to six lanes by building new lanes in the existing median and adding soundwalls and auxiliary lanes. The 8.3-mile stretch of road heads south from Arch Road to Austin Road, south of the Route 120 interchange. Landscaping also is planned. The next two phases to build interchanges along the way will follow, possibly for completion in 2015. The $250 million for the project comes from San Joaquin County's half-cent Measure K sales tax, bond funds approved by state voters in 2006 and other state funds. A second $250 million project to widen Route 99 also is expected to begin construction in 2012. That project would build new interchanges and widen the freeway from four to six lanes between the Crosstown Freeway and Arch Road in south Stockton.

    In January 2013, it was reported that the CTC approved $10,485,000 for a Prop. 1B project that includes widening lanes from 4 to 6 lanes from just north of Arch Road to just south of Route 4.

    In February 2013, it was reported that construction was soon to start to widen Route 99 through south Stockton, a $214 million project intended to relieve traffic congestion and create a safer and more modern roadway. Construction work will bring temporary delays and detours until the project's expected completion date in 2015. Drivers will see some permanent changes taking shape, with the replacement or addition of interchanges in places and the removal of on- and off-ramps in others. Spanning from near the Crosstown Freeway south to Arch-Airport Road, it is part of another widening project under way that will widen Route 99 from four to six lanes through Manteca. The project replaces access points at the same level as the highway, instead using interchanges with more room to speed up to merge with traffic. Originally slated as a $250 million project, the south-Stockton widening came in from bidding at $214 million. It is paid for with $132 million from Proposition 1B, a transportation bond approved by voters statewide in 2006. It also receives $47.5 million from Measure K, the 1/2-cent sales tax approved by voters in San Joaquin County. Those changes required more space, which means Caltrans needed to acquire property. It amounts to all or part of 133 parcels of land. Most of these were already bought from the property owners.
    (Source: Recordnet.com, 2/21/13)

    It will be constructed in stages, starting with building a new interchange at Golden Gate Avenue. That will be ready for use before work crews close the interchange at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

    I-<a href=5 MLK Blvd interchange in Stockton" HSPACE="5" VSPACE="5">In May 2009, the CTC approved a public road connection to Route 99 at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, in the county of San Joaquin. The San Joaquin Council of Governments (SJCOG), in conjunction with the City of Stockton, San Joaquin County, and the Department, are proposing to construct a new interchange at Route 99 and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in San Joaquin County, near the junction with Route 4. Within the project limits, Route 99 is a four-lane freeway with four closely spaced interchanges. Traffic in the project area is highly congested during peak hours, with high demand from both regional and local traffic. These high traffic volumes, coupled with localized traffic weaving on Route 99, cause traffic to slow down to below acceptable levels. The proposed project is expected to improve the safety and operations of Route 99. In order for this project to proceed, Commission approval is required for the new public road connection to Route 99 at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. This two mile section of Route 99 is a four-lane divided freeway with 12-foot wide travel lanes, 8-foot wide outside shoulders, and 5-foot wide inside shoulders. The median width varies from 36 feet to 26 feet between Mariposa Road and the Crosstown Freeway, Route 4 west of Route 99. Route 4 is not continuous through this area. Ramp connectors from Route 99 to Route 4 east of Route 99 are provided at Farmington Road interchange. Proposed improvements will include freeway widening to six-lanes, reconstruction of structures to accommodate a future eight-lane facility, construction of auxiliary lanes in both directions from Mariposa Road interchange to the Crosstown Freeway, modification and reconstruction of the Mariposa Road interchange, removal of the Farmington Road interchange, removal of the Charter Way interchange, and construction of the new Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard interchange. Golden Gate Avenue will be realigned and renamed Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. In addition, approximately 0.2 miles of Route 4, east of Route 99, will be reconstructed to align with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard at the new interchange, hence providing route continuity between Route 99 and Route 4.

    In Spring 2012, Caltrans put out for bid reconstruction of the segment from 0.8 Mile south of the French Camp Road undercrossing to 0.3 mile north of the Arch Road Undercrossing. This is a complete rebuild of that segment, with the old freeway, in some parts, being many feet below the new roadway. This also eliminates a bridge with open concrete railing plus some older signage.

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Stockton along Route 99 on the 99 Frontage Road (Kingsley Road), north of Arch Road, consisting of a collateral facility.

    In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Stockton along Route 99 on Hammer Lane between Moreland Streets and Maranatha Drive, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In March 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 99 at Hammer Lane, consisting of collateral facilities inadvertently omitted from a previous relinquishment.

    North of Stockton to Sacramento

    2007 CMIA. A project on Route 99 in Stockton (widening and operational improvements) in San Joaquin ($50M) was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) for funding. It was not recommended for funding. Neither was the Central Galt Interchange. In May 2008, there was a Draft EIR in circulation regarding this that proposed four alternatives:

    1. Alternative 1 — No Build.

    2. Alternative 2 — This alternative would widen a 2.7 mile portion of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes and reconfigure the Mariposa Road interchange to a partial cloverleaf configuration.

    3. Alternative 3 — This alternative would widen a 2.7 mile portion of Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes and realign the existing Charter Way interchange. A new interchange would also be constructed south of Golden Gate Avenue on Route 99.

    4. Alternative 4 — This alternative would widen a 2.7 mile portion of State Route 99 from four lanes to six lanes and reconfigure the Mariposa Road and Farmington Road interchanges.

    In May 2011, the CTC approved relinqiushment of right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 99 from the Calaveras River Overcrossing near Stockton to 0.2 mile north thereof.

    In September 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 99 from 0.4 mile south of East Hammer Lane to 0.3 mile north of East Hammer Lane (near Stockton), consisting of collateral facilities.

    In June 2012, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 99 on Cherokee and Waterloo Roads (near Stockton), consisting of collateral facilities inadvertently omitted from a previous relinquishment.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $2,504,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Lodi, from 0.5 mile north of Harney Lane to East Pine Street, that will rehabilitate 4.5 lane miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality.

    [Central Galt Interchange]In August 2012, information was posted about improvements in Galt, together with a website on those improvements. The goal of the Central Galt Interchange project is to modify the existing interchange at Route 99. Currently, the traffic conditions are extremely congested during the morning and afternoon hours. Most of the congestion occurs at the C street/Fairway Drive/Route 99 southbound off-ramp intersection and Boessow Road/Route 99 northbound on and off-ramp. Some of the improvements that have been included in the design of the project are:

    • Enhancing safety by extending and expanding on and off-ramps .
    • Improving the operations and safety for drivers entering or exiting Route 99.
    • Improving local traffic circulation.
    • Providing safe pedestrian crossings and bicycle access through the interchange.

    As of July 2012, it was reported that the new C Street Overcrossing was almost complete with just a few finishing touches remaining before the bridge will be ready for traffic. Fairway Dr. and the new on-ramp to Southbound Route 99 have been paved but will remain closed to traffic to allow additional work to be completed in the area. A Street was being realigned between Lincoln Way and the A Street Overcrossing. On the other side of the freeway the Contractor was also working to reconstruct Boessow Road between the C Street Overcrossing and Crystal Way.

    In October 2012, it was reported that Caltrans and the city of Galt on Friday started construction on the Central Galt interchange on Route 99. The $41 million project includes extending and expanding the north and southbound onramps and exits to improve safety and traffic flow. The project also includes improved lighting, and a safer pedestrian crossing with bicycle access through the interchange. The project will be funded by state transportation bonds and Sacramento County transportation sales tax funds.

    [TCRP 135 - From City of Elk Grove Website]TCRP Project #135 will reconstruct and expand the Route 99/Sheldon Road interchange. These improvements will provide efficient accessibility to and from Route 99, as well as improvement to Sheldon Road to accommodate the current and projected traffic volumes for the City of Elk Grove. Planned improvements include construction of a two-lane southbound loop off-ramp and a diagonal southbound on-ramp within the southwest quadrant; construction of a two-lane northbound loop on-ramp with one mixed flow lane and one high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) bypass lane and a diagonal northbound off-ramp within the southeast quadrant; construction of a diagonal northbound on-ramp within the northeast quadrant; replacement of the existing bridge over Route 99 (which dates to 1957); addition of bike lanes, landscaped medians, and sidewalks on Sheldon Road; installation of on-ramp metering with high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) bypass lanes; and relocation and expansion of the existing Park & Ride lot. The project is anticipated to be completed by Fall 2009.

    In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will modify the existing Elk Grove Boulevard/Route 99 Interchange by adding a northbound on-ramp to Route 99 from East Stockton Boulevard through Caltrans right-of-way, eliminating left turns and the traffic signal on Elk Grove Boulevard at the existing northbound on-ramp, adding a traffic signal at the northbound ramp intersection on East Stockton Boulevard, and modifying the southbound on-ramp intersection.

    In March 2013, the CTC approved $5,000,000 to add northbound on-ramp, remove existing traffic signal, add second left turn lane to southbound on-ramp, and add northbound deceleration lane at the Elk Grove Blvd/Route 99 Interchange.

    In August 2008, officials from Elk Grove to Rancho Cordova, Folsom and El Dorado County will gather for a historic summit that will focus on the long-proposed connector/expressway linking I-5, Route 99 and US 50.

    General Route 99 (Southern Segment)

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed a complete corridor enhancement master plan. This included conversion of a number of expressway sections to freeway, and widening a number of freeway sections. This will bring the corridor to a full freeway standard, add capacity/lanes overall, improve and add interchanges, and make other improvements. The project is estimated to cost $8.8 million. The project is currently funded with Local ($8.8 million) funds. Due to local fund revenue shortfalls construction is estimated to start in fiscal year 2015/16. The project is a potential candidate for future bond savings. Construction will begin in fiscal year 2012/13 if bond savings are granted.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #287: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. See also HPP #3798. $2,800,000.

    • High Priority Project #716: Preparation of a Project Study Report for new Route 99 interchange between Route 165 and Bradbury Road, serving the Turlock/Hilmar region. Related to this is Transportation Improvement #18. $400,000.

    • High Priority Project #1257: Construction of the Central Galt and Route 99 Interchange and Access Improvements. $2,400,000.

    • High Priority Project #1780: Construction of Campus Parkway from Route 99 to Yosemite Ave., Merced County. This related to TCRP #106.$400,000.

    • High Priority Project #1830: Improve the Route 99/Route 145 interchange in the City of Madera, CA. $2,400,000.

    • High Priority Project #1990: Route 99 improvements at Sheldon Road. $3,200,000.

    • High Priority Project #2067: Complete the engineering design and acquire the right-of-way needed for the Arch-Sperry project in San Joaquin County. The Project will widen Arch-Sperry Road to six lanes west of Airport Way to Route 99 and construct an interim four lane elevated roadway including five bridges crossing three railroads, two roadways and French Camp Slough east to I-5. The project will include reconstruction of the French Camp/I-5 interchange.$4,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #3132: Improvements/Widenening of Route 99 from Goshen to Kingsburg in Tulare County, California. See also HPP #3800. $6,560,000.

    • High Priority Project #3798: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. This seems to be supplemental funding for HPP #287. $1,500,000.

    • High Priority Project #3800: Improvements/Widenening of Route 99 from Goshen to Kingsburg in Tulare County, California. This seems to be supplemental funding to HPP #3132. $8,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #3806: Construct eastern loop of Campus Parkway in Merced. $2,000,000.

    • Transportation Improvement #18: Hilmar/Turlock Route 99 interchange engineering and construction in Merced County. This is related to HPP #716.$1,000,000.

    • High Priority Corridor. Section 1304 adds Route 99 to the list of high priority corridors (#54): The California Farm-to-Market Corridor, California State Route 99 from south of Bakersfield to Sacramento, California.

    • Future Interstate Routing The following language authorizes Corridor #54 to become part of the Interstate System in the "future": (5) INCLUSION OF CERTAIN ROUTE SEGMENTS ON INTERSTATE SYSTEM- (A) IN GENERAL- The portions of the routes referred to in clauses (I), (ii), and (iii) of subsection (c)(5)(B), in subsection (c)(9), in subsections (c)(18) and (c)(20), subsection (c)(45), subsection (c)(54), and subsection (c)(57) that are not a part of the Interstate System are designated as future parts of the Interstate System.

    Route 99 as an Interstate Highway

    Shafter Assemblyman Dean Florez has proposed creating a Route 99 supercorridor, in four phases, between Grapevine and Fresno. Fresno Mayor Alan Autry is lobbying federal officials to upgrade Route 99 and make it part of the nearly 47,000-mile interstate system. Backer says that say Fresno is the largest U.S. city (440,000 residents) not tied to the interstate system, and the absence of a federal highway is one reason national and international firms refuse to locate there. Preservationists oppose the change on historical grounds, as the old stagecoach trail that is now Route 99 was the longest toll-free road in the world—it the road traveled by the immigrants from Oklahoma, described by Steinbeck, Saroyan, McWilliams and Chavez. Everyone agrees on upgrading of the condition of the highway. This has been captured in a Master Plan for the Route 99 Corridor, which among other things, proposes applying for the designation Interstate 9. There were lots of discussions about including this funding in the 2005 Transportation Bill. Converting Route 99 to an interstate would mean rebuilding it to the higher standards or winning a federal waiver. Caltrans estimates the cost of a conversion at $20 billion to $25 billion. In contrast, the agency says it would cost $6 billion to widen Highway 99 to six or more lanes if interstate standards aren't applied. The difference is due to bridge retrofitting and improvement. Route 99 might alternatively be designated a High Priority Corridor. This would allow Route 99 to compete with more than 40 other highways for $3.3 billion over six years.

    The Fresno Bee provided more specifics: The legislation in question states "Section 1105(e)(5)(A) of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Act of 1991 (105 Stat. 2032; 115 Stat. 872) is amended by striking 'and subsection (c)(45)' and inserting the following: 'subsection (c)(45), and subsection (c)(54).' " What this does is make Route 99 eligible for Interstate designation, but doesn't directly designate it as an interstate. This lets the federal Transportation Department and the California Department of Transportation negotiate a long-range plan for the upgrading of the highway to meet interstate standards. Interstates, for instance, must maintain medians of at least 36 feet in rural areas. Paved shoulders on the right must be at least 10 feet wide. Bridges must offer at least 16 feet of clearance. A crucial part of future negotiations would identify which interstate standards might be waived. Bridge heights originally designed to permit passage of missile-bearing military trucks, for instance, could be waived, while highway shoulder requirements might be retained. The legislation doesn't spell out such details; that will be up to state and federal negotiators. The language did make it into the final bill, which was signed in August 2005. Some folks are suggesting that this might be designated as I-7. The legislation also included widening Route 99 between Goshen and Kingsburg and building a parkway connecting the highway to the new University of California at Merced campus.

     

    Business Routes
    • Los Angeles, San Fernando: Before the highway renumbering in 1964, San Fernando Road was Business US 99 through the San Fernando Valley near Los Angeles.
    • Bakersfield: "Golden State Highway", Route 204.
    • Atwater
    • McFarland
    • Delano: High Street from Exit 54 to Exit 58 (at County Line Road)
    • Earlimart
    • Pixley
    • Tulare: J and K Street
    • Fresno: Golden State Avenue. This runs south all the way to Kingsburg, and about halfway thru that city. Also, both stretches of US 99 thru Selma, are still used as city streets. W. Front St. was the original US 99, and in the 30's moved over to Whitson Ave.
    • Highway City
    • Madera: N and S Gateway Blvd
    • Merced: 16th Street
    • Turlock: Golden State Blvd.
    • Modesto: 9th Street
    • Manteca: Moffet Blvd and Main Street. According to Jeremy Hannon, because of the widening of Route 99 from 4 to 6 lanes from the San Joaquin County Line (southern) to the Route 120 Interchange, the Mofett off-ramp (a left-hand off-ramp) was removed. Going Northbound, one would need to take the Austin Road Off-ramp, cross over Route 99 to make a right onto Mofett. At then end of Mofett, one then proceeds up Main Street to the right, following the old route. Southbound traffic can take the "Manteca" exit. Note, that this is not signed as "Business Route 99" as most segments are. There is no mention of Business Route 99 or Business Route 120 through Manteca.
    • Lodi: Cherokee Lane
    • Stockton: Charter Way to Wilson Way

     

    Naming

    Entire Route

    This segment is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993. Areas marked include San Fernando Road, Avenue 20, Main Street, and Valley Blvd in the City of Los Angeles, and San Fernando Blvd (I know one sign is just S of the Media Center Mall) in Burbank.

    Historically, the route was named the "Golden State Highway" between Sacramento and Bakersfield. This is because the route ran the length of the "Golden State".

    This segment is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

    Route 99/I-5 Split to Bakersfield

    The portion of this route from the I-5/Route 99 junction to Bakersfield is part of the historic "Ridge Route". More details on the Ridge Route can be found on the page for I-5.

    The portion of this route between the southern terminus of Route 99, three and one-half miles south of Mettler and the northern Kern County line in Delano at County Line Road (County Route J44) is named the "Kern County Korean War Veterans Memorial Highway". This is in honor of the 42 Kern County military personnel killed in action in Korea, the three who died while missing, the two who died while captured, and the six who died from wounds, and the approximately 8,120 Korean War veterans who presently live in Kern County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 46, Resolution Chapter 54, filed May 31, 2001.

    The interchange of Route 99 and Route 119 is named the "Deputy Daniel Lee Archuleta Memorial Interchange". Named in memory of Daniel Lee Archuleta, who was born in Huntington Beach, California. Daniel Lee Archuleta attended Golden West College, where he received an Associate of Arts degree on October 20, 1996, and subsequently attended California State University at Long Beach, where he received a bachelor's degree on May 28, 1999. Daniel Lee Archuleta attended, and graduated from, the academy of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department at East Los Angeles College on February 20, 2001, and began employment with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department in February of 2001. Archuleta was hired by the Kern County Sheriff's Department on October 5, 2002, and was assigned to the Support Services Bureau, the Training Division, and the Resource Pool, and also worked temporarily in the Court Services Division. Daniel Lee Archuleta transferred to the Law Enforcement Bureau, South Area Substation Division, Taft Court on November 2, 2002, and on May 27, 2003, he entered the Field Training Officer Program and was promoted to Deputy Sheriff II on October 4, 2003. Daniel Lee Archuleta was killed on September 12, 2004, when his patrol vehicle rolled over on Tupman Road, just north of the west Kern County town of Tupman, while he was traveling south on Tupman Road responding to an emergency call. A deputy from the Kern County Sheriff's Department driving north on Tupman Road found the battered patrol vehicle in the southbound lane of Tupman Road, and Daniel Lee Archuleta was found dead at the scene. California Highway Patrol investigative units from Bakersfield and Fresno were called to the scene but were unable to ascertain the cause of the accident. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 50, Resolution Chapter 86, on August 24, 2012.

    Bakersfield to Tulare

    The interchange between Route 99, Route 204, and Airport Drive in Bakersfield is named the "Richard Alan Maxwell Memorial Interchange". State Traffic Officer Richard Alan Maxwell began his career in law enforcement with his appointment to the California Highway Patrol on May 15, 1989, and was killed in the line of duty on July 11, 1994. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 60, Chapter 135, in 1994, and Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 119, Chapter 147, in 1994.

    The intersection of Route 99 and White Lane in Bakersfield is named the "Mark C. Salvaggio Interchange". It was named in honor of Mark C. Salvaggio, a native Californian who graduated from California State University, Bakersfield in 1972. After obtaining his teaching credential, Mark C. Salvaggio taught seventh and eighth grade students in the Arvin Union School District for more than 30 years, from 1972 until his retirement in 2004. He also was a distinguished member of the Bakersfield City Council, representing Ward 7 for nearly 20 years, from 1985 to 2004. During his tenure on the Bakersfield City Council, Mark C. Salvaggio served as Vice Mayor from December 2000 to December 2002, and as a council member was instrumental in numerous projects that benefitted the community, including the Kern River Parkway Plan, construction of the Northeast Bakersfield Water Treatment Plant, the extension of the Bakersfield Bike Path, the establishment of the Bakersfield Educational Studies Area, and the enhancement of the White Lane-Route 99 Interchange in Bakersfield. He has received numerous awards and commendations for his community service. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 53, Resolution Chapter 39, on 4/26/2006.

    The portion of Route 99 between McFarland to Tulare is named the "Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Memorial Highway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 54, Chapter 19, in 1992.

    Tulare to Fresno

    The portion of Route 99 between the City of Tulare and the City of Fresno is officially designated the "Pearl Harbor Survivors Memorial Highway". Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 13, Chapter 81, in 1993.

    The portion of Route 99 between Mountain View Crossing in southern Fresno County (near Kingsburg) to the San Joaquin River on the northern boundary (on the northern edge of Fresno) is named the "William "Bill" Lehn Memorial Highway". Named in honor of Fresno Police Officer William "Bill" Lehn, killed while in the line of duty on June 21, 1994, when his Fresno Police Department motorcycle collided with a car while he was attempting to make a traffic stop. Officer Lehn was born in Hanford and raised in Lemoore, graduating in 1974 from Lemoore High School. He began his career in law enforcement in 1979 when he joined the City of San Joaquin Police Department. In 1980, he was hired by the Kings County Sheriff's Department where he was a deputy until he was hired by the Fresno Police Department in 1986. He was a well liked officer who was remembered as a pleasure to know and to work with. He died at the age of 38. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 30, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 82.

    Fresno to Merced

    The Route 41/Route 99 interchange in downtown Fresno is named the "Rosa Parks Interchange". Rosa Parks (born February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama) is considered the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement". This fame started when she was arrested on December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Her arrest was the impetus for a boycott of Montgomery buses, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and joined by approximately 42,000 African Americans for 381 days. On November 13, 1956, the United States Supreme Court ruled that Montgomery's segregation law was unconstitutional, and on December 20, 1956, Montgomery officials were ordered to desegregate buses. Rosa Parks refusal to surrender her seat in compliance with Montgomery's segregation law inspired the civil rights movement, which has resulted in the breakdown of numerous legal barriers and the lessening of profound discrimination against African Americans in this country. Her courage and conviction laid the foundation for equal rights for all Americans and for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Rosa Parks was the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was an active volunteer for the Montgomery Voters League. She cofounded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 1987 with Elaine Easton Steele to motivate and direct youth to achieve their highest potential through the "Pathways to Freedom" program. She is the recipient of many awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian, and the first International Freedom Conductor Award from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 3, Chaptered 7/16/2003, Chapter 98.

    The portion of Route 99 from the San Joaquin River in northern Fresno to the Madera/Merced County line in Madera County is named the "Steven Lindblom Memorial Freeway". Named in honor of Madera County Sheriff's Deputy Steven Lindblom, who was killed by gunfire in 1975 when a deranged gunman ambushed him from a barricaded residence upon his response to a hostage situation. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 35, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 83.

    The portion of Route 99 between the Cities of Fresno and Madera is (also) officially named "The 100th Infantry Battalion Memorial Highway". At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, many Nisei served in the Federalized 298th and 299th Infantry of the Hawaii National Guard, inducted through three military drafts prior to Pearl Harbor. 1,432 Nisei soldiers transferred out of the 298th and 299th into the “Hawaiian Provisional Infantry Battalion” and sailed from Honolulu on the SS Maui on June 5, 1942. Upon arrival in Oakland, they were then activated into the “100th Infantry Battalion (Separate);” “separate” meaning not attached to any other military unit, literally a military orphan outfit. On September 2, 1943, the 100th landed in Oran, North Africa. On September 5th the 100th was assigned to the 133rd Regiment, 34th Division. On September 22, 1943, the 100th made an amphibious landing at the Salerno beachhead as part of the 34th “Red Bull” Division. Tough battles, especially at Cassino, marked the harsh, bitter route of the 100th from Salerno to Rome. For the Cassino battles alone, the 100th suffered 48 casualties, 144 wounded, and 75 hospitalized for trench foot. The 100th landed at Salerno with over 1,300 personnel, but after Cassino only 521 remained. The “Guinea Pig Battalion” had now become known as the “Purple Heart Battalion.” On March 10, April 2, and May 24, 1944, three waves of replacements from the 442nd arrived, replenishing the ranks of the 100th with 555 replacement troops. On June 26, 1944, the 100th, still retaining its name “100th Infantry Battalion” began fighting with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and fought together until the surrender of Germany on May 8, 1945.
    [Information excerpted from the Go For Broke Educational Foundation's page on the 100th Infantry Battalion]

    The portion of Route 99 between Athlone Road (S of Merced) and Worden Avenue in Merced County is officially named the "CHP Officer James J. Schumacher, Jr., Memorial Highway". CHP Officer James J. Schumacher was a graduate of Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento, and attended Golden West College. Her served in the United States Army, where he achieved the rank of Sergeant. After graduating from the CHP Academy, he was appointed to the California Highway Patrol on May 19, 1969. An admired and respected 12-year veteran of the California Highway Patrol, he served in the South Los Angeles, Westminster, and Merced areas. Officer Schumacher was killed while in the line of duty, early on the morning of June 13, 1981, on Route 99 approximately four miles south of Merced. He had just finished writing a speeding ticket and was standing approximately four feet off the highway while obtaining the ticketed driver's signature and warning the ticketed driver to be careful pulling out onto the highway, when he was struck by another car driven at a high rate of speed by a driver who had fallen asleep at the wheel. He died instantly from massive injuries to his head and body. The tragedy was made worse by the theft of Officer Schumacher's badge from the scene of the accident by a bystander--it being the tradition of the California Highway Patrol since its inception, to memorialize a fallen officer by presenting his or her badge to the officer's family. Officer Schumacher was only 33 years of age at the time of his death and was survived by his wife, Roberta, and their sons, James, then aged 9, and Andrew, then aged 7, his parents, three sisters, and two brothers, one of whom was a fellow officer in the California Highway Patrol. He died only five miles north from where California Highway Patrol Officer Al Johnson died, when he was struck by a drunk driver while writing out a ticket, in August of 1972. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 111, Chapter 32, April 22, 2002.

    Merced to Modesto

    The portion of Route 99 from E Mission Avenue to Campus Parkway in Merced is officially named the "CHP Officer Walter Frago and Roger Gore Memorial Freeway". On April 5, 1970, four California Highway Patrol Officers were murdered in one of the worst uniformed police officer killing incidents in American history when Officers George Aleyn, Walter Frago, James Pence Jr., and Roger Gore were gunned down just off of Interstate 5. Two of those officers, Walter Frago and Roger Gore were from Merced County, Officer Frago having grown up in Merced, while Roger Gore resided in Snelling. The officers were on the lookout for a suspect who had been reportedly seen brandishing a weapon. Officers Frago and Gore were the first on the scene, pulling over a vehicle with two men, when a gun fight ensued leaving both of these fine officers dead at the age of 23 years. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 180, Chapter 147, September 18, 2000.

    The portion of Route 99 between Childs Avenue and 16th Street in the City of Merced is named the "Officer Stephan Gene Gray Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Officer Stephan Gene Gray of the Merced Police Department, who was killed in the line of duty on April 15, 2004, while working in an undercover detail with the Special Operations Unit specializing in street level narcotics and gang violence suppression. Officer Gray was born on August 21, 1969, in Tulare; he attended local schools until his family relocated to Hanford, where he graduated from Hanford High School in 1987. Officer Gray attended Fresno City College for two years, and entered the Fresno Police Academy; upon completion, he was hired as an officer by the Merced Police Department. Highly decorated, Officer Gray was a gallant and dedicated officer who exemplified the true character of the brave men and women who devote their time and energy to the perilous duties of law enforcement. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 7, Resolution Chapter 56, on 05/25/2006.

    The northbound and southbound portion of Route 99 between the Franklin Road exits and the Winton Way and Applegate Road exit in Atwater is officially named the "Correctional Officer Jose Rivera Memorial Highway", This segment was named in memory of Federal Correctional Officer Jose Rivera was violently murdered on June 20, 2008 by two inmates while employed at the United States Penitentiary Atwater in Atwater. Officer Rivera died needlessly at a very young age. The third of five children, Officer Rivera grew up in Chowchilla and graduated from Le Grand High School in 2003. Shortly thereafter, Officer Rivera enlisted in the United States Navy. Officer Rivera served four years in the military, which included two tours in Iraq. After serving his country overseas, Officer Rivera returned to serve his country at home; and upon his return, Officer Rivera began working for the Federal Bureau of Prisons in Atwater. Officer Rivera's death is tragic and a reminder that the law enforcement officers who serve the public risk their lives on a daily basis. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 118, Resolution Chapter 129, on 9/7/2010.

    The portion of Route 99 constructed to freeway standards near the City of Livingston is colloquially called the "Livingston" Freeway. Officially, it is the "Kenneth L. Maddy" Freeway. Kenneth L. Maddy served as California Senate Republican leader (1987-1995) and was the legislative proponent of the Livingston Bypass on Route 99. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, in 1997.

    Bridge 39-196 over Shanks Road in Merced county is named the "Dallas C. Bache Interchange". Dallas C. Bache was a dedicated civic leader whose efforts helped to bring about the construction of the Delhi Freeway in the 1970's. It was built in 1979, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 104, Chapter 43, in 1978 (before construction was finished).

    The portion of Route 99 between the Stanislaus/Merced County line in the County of Stanislaus (near Turlock) and Mitchell Road (near Ceres) is named the "Joash E. Paul Memorial Highway". Named in honor of Joash E. Paul, a lifelong resident of the City of Turlock where he was a rancher, an entrepreneur, and a dedicated servant of the people of Stanislaus County. Born on September 23, 1919, Joash Paul was elected to the Stanislaus County Board of Supervisors in 1968 and served as a board member until 1980. He worked in real estate for 25 years, and until the mid-1970s helped operate a family-owned lodging and dining establishment along Route 99 when it passed through the City of Turlock. After retiring from the board of supervisors, he served as president of the fund-raising foundation for the then county-owned Scenic General Hospital in the City of Modesto. He was an active member of various community organizations in the City of Turlock, including the Assyrian American Civic Club, the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, and the Portuguese Union of the State of California. Joash E. Paul died in 2000. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 81.

    The interchange at Route 99 and Whitmore Avenue in the City of Ceres is named the "Sergeant Howard K. Stevenson Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Sergeant Howard K. "Howie" Stevenson, who was born on February 18, 1965. On June 3, 1986, at 21 years of age, Stevenson became a peace officer with the Ceres Police Department. On January 9, 2005, while responding to a call for assistance at a local liquor store, Sergeant Stevenson and fellow officers were ambushed and met with a hail of gunfire from an assault rifle. Sergeant Stevenson died almost instantly. Sergeant Stevenson was the first police officer in the 86-year history of the City of Ceres to be killed in the line of duty. Sergeant Stevenson is remembered affectionately by his fellow officers as being a role model and mentor to younger officers, and as being "a cops' cop". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 20, Resolution Chapter 77, on 7/17/2009.

    The portion of Route 99 from the Stanislaus county line (seemingly the southern end S of Turlock, although it wasn't explicit in the resolution) to Route 132 in Modesto is named the "John G. Veneman Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 171, Chapter 131, in 1984. John Veneman was born in 1925 in Corcoran, California. In 1944, he graduated from Arizona State College. After serving with the United States Naval Reserve (1944-1945), he attended the University of Texas. In 1959, he was elected to the Board of Supervisors of Stanislaus County, where he served until 1962. In 1962, he was elected to the California State Assembly, serving until 1969. He authored legislation to improve and complete the section of Route 99 from Modesto to Turlock, which bears his name. In 1969, he was appointed Under Secretary, Department of Health, Education and Welfare. In 1973, he left government for private industry. He died in 1982 in Sacramento, California.
    [Adapted from information at the Online Archives of California]

    Modesto to Stockton

    The portion of Route 99 between Standiford Avenue/Beckwith Road, and Tuolumne Boulevard in Modesto is named the "Jerry Medina Memorial Freeway". This section of highway was named to remind all of us of the need to keep safety a priority and a reminder to cherish every day and enjoy it to the fullest. It was named after Jerry Medina, an 18 year old killed on March 29, 2001 when a truck crossed the highway median and landed on Jerry's car near Maze Boulevard. Five other people were injured as a result of this accident. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 168, Chapter 140, on September 3, 2002.

    The portion of Route 99 between the Pelandale Avenue exit (on the northern end of Modesto) and the junction with Route 219 near Salida in Stanislaus County is offiically named the "CHP Officer Earl Scott Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Earl Scott, who was tragically shot and killed on February 17, 2006 while making a traffic stop on Route 99 in Stanislaus County. Officer Scott was 36 years old and had served with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) for five years. Officer Scott came from a long line of family members who devoted themselves to public service under the auspices of the CHP, including his father and two uncles who retired from the CHP as sergeants, and a cousin who currently serves as a sergeant with the CHP. Officer Scott is remembered as being the first to volunteer for such causes as shaving his head for "Shave the Brave," a fundraiser for cancer victims; and he also frequently took youth Law Enforcement Explorers on ride-alongs. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 120, Resolution Chapter 130, on 9/7/2010.

    The portion of Route 99 between the Cities of Salida and Manteca is officially named "The 442nd Regimental Combat Team Memorial Highway". The "100th Infantry" and "442nd Regimental" names are in honor of the Nisei Soldiers of World War II who served in units of the United States Armed Forces comprising the 100/442/MIS triad. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 62, Chapter 115 in 1994. The other part of the triad is on Route 23.

    Stockton to Sacramento

    The protion between Hammer Lane and Route 4 in Stockton is officially designated the "Women Veterans' Highway". Named in recognition of the sacrifices made by women in defense of our nation that began over 220 years ago with the American Revolution and continues today. Throughout our country's history, nearly two million women have attained the esteemed title of veteran because of their service to the United States. In 1999, women comprised 14 percent of all Americans in military uniform and accounted for 20 percent of all new recruits. Though women were not permitted to participate in the United States' armed forces in earlier years, historical records verify that over 60 women were either wounded or killed at various battles during the Civil War. In 1901, the United States' Army recognized women's enthusiasm to serve our country by establishing the first official entity for women named the Army Nurse Corps, without providing the benefit of military rank, equal pay, or benefits. Because of their courageous efforts and determined commitment to their country, women were finally granted attendance to the United States Military Academies in 1975 when Congress introduced and passed a law allowing for these highly regarded universities to become coeducational. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 43, Chapter 129, 9/12/2003.

    The portion of this route between Route 4 in Stockton and Route 50 in Sacramento is named the "Purple Hearts Veterans Highway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 54, Chapter 19, in 1992.

    The portion of Route 99, from East Victor Road to East Kettleman Lane in the County of San Joaquin near Lodi is named the "Donald Mark Lichliter Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Donald Mark Lichliter, who was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and resided there until he joined the United States Air Force at 18 years of age. The Air Force brought Donald to the Sacramento area, and from that time forward he called California home. Donald was a member of Chapter 263 of the American Legion Riders, and enjoyed golfing, motorcycling, hunting, and fishing. Donald was a devoted and hard-working public servant, who worked for Caltrans for over 27 years. Donald met his wife, Mandy, in 1987 and they were married in 1988. Each Tuesday, Donald and Mandy met with their church congregation where they worked to feed the homeless. On July 23, 2009, Donald was working as a Caltrans tree maintenance leadworker when he was struck by a truck as he worked next to his vehicle, and was killed in the line of duty.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    The portion between the Sacramento County line near Galt and Route 50 is named the "South Sacramento" Freeway. This was named after the unincorporated area of South Sacramento, which consists of parts of the incorporated city of Sacramento as well as the unincorporated enclave of Parkway, a place with a distinctive street grid where every route is a "parkway" of some sort.

     

    Named Structures

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Philip S. Raine (Tipton), in Tulare County 2.5 mi N of Tipton. It was named in 1982 in honor of Philip S. Raine, Chief of the Division of Highways in Sacramento until he was forced into an early retirement with subsequent death by cancer in 1981. CALTRANS and The Great Valley Center, with the support of the American Institute of Architects, California Council, and private organizations, are partnering in an open one-stage international competition to select a design, and thereby a design team, to update this stop as a self-sustainable and "off the grid" roadside GreenStop. In other words, the goal is to make this a "green" rest area that can serve as a model for current and future rest stops within the state system, with the ability to be customized so as to be regionally relevant for each location. Details on the competition may be found at http://www.greenstopdesign.com/.

    • C. H. Warlow (Kingsburg) in Tulare County at Dodge Avenue near the Kings River. Chester Warlow was a member of the California Highway Commission from Fresno. He was also a member of the Shaver Lake fishing club (there is a picture of him in the gallery at www.shaverlake.org/gallery.html). Mt. Warlow near Muir Pass was also named for him.

    • Enoch Christoffersen Memorial Rest Area, S of Turlock in Stanislaus County. Enoch Christoffersen served as Mayor of the City of Turlock from 1952 to 1958, and again from 1962 to 1978. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 41, Chapter 60, in 1993.

     

    National Trails

    Pacific Highway Sign The portion of this route from Fresno to Stockton was part of the "Pacific Highway (Valley Route Portion)".

    Lincoln Highway Sign Victory Highway Sign This portion of this segment from Route 120 to US 50 (i.e., former US 50) was part of the coast-to-coast "Lincoln Highway" and part of the "Victory Highway".

    National Park to Park Highway Sign Portions of this route were part of the "National Park to Park Highway".

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Kern 99 20.82 21.48
    Kern 99 21.48 24.80
    Kern 99 24.86 25.37
    Kern 99 25.42 25.92
    Kern 99 25.92 27.06
    Kern 99 49.20 49.48
    Kern 99 49.85 50.07
    Kern 99 55.07 56.61
    Kern 99 56.61 57.13
    Tulare 99 5.98 6.29
    Tulare 99 6.29 7.45
    Tulare 99 12.16 12.93
    Tulare 99 18.65 19.33
    Tulare 99 28.33 30.06
    Tulare 99 53.63 53.94
    Fresno 99 0.00 1.26
    Fresno 99 4.72 5.99
    Fresno 99 6.17 6.81
    Fresno 99 10.83 11.38
    Fresno 99 12.61 12.93
    Fresno 99 12.98 13.18
    Fresno 99 14.71 16.54
    Fresno 99 16.60 16.92
    Fresno 99 16.92 17.10
    Fresno 99 18.03 24.39
    Fresno 99 24.39 24.48
    Fresno 99 24.48 26.22
    Fresno 99 26.22 26.64
    Fresno 99 26.64 28.00
    Madera 99 9.98 11.64
    Madera 99 11.74 12.63
    Madera 99 12.85 13.14
    Madera 99 13.93 14.40
    Merced 99 11.14 12.98
    Merced 99 12.98 13.30
    Merced 99 13.71 16.00
    Merced 99 16.00 16.06
    Merced 99 22.30 23.05
    Merced 99 23.28 23.47
    Merced 99 23.59 24.10
    Merced 99 26.90 27.52
    Merced 99 28.84 30.57
    Merced 99 33.17 34.43
    Stanislaus 99 R2.83 R3.87
    Stanislaus 99 R7.86 8.69
    Stanislaus 99 R11.24 R11.90
    Stanislaus 99 R12.91 R14.92
    Stanislaus 99 R15.06 R16.47
    Stanislaus 99 R22.20 R22.90
    Stanislaus 99 R22.94 R23.06
    San Joaquin 99 0.66 1.16
    San Joaquin 99 2.07 2.55
    San Joaquin 99 4.59 4.84
    San Joaquin 99 4.84 5.00
    San Joaquin 99 6.20 6.40
    San Joaquin 99 6.54 6.80
    San Joaquin 99 6.80 7.32
    San Joaquin 99 7.42 7.96
    San Joaquin 99 8.76 8.96
    San Joaquin 99 14.36 14.74
    San Joaquin 99 17.90 20.09
    San Joaquin 99 22.76 23.07
    San Joaquin 99 28.34 28.63
    San Joaquin 99 28.82 31.64
    San Joaquin 99 33.40 33.74
    San Joaquin 99 36.55 36.84

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes currently exist between Mack Road and Martin Luther King Blvd. in Sacramento. These lines are in operation between 6 AM and 10 AM, and 3 PM and 7 PM, on weekdays, and require a minumum of two people.

    Caltrans plans to add lanes to the segments from 0.8mi S of Elk Grove Blvd to Mack Road (11.4 mi, planned opening October 1997), and from Martin Luther King Blvd to Route 51 (construction starts August 1999).


  2. From Route 5 in Sacramento to Route 36 near Red Bluff, passing near Catlett and Tudor.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was covered by (b) and (c) of the original definition: “(b) Route 5 in Sacramento to Route 20, passing near Catlett and Tudor. (c) Route 20 to Route 5 near Red Bluff.”

    The segment from Sacramento to the Route 70/Route 99 split was once cosigned as Route 70/Route 99, although it is legislatively Route 99. In 1969, this segment ran along Jibboom St., Garden Highway, El Centro Road.

    The Chico bypass was completed by 1967. Before the Chico Bypass was constructed, the route through Durham and Richvale followed Richvale Highway west to Richvale, Richvale South Highway north to Nelson, Midway from Nelson to Chico via Durham, Main Street and Broadway through Chico, and Esplande north from Chico to current Route 99 near Wilson Landing Road.

    In 1984, Chapter 409 combined (b) and (c), creating "(b) Route 5 in Sacramento to Route 5 near Red Bluff, passing near Catlett and Tudor."

    In 1988, Chapter 106 changed the terminus of this segment to "Route 36 near Red Bluff"

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    The present routing of Route 99 follows I-5 out of Sacramento along former Route 24, and then N cosigned with Route 70 to Marysville. This corresponds to portions of LRN 232 (defined in 1951), LRN 245 (defined in 1959), and LRN 87 (defined in 1933), and LRN 3 (defined in 1909). At one point this was signed US 40 Alternate between Route 113 north of Knight's Landing and Route 20 in the Yuba/Marysville area. According to Chris Sampang, the routing of US 99/US 40 between the Yolo Causeway and Route 113 was as follows:

    • County Road 32A (which still retains some of its original concrete) from the Frontage Road exit westbound to where it crosses the railroad tracks

    • Olive Drive (note that the connection between County Road 32A and Olive Drive was paved over by I-80 and may be approximated by the current bike trail)

    • Richards Boulevard, which was originally graded into Olive Drive; the Olive and Richards extensions were built circa 1960.

    • First Street westbound

    • B Street northbound

    • Russell Boulevard westbound at Central Park in Davis (home of a Lincoln Highway marker; Lincoln Highway markers have been appearing on portions of Old US 40 west of Davis and in Dixon on Route 113)

    At Route 113, US 99 (later US 99W) went north. Note that US 99W later was given this route solo (from Olive Drive west) in the early 1950s, after US 40 was placed on the bypass that is now I-80 and right when US 40A was first commissioned (but before the north-south connector from Russell to I-80 was constructed that would later become Route 113). Also note that the Yolo Causeway originally was a twin-bridge four lane structure up until the 1960s; the original Causeway (1910s-1920s vintage) was located between the current railroad and freeway structures and was dismantled to make way for the I-80 bridge. US 99 (and US 99W) were routed this indirect way to Woodland via Davis, rather than the direct route of former Route 16/Route 24 to Woodland, due to the issues of flooding and closure.
    [Based on information provided by Chris Sampang]

    Parts of the original US 99 12 foot wide original concrete slab (OCS) still exist in Siskyou County, and can be driven on:
    [Based on a posting by donutbandit on M.T.R]

    • Off Crag View Drive going north, just south of Dunsmuir, the original US 99 slab enters Dwight's Wrecking and Towing.

    • In Dunsmuir, driving north on Dunsmuir Avenue, go straight into Florence Loop, and you are on Old US 99 for 2 blocks. The bridge that once linked Florence Loop with present day Siskiyou Avenue is long gone.

    • In Mt. Shasta, at N. Mt. Shasta Blvd. and Ski Village Drive: The OCS is visible in front of the Humane Society compound. Go right on Ski Village, and you can see the OCS winding away between some houses into a field.

    • Off Spring Hill Road north of Mt. Shasta: the road ends under an arch leading into a private driveway. The original concrete slab is the driveway.

    • Truck Village Drive between Weed and Mt. Shasta: go north and watch the road turn into OCS just before it is gated.

    • Black Butte Drive in Weed: go south, and the road quickly turns into 12 foot wide asphalt, with gaping potholes revealing the OCS beneath. Additionally, a short spur of the OCS exists at the northern end.

    • One can easily short sight the route across the current I-5 freeway into S. Weed Blvd. on the other side of the freeway, which was part of the original US 99.

    • Edgewood Road (formerly Trailer Lane) north of Weed: asphalt covered US 99 intact for several miles. At one point, you can easily see across the freeway to the southern terminus of Old US 99 Road (emptying out onto the freeway), which would have been the original route.

    The bypass route used the modern Dunsmuir Avenue bridge over the Sacramento River in Dunsmuir, then followed current Dunsmuir Avenue/Mott Road to the northern terminus which is a dead end at the old Diamond Lumber building. It likely followed the existing freeway route from there up to S. Mt. Shasta Blvd.

    In the Lake Shasta area, I-5 replaced the former Route 99 routing, which was submerged when the lake was filled. Relics of this routing reappears when the lake water level drops, as noted in this story: "A bridge from Highway 99, the precursor to Interstate 5, was being used last week as a makeshift low-water boat ramp at Antlers Resort & Marina near Lakeshore Drive in Lakehead."

     

    Status

    Overall Northern Segment

    The portion from Route 5 to 5 miles north of I-5 is cosigned with Route 70. Some old routings have been relinquished, for example, KP 20.5/29.1 in Sutter County, and RM 28.2-R32.7 in the County of Merced. A proposed route adoption was also relinquished: From PM 36.0/42.2 in Sutter County and from PM 0.0/13.1 in Butte County.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed a comprehensive Route 70/Route 99 project. The project (stretching from the I-5/Route 99 junction to Route 149 in Butte County) converts two-lane conventional corridors to four-and-five-lane expressways, completes key segments to freeway by constructing interchanges, and provides additional capacity and throughput for current and projected future populations. It connects the Sacramento, Yuba-City and Chico urbanized area with an improved facility, saves lives by removing two lane segments, and supports improved freight movement.

    Sacramento to Yuba City

    [Riego]There are plans to construct a new interchange to connect Riego Road to Route 99 at the Sacramento/Sutter County line. The project is programmed in the Route 99 Corridor bond program and will be combined with local funds. The estimated cost of the project is $30,840,000 and is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

    In April 2012, it was reported that work should begin by Fall 2012 for improvements at Riego Road and Route 99, after the California Transportation Commission approved a $21.1 million allocation for the project in March 2012. The work should take about two years and when it is done will result in an interchange similar to that at Elkhorn Boulevard and Route 99 at Sacramento's northern edge. The completed project will have off- and on-ramps for traffic going either direction on Riego Road and 99 as well as an overcrossing for through traffic on Riego. Funding for the project comes from Proposition 1B, a $4.5 billion transportation bond approved by voters in 2006. The project did have some delays due to coordination with the United States Army Corps of Engineers in obtaining the required environmental permits. During this process, there were difficult and lengthy discussions and negotiations relating to the required project mitigation proposals that were initially deemed costly and unattainable by the Department. These negotiations continued until a workable resolution was reached. These delays not only led to delays in Design and Right of Way (R/W) acquisition, it also affected the construction milestone dates.

    In October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct an interchange at Route 99/Elverta Road in northern Sacramento to replace the existing signalized “at grade” intersection. On July 14, 2009, the County Board of Supervisors certified the MND finding that the project will not have a significant effect on the environment. The project is estimated to cost $30,200,000. The project is programmed for funding with Route 99 Bond ($19,110,000) and Local ($ 11,090,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2010/11. In November 2010, the CTC approved amending the project to (1) Revise the scope for the bridge structure to accommodate ten lanes versus eight lanes. (2) Revise scope to add 15 feet to the structure width to accommodate sidewalks and bike lanes on each side. (3) Revise the funding plan to reflect additional scope, funded from the Route 99 Corridor Bond program. In April 2012, it was reported that work on this project would begin in Summer 2012. Closeout is anticipated for July 2014.

    [Feather River Project]In June 2008, the CTC approved reallocating some funding related to the Feather River Bridge reconstruction, near Nicolaus. The Sutter 99 Segment 2, Feather River Bridge Project PPNO (8361B) is part of the Route 99 Bond Program. The project proposes to widen Route 99 in Sutter County from two to four lanes with a continuous left turn lane from just south of Nicholaus Road to Sacramento Avenue. The project mainly consists of a new 3,045 foot two-lane bridge east of the existing Feather River Bridge (#18-26). The project also realigns the ramps to Nicholaus Road. The existing two-lane Feather River Bridge will remain in service. As the design work started, and detailed design information became available, the design and construction strategies considered during the environmental phase were reevaluated. Foundation drilling revealed different foundation conditions than what was originally considered. Preliminary consultations with the regulatory agencies for permitting began with the updated information. It was determined that environmental permit requirements had become more stringent and the agencies were requiring a reduced impact on the river. In addition, a more restrictive construction window for work being done in the channel is required. These factors led to a change in design and construction strategy. To address these new requirements and information, the current design reduces the number of bridge spans and foundations in the water, in order to minimize impacts to the main river channel. The longer spans require longer and larger diameter piles and an increased super structure and deck thickness, which in turn increases structure costs. Other options available will not render any financial savings; in fact, they could potentially be more costly in time and money. The proposed construction method minimizes the work area in the channel and reduces the noise levels from pile driving.

    In May 2012, KCRA reported that Caltrans will no longer use Nehemiah Construction, Inc., to widen Route 99 over the Feather River. The Gold River-based construction company was terminated from the Sutter County project because of nonperformance. Specifically, Caltrans indicated that Nehemiah Construction couldn't provide an adequate work force, and didn't have enough employees to complete the job. The change could extend the work into another construction season and delay the $60.8 million project's completion until 2016. It was originally slated for finish by 2015.

    In early 2009, work began on a $54 million project to widen Route 99 to four lanes and realign connections at Wilson Road and Route 113, s of Yuba City. Completion is expected in 2010.

    [Tudor Bypass]There are plans to widen this route to four lanes near Yuba City. There are also plans to bypass the city of Tudor. As of Mid-May 2009, it was reported that visible progress is being made on the Tudor Bypass, a $54.8 million project to reroute Route 99 past the sweeping, accident-prone S-curve at Route 113. The new four-lane roadway, a straight shot through an expanse of orchards, is expected to open in September 2010. The section has the most need for improvements, as the junctions of Route 99 and Garden Highway and Route113 have an unusually high incidence of accidents. Property owners were not happy with the loss of road frontage. Traffic signals will be added at the intersections with Route 113 and Wilson Road

    In May 2011, it was reported that there are plans to construct a new interchange near Route 113.

    In April 2013, it was reported that Caltrans will be building an overpass as part of a new interchange between Route 99 and Route 113 in hopes of improving traffic flow and safety conditions. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on April 26, 2013 when the $19.4 million project gets underway. The interchange will replace stoplights installed when the Route 99 Tudor Bypass was completed south of Yuba City in 2010.

    Yuba City to Chico

    I-<a href=5 interchange in Gridley" src="maps/099-gridley.jpg" ALIGN="right" WIDTH="291" HEIGHT="241" BORDER="0" HSPACE="5" VSPACE="5">In June 2007, the CTC considered rescinding a portion of the freeway adoption for Route 99 in the County of Sutter, Post Mile T36.0/42.2 and the County of Butte, Post Mile 0.0/13.1. This was up for a vote again in December 2007. Due to funding constraints, Caltarns is unable to construct a freeway on a new alignment (bypassing the cities of Live Oak and Gridley) to replace the existing Route 99 facility in Sutter and Butte Counties. The specific portion to be rescinded is along Route 99 from Encinal Road at PM T36.0 to PM 42.2 in Sutter County and from the Sutter/Butte county line PM 0.0 to SR 162, at PM 13.1, in Butte County. Numerous studies were conducted on the Route 99/Route 70 corridor, with the conclusion to upgrade Route 70 to freeway standards, parallel to Route 99. Route 70 has been designated as a focus route in the Interregional Transportation Strategic Plan and maintains priority for Interregional Transportation Improvement Program funding. Route 99 runs 36.8 miles through Sacramento County as a four-lane expressway to an eight-lane freeway. Route 99 continues northward through Sutter County for 42.3 miles as a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane freeway. It continues 45.9 miles through Butte County as a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane conventional highway. On May 22, 1963, the Commission adopted the current Route 99 corridor, which bypasses the cities of Live Oak and Gridley. Numerous parcels, but not all, were purchased to obtain the necessary right of way for the adopted corridor. A decrease in freeway funding caused the project to be suspended. In 1988, the Commission asked that a corridor study determine the alignment for a divided expressway, for ultimate conversion to a freeway, connecting Sacramento, Yuba City/Marysville, and Chico. The result was a Routes 70 and 99 Corridor Study, which was adopted by the Butte County Association of Governments and by the Sacramento Area Council of Governments in 1990. Twenty-four alternatives were studied. The recommended proposed alternative was “A four-lane freeway (initially to be constructed as an expressway) on Route 70 from the Route 70/99 interchange to Route 149 via a Marysville Bypass; a four-lane freeway on Route 149 from Route 70 to Route 99; and a four-lane freeway on Route 99 from Route 149 to the existing freeway section south of the City of Chico.” The Study’s proposed alignment does not include a new alignment for Route 99 bypassing the cities of Live Oak and Gridley, though such a bypass was studied in 7 of the 24 alternatives. Butte County’s direction on a bypass goes back to its 1984 General Plan Circulation Element, which does not discuss or map a bypass of Live Oak or Gridley along Route 99 as an alternative. Sutter County concurred with the State Routes 70 and 99 Corridor Study in its 1995 General Plan Circulation Element and did not discuss the Live Oak or Gridley bypass alternative nor recognize it as an alternative on any maps in the Circulation Element. Gridley City Council discussions indicate a strong desire to work with the Department to reach a mutually beneficial solution.

    In December 2009, an effort by the state to sell 24 parcels east of Gridley. purchased by Caltrans in the 1960s for a future Route 99 bypass around the city ran into problems. The plan was dropped in the 1990s when it became clear either Route 99 or Route 70 could be improved to freeway or expressway status, but not both. After study and debate, Route 70 was chosen. The state started proceedings to sell the land in 2004, but delayed at the request of Gridley, which saw an eventual need for such a bypass. The bypass has been retained in both the city and Butte County general plans now being developed... and in Demember 2009, the Butte County Association of Governments added its endorsement to those seeking to have the state retain the property. Caltrans estimates the sale would raise $2.2 million. In the Gridley and county general plans, the bypass would be an "arterial" constructed to local standards, rather than a highway that would trigger state and federal oversight.

    In July 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way along Route 99 from post mile 22.8 to the Durham Dayton Highway.

    Chico to Red Bluff

    [99 aux lane near Chico]In February 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to construct an auxiliary lane near Chico. The project is located in the City of Chico on Route 99 between the Route 32 and East 1st Avenue interchanges and on East 1st Avenue in the vicinity of the Route 99/East 1st Avenue interchange. The project would improve the operational characteristics of Route 99 by providing an auxiliary lane in each direction between Route 32 and East 1st Avenue. Two build alternatives, the Inside Widening Alternative and the Outside Widening Alternative, were considered during the environmental process. The Inside Widening Alternative with signalized conventional ramp intersections on East 1st Avenue was selected as the preferred alternative. The preferred alternative results in certain environmental impacts related to land use, transportation, air quality, noise, hydrology and water quality, biological resources, cultural resources, earth resources, visual resources, public services and facilities that require mitigation to be reduced to a less than significant level. The project is planned to be constructed in three phases. Phase I consists of northbound ramp improvements at East 1st Avenue. The construction capital and support costs for this phase were programmed at $8,286,000. Phase I construction is nearly complete. Phase II consists of the construction of a northbound auxiliary lane and widening of median and structures. This phase is estimated to cost $39,520,000 and is programmed with Route 99 Bond ($23,520,000) and STIP ($16,000,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin May 2010. Phase III will construct a southbound auxiliary lane. This phase is estimated to cost $12,500,000 and is not programmed.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved amending the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Route 99 Corridor baseline agreement for the Butte Route 99 Chico Auxiliary Lanes — Phase II project (PPNO 2410B) in Chico to add Phase 3 scope including southbound (SB) auxiliary lane improvements; change lead agency for Construction from BCAG to Caltrans; replace $1,653,000 Regional Improvement Program (RIP) Right of Way (R/W) funds with Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds; and update project schedule. This project is part of the Route 99 Bond Program. The ultimate Route 99 auxiliary lane project was approved in 2005, which included northbound (NB) and SB auxiliary lanes between Route 32 and East 1st Avenue. The project also includes improvements to the NB off-ramp at East 1st Avenue, a viaduct structure widening over Bidwell Park, widening of undercrossing structures at Palmetto Avenue, interchange ramp improvements and soundwall construction. The completed improvements will relieve congestion, increase capacity, and enhance safety. There are three phases due to funding constraints: Phase 1 — Improve NB off-ramp at First Avenue (PPNO 2410) — Completed; Phase 2 — Construct NB auxiliary lane, widen the NB and SB viaduct structures over Bidwell Park, widen both undercrossing structures (NB and SB) at Palmetto Avenue, and construct soundwalls (PPNO 2410B) — Currently programmed with Route 99 bond and STIP funds; and Phase 3 — Construct the SB auxiliary lane with corresponding ramp improvements, and widen East 1st Avenue. The adjusted end of construction is October 2013.

    In June 2010, it was noted that recent estimates now indicate lower construction costs for Phase 2 as well as additional savings if combined with Phase 3. BCAG proposed (and the CTC concured with) combining Phase 3 work with Phase 2. If the two phases could not be combined, the project runs the risk of increased costs for the delivery for each phase as well as an increase to the impact on traffic and to the public. There were also some funding shifts. The revised project completion shows:

    Begin Right of Way Phase 05/01/08
    End Right of Way Phase (Right of Way Certification Milestone) 05/10/10
    Begin Construction Phase (Contract Award Milestone) 01/15/11
    End Construction Phase (Construction Contract Acceptance Milestone) 10/15/13
    Begin Closeout Phase 10/15/13
    End Closeout Phase (Closeout Report) 10/15/15

    In January 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Butte County that will replace the northbound Butte Creek Bridge near the city of Chico. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Total estimated project cost is $15,517,000 for capital and support. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to elderberry shrubs in the project area will be mitigated by purchasing credits at a mitigation bank. Potential impacts to fish will be mitigated by replacing riparian vegetation at a 3:1 ratio.

    In August 2009, the CTC approved reinquishment of right of way in the county of Tehama along Route 99 near Los Molinos at Butler Street, consisting of a reconstructed county road.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved vacation of right of way in the county of Tehama along Route 99 between 66th Avenue and 68th Avenue, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In May 2012, the CTC authorized SHOPP funding on Route 99, in Tehama County, 02-Teh-99 14.1 Near Los Molinos, from the south fork of Mill Creek Bridge #08-160 to First Avenue. $3,800,000 to replace one scoured bridge to maintain structural integrity, reduce the risk to lives and properties, and to comply with the Bridge Inspection Report recommendation.

    In November 2010, the CTC approved amending the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Route 99 Corridor baseline agreement for the Los Molinos project (PPNO 3326) in Tehama County to: · Update Phase 2 schedule and funding plan based on current estimates. · Increase Right of Way (R/W) funding to accommodate utility relocation work recently discovered. · Split out Transportation Enhancement (TE) project added as part of the 2010 STIP.

    In November 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Tehama along Route 99 at 68th Avenue and Le Claire Avenue near Los Molinos, consisting of reconstructed county roads.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved about $3 million in funding for a "traffic calming" project on Route 99 from Grant Street in Los Molinos north to Tehama Vina Road. Curbs, gutters, lights, drainage, bike buffers, landscape islands and a thin-blanket overlay will be installed.

     

    Suffixed Routings

    The old US 99 used to split into US 99E and US 99W in Sacramento:

    US 99E

    The current routing is what was much of US 99E. US 99E ran concurrent with US 40 (now I-80) to Roseville along a portion of LRN 3, defined in 1909. At Roseville, still as LRN 3, it ran N to Lincoln along present day Route 65 (for a while, Route 65 and US 99E were cosigned). From Lincoln, US 99E ran to Marysville still as LRN 3 (this segment is present-day Route 65 to Olivehurst, and Route 70 from Olivehurst to Marysville). From Marysville, US 99E turned north to Chico, and Red Bluff, all as LRN 3.

    Route 20 between Yuba City and Marysville was co-signed with US 99E and Alternate US 40. (US 40A east was multiplexed with 20 east and US 99E south)

    Part of the US 99E routing in Sacramento is now part of Route 51, the former Elvas Freeway. See Route 51 for specific historical information.

    US 99W

    US 99W originally ran W out of Sacramento along LRN 50, defined in 1933, and then W along US 40 to the vicinity of Davis (along LRN 6, defined in 1909). It ran to near Exit 73 westbound (Olive Drive), then somehow connected with 5th Street on a now-removed alignment headed from US 40 west to the current Power Line Road/5th Street junction. (This removed alignment of 5th Street seems to have existed as late as 1967). US 99W continued west on 5th Street through downtown Davis, continuing in that direction as the street name changed to Russell Boulevard at B Street (where Davis's Central Park is located). US 99W then followed Russell to current Route 113 where it then merged with Alternate US 40 eastbound going north on Route 113 (cosigned as Route 113/US 99W). It then ran N cosigned with Alternate US 40 (present-day Route 113) to Woodland (along LRN 7, defined in 1909). It jogged W briefly along Route 16 (LRN 50), and then continued N signed as US 99W, along LRN 7, to Red Bluff. This was later replaced with I-5 (LRN 238, defined in 1959), whose routing is a closer approximation to Route 16 out of Sacramento to Woodland.

    The routings in Davis changed to the Route 113 routing by 1953.

    There was also a split at one time between Manteca to Stockton, between 1930 and 1933. At this time, US 99 ran down to Stockton, and US 99W split from US 99 in Stockton.

    Thomas Creek BridgeNote: Much of this is still signed (at least in terms of name) as 99W. This is best seen starting around Williams, CA, where there is a road roughly parallel to I-5 that appears to be called "Old Hwy 99W", "County Road 99W", "Highway 99W" (as in Williams, CA), "99W Highway", "State Highway 99W", and "Road 99W". The latter designation is co-signed with Tehama County Route A8 north of San Benito Avenue near Red Bluff, CA. Portions of this routing may even still be in the state highway system, although they are not signed as part of the formal Route 99. It is unclear if these portions have postmiles.

    This was implied by a March 2012 CTC action, which approved for future consideration of funding the Thomes Creek Bridge Replacement Project (project) in Tehama County. The project is estimated to cost $12,624,000 and is programmed with State ($1,398,000) funds, Federal ($11,176,000) funds, and Local ($50,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal

    year 2013/14.

     

    Business Routes
    • Gridley
    • Chico: The Esplanade

     

    Naming

    Sacramento to Yuba City

    The 5-mile segment of Route 99 south of its intersection with Route 70 in the County of Sutter is named the Bernie Richter Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Bernie Richter, born September 7, 1931, a member of the Assembly of the State of California from 1992 to 1998. In January 1998 Bernie Richter witnessed a vehicle lose control, crash into a bridge abutment just south of the intersection of Route 99 and Route 70 in the County of Sutter, and burst into flames. At this point Assemblymember Richter raced to the vehicle with his own fire extinguisher, and with the assistance of another good Samaritan, rescued the driver by pulling him out of the vehicle. Bernie Richter died at the age of 68 on October 25, 1999. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 189, August 17, 2004, Chapter 142.

    The Tudor Bypass segment of Route 99, from the intersection of Route 99 and Route 113 south to the intersection of Route 99 and Central Avenue, in Sutter County is formally named the "Joan Bechtel Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Joan Bechtel, was elected to the Sutter County Board of Supervisors in November 1992, and who subsequently represented the citizens of the Fourth Supervisorial District from January 1993 to May 2002. She served as the Sutter County Clerk-Recorder from May 2002 to December 2007. Ms. Bechtel also showed her commitment to the community by serving as a member of the Fremont-Rideout Health Group's Board of Directors for 25 years, and on the Yuba-Sutter Fair Board for eight years. During her tenure as county supervisor, Ms. Bechtel led the effort to widen Route 99 for the safety of all citizens of Sutter County and all those that travel along Route 99. As a direct result of her efforts, there has been a precipitous drop in accident rates and fatalities on Route 99. Ms. Bechtel passed away on June 25, 2008, and the Legislature wishes to honor her commitment and dedication to Sutter County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 150, Resolution Chapter 162, on 9/19/2008.

    The interchange between Route 99 and Riego Road in Sutter County is officially named the "Dean Patton Memorial Interchange." It was named in memory of Dean Patton of Grass Valley, who started his career with the Department of Transportation as a highway maintenance worker in 2006, initially assigned to the Marysville special crews yard as part of a stormwater and bridge crew, and more recently assigned to the Nevada City maintenance yard. On May 2, 2013, Mr. Patton was struck by another vehicle and killed while riding his motorcycle on his day off onRoute 99 at Riego Road in Sutter County on the way to the State Capitol in Sacramento, as a participant in the third annual Highway Workers Memorial Run, benefiting the children of fallen Caltrans employees. In his private life, Mr. Patton sought to improve his community through public service, active involvement in the Twin Cities Church in Grass Valley, helping others better themselves through Alcoholics Anonymous, and coaching a Little League team for children with special needs. It was named on 09/20/13 by SCR 55, Res. Chapter 125, Statutes of 2013.

    Yuba City to Chico

    The portion of this route from Route 65 to Red Bluff was historically called the "Capitol Highway". In local usage, it is called the "East Side Highway".

    The portion of Route 99 in Sutter County, from post mile 36 (N of Yuba City) to post mile 40, inclusive, is named the “Patricia Ann Weston Memorial Highway”. This segment was named in memory of Patricia Ann Weston, who was born on July 19, 1951, in Mount Pleasant, Michigan. Weston graduated from the Central Michigan University in 1973 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Earth Science, Geography; and moved to California in 1974. She attended the University of California, Davis, from June 1976 to September 1977; and started her career in transportation with the Sacramento Area Regional Planning Commission. Weston began her career with the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) on January 9, 1979, in planning in the Marysville District 3 Office, transferred to the headquarters Division of Mass Transportation, and finally transferred to the headquarters Division of Transportation Planning as the Office Chief of Advance System Planning and Economics on January 4, 1993. Weston was a champion and advocate for rural agencies working to ensure that rural projects were included in the State Transportation Improvement Program. Weston changed state transportation planning by being instrumental in not only the development of the Transportation Development Act, an act that provides funding to counties and cities for transit projects, but also in assisting the State of California in securing the initial Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) grants that provided funding to private and nonprofit groups for handicap services. Weston wrote the 1998 Interregional Strategic Plan, a plan that describes the framework by which the state carries out its responsibilities for the Interregional Transportation Improvement Program and identifies how the Department of Transportation works with regional agencies in gaining consensus on the prioritized improvements contained in the program. Weston was instrumental in writing GoCalifornia and the Governor's Strategic Growth Plan, which established the framework for the subsequent Proposition 1B Program. Weston mentored generations of planners and engineers at both the Department of Transportation and at transportation planning agencies and private planning firms statewide, freely sharing her experiences, expertise, wisdom, and extreme professionalism with all who endeavored to become more than they were. Weston dedicated 30 years of service to the State of California and all who travel on its transportation systems, spending her life improving those systems, and making travel options more accessible, faster, and safer for the traveling public. On September 8, 2009, Patricia Ann Weston peacefully and quietly passed away following a short illness. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 84, Resolution Chapter 66, on 8/4/2010.

    The portion of Route 99 between Oroville Dam Boulevard West and Nelson Avenue in Oroville is named the "Milton La Malfa Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Milton Joseph La Malfa, who died on October 5, 2008. Born in San Jose, California, to Tony and Marge La Malfa on February 22, 1937, Milton La Malfa was raised and lived nearly his entire life in Richvale, California, on the farm that his Italian grandfather, Giusseppe La Malfa, purchased in 1931. Earning a degree in agriculture/business from Fresno State University in 1959, Milton La Malfa married Karon Myers of Oroville, California, in 1958, and they had three children, Doug, Sherry, and Lisa. Distinguishing himself as a prominent rice farmer in the area, Milton La Malfa worked with his father to level the ground in the 1950's and 1960's, taming new acreage and improving irrigation methods of rice. Milton La Malfa was also involved with experimental projects through the rice experiment station, where he worked on fertilizer and herbicide studies to improve rice production and yields and grew foundation seed rice, and in 1960, a small rice dryer was built on the ranch for seed rice storage and isolation. In addition to utilizing his outstanding talent and skills as an innovative thinker in his farming operation, Milton La Malfa shared his wise counsel in numerous capacities on a broad range of public and private organizations, including several rice industry organizations. Milton La Malfa provided leadership and results-oriented vision as a director of the Butte County Rice Growers Association from 1973 to 1975 and again from 1981 to 1986, as well as secretary-treasurer for four years and chair for one year. Milton La Malfa also served with distinction as a director of Associated Rice Marketing Cooperative from 1988 to 1993, serving as chair for one year, and also gave his time as director of the Richvale Seed Growers for many years. Milton La Malfa was instrumental in organizing local farmers in 1985 to form the Western Canal Water Users Association, which initiated the negotiations with Pacific Gas and Electric to purchase the water rights and conveyance system for the farmers in the area; he subsequently became director of the Western Canal Water District (formed from the Western Canal Water Users Association) and also served as its president. Milton La Malfa also contributed extensively as a director of Drainage District 200 and was on the Board of the Northern California Water Association, which is the advocacy arm of the water districts in Sacramento. Milton La Malfa was recognized for his leadership in rice propagation, development, and in securing water for California rice's future, and was nationally awarded the prestigious 2008 Rice Farmer of the Year Award by the USA Rice Federation. Milton La Malfa was dedicated to philanthropy in his personal life, and his many contributions to the community will not be forgotten. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 71, Resolution Chapter 107, on 9/23/2009.

    The portion of Route 99 consisting of the four-lane expressway between the Edgar Slough (Bridge No. 12128) and the Pentz Road overcrossing (Postmile 24.2, Butte County) is officially designated the "Ray E. Johnson Expressway" (this is in the segment between the Route 99/Route 149 junction and Chico). Ray E. Johnson was a member of the California Legislature for 18 years, having been first elected in 1964 to the Assembly, and to the Senate in 1976. He represented 15 counties as a Member of the Legislature and, in that capacity, was instrumental in securing the completion of the Route 65 Bypass of Interstate 80 and in the three-lane widening of Interstate 80. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 74, Chapter 113, in 1993.

    Chico to Red Bluff

    The portion of Route 99, from one mile north of its intersection with Wilson Landing Road to Broyles Road, north of the City of Chico, is named the "Caltrans Leadworker Gary Wayne Smith Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Gary Wayne Smith, who began working for Caltrans on May 16, 1978, and spent the majority of his career at the Chico Maintenance Station. On November 14, 2010, Gary Wayne Smith was struck and killed by a vehicle while performing traffic control at the scene of a fatal accident on Route 99 north of the City of Chico. Gary Wayne Smith was known as a kind-natured individual who was never without a smile and who helped many coworkers on the job. Gary Wayne Smith never hesitated to help or respond to callouts regardless of the time or day. Gary Wayne Smith had great pride regarding his service to the State of California. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Resolution Chapter 94, on September 15, 2011.

     

    National Trails

    Pacific Highway Sign This segment was part of the "Pacific Highway".

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] From Route 5 in Sacramento to Route 36 near Red Bluff. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Sacramento 99 0.59 0.99
    Sacramento 99 1.32 1.86
    Sacramento 99 13.70 14.00
    Sacramento 99 17.02 17.32
    Sacramento 99 17.46 24.35
    Sacramento 99 R32.12 R32.37
    Sutter 99 R30.67 R32.14
    Sutter 99 R32.47 R32.77
    Sutter 99 R33.79 R34.12
    Butte 99 R31.15 R31.72
    Butte 99 R32.21 R35.31

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.15] With routing to be determined via Route 70 or via Route 99 between Route 70 north of Sacramento and Route 149 north of Oroville.

Pre 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield Until the signed/legislative route alignment and renumbering in 1964, Route 99 was longer on both ends:

Southern End

On the southern end, the route ran to the Mexican border. From the current terminus of Route 99, US 99 continued S along present-day I-5 into Los Angeles. Before 1964, this was signed as US 99 to the junction with (pre-1964) Route 7 (also known as US 6). This was LRN 4, defined in 1909. It entered Los Angeles along San Fernando Road, (along what was then Route 7) and headed east at Fletcher (in Glendale). For a portion of this, it ran concurrent with US 6.

Originally, US 99 then ran into Eagle Rock and Colorado, where it ran concurrent with US 66 as far as San Bernardino (LRN 9), where it joined cosigned US 60/US 70. One map shows US 99 running along the old Route 118 (approx. I-210) routing along the foothills. This was the former LRN 9 routing, so this does make sense. This former LRN 9 routing was gone by 1929.

By 1939, US 99 ran cosigned with US 6 into downtown Los Angeles (LRN 4, defined in 1909). Before the freeway was constructed, it ran along San Fernando Road. After the freeway was constructed, it ran along the freeway portion (LRN 161 defined in 1933), bypassing San Fernando Road (which was signed as Business US 99). This is present-day I-5.

Near downtown, until the construction of the Pasadena Freeway, it ran down San Fernando Road to Ramona, where it joined cosigned US 60/US 70. Once the first segments of the Pasadena (Arroyo Seco Parkway) and San Bernardino (Ramona Parkway) Freeways were constructed in the early 1940s, US 99 was rerouted to run down the Route 11 (LRN 165, defined in 1933) to cosigned US 66/US 101, and then E to US 60/US 70 (along LRN 2 to LRN 26). Once the Santa Ana Freeway was constructed, US 99 was again resigned to run E directly from the Route 11/US 66 junction to the San Bernardino Freeway (this segment was LRN 4). This is present-day I-5 to the I-10 junction.

There is evidence the route ran along the Aliso Street Viaduct in downtown Los Angeles.

After the junction with US 60/US 70, the route continued E cosigned. This was LRN 26, although the surface route along Valley Blvd was LRN 77 by 1963. This is present-day I-10. The US signage is unclear and likely varied -- at points US 99 being along Ramona (esp. after construction of the freeway), at points running along Valley Blvd. (The extension of LRN 26 from Colton to the eastern limits of Los Angeles along Garvey/Holt was added in 1931; the extension along Ramona Blvd was added in 1933; the alternate routing along Valley Blvd was added as a non-contiguous extension of LRN 77 in 1935).

E of Pomona, US 99 was cosigned only with US 70 to Beaumont (US 60 continued along LRN 77 through Riverside, and thence to Beaumont). This was LRN 26. The portion between Pomona and Colton/San Bernardino was part of the 1931 extension of LRN 26; the portion from San Bernardino to Beaumont was part of the 1916 definition of LRN 26. This is present-day I-10.

In 1947, CHPW reported that the segment through E Redlands had been converted into a four-lane divided limited-freeway.

From Beaumont to Indio, US 99 was cosigned with US 60 and US 70, and was part of the 1916 LRN 26 segment. This is present-day I-10.

From Indio, US 99 left US 60/US 70 and continued S to Calexico through Brawley and El Centro. This is present-day Route 86. The segment between Indio and El Centro was part of the 1916 LRN 26; the segment from EL Centro to the border at Calexico was a 1931 extension of LRN 26.

North of Sacramento

Between Sacramento and Red Bluff: Originally (i.e., 1929), there was only one US 99 N of Sacramento, following the route of what was later US 99W. Some maps show US 99W signed as Route 99, and US 99E as Alt Route 99. By 1939, there was both a US 99W and a US 99E out of Sacramento.

Northern End

Before 1964, the current routing of I-5 was signed as US 99 to the Oregon border. This was LRN 3. Parts of this have been bypassed by the I-5 freeway. The older true Route 99 segments include present-day Route 273, Route 265, and Route 263.

 

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Other WWW Links

 

National Trails

Midland Trail Sign The portion of former US 99 that was cosigned with US 6 was part of the Midland Trail.

 

Interstate Submissions

Route 99 was not recommended for inclusion in the Interstate system. However, Assembly Joint Resolution 63 requested the President and Congress of the United States to enact legislation to include Route 99 in the interstate highway system. (August 19, 2004, Chapter 153).

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

 


Overall statistics for Route 99:

  • Total Length (1995): 415 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 6,000 to 155,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 261; Sm. Urban 50; Urbanized: 104.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 415 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 415 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Kern, Tulare, Fresno, Madera, Merced, Stanislaus, San Joaquin, Sacramento, Sutter, Butte.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 53] at Rio Vista via Ryer Island to [LRN 6] near Broderick" to the highway system. In 1935, this was defined in the code to be LRN 99 with the same definition.

In 1961, Chapter 1146 relaxed the origin to be "[LRN 53] near Rio Vista".

This route ran from Route 12 near Rio Vista via Ryer Island to US 40), now I-80, near Broderick. It is part of the present-day unsigned Route 84 in this area.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 100



Routing

From the junction of Routes 1 and 17 to Route 1 west of the San Lorenzo River via the beach area in Santa Cruz.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from its 1963 definition. It was a proposed freeway loop routing through Santa Cruz. This route adoption was rescinded in August 1975. The route location was never determined. There is no local traversable routing.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 287 (defined in 1959), which was proposed with the routing undetermined in 1963.

Route 100 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 100 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

Unsigned and unconstructed.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 100:

  • Total Length (1995): 5 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban 0 Urbanized: 5.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Cruz.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "Rio Vista-Broderick Road on Ryer Island to Sacramento-Antioch Road" to the highway system. In 1935, this was added to the highway system as LRN 100, with the definition:

[LRN 99] on Ryer Island to that part of [LRN 11] between Sacramento and Antioch

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It ran from present-day unsigned Route 84 on Ryer Island to present-day Route 160 (pre-1963 Route 24). This is present day Route 220.


US Highway Shield

US Highway 101



Routing
  1. Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles to Route 1, Funston approach, and the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in the Presidio of San Francisco via Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Salinas.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    (105-110)In 1963, this segment was segment (a) and (b), and was defined as the route "(a) The junction of Routes 105 and 110 in Los Angeles to Route 80 in San Francisco, passing near Ford Road south of San Jose. (b) Route 80 to Route 480." In this definition, "the junction of Routes 105 and 110 in Los Angeles" refers to the present-day I-10 east/US 101 junction -- the plan in 1963 was for those to be short stub interstates I-105 and I-110.

    In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the definition of both segments. This reflected two major changes. On the southern end, the stub definitions of I-105 and I-110 were removed. What had been I-105, the portion of US 101 from the I-10 E junction to I-5, was added to US 101 (I-110, which was the short stub from (present) US 101 to I-5/I-10, was added to I-10). On the northern end, the freeway revolt in San Francisco was in flower, and routes were changing everywhere. Portions of routes were switched between I-480 and I-280 (and some of I-480 was deleted); changes were made to I-80. As a result, both segments changed, and the new definition was: "(a) The junction of Routes 105 and 110 Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles to Route 80 near Division Street in San Francisco, passing near Ford Road south of San Jose. (b) Route 80 near Division Street in San Francisco to Route 480."

    In 1991, Chapter 498 changed segment (b) to absorb former Route 480, making it "(b) Route 80 near Division Street in San Francisco to the junction of Route 1, Funston approach, and the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in the Presidio of San Francisco passing near the intersections of Lombard Street and Van Ness Avenue."

    In 1992, Chapter 1243 combined (a) and (b): "(a) Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles to Route 1, Funston approach, and the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge in the Presidio of San Francisco via Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Salinas."

    Section 72.1 explicitly abandons as a state highway the portion of current Route 101 between Fell Street and Turk Street. The portion of current Route 101 between Market Street and Turk Street ceases to be a state highway unless the alternative to the Octavia Street Project is approved in November 1999. This reflects a portion that came to US 101 from Route 480.

    There are some planned freeway routings in the city of San Francisco. California Transportation Commission (CTC) Agenda Item June 2000 2.3a discusses a route from PK (Post Kilometer) 7.6 at South Van Ness to PK R8.2 at Fell Street. July 2000 Agenda Item 2.3a discusses a route from PM R5.0 at Eire Street to PM 5.3 at Golden Gate Avenue.

    The following freeway-to-freeway connections were never constructed:

    • NB US 101 to EB Route 134. Rationale: Construction of this connector was put "on hold" pending completion of the interchange for the Laurel Canyon Freeway (Route 170), which ended up never being constructed.

    Some additional bit of history:

    • The Los Angeles Times in December 2009 published a nice article on the Hollywood Freeway chickens. The flock started with the 1969 crash of a poultry truck on the Hollywood Freeway. As the driver, Joe Silbert, told The Times in 2000, "I was taking anywhere from 500 to 1,000 chickens back from the Valley to a slaughterhouse in L.A." During the accident, many of the birds spilled out and escaped into the brush near the Vineland Avenue onramp in Studio City. Silbert gave chase but estimated that at least 200 chickens made their way to freedom. The fugitives took up residence along US 101 and became known as the Freeway Chickens. The birds' existence was eased by an elderly resident (Minnie Blumfield) who sprinkled seed through the chain-link fence, left water for them and inevitably became known as the Chicken Lady. By 1976, Blumfield was 90 and worried about who would care for the flock after she was gone. She gave her blessing to the Great Chicken Roundup. Animal services officers captured the fowl and shipped them to a farm in Sylmar. Evidently a few survived, and there are sightings to this day.
    • In March 2010, there was an exhibition of photos by Richard C. Miller at Bergamot Station that includes a number documenting the construction of the Hollywood Freeway. The Los Angeles Daily News also developed a slide show of the pictures.
    • Some nice pictures of the construction of this route may be found on the KCET website.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    San Diego County

    US 101 was part of the original set of planned US routes in 1926, and was first signed in 1928. The route existed long before the signing, however. It began at the Mexican border, and ran N through San Diego along National Avenue, Main St., Harbor Drive, Pacific Drive, Midway Drive, Morena Blvd, and Pacific Coast Highway (the route from National City/San Diego N was LRN 2, defined in 1909; it was extended to the Mexican border in 1931). Both were essentially following a routing established by El Camino Real. The US 101 routing was later bypassed by the present-day I-5 (Montgomery Freeway). SignOnSanDiego has noted there is an oral-history project recording memories of old US 101. There's a Historic US 101 sign on San Diego Ave. in the Old Town section, near the Whaley House. Also, street names like "Old Hwy 101" and "Coast Hwy 101" follow the old route in Solana Beach and Encinitas.

    This alignment, along Torrey Pines and La Jolla Blvd., was once signed as US 101W. The later I-5 alignment, the Rose Canyon Highway, was signed as US 101E.

    County Route Shield From San Diego, the route ran N along Pacific Coast Highway to San Juan Capestrano. This route is now San Diego County Route S21. The old "El Camino Real" is San Diego County Route S11. This has been bypassed by I-5, and was LRN 2. Other portions that were onced signed as US 101 include San Diego County Route S6, San Diego County Route S8. This is one of the older freeway segments in the San Diego area, encompassing the former CarlFd Freeway, and including a Business Routing for US 101 in Oceanside. A California Highways and Public Works magazine from 1925 notes that the original pavement was first placed in service around 1912, with 15' wide by 4" thick concrete. A relocation project occurred in 1924, which widened the pavement, relocated 7 miles, and eliminated 2 grade crossings.,

    Between this point and Oceanside, I-5 buries the old road. Between San Juan Capestrano and Oceanside, the following is a description of how to find the old road (alias, it goes from N to S, while the rest of this paragraph goes from S to N):

    South of San Juan Capistrano, you can follow US 101 pretty closely on Camino Capistrano then continuing south on the Old Coast Hwy which then turns into El Camino Real through San Clemente. You will have to get back on the freeway at Christantos. Then you can take Baslone Road and turn right, you will be on the Old Pacific Hwy and if you can do it, when your making the sharp left turn after the Fwy take a look right and you can see the old Expressway thats now buried by I-5. Continue south on the old expressway, over the railroad overpass and past San Onofree Nuclear Power Station until you get to the entrance to the San Onofree State Beach. Pay the ranger and continue on. Now eventually you will have to get on a bycycle to continue further south, when the Expressway gets to area below the Vista Point this is point where I-5 buries the old road all the way to Oceanside.

    With respect to the route through the Marine base, US 101 was open through the base, all the way to San Diego. It was only four lanes divided through the base, with a 60mph speed limit. The accident rate was high. Portions of the original road still exist south of Camp Pendleton down to San Diego, with historic US 101 markers. Within the base, the northern part of the old road still exists, as a service road to San Onofre State Beach and the nuclear power plant. Most of the rest was incorporated into, or obliterated by, I-5, or still exists as a bike trail.
    [Oscar Voss]

    Orange County/Los Angeles County

    From San Juan Capestrano, US 101 ran N through El Toro and Irvine to Santa Ana. It ran along 1st Street, Main Street (Santa Ana), Santa Ana Blvd, Los Angeles Blvd (renamed after 1970 to Anaheim Blvd), and Spadra (renamed in 1967 to Harbor Blvd). It ran N on Spadra/Harbor to Whittier Blvd, and W along Whittier Blvd into Los Angeles County to Mission Road. It ran N along Mission Road to Sunset Blvd. This portion of the routing has been bypassed by I-5.

    It may have taken, at one time, a different route through Norwalk, as there is an El Camino Real bell at the intersection of Orr and Day and Imperial. In terms of LRNs, the freeway routing of US 101 S was LRN 2 (defined in 1909) from San Diego to a point S of Anaheim, LRN 174 (defined in 1933) from Anaheim to Route 35, and LRN 166 (defined in 1933) into downtown LA. The surface street routing ("old US 101") was LRN 2 at this point, and was likely signed is "Business US 101". It is present-day Route 72. For a short time, there was also a Bypass US 101 ranning from the intersection of Firestone Blvd / Manchester Ave. and Los Angeles St, northwest along Firestone (pre-1964 Route 10), N along Lakewood Blvd. (Route 19), W at Anaheim Telegraph Rd (Route 26), N to Whitter Blvd at Calzona St.

    Los Angeles County

    At this point, the present-day routing of US 101 N began. Note that the portion in the downtown area (between the Route 110 (former Route 11/US 66) interchange and the Route 60 interchange) was signed, between 1947 and 1958, as US 99/US 101/US 60/US 70. Before the construction of the freeway in Los Angeles, US 101 ran W along Sunset to Cahuenga, N along Cahuenga to Ventura Blvd, and ran out of Los Angeles on Ventura Blvd. Ventura Blvd is the oldest continuously traveled route in the Valley. Originally part of the famed El Camino Real, the dirt path between between California's Spanish missions, it has been known as Camino de las Virgenes and Ventura Road.

    Construction of US 101 as freeway through downtown Los Angeles started in 1949, reduced Fort Moore Hill to a stump and converted the section of Broadway between Temple and Sunset from a tunnel to a freeway overpass. This had the side effect of removing the Fort Moore Hill tunnel. The freeway's construction also doomed the Hill Street tunnels, although the second tunnel through Fort Moore Hill would survive until 2004 as storage space for the Los Angeles Unified School District's archives. Information on the tunnels in downtown LA, including pictures, may be found here. Details on the construction may be found in the 1950 and 1951 issues of CHPW.

    A 1954 issue of CHPW confirms that the widening of US 101 near Vermont was in anticipation for the future Route 2 freeway (LRN 162, called, at that time, the "Santa Monica Freeway" as it ran along Santa Monica Blvd, vice LRN 173, the Olympic Freeway (Route 26), which eventually became I-10): "The design finally adopted for the Hollywood Freeway at the crossing. with Vermont Avenue was influenced by the contemplated future construction of the Santa Monica Freeway and also the possibility of rail rapid transit facilities being installed on the future Santa Monica Freeway. This required the lengthening of the Vermont Avenue Bridge and other bridges in the vicinity. The added cost providing for future rail rapid transit facilities was financed by the City of Los Angeles from city funds. Similarly financed from city funds were the bus transfer facilities at Alvarado Street and Vermont Avenue and Western Avenue."

    The Cahuenga Pass Parkway concept was developed by City Engineer, Lloyd Aldrich. Aldrich's plan include four lanes in each direction, with separation between opposing traffic flows with the Pacific Electric Railroad tracks in the middle. Bridges connecting the service roads and spanning the parkway were constructed at the Pilgrimage (now John Anson Ford) Theater, Mulholland Drive and Barham Boulevard. At the southern end of the Pass, southbound traffic destined to Highland Avenue would stay to the right, while traffic destined to southbound Cahuenga Boulevard would stay in the left two lanes and travel in a tunnel under the Pacific Electric Railroad tracks. The first unit was opened on June 15, 1940 and extended northerly to the Barham Boulevard ramps. By January 1, 1941, the roadway was extended to terminate in a 90° curve connecting with the older segment of Cahuenga Boulevard near Bennett Drive. Cahuenga Boulevard Parkway, a freeway less than two miles long, was opened just one day after the Arroyo Seco Parkway was dedicated. The next phase of extending the parkway to the intersection of Ventura Boulevard and Vineland Avenue was disrupted by World War II, and was completed by the State in 1949. In 1954, Cahuenga Parkway was altered and incorporated into the Hollywood Freeway. This route was LRN 2, started in 1909.

    While the last phase of the Cahuenga Parkway was being completed, work already was underway on building the Hollywood Freeway. The last segment of the freeway, built in 1954, connected to the south end of the original Cahuenga Parkway. The completion of the Hollywood Freeway necessitated the demolition of the 1940 tunnel connection under the Pacific Electric Railroad tracks between the Pilgrimage bridge and Odin Street (you can find a nice history of the Pilgrimage Bridge here). In addition, since the Pacific Electric Railroad had ceased operation in 1944, the area that it had occupied in the median was reconstructed to accommodate traffic from northbound Highland Avenue. In 1957, when the Hollywood Freeway was extended northwesterly of Lankershim Boulevard, the northbound on-ramp, northbound off-ramp and southbound on-ramp at Barham Boulevard were abandoned. The abandoned ramps have remained preserved since that time. Despite alterations, much of the original Cahuenga Parkway remains intact. The original ornamental street lights on the bridges still look charming. The Pacific Electric Railroad overhead cable hooks can still be seen on the bridges over the area formerly occupied by the tracks. And the ornamental design in the corners of Barham Boulevard bridge remains.
    [The historical information above on the Cahuenga Pass Parkway was derived from "Transportation Topics and Tales: Milestones in Transportation History in Southern California" by John E. Fisher, P.E. PTOE, available at http://ladot.lacity.org/pdf/PDF100.pdf]

    An August 1941 report issued by the Regional Planning Commission of Los Angeles County entitled “A Report on the Feasibility of a Freeway Along the Channel of the Los Angeles River” proposed a four-lane roadway on each levee from Anaheim Street in Long Beach north to Sepulveda Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley; excepting between Soto Street and Dayton Street in downtown Los Angeles, where, due to a lack of right-of-way along the river, the alignment matches the future alignment of the US 101 portion of the Santa Ana Freeway. There is no mention in the report of a master plan of freeways like that issued in 1947, although the maps showed connections to the already-completed Arroyo Seco Parkway and the proposed Ramona and Rio Hondo Parkways.
    (Thanks to Daniel Thomas for hunting down this information)

    In mid-1962, the Hollywood Freeway was extended to Vineland and Magnolia in N. Hollywood, with traffic using it as far as Magnolia Blvd. Further, a project was started to widen the original Hollywood freeway between Sunset and Pilgrimage Bridge to make it a uniform 8-lanes between downtown and the valley. Also in 1962, the route was made continuous from the Hollywood Freeway to the Golden State Freeway... to the east (the extension to the north was still under construction). This occured with the completion of the projects between the Hollywood Freeway and Buena Vista Street, and between Buena Vista Street and the Golden State Freeway, five miles, completed at a combined construction cost of $10,436,000.

    On 11/18/1954, the CHC adopted a 10.9 mi route for the Riverside-Ventura freeway extending from the junction with US 99, the Golden State Freeway, westerly to Sepulveda Blvd.

    Ventura County

    Conejo GradeIn 1935, an interesting rerouting of US 101 along the Conejo Grade, traces of which are still visible today. The Conejo Grade was originally routed in 1912 as one of the first roads to be surveyed by the State Highway Department. By 1929, when the new Coast Highway (US 101A, signed Route 3, present-day Route 1) route was completed between Oxnard and Santa Monica, the old route was overcrowded and some of the sharper turns on the Conejo Grade had become quite dangerous. As a result traffic showed a preference for the coast route so that about 60% of the coast traffic followed the Oxnard-Santa Monica Route and only 40% chose the old route. Truck traffic especially preferred the "sea level" route to the steep grades, narrow roadbed, and inferior alignment on the Conejo Grade. The old location, although in general fairly direct, necessarily had many short radius curves in order to keep construction costs to a minimum as well as keep within the allowable 6% maximum grade. Three routes were considered:a North Route, a Middle Route and a South Route. The "Middle Route" was by far the most direct alignment, but on account of its directness it required a grade greater than 6% for a portion of the distance. However, far better alignment could be obtained by adopting this route, as well as keeping curvature to a much lower figure than on either of the other routes. Surveys indicated that by using a 7% grade for the two miles down the west slope of the Conejo Range, the Middle Route could be used and thus secure the advantages of better alignment and shorter distance. Note that the land for the Conejo Grade rerouting was donated by Adolpho Camarillo, founder of Camarillo.

    The three mile segment of the Ventura Freeway from Palm Street to Emma Wood State Park began construction on February 28, 1961. This construction included a one mile segment of the Ojai Freeway (Route 33), which replaced a hazardous at-grade intersection that had originally existed. The project was completed in May 1963.

    Santa Barbara/ San Luis Obispo/San Benito Counties

    The route remained signed as US 101, and legislatively as LRN 2, into San Jose, running through Santa Barbara, San Luis Obsipo, Paso Robles, Salinas, and Gilroy.

    In 1947, it was reported that the original coast highwas was relocated for 9.3 mi N of Santa Barbara to Tecolote Canyon. The revised routing replaced the old route through the town of Goleta between the Hollister Underpass and the Elwood Overhead. The old highway became a county road. The new highway is a four-lane divided roadway. The alignment parallels the SP main line for approximately eight miles, and replaced an old road that had 17 curves and grades of up to 6%.

    An interesting side note about San Luis Obispo: It was the location of the first motel. To be more specific, in December 1925, architect Arthur S. Heineman opened a group of cottages that permitted lodgers to drive to their doors. It was originally named the Milestone Motel, but was later called the "Mo-Tel Inn." It was located at 2223 Monterey Street, and accomodated 160 guests. It is next to the current Apple Farm restaurant and motel. For more information, visit the History in San Luis Obispo County site.

    In Templeton, Main Street and possibly Old County Road is a former routing of US 101. Near San Ardos, Cattleman Dr. is former US 101.

    According to Tod Fitch, it appears as if San Juan Road and San Juan Grade road may be early routing of US 101 through San Juan Bautista (since bypassed). This is based on topological maps at http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/histopo/. Following the link to the Monterey Bay region, he was able to get two 15 minute topographic quadrangle maps for San Juan Bautista. The first, from 1917 reissued in 1932, shows the San Juan Grade road as "state highway" and does NOT show a road near the current alignment of US 101. The second, from 1939 reissued in 1958, shows US 101 near or on the current US 101 alignment. It may very well be that San Juan Grade Road and San Juan Road were an early alignment of US 101 from Salinas through San Juan Bautista; there is some logic in this based on the US highway system approach of running through the small towns in the area.

    Santa Clara County

    Business Route Shield The route between Gilroy and San Jose approximates the original routing. The original routing still exists and is designated as Business Route 101, and is "Monterey" Highway.

    In San Jose, the routing followed the present El Camino route that is present-day Route 82. This was signed as US 101 and was LRN 2. The present-day freeway routing was signed as Bypass US 101, and was LRN 68, defined in 1923. Construction began on LRN 68 in 1924, it was completed in 1929. The portion from 10th St. N was LRN 2.

    The segments of Grant Street in Santa Clara and Santa Clara Street/Market Street in San Jose appear to have been bypassed after 1968, as noted in this map. In Santa Clara, while what was named as late as 1968 as "Clay Street" east of Lincoln Street (now part of "El Camino Real" and was part of the pre-1964 US 101) remains on the route, the original alignment along what was then "Grant Street" (now part of a northwest extension of The Alameda from Camino Drive) was bypassed to make way for an expansion of Santa Clara University. Part of the original Grant Street/US 101/Route 82 between Franklin Street and Market Street has been supplanted by a pedestrian pathway through university property. Also, apparently in 1968, the US 101-era routing of Santa Clara Street directly to Market Street (instead of the modern Montgomery/Autumn and San Carlos path) in downtown San Jose was in use for Route 82 at the time.

    There was evidently a study regarding double-decking US 101 up the pennisula, including all the way down to San Jose.

    The June 1925 issue of CHPW noted that the Bay Shore Highway, from San Francisco to San Jose, was added to the state highway system. This changed the description of LRN 2 from "the county line of the city and county of San Francisco to and through the county of San Mateo" to "from San Francisco to the city of San Jose."

    San Mateo/San Franciso Area

    Here are some specifics on the routings:

    • Up to 1932, US 101 from San Jose to San Francisco was US 101W, following El Camino Real, Mission St., Valencia St, Market St. (where it met US 101E coming from Oakland, via a Ferry), Van Ness Av, Bay St., and Hyde St., to the Sausalito Ferry. In July 1932, the US 101W/US 101 E split occurred.

    • In 1933, US 101W changed at Daly City to the route of San Jose Ave., Alemany Blvd., Bayshore Blvd., Potrero Ave., 10th St., Fell St., Van Ness Ave., Bay St. and Hyde St. to the Sausalito Ferry.

    • In 1936, US 101W became US 101.

    • In 1938, the Bayshore Blvd from San Francisco to San Jose became US 101, and Alemany Bl - San Jose Ave - El Camino Real becamse US 101A. From Bayshore Blvd & Alemany, US 101 continued on Bayshore Blvd., Potrero Ave., 10th St., Fell St., Van Ness Ave., Lombard St., and Richardson Blvd. to the Golden Gate Bridge. There evidently was a lot of infighting as to whether the El Camino or Bayshore would be US 101; some of this is illustrated by the Trees for El Camino Project

    • In 1940, Alemany Blvd., San Jose Ave., and El Camino Real became US 101, while Bayshore Blvd. became Bypass US 101. The old US 101 and Bypass 101 rejoined in southern San Francisco. The route was LRN 68 for a short time.

    • In 1962, the freeway was completed in 1962 (construction started in 1945).

    • In 1964, I-280 was routed on the 19th Avenue corridor (the north extension of the Junipero Serra Freeway, including the current freeway stub south of Font Boulevard); Route 1 was routed on the Southern Freeway between the current Route 1/I-280 split and Route 82 was routed on the Southern Freeway on the old US 101 portion (which includes Alemany Boulevard) as well as San Jose Avenue, Mission Street (in Daly City and Colma) and El Camino Real (from Colma south) and also on the Southern Freeway between Army Street (the planned junction with Route 87) and the Alemany Maze (Southern/Bayshore junction). US 101 was moved from the El Camino/Southern routing to the Bayshore/Lick (former Bypass US 101) routing from San Jose (the current Route 82/US 101 split) to the Alemany Maze.

    • In 1968, Route 82 was cut back from the Southern Freeway to end at the San Jose Avenue junction. Route 87 was cut back from I-80/Route 480 junction in downtown SF to the Army Street/Southern Freeway junction (and would be further cut back to Route 237 in 1970). The I-280 designation was removed from the 19th Avenue corridor and Route 1 was legislatively restored to the entire route (and taken off the short connector of the Southern Freeway between Daly City and San Jose Avenue). It is uncertain if the short Route 1 freeway stub between Font and the I-280/Route 1 junction was ever signed as part of the interstate. Interstate 280 was then rerouted to the entire Southern Freeway between Daly City and the I-80/Route 480 junction. No changes were made to US 101; the move to the Bayshore/Lick routing had already taken place.

    • In 1991, the portion of US 101 that would've been part of Route 480 (between Van Ness/Lombard and the Route 1/US 101 interchange in the Presidio) was legislatively given to US 101, although it has never been signed as anything else since the first portions of freeway were built in the 1940s. Thus, had Route 480 been constructed from the terminus at Broadway northwest to near the current left turn of US 101 (Van Ness to Lombard), there would have been a co-signage of Route 480 and US 101 on Doyle Drive. The rationale for the Route 480 numbering would have been its terminus at I-280 in the Presidio (when I-280 ran up the Route 1 corridor), very similar to the 280/680 numbering change in San Jose)

    A good history of the route in the San Francisco Bay Area may be found in the article "History Traces the Bayshore from Highway to Freeway", from the San Mateo Community Journal.

    The Hyde Park Ferry across San Francisco Bay has a large "Historic US 101" sign on it. At one point, ferries were considered part of the state highway system.

    In San Francisco, US 101 was routed on the Central Freeway, which starts at I-80 and ended on the northbound (lower deck) side at Franklin and Golden Gate. It then went via Golden Gate to its current routing on Van Ness. The southbound upper deck started at Turk and Gough, using Turk from Van Ness. In 1958, the 1.3-mile-long extension of the Central Freeway from South Van Ness Avenue to Turk Street was under construction, with completion expected for 1959. This section was a two-level elevated viaduct with the three southbound lanes carried above the three northbound lanes. It wasdamaged in the Loma Priata earthquake and it was only open to Fell and Oak at Laguna. US 101 exited the Central Freeway at Mission/Van Ness. In 1996, this segment was closed down to take out the double deck portion.

    The Central Freeway had four sets of "ghost ramp" stubs off it:

    1. Stubs that could have been used to extend the freeway beyond its original north end at Turk/Golden Gate.

    2. A potential additional northbound off-ramp and southbound on-ramp (or another path for extending the freeway) to the west near Fulton St.

    3. A potential southbound off-ramp and northbound on-ramp at Fell/Oak, if extension (1) had occurred. (Conversely, if the freeway had been extended along Fell/Oak, these would have provided a connection >between the extension and the Turk/Golden Gate spur.

    4. On the surviving, single-deck section, what would have been a southbound off-ramp and northbound on-ramp at Van Ness/Mission.

    On US 101 near Moffet Blvd there are some bus cutouts. According to a posting on misc.transport.road, these were there to allow people to pick up soldiers, but their use is now discouraged, and they will be removed when the interchange is reconstructed.

    At the Rengstorff exit and around Mountain View, one can still see the old white-on-green BYP US 101 signs (with BYP greened out).

    The former terminus of the Bayshore Freeway (Blossom Hill Road (nee Ford Road) junction with Route 82 (Monterey Road)) still shows some vestige of the former Y interchange that fed the Bayshore into the older routing. Here one can see where the freeway makes a sudden turn to the left at this point, even though the Blossom Hill interchange is now a mere diamond. This old interchange was removed in 1982, for the Caltrans bridge log shows the bridges for the current CA 82/US 101 separation having been built then. (Thanks to Chris Sampang for this information)

    According to the San Mateo Daily Journal and the Feb 1925 CHPW, the predecessor to the Bayshore Freeway in the San Mateo area was the old Bayshore Highway. Parts of this highway (El Camino Real, once called the County Road) had already been built by the 1920s. The initial contract was approved by the California Highway Commission in 1924, providing for the grading of a 5.2 mile section between South San Francisco and Burlingame. These first 5.2 miles cost approximately $400,000 to construct.

    101 Open FillIn 1926, this was incorporated into the new US Highway system as part of US 101. As the Bayshore Freeway began to be designated as US 101, El Camino Realtime became known as the US 101 BYP. In 1931, the highway was completed to Redwood City. The southern section to San Jose was finished in 1937. The route of the old Bayshore began at 10th and Market in San Francisco. It extended past the intersection at today's Cesar Chavez and Potrero. It continued along what is now Bayshore Boulevard, which parallels today's freeway until it intersects with Third Street. From Third Street, the Bayshore Highway proceeded through “Boneyard Hill”, continuing around San Bruno Mountain south of Brisbane, extending through South San Francisco along what is now Airport Boulevard. Airport Boulevard crosses under the freeway at the north end of San Francisco International Airport. Cutting through the rich dairy land which once comprised much of Millbrae, the Bayshore Highway rolled through what is now a runway at SFO, then past today's hotel row in Burlingame, stopping at Broadway in Burlingame. At that point, the highway followed essentially the same route as today's Bayshore Freeway, until it reached Redwood City. There, today's Veteran's Boulevard served as the highway course, extending south to Marsh Road in Menlo Park. Beyond Palo Alto, the old highway followed much the same configuration as the present US 101. The first overpass over the Bayshore emerged at Peninsula Avenue, with the interchanges at Ralston Avenue, Holly Street and Whipple Avenue constructed later. By 1940, traffic congestion on El Camino Real led to construction of a a 27-mile freeway from San Francisco to Palo Alto. By 1948, most of initial construction of the Bayshore Freeway from San Francisco to Broadway-Burlingame had been completed. The second phase of construction extended the freeway into San Mateo. By July 11, 1957, the Candlestick causeway had been built over the water linking San Francisco with San Mateo County. This section of the freeway was constructed through the marshland from Candlestick Point and Oyster Point in South San Francisco, including excavating a mountain and filling the marsh east of Brisbane with landfill. Overall, 4,007,000 cubic yards of fill was used. Full details of the fill project may be found in the Nov/Dec 1955 issue of CHPW. In 1964, with the great renumbering, the Bayshore Freeway gained the sole designation of US 101, while El Camino Real became Route 82.

    In Brisbane (up to the Bayshore district of Daly City), the Bayshore Freeway takes a direct north-south path between the Cow Palace exit and the SF county line; Bayshore Boulevard swings to the left here because until the early 1960s, that was the actual SF Bay shoreline in what is called the Brisbane Lagoon. When the Bayshore Freeway was constructed here, part of the SF Bay was filled in for the freeway lanes (and is now occupied by the freeway and by the Sierra Point Parkway); the Brisbane Lagoon now is seperated from the rest of the Bay. (Thanks to Chris Sampang for this information)

    According to the Millbrae Spur Project: In the 1920s, San Francisco and San Mateo Counties proposed a faster through route between San Jose and San Francisco. The Junipero Serra Highway went through the congested downtown area of southern San Francisco, west to Daly City, and ended in Colma. In the late 1930s, the route (now US 101) was extended to Sneath Lane in San Bruno. It then connected to El Camino Real via Sneath Lane. In the mid-1950s a section was added extending the route to Crystal Springs Road, at which point one traveled east to El Camino or west to Skyline Boulevard. The CHC intended to complete this road through Millbrae to Millbrae Avenue, and create a connector to the Bayshore. However Millbrae housing development conflicted with the proposed highway construction. In early 1955 the proposed route of the Junipero Serra Highway was reoriented in San Bruno to go to Skyline Boulevard and south to Ralston Avenue in Belmont. This was considerably west of the original route; it no longer divided the Peninsula cities. In the 1960s the route was again modified, and the proposed highway was absorbed into I-280.

    Evidently, the route south from San Bruno was chosen for the first commemorative contract with groundbreaking on August 7, 1912. Why was it chosen? All the clout was in the San Francisco Bay area at the time - San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara & Alameda Counties. There was a strong desire for a San Francisco to Los Angeles route, and they wanted it in place before the Panama Pacific International Exhibition planned for 1915. The Highway Commission announced they would not build in incorporated cities. El Camino was "shovel ready" and San Bruno was not yet incorporated.

    There are also quite a few old alignments of Bypass 101 still existing: (Again, thank you Chris)

    • Bayshore Boulevard, Airport Boulevard, and South Airport Boulevard from Alemany Boulevard in San Francisco (near the Alemany Maze interchange of I-280/US 101, formerly Route 82/US 101 and before that, US 101/Bypass US 101) to San Bruno Avenue in San Bruno near the San Francisco International Airport, passing through the Bayshore district of Daly City, Brisbane, and South San Francisco. (Bayshore Boulevard between Army Street and Alemany Boulevard was mainline US 101, though it may have been US 101A when that existed on the Peninsula.)

    • McDonnell Road between San Bruno Avenue and Millbrae Avenue passing through the San Francisco International Airport, which was probably constructed after the airport was built.

    • Old Bayshore Highway between Millbrae Avenue near the San Francisco International Airport and Broadway/Airport Boulevard in Burlingame.

    • North Bayshore Boulevard between Coyote Point Drive in San Mateo and East Third Avenue in San Mateo.

    • South Bayshore Boulevard between Beacon Avenue in San Mateo and Newbridge Avenue in San Mateo.

    • Veterans Boulevard in Redwood City (from Holly Avenue exit to Route 84).

    • East Bayshore Road in Redwood City from Whipple Avenue to Bair Island Road.

    • East Bayshore Road in Redwood City from Seaport Boulevard to Secluded Avenue.

    • East Bayshore Road and Bayshore Parkway from Saratoga Avenue in East Palo Alto to Salado Drive in Mountain View passing through Palo Alto.

    • West Bayshore Road in East Palo Alto from Donohoe Street to Manhattan Avenue.

    • West Bayshore Road from Capitol Avenue in East Palo Alto to Embarcadero Road in Palo Alto.

    • West Bayshore Road from Oregon Expressway in Palo Alto to Fabian Way in Mountain View.

    • Old Bayshore Highway in San Jose from Airport Parkway to North 4th Street.

    • Old Bayshore Highway in San Jose from Zanker Road to Commercial Street.

    There is also, according to Chris, the possibility that Mission Road between Colma (originally known as Lawndale) and South San Francisco was once part of US 101. Chris did an analysis of a 1933 and a 1942 map posted by Mark Furqueron. In the 1933 map, US 101W takes a route that includes an intersection with Grand Avenue; the current El Camino Real alignment does not touch Grand Avenue. This is made clear in the 1942 map, suggesting that the current alignment of current Route 82 in South San Francisco was constructed between 1933 and 1942. As the Mission Road alignment first shown as bypassed a 1936 Gousha map, it's possible that this new routing around Colma Creek was constructed between 1933 and 1936, but not before 1933 at least. In the 1942 map, Mission Road intersects El Camino Real in "Baden Station", near the present junction of Westborough Boulevard/Chestnut Avenue with Route 82. This would mean that Chestnut Avenue's bridge over Colma Creek may have once been part of the US 101 routing, or a different bridge may have existed (Mission Road now ends in a T intersection with Chestnut). According to the CalTrans bridge log, the original Colma Creek bridge at the Mission/El Camino junction in Colma was built in 1913, and revamped in 1927 (thus suggesting that Mission Road may have only been a temporary routing before the Colma Creek bypass was finished).

    At one point, there was more freeway planned for US 101: it would have been the Mission Freeway: A freeway that looks like it ran down Mission Street from US 101 in Daly City to the present-day US 101 near Oak and Fell. This was more proposed freeway than anything actual; it certainly was not part of the state highway system by 1963. It appears that a portion of it (as San Jose Avenue) existed for about a mile or two north of I-280, with a couple of interchanges. It is more likely that this stretch is the remains of San Jose Avenue, which was built as a divided road beside the original (1860's-1870's) Southern Pacific main line (an article on this stretch may be found here). Later, the Ocean Shore RR and streetcar lines joined in, and starting in the early 1900's SP gradually abandoned the line after building the one Caltrain uses now. The RR(s) originally built the cut; the City later widened it and built roadways. Pictures from the 1950's and early 1960's show the overpasses built with a narrow space between pillars in the center (where the railroad/streetcar tracks were) paved over as a passing lane, with wider spaces on either side for the main road. In the 1960's or 1970's, the bridges were replaced for seismic and road reconstruction purposes with the full-width spans seen today. The only actual interchange is at Glen Park (Diamond St. - Monterey Blvd.) where it was built as part of the Southern Freeway project (I-280). Note that portions of this are currently maintained by the City of San Francisco, although the portion south of Rousseau is Caltrans.

    In 1942, southbound Bypass US 101 did not continue down Bayshore Highway past Fourth Street (near the current I-880/US 101 junction) but went down Fourth, Reed, and Second to rejoin US 101 (First Street, now Route 82) near the current I-280/Route 82 junction. The Bayshore Highway continued only southeast from Fourth Street to McKee Road, where it became 30th Street (but reconnected to Monterey Highway). 30th Street has since been relegated to a non-continuous frontage road next to the Bayshore Freeway.

     

    Alternate Routes

    Between the mid-1930s and 1964, there was also an Alternate US 101. This ran along the 1934 state signed Route 3 between San Juan Capestrano and El Rio (near Ventura), and is present-day Route 1. This was LRN 60, defined in 1919. In Southern California, this ran along Pacific Coast Highway, Palisades Beach Road (PCH in Santa Monica), Olympic Blvd (Route 26), Lincoln Blvd, Sepulveda Blvd, and PCH.

    A second Alternate US 101 (US 101E) existed in the San Franciso Bay area. This alternate diverged from US 101 in downtown San Jose, at approximately Alameda and Santa Clara. It ran along Santa Clara, and then along 13th St N to what is now Old Oakland Road. Later it followed the route of what was then Route 17 (original Route 13; LRN 69 (defined in 1933); present-day I-880) into Oakland. Briefly, the US 101 routing was signed as US 101W, and the Alternate US 101 routing was signed as US 101E. The US101E routing may have been the original 1926 US 101 routing. It appears the 101W and 101E designations disappeared with the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge.

    There is a report that a 1934 Gousha map shows US 101E following US 50 from Oakland to Hayward, then along the route that is now Route 238 southward, not along the Route 17 alignment.

     

    Status

    Los Angeles County

    There's a plan afoot to build a park atop the Hollywood Freeway in Hollywood. This would roughly be over the freeway between Western and Franklin. Details are on Curbed-LA. The plan is called Hollywood Freeway Central Park. The project hopes to start the environmental impact review process in the first quarter of 2012, with the Bureau of Engineering as the lead agency (previously, Caltrans was the lead agency). The project also says that a working group with members from Bureau of Engineering, the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles, Councilmember Eric Garcetti's office, and the Friends of the Hollywood Central Park has been meeting since May 2011 to prepare for the EIR.

    [101 Slot Park]Caltrans is also talking another park proposal. This would be a massive park and development project atop what is known as the Slot, the below-grade section of US 101 that runs between the Civic Center and Chinatown. According to Caltrans, the idea would be to cap about a half-mile of US 101 just east of Route 110. Curently, there are no firm plans for the cap, nor a cost estimate. The project was developed in 2008 by 24 interns with international design firm EDAW. They worked here for two weeks and produced a design for Park 101, a revolutionary urban design solution to create a leafy oasis in the downtown urban core. The next step for the Park 101 Steering Committee is to obtain sponsorship and funding.

    In September 2013, City Council members voted 14-0 to approve the motion introduced by Councilman Jose Huizar (PDF) on July 30 to seek funding from private, federal and state grants for the Downtown Park 101 Freeway cap park project, which would connect the Civic Center with Olvera Street, Chinatown and Union Station.

    In 2006, NBC/Universal proposed a series of new plans for developments and improvements at the Universal Studios property. These plans include an extensive package of transportation proposals they say are designed to enhance mobility throughout Universal City and the community. The improvements under consideration include: a shuttle system from Universal Village and throughout Universal City to the MTA station; construction of a North/South "Great Street" through Universal Village connecting Forest Lawn Drive to Coral Drive; freeway and access improvements including possible construction of a southbound entrance to US 101 from Universal City. Also under consideration are a single-purpose urban interchange (SPUI) near Campo de Cahuenga connecting to US 101, and other system improvements to the US 101 corridor and the Route 134 interchange. Barham corridor improvements including the modification of the intersection at Forest Lawn Drive and Barham Boulevard and the possible widening of the Barham Bridge at the L.A. River; the enhancement of the pedestrian crossing at Lankershim Boulevard and Campo de Cahuenga, and various traffic signal system upgrades and intersection enhancements.

    Tony Curtis MuralIn October 2011, the Tony Curtis mural on US 101 was removed. This was done by the artist after 16-years of re-touching the mural after numerous vandal attacks, and after a recent repainting of the mural. It was painted by George Sportelli of Whittier, who indicated in October 2011, “I decided about a year or two ago that I needed to relocate this mural because I didn't intend to spend the rest of my life cleaning graffiti off of it.” Originally painted in 1995 by Sportelli as part of Caltrans Transportation Art Program, the mural has stood as an easy reminder to motorists that they are passing through Hollywood or the city's creative nature. The current mural will be installed on a building at the Shiloh Horse Rescue near Las Vegas which is owned by Curtis' widow, Jill Curtis.
    (Caltrans Blog)

    In September 2000, the California Transportation Commission considered a proposal (TCRP Project 51) to add an auxiliary lane and widen the ramp through the I-405/US 101 freeway interchange in Sherman Oaks. For phases 1 and 2, the request was for $4 million, with a total estimated cost of $34 million.

    There is also work afoot to address another problem at that interchange -- specifically, the connector between southbound I-405 and the northbound US 101. This might involve construction of an elevated two-lane connector. There are five options currently under consideration, some of which could affect nearby homes or take out part of the Sepulveda Basin wildlife refuge. The connection between two freeways is now just one lane and often backs up on I-405. The project would build a two-lane connector across the Sepulveda Dam spillway, and could possibly include changes to southbound I-405 and the southbound US-101 interchange, and the Burbank Boulevard on-and-off-ramps.

    TCRP Project #48 is a study to improve the US 101 corridor between Route 170 and Route 23. Many of these ideas will never happen. There is also a proposal for short term measures, such as adjusting city streets.

    Note that in the San Fernando Valley, portions of the route are labelled as east/west instead of (or sometimes, in addition to) being north/south. Presumably, this is to simplify directions for local travellers, who don't see the route as running North/South.

    [Reyes Adobe]In August 2008, it was announced that work would begin in October on the demolition of the narrow Reyes Adobe Road bridge over Route 101, and its replacement with a new overpass. The final $8.4 million package of federal, state and regional transportation funds is being secured, and officials expect the Agoura Hills City Council will approve going out to bid on the project in September 2008. The project will replace a bridge built in 1965 that has three lanes squeezed into space for two, no room for bikes, and a sidewalk on only one side of the road. However, right of way restrictions will prevent them from moving frontage roads a block away from the freeway ramp intersections in a major circulation reconfiguration (as was done at Kanan Road). As a result, the signal for Canwood Street on the north side of the freeway will have to remain within a dozen yards of the northbound half of the diamond interchange. The project will cost $11.3 million, with most of that coming from impact fees paid by developers to the city. About $3.9 million is coming from the federal treasury under two special congressional appropriations, $2.1 million from a grant from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and the rest from the city of Agoura Hills. (source)

    101-Palo Comado InterchangeIn February 2012, it was reported that Caltrans and the City of Agoura Hills propose to construct improvements at the US 101/Palo Comado Canyon Road interchange (PM 33.0/34.4), in Los Angeles County within in the City of Agoura Hills (this is the "Chesboro Road" offramp). The project would include widening the Palo Comado Canyon Road and Palo Comado Canyon Road Overcrossing over US 101 and modification of the interchange ramps in order to improve traffic circulation, safety, and bicycle/pedestrian access. The need for this project was first identified by Agoura Hills in their 1992 General Plan. The Plan’s Circulation Element discusses the need for widening of the US 101/Palo Comado Canyon Road overcrossing due to congested freeway access and poor circulation. Discussion of the need for this project was carried forth to the City’s 2010 General Plan. The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) included the project in Addendum #3 to their 2008 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and Draft Amendment #08-34 to the 2008 Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP). The current (2012) overcrossing structure was built in 1963. It provides two 12-foot lanes and 4-foot shoulders in each direction. A 5-foot sidewalk is provided on the west side of the overcrossing. The minimum vertical clearance is 15.1 feet, which is located in the northeast corner of the structure over the northbound US 101 number four lane. The interchange is configured with tight diamond ramps on the northbound side and hook ramps on the southbound side. The southbound hook ramps connect with Dorothy Drive and Chesebro Road at a four-point intersection south of US 101. A short section of Chesebro Road directly opposite the hook ramps provides access from the ramps to Palo Comado Canyon Road. The southbound off-ramp is a one-lane exit that widens to two lanes at its termini. The southbound on-ramp is a one-lane ramp throughout. The northbound ramps connect directly to Palo Comado Road. The northbound on-ramp has two lanes starting from the Palo Comado Road intersection and tapers to a one-lane on-ramp before joining the freeway. The northbound off-ramp begins as one lane and widens to two lanes at its termini. The interchange does not currently have any signalized intersections. The proposed new interchange (as of January 2012) would include widening Palo Comado Canyon Road from two to four lanes between Driver Avenue and Chesebro Road. Just north of the overcrossing, Driver Avenue becomes Palo Comado Canyon Road; just south of the overcrossing, Palo Comado Canyon Road becomes Chesebro Road. The Palo Comado Canyon Road Overcrossing would be widened from one lane in each direction to provide two lanes in each direction, along with a dedicated left-hand turn lane, for a total of five striped lanes. A Class II bike lane and sidewalks would be provided on both sides of the overcrossing. The construction would maintain the existing layout of the interchange ramps; however, the northbound on- and off-ramps would be slightly re-configured, with an additional lane being provided on the northbound off-ramp at the Palo Comado Canyon Road intersection. The intersection of the northbound ramps and Palo Comado Road would be signalized; the remaining intersections would remain un-signalized. Details are found in the draft initial study. At an initial community meeting on the project, local residents expressed concern about whether there was sufficient traffic to justify the changes.

    In December 2012, it was reported that a feasibility study and environmental impact report have been done and public meetings held on proposed plans to widen Palo Comado between Driver Avenue and Chesebro Road. In response to these, the Agoura Hills City Council decided in November 2012 not to move forward with putting the engineering design phase of the project out to bid after 12 residents from the Old Agoura neighborhood spoke at the council's Nov. 14 meeting. They plan to revisit the issue in January 2013.

    In April 2013, it was reported that the new Lindero Canyon Bridge will feature artwork from a Westlake Villiage artist. The Westlake City Council in consultation with Caltrans, which is in charge of the construction, commissioned sculptor Joe Wertheimer to design an imprint for concrete on both sides of the bridge. Wertheimer, who works out of a studio on Via Colinas in Westlake Village, said the project is unique, as nobody has spanned a freeway. The original drawing of the scene features mountains and trees as a backdrop to a lake with sailboats and birds. This was then broken down into 1-inch scale,transferred to a 1-foot scale. This was then drawn on each panel. During this process, the five panels were lined up; the artist would sculpt one, two and three at a time and then slide it down and add another panel, and that was the process for eight months. The 42 panels were coated in plaster and used to make molds. When completed, the work will be 360 feet long and 6 feet tall. It will be created by pouring concrete into the form and then peeling off the front molds to leave a raised relief. The $5 million project will add a traffic lane in each direction, retrofit seismic upgrades and improve the aesthetics of the interchange. The bridge project is being funded primarily using Measure R funds from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Work is anticipated to begin in mid-June 2013, and the project is expected to take about 10 months to complete, he said, and once completed will help alleviate traffic backups at the intersection during peak commuter hours. The upgraded bridge will feature an 11-foot-wide lighted pedestrian walkway on the east side. Each corner of the bridge will be defined with a stone pilaster with a bronze sailboat similar to the city’s entry monuments.
    (Source: VC Star, 4/20/13)

    Ventura County

    In January 2014, it was reported that Ventura County was beginning a study regarding the possibility of adding toll (i.e., HOT or "express lanes") to US 101 in Ventura County. But even if the Ventura County Transportation Commission’s $111,000 feasibility study finds that installing High-Occupancy Toll lanes along the 101 Freeway is doable, it would take at least a decade before motorists could actually use them. The results of the feasibility study should be available by the end of 2014, at which time they will be discussed at a public VCTC meeting.
    (Source: The Acorn)

    In May 2009, using money from the ARRA (Stimulus Package), Ventura County commissioners agreed to give $6.5 million to Thousand Oaks to begin the design process for the widening of the interchange of US 101 and Route 23. The Thousand Oaks City Council recently decided to loan the project money from the city's General Fund so the process could begin this year and to reimburse the General Fund when (if?) the state funding comes through in 2010-11. In late July 2009, the city reached a cooperative agreement with the California Department of Transportation to take over the design. The proposed improvements will add one lane on US 101 in each direction between the Los Angeles/Ventura County line and Moorpark Road by widening the freeway, restriping, reconstructing the median, and realigning a portion of the center line. Soundwalls will be constructed between Hampshire Road and Conejo School Road on the northbound side and between Manzanita Lane and Hampshire Road on the southbound side. The city hopes that the design process will be completed by May 2012 at the latest and that Caltrans will be able to take back the project at that point to begin the construction process. However, the construction phase is still unfunded at this point and additional federal funds will be required to complete the work by 2016 as laid out in the preliminary schedule.

    In late September 2011, it was reported that the Thousand Oaks City Council on Tuesday considered loaning $20 million out of city reserves to cover the pending CTC portion of the funding. The city's loan would be contingent on the state transportation commission agreeing to pay it back using the money the panel planned to award the project in 2016. If an agreement between the city and state is reached, the $20 million would be used as required matching funds for a federal transportation stimulus grant. Thousand Oaks and VCTC plan to jointly apply for a $20 million grant in October. The grant requires a minimum 20 percent local match. Construction could get under way in late 2012 or early 2013. It would add a new lane on US 101 in each direction and two lanes on the ramps that narrow to one lane would be extended. Design work on the interchange is expected to be completed early next year. The work, which includes rights of way for utility relocation, cost $6 million and was funded with federal stimulus money.

    In January 2012, it was reported that the City of Thousand Oaks lost out on $19.5 million in funding it was seeking through the U.S. Department of Transportation's TIGER III grant program. This is anticipated to delay the start of construction for several years, unless funding is obtained in the 2012 transportation bills. In March 2012, officials from the Ventura County Transportation Commission and the City of Thousand Oaks traveled to Washington, D.C., ahead of the March 19 deadline to reapply for a $20-million Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant. If the city’s request is approved, construction would start in early 2013 and finish in about two years.

    In October 2012, it was reported that the Thousand Oaks City Council voted unanimously Oct. 9, 2012 to advance up to $17.7 million from its capital fund reserves to jump-start the estimated $42-million US 101/Route 23 interchange project, pending the granting of anticipated state and federal funds. Even with the council’s approval of the loan, work can’t begin until the state agrees to the arrangement. City and county officials have been trying unsuccessfully for years to obtain state and federal funds to pay for the interchange expansion, which would add a travel lane in each direction for drivers connecting to US 101 from Route 23 or vice versa. Thousand Oaks and VCTC tried twice before to obtain a $20-million federal Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant. Both applications were denied. Also in October, the California Transportation Commission unanimously approved the use of $11.9 million to partially fund the $42 million project. The $11.9 million is money left over from the widening of the US 101/Rice Avenue interchange project in Oxnard. It comes from funds that must be used to aid the movement of freight. The project will add one lane in each direction of Highway 101 between the Ventura County/Los Angeles County line and Moorpark Road. Sound walls will also be built.

    On March 1, 2013, the Ventura County Transportation Commission, a body representing all 10 cities in the county, approved a critical loan repayment agreement between the City of Thousand Oaks and the state that could get the long-awaited construction effort underway by the end of 2013. The project, which is estimated to cost $42 million, would add a travel lane in each direction for drivers connecting to US 101 from Route 23 and vice versa. It’s been discussed for more than a decade but the county has been unsuccessful up until now in finding the funds to pay for it. Under the agreement, Thousand Oaks will put up $15.7 million to get the work started, money that would be repaid by 2016 from the state’s Transportation Improvement Program. The Thousand Oaks City Council voted unanimously in November 2012 to advance the money from its capital fund reserves before millions in state funding becomes available.
    (Source: TO Acorn, 3/8/13)

    In December 2013, it was reported that Caltrans planned to award the construction contract in January 2014. The roadwork will add a travel lane in each direction for drivers connecting to US 101 from Route 23 and vice versa. Sound walls will be constructed on the north side of the interchange between Hampshire and Conejo School roads and on the south side between Manzanita Lane and Hampshire. Caltrans plans to award the construction contract to Security Paving Co, Inc. of Sylmar, which submitted a $24.7-million bid in September.

    In January 2013, the CTC approved an AB 3090 cash reimbursement in order to use local funds to replace $20,000,000 in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds for construction of the Los Angeles County Line to Route 23 – US 101 Improvements - Phase 1 project (PPNO 2291). The City and VCTC propose reimbursement of $15,764,000 in FY 2015-16, with the remaining $4,236,000 returning to Ventura County’s share balance. This project will improve Route 101 from the Los Angeles County line to Moorpark Road, including improvements to the interchange of Route 101 and Route 23.

    In January 2012, construction will begin on improvements to the Wendy Drive interchange. This is based on the fact that in August 2011, the city of Thousand Oaks secured $10.7 million in federal money for the $13.5 million, 18-month project to widen northbound and southbound ramps. The rest of the funding consists of $605,000 in gas tax money and $2.9 million in developer fees, although it will be several years before the city receives the developer money. Plans to alleviate congestion at the interchange include adding a travel lane in each direction on the bridge,adding a lane on the westbound on-ramp and the eastbound off-ramp, as well as updating signals, planting landscaping, adding decorative railing and light fixtures on the bridge, and installing a northbound bike lane on Wendy. The bike lane will run between two vehicle lanes to keep cyclists from riding past cars coming on or off the freeway that are not required to stop. This design is the first of its kind and has garnered the support of cyclists and Caltrans. Along with temporary ramp closures, the entire freeway in both directions will be shut down for several nights to install steel girders across the highway. The first full closure will come nine months into construction, with a second full closure at the one-year mark. Traffic will be detoured onto local streets. One lane on the bridge also will be closed during construction to allow for the span's widening. In early December 2011, the Thousand Oaks City Council awarded a $1.2 million construction management contract to AECOM Technical Services, Inc. of Los Angeles and a $8.4 million construction contract to Valencia-based C.A. Rasmussen, Inc. The construction bid came in $1.1 million less than the city's estimate. Updates on the project may be found on a website maintained by the City of Thousand Oaks.

    In May 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Camarillo, on Petit Street, 0.1 mile west of Calleguas Creek, consisting of frontage roads.

    There are plans to construct a new interchange at Springville Drive in Camarillo, CA. According to the Ventura County Star in December 2009, the Camarillo City Council finally agreed to move forward with a new US 101 interchange project near Springville Road. The council voted unanimously to establish a “benefit area” to raise money for the $51 million Springville Interchange project. About $23 million is needed for a new bridge, on- and off-ramps and road extensions, said City Manager Jerry Bankston. The rest is for additional improvements in the Springville and north Camarillo Airport areas. Property owners in the benefit area will pay one-time road and bridge improvement fees to the city, which will sell bonds to finance the interchange up-front. The council also approved the formation of a Community Facilities District within the benefit area. The district would include 47 acres owned by Robert D. Selleck of Selleck Properties. “Without the district, we could not have raised the (bridge fee) money, especially under these tough economic times,” Selleck said. Mayor Kevin Kildee said the interchange is necessary to improve traffic flow throughout the city, especially with the recent expansion of Camarillo Premium Outlets and future growth at CSU Channel Islands. The project will include an interchange with a six-lane bridge over the freeway, new on- and off-ramps and a connection to an extended Verdulera Street. Ponderosa Drive will be widened to four lanes from Las Posas Road to the new interchange. Ventura Boulevard will also be extended east and west of Springville. The California Department of Transportation has approved permits for the project, and the city plans to start construction at the beginning of 2010.

    In February 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Ventura County to reconstruct the interchange at Route 101 and Rice Avenue and improve traffic operations, enhance safety and increase capacity. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF) and includes local funds and federal demonstration funds. The total estimated project cost is $86,899,000. It is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2008-09. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project TCIF baseline agreement. In May 2009, the Ventura County Transportation Commission approved the allocation of $5 million for improvements to the Rice Road-US 101 interchange in Oxnard, using regional ARRA funds. The project is expected to be completed in middle 2012. In February 2012, the CTC adjusted the project funding to reflect construction savings.

    In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Oxnard adjacent to Route 1 and US 101 on Wagon Wheel Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

    [TCRP 47] In Ventura, the current 5-lane bridge (3 lanes EB, 2 lanes WB) over the Santa Clara River will be replaced with a new 12 lane bridge. The current Route 1 flyover that currently brings that traffic into the left-lane lane of US 101 will become a right-lane entrance that is standard. This is TCRP Project #47. In October 2006, the city of Ventura requested additional funding for environmental documentation. The goal of the Route 101, California Street Off-Ramp project is to improve the traffic flow, sight distance, and increase ramp storage to mitigate an existing problem of traffic backing up to the freeway. The project also creates a connection between California Street and the downtown business district. The project is projected to be completed in FY 2009/2010, although according to the Los Angeles Times, the widening should be completed in mid August 2007. Work began in 2002 and was to be completed in four years. Problems and design revisions delayed the project and pushed construction costs from $72 million to $85 million. The project was constructed by Sacramento-based MCM Construction Inc., a leading bridge builder in California who has erected spans over Malibu Lagoon on Pacific Coast Highway, built the Riverside Freeway (Route 91) and I-5 interchange near Knott's Berry Farm and installed bridges across I-210 between Fontana and San Dimas. The project was subject to numerous restrictions. Between Dec. 15 and June 1, crews couldn't use heavy equipment in the streambed. Wildlife authorities imposed the restriction to protect a rare songbird that, despite the nearby traffic and development, nests in the willows and alders along the river. The presence of the imperiled southern steelhead trout, which migrates up the river in winter months, hampered progress on the bridge. In 2004, the heaviest rainfall in Southern California in over 100 years swept away the project's scaffolding and support equipment. Average daily traffic flows are forecast to reach 214,000 trips daily while peak traffic flows are expected to reach 18,000 vehicles per hour by 2025, according to Caltrans and the county Transportation Commission. In September 2011, the CTC received a request to update the project schedule and funding plan and to re-allocate $120,000 in previously allocated TCRP funds. This project originally included $606,000 in TCRP funds for the Environmental (PA&ED) phase. In October 2006, the Commission approved an additional allocation of $120,000 for environmental work. The project was subsequently suspended after several technical issues with drainage and storm water runoff were revealed. Now that a solution to the issues has been identified, the City would like to proceed with completion of the environmental work. The previously allocated $120,000 in TCRP funds is currently unexpended and set to expire in October 2011. The City requests that these funds be reallocated so the project can move forward. The City also requests that the funding plan be updated to reflect the addition of $2,750,000 in Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds for the project.

    [Mussel Shoals]In 2007, the CTC recommended funding (from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account [CMIA]) to construct HOV lanes from Mussel Shoals to Casitas Pass Rd ($151,470K requested; $131,600K recommended). In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project spanning Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties to construct HOV lanes in each direction and roadway improvements near the community of Mussel Shoals in Ventura County to Casitas Pass Road in Santa Barbara County. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). Total estimated cost is $151,470,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Specifically, six miles of car-pool lanes will be added, and the project shuld begin in winter 2011. In November 2010, the Ventura County Star noted that the project will also include a bike path that is separate from the highway lanes, a new walkway under the highway between La Conchita and the beach, and the closing of the left turn lanes in and out of La Conchita and Mussel Shoals. Caltrans officials say they would have preferred the bike path to be on the mountain side, but the California Coastal Commission asked them to move it because it wants to encourage development of a network of coastal trails that stretch from Oregon to the Mexican border. Putting the bike lanes on the southbound side means a smaller shoulder on that side of the road — 10 feet, down from 19 feet now — which means there won't be room for surfers, fishermen and beachgoers to park their cars. The southbound shoulder near La Conchita is designated now as emergency parking only, but the rule is rarely enforced. Caltrans is also including sound walls at the request of Mussel Shoals homeowners. The agency asked people living in all of the small communities along US 101 whether they wanted sound walls, and Mussel Shoals was the only community that voted for them. The walls will be from 8 to 14 feet tall. In November 2010, it was reported that there was some opposition to the plan—less due to the widening than the location of the bicycle path on the ocean side of the roadway. They claim that that location would reduce access, be vulnerable to erosion and create parking problems. However, the Coastal Commission sided with Caltrans and kept the bike lane where it was.

    Environmental and design studies are underway to add extra capacity to the clogged corridor along a six mile stretch between the Mobil Pier and Casitas Pass Road. The general idea is to add a carpool lane in both directions using the existing median area. In addition to the extra lane, shoulder and median widths may be enlarged. In addition, the non-freeway portions in La Conchita and Mussel Shoals would be converted to full freeway standard and the left and u-turn openings closed off. Operational improvements include the addition of traffic cameras, pavement speed sensors and changeable message signs. Proper sound walls and retaining walls would be built as well as metal guardrail replaced with concrete barriers. In July 2010, the Ventura County Planning Commission voted unanimously to grant a permit for the project and funding has been obtained through $150 million in transportation bonds. Construction could begin in late 2011.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved schedule and funding changes to the HOV lane project near Mussel Shoals. The project was delayed due to a number of issues, including (a) Coastal Zone permitting requirements – Considerable coordination with the California Coastal Commission (CCC) was necessary in order to obtain coastal development permits for the project. This delayed the design phase by over a year. (b) Right of Way (R/W) easement requirements – The proposed pedestrian undercrossing at La Conchita passes through Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) R/W. Easements required for the undercrossing were declined by the UPRR and the Department began the condemnation process. A Resolution of Necessity was approved at the June 2011 Commission meeting. Negotiations for the compensation of the easement with UPRR are on-going. These changes move the start of construction out a year to February 2012, with construction completion scheduled for August 2016.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $131,600,000 in state-administered CMIA funds for construction of HOV lanes on US 101 from near Mussel Shoals, in Ventura County to just south of Casitas Pass Road in Santa Barbara County. In March 2012, the CTC reduced the original CMIA allocation for construction on Route 101 by $50,307,000, from $116,300,000 to $65,993,000, for the HOV Lanes, Mussel Shoals to Casitas Pass Road project (PPNO 3918) in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties.

    In May 2012, ground was broken for the first HOV lanes on US 101 in Southern California, expected to be completed in late 2015. These go in both directions from Mobil Pier Road in Ventura County to Casitas Pass Road in Santa Barbara County. Most of the $102 million project is in Ventura County, with a small portion in Santa Barbara County. The project also will include a southbound bike path and a pedestrian undercrossing in La Conchita. After the project is finished, ground will be broken in 2016 for a carpool lane along Highway 101, from Carpinteria to Santa Barbara.

    In February 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Camarillo along Route 101 from Route 34 (Lewis Road) to Arneill Road, consisting of relocated or reconstructed city streets, frontage roads, and parking facilities.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening US 101 in Santa Barbara and Ventura County.

    Santa Barbara/San Luis Obispo/San Benito Counties/Monterey

    [Carpinteria]In June 2008, the CTC received a notice of preparation for roadway improvements on a portion of Route 101 near Carpinteria in Santa Barbara County. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for project development, right of way and construction support for $50,468,000. Total cost of the project is estimated to be $100,451,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2013-14, depending on the availability of funds. There are five alternatives being considered for the project.

    • Alternative 1: This alternative would replace the Linden Avenue Overcrossing with a five-lane structure, construct a northbound on-ramp and a southbound off-ramp in a diamond configuration, replace the northbound Franklin Creek Bridge, replace the Casitas Pass Road Overcrossing with a five-lane structure, construct northbound hook ramps, construct southbound diamond ramps, widen and replace the northbound and southbound Carpinteria Creek Bridges, construct a new two-lane bridge for the Via Real extension over Carpinteria Creek, and extend Via Real to provide connectivity between Bailard Avenue and Linden Avenue.

    • Alternative 2: This alternative would replace the Linden Avenue Overcrossing with a four-lane structure, construct a northbound hook on-ramp, construct a southbound diamond off-ramp, replace the Casitas Pass Road Overcrossing with a five-lane structure, construct northbound hook ramps, construct southbound diamond ramps, widen and replace the northbound and southbound Carpinteria Creek Bridges, construct a new two-lane bridge for the Via Real extension over Carpinteria Creek, and extend Via Real to provide connectivity between Bailard Avenue and Linden Avenue.

    • Alternative 3: This alternative would replace the Linden Avenue Overcrossing with a four-lane structure, construct a roundabout with one leg as a northbound on-ramp, construct a southbound diamond off-ramp, replace the Casitas Pass Road Overcrossing with a five-lane structure, construct northbound hook ramps, construct southbound diamond ramps, widen and replace the northbound and southbound Carpinteria Creek Bridges, construct a new two-lane bridge for the Via Real extension over Carpinteria Creek, and extend Via Real to provide connectivity between Bailard Avenue and Linden Avenue.

    • Alternative 4: This alternative would replace the Linden Avenue Overcrossing with a five-lane structure, construct a northbound on-ramp and a southbound off-ramp in a diamond configuration, replace the northbound Franklin Creek Bridge, replace the Casitas Pass Road Overcrossing with a five-lane structure, construct northbound hook ramps, construct southbound diamond ramps, widen and replace the northbound and southbound Carpinteria Creek Bridges, construct a new two-lane bridge for the Via Real extension over Carpinteria Creek, and extend Via Real to provide connectivity between Bailard Avenue and Linden Avenue.

      Alternative 5: No-build

    In February 2009, the CTC received the Draft EIR on the above project for review. The alternatives changed slightly:

    • Alternative 1 - No Build.

    • Alternative 2 - This alternative replaces the bridges on Route 101 over Carpinteria Creek including reconstructing the Casitas Pass Road overcrossing, reconfiguring the northbound on- and off-ramps, extending Via Real to Linden Avenue, and reconstructing bicycle paths.

    • Alternative 3 - Same as Alternative 2 yet relocates the northbound on-ramp with a direct connection to the north side of Linden Avenue, requiring a five-lane overcrossing.

    • Alternative 4 - Same as Alternative 3 yet uses a roundabout at the intersection of Via Real, Ogan Road and the northbound on-ramp.

    In November 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Santa Barbara County that will make operational improvements to Route 101 in the city of Carpinteria by reconstructing the Linden Avenue and Casitas Pass Road interchanges, reconfiguring on and off ramps, replacing Route 101 bridges over Carpinteria Creek and reconstructing bike paths. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program for project development only. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. Total estimated project cost is $101,171,000 for capital and support. Resources that may be impacted by the project include; land use, farmlands, biological resources, visual resources, water quality, and noise. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance through proposed mitigation measures.

    In June 2009, the CTC recieved notice of the preparation of a draft EIR. The project under consideration would construct a new HOV lane on Route 101 between Bailard Avenue in the city of Carpinteria and Milpas Street in the city of Santa Barbara. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for Plans, Specifications, and Estimates in the amount of $12,585,000. Santa Barbara County voters, through the passage of Measure A in November 2008, dedicated $140,000,000 of regional sales tax funds toward the construction of this project. The total cost of the project is estimated to be between $380 million and $600 million. Assuming the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. In addition to the no build alternatives, there are three alternatives under consideration. All build alternatives propose to add one HOV lane in each direction, resulting in a six-lane freeway within the project limits. Alternative 1 proposes to add the HOV lane while balancing outside and inside (median) landscaping impacts. Alternative 2 proposes to add the HOV lanes while maximizing the amount of median planting within the project limits. Alternative 3 proposes to add the HOV lanes within the existing median with minor incidental outside widening.

    In March 2011, the CTC received notice of an amendment that proposes to extend the limits of this project to the south by 0.6 mile. This would change the southern project limits from 0.4 mile south of Carpenteria Creek Bridge to 0.2 mile south of Bailard Avenue. The proposed change would incorporate improvements to storm water treatment facilities at the Bailard Avenue interchange.

    [101 HOV Carpinteria]In April 2012, Caltrans released the draft EIR for the project. The project involves an 11-mile stretch of freeway, and would add HOV lanes between Sycamore Creek, north of Salinas Street, in Santa Barbara and Bailard Avenue in Carpinteria. During peak traffic periods, the extra lanes would be restricted to vehicles with two or more passengers. The HOV lanes would be open to all vehicles outside of the morning and afternoon commute times. The project also would have “substantial adverse visual impacts” and require amendments to the local coastal plans for the cities of Santa Barbara and Carpinteria, due to the proximity of several wetlands locations. Three build alternatives—Alternatives 1, 2, and 3—and a No-Build Alternative are proposed for this project. Alternative 1 proposes to widen to the median in some locations and widen to the outside in other locations to balance inside and outside resources. Alternative 2 proposes widening to the outside to maximize available areas for median landscaping. Alternative 3 proposes widening to the inside, which means building all new paved lanes within the existing available median. All build alternatives would be built mainly within the existing public right-of-way with only slight variations between all three. Projected costs for each build alternative vary and depend on which configuration is selected for the Cabrillo Boulevard Interchange. Current proposed costs for the alternatives with the various Cabrillo Boulevard Interchange configurations are: Alternative 1 ranges from $285 million to $340 million; Alternative 2 ranges from $305 million to $355 million; and Alternative 3 ranges from $270 million to $325 million. All of the alternatives will widen the freeway to provide for a six-lane facility within the project limits, and will add a part-time, continuous access HOV lane in each direction on US 101 extending from Carpinteria Creek in the City of Carpinteria to Cabrillo Boulevard in the City of Santa Barbara. They would also (a) improve the southbound shoulder ditches near the Bailard Avenue interchange to provide graded, flat-bottom swales to be used for stormwater treatment, (b) replace bridge structures at Arroyo Paredon (Parida), Toro Canyon, Romero (Picay), Oak, and San Ysidro creeks, (c) widen bridge structures at Franklin and Santa Monica creeks, (d) widen traffic undercrossing structures at South Padaro Lane and Evans Avenue, (e) build a southbound auxiliary lane between the Sheffield Drive on-ramp and the Evans Avenue off-ramp, (f) replace the interchange at Sheffield Drive, which includes reconfiguring the southbound highway lanes and ramps, including a reconstructed bridge that would be 118 feet wide and would contain a single concrete barrier, (g) reconstruct the highway to remove a nonstandard-crest vertical curve north of Sheffield Drive near the Romero (Picay) Creek Bridge, which implies lowering the freeway profile a maximum of 2 feet to accomplish the reconstruction, (h) rebuild the interchange at Cabrillo Boulevard/Hot Springs, and (i) signals, landscaping, soundwalls, retaining walls, as appropriate. Specifics for each alternative are: Alternative 1— selectively widen inside and outside within available right-of-way, maximizing opportunities to retain and refine high value resources including scenic views, wetlands and median/outside landscaping, add median landscaping, where appropriate: from Carpinteria Creek to Linden Avenue; near the South Padaro Lane interchange; Nidever Road to Garapato Creek; and near the North Padaro Lane interchange, build one additional retaining wall to maximize median planting, on the southbound shoulder at the right-of-way line ending at the Santa Claus Lane southbound on-ramp (500 feet in length); Alternative 2— add a lane to the outside in order to maximize median landscaping in the median where right-of-way is available, provide median landscaping, where appropriate: from Carpinteria Creek to Reynolds Avenue; and from Santa Monica Road to the Evans Avenue interchange, build three additional retaining walls to maximize median planting: one on the southbound shoulder at the right-of-way line ending at the Santa Claus Lane southbound on-ramp (500 feet in length); one on the northbound shoulder near Greenwell Creek (700 feet in length); and one on the northbound shoulder near the northbound off-ramp to Summerland (300 feet in length.); Alternative 3 — build all new paved lanes within the existing available median, with the goal of maximizing the outside planting, provide a single barrier in the median, separating the two inside paved shoulders, between Carpinteria Creek and Olive Mill Road. This largely retains the existing outside edge of pavement within these areas and no additional retaining walls are needed. The Cabrillo Boulevard interchange would be rebuilt under all three build alternatives. There are five mutually exclusive interchange configurations—F, F Modified, J, M, and M Modified—being considered under each of the three build alternatives. Two of the five configurations (F Modified and M Modified) would provide northbound access largely in the same way that it exists now with two northbound exits. One of the configurations would remove the off-ramp at Hermosillo Road (configuration M), and two configurations would consolidate the northbound off-ramp traffic at the Hermosillo Road off-ramp (configurations F and J). The estimated costs of the five Cabrillo Boulevard interchange configurations include all work from 0.1 mile south of the Hermosillo Road Exit (PM 10.9) to the northern project limit. The configuration costs are as follows: configuration F is approximately $40 million; configuration F Modified is approximately $50 million; configuration J is approximately $85 million; and configurations M and M Modified are each approximately $90 million. Interchange concepts that include railroad involvement (configurations J, M, and M Modified) are estimated to cost from $35 million to $50 million more than those that do not (configurations F and F Modified).
    (Source: Noozhawk.com, 4/2/2012; Caltrans Draft EIR)

    In May 2012, it was reported that the Cabrillo Interchange reconstruction was creating controversy. The preferred Caltrans alternative, known as “F modified,” that takes away the left hand ramps, but installs a new northbound off ramp at Cabrillo Boulevard. Some residents have seized on this being the best option the community is likely to get, given that it’s the only one that keeps traffic away from Coast Village Road. Others believe that a better alternative could still be worked out with Caltrans. Hermosillo Road residents demanded to know why the Montecito board had sent a letter to Caltrans with wording that some residents felt implied support of using Hermosillo Road as the primary exit. The residents demanded the board take a stance on preventing Hermosillo Road from becoming the new beach thoroughfare. Some feared that losing the ramps without building a new right hand ramp would send tourists, airbuses, and other vehicles ill-suited to the roundabout through Coast Village Road.
    (Source: Daily Sound, 5/17/2012)

    In January 2013, it was reported that a group called Common Sense 101 was protesting the plans in Montecito and proposing a "Plan B". They have a link to their proposal, but it is mostly graphics and does not contain a specific written description of the changes. Their proposal supposedly takes less time, costs less money, and keeps the freeway open. It is unclear whether it addresses all of the same goals.
    (Source: Pacific Business Times, Common Sense 101)

    In December 2013, it was reported that Caltrans had rejected the proposal from Common Sense 101, and that they want to move forward with the original proposed South Coast Highway 101 HOV Project.

    In December 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct operational improvements to the existing four-lane Route 101 including additional lanes, new and reconfigured ramps, replacement/widening of Milpas Street Undercrossing and Sycamore Creek Bridge, new Cacique Street Undercrossing, and bicycle/pedestrian facilities in the city of Santa Barbara. The Department and the Federal Highway Administration originally approved the FEIR/FONSI in 2004. In November 2007, the Commission allocated $53,043,000 programmed in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). At that time, the landscape scope of work was split to form a parent project (PPNO 0478) and a child project (PPNO 0478Y). The revalidation of the document is needed for the landscaping project (PPNO 0478Y), acknowledges the addition of scope that was added in 2005, and corrects inaccuracies in the Notice of Determination that was filed in 2004. The landscape project is programmed in the 2008 STIP for $3,065,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

    In April 2012, it was reported that Caltrans opened the gate between two sides of Cacique Street previously blocked by US 101. A two-lane road with bike lanes now flows under the raised highway, better connecting drivers, cyclists, and walkers of the lower Eastside neighborhood with nearby business and the beach, and allowing them to bypass the tricky Milpas roundabout. The corridor opened in conjunction with the completion of new third lanes on US 101 between Milpas Street and Hot Springs Road. These first-phase improvements, four years of construction and $57 million in the making, included the overhaul of two major interchanges, work on six new or improved bridges, and the Montecito roundabout. It was the largest Caltrans project in Santa Barbara since the crosstown route was completed in the early 1990s. The voter-approved Measure D, a local sales tax that helps pay for such traffic-improvement ventures, contributed $13 million toward the $57-million price tag.
    (Source: Santa Barbara Independent, 4/4/2012)

    In October 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Barbara, adjacent to Route 101 and underlying the Milpas Street roundabout, consisting of collateral facilities.

    [101 Work in Santa Barbara]In July 2008, work began on a series of projects to improve the flow of US 101 in Santa Barbara. This includes a $53 million project to widen the freeway between Montecito and Santa Barbara. As of August, the extent of the work had included the removal of trees and bushes along the roadway, restriping some of the lanes and putting in concrete barriers. The speed limit has also been reduced along the route to 55 mph. The two lanes will remain open during the day, but at night, when construction is being done, the highway will be reduced to one lane each way. The more significant work of widening US 101 all the way to the Ventura County line depends on voters' in Santa Barbara County approving a renewal of a transportation sales tax in November. Voters rejected the renewal once before. Ventura County voters have twice rejected a similar measure, but local officials are mulling over a third try in the coming years. In three years there are plans to begin widening the highway from Mussel Shoals, past La Conchita and north past the Rincon. But before that begins, there will likely be several phases of construction in Santa Barbara County. The first phase would add a lane in both directions between Milpas Street in Santa Barbara south to Montecito's Hot Springs Road. Specific information on this project can be found at http://www.sbroads.com/index.htm.(source)

    In May 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Santa Barbara, between Lawrence Street to 0.6 mile westerly of State Street, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads, and cul-de-sacs.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santa Barbara along Route 101, on Hot Springs Road, Old Coast Highway, and Coast Village Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

    Santa Barbara Improvements near GoletaIn March 2007, the CTC considered for future consideration of funding Route 101 in Santa Barbara County – Roadway improvements near Goleta. This project in Santa Barbara County will replace an existing overcrossing and construct roadway improvements associated with the new overcrossing. The project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $6,880,000. It is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2008-09.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $640,000 and $100,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Goleta, at Cathedral Oaks Overcrossing Bridge #51-0331, and at Cathedral Oaks Overhead Bridge #51-C0344 that construct replacement planting at two structures.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening US 101 in Santa Barbara and Ventura County.

    In March 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Santa Barbara County near the town of Gaviota that will realign the northbound side of Route 101, including replacing the existing curve, widening the shoulders, and constructing other modifications.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct roadway improvements including bridge widening and an additional northbound and southbound lane on Route 101 near the city of Santa Maria. The specific limits of this project are from SBA PM 91.0 to SLO PM 0.8. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. Total estimated project cost is $49,302,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the project baseline agreement.

    In February 2013, it was reported that Stage 2 work continues on the river bridge with the southbound deck currently being poured. The concrete decking is about halfway finished. The southbound side of the bridge will hold two lanes and a pedestrian and bike lane when completed. The $34.8 million project is scheduled for completion by the summer of 2014.

    There are plans to widen US 101 to 6-lane freeway from 0.4 km south of Santa Maria Way Undercrossing to Route 135/US 101 Separation in Santa Maria . This was on the July 2005 CTC agenda. In February 2006, the CTC considered adding funding. The proposal noted that the widening would be within the existing 46 to 56-foot median area. The existing inside shoulders would be removed and the entire median area paved to include two 12-foot traveled lanes, two 10-foot inside shoulders and a type 60 concrete median barrier placed in the area between the inside shoulders for the entire length of the project. There are also five locations where soundwalls are to be constructed.

    [Union Valley]In December 2008, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR regarding construction of a new interchange for Santa Maria and the community of Orcutt. The interchange would be constructed between Clark Avenue overcrossing and Santa Maria Way undercrossing and extend Route 58 (note: The CTC document said Route 58, but Route 58 isn't in that area--it ends at Route 1 in Santa Margarita) approximately 1.6 miles in length in the community of Orcutt. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) with Regional Improvement Program and Regional Surface Transportation Program funds for $12,782,000. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $36,100,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. There are four alternatives identified in the draft EIR:

    • No Build Alternative

    • Alternative 1 - The Union Valley Extension proposes to extend Union Valley Parkway between Hummel Drive and Blosser Road and construct an eight-foothigh masonry soundwall on the south side of the extension between California Boulevard and Foxenwood Lane.

    • Alternative 2 - Curved Alignment proposes to extend Union Valley Parkway between Hummel Drive and Blosser Road curving northward near Blosser Road to avoid an existing area of eucalyptus woodland. Included is construction of an eight-foot-high masonry soundwall on the south side of the extension between California Boulevard and Foxenwood Lane.

    • Alternative 3 - Foster Road Alignment proposes to extend Union Valley Parkway between Hummel Drive and Blosser Road east of Route 135, but contains a realigned roadway that forks northeast toward Foster Road between Foxenwood Drive and California Boulevard. Included is construction of an eight-foot-high masonry soundwall on the south side of the extension between California Boulevard and Foxenwood Lane.

    • Alternative 4 - Reduced Extension Alternative proposes only improvements east of Route 135, and would not include any improvements west of Route 135.

    In March 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the Union Valley Parkway extension. This project in Santa Barbara County will extend the Union Valley Parkway east to west approximately 1.6 miles and construct an interchange with US 101 just south of the City of Santa Maria. The project is not fully funded. It is expected that the necessary funding will be come from the Santa Barbara County’s formula State-Local Partnership Program shares. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The total project cost is $24,430,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funding, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 STIP. Funding was authorized in April 2012, contingent on the passing of the budget act.

    In February 2013, it was reported that Stage 1 work continues on the Union Valley Parkway interchange. It includes earthwork, ramp and road construction and construction of bridge abutments. Pile-driving work on the east abutment and in the median has been completed. Work continues on the west side of the freeway. Crews have graded the new southbound on- and off-ramps, and they soon will be paving both ramps. The southbound ramps will be used as a detour during nighttime closures when the bridge falsework is built. The $10.3 million project is scheduled to be completed by early 2014. It is the final piece of the Union Valley Parkway that will connect US 101 to Orcutt, Route 135 and the Santa Maria Public Airport.

    In January 2010, the CTC approved a new public road connection at Willow Road to US 101, in the community of Nipomo, at Post Mile (PM) 6.4, in San Luis Obispo County. The proposed project includes the extension of Willow Road across US 101 to Thompson Road with the intention to provide a much needed east-west arterial connection to Route 1 and the Callender area. The project will also relieve future traffic demand at the adjacent Tefft Street and Los Berros Road/Thompson Road interchanges. The Nipomo area is served by three interchanges on US 101: Hutton Road (Route 166) on the south, Tefft Street in the central area, and Los Berros Road/Thompson Road on the north. Recent traffic forecasts for the Nipomo area predict that the existing Tefft Street interchange and the existing Los Berros Road/Thompson Road interchanges will be inadequate to serve projected development during peak traffic periods. Motorists would be subjected to recurring congestion and delays due to increasing traffic on US 101 and on the existing local street network. Of the three interchanges, only the Tefft Street interchange is located centrally to existing and planned developments. Los Berros Road/Thompson Road and Hutton Road (Route 166) are located at the fringe of future development.

    In October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct the extension of Willow Road and connect it with US 101 in the community of Nipomo, south San Luis Obispo County. The proposed project includes the extension of Willow Road east from its existing terminus approximately 1,000 feet west of Pomeroy Road to Thompson Avenue; construction of a frontage road between Willow Road and Sandydale Drive; and construction of a new US 101/Willow Road interchange. In March 1999 a Tier I Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) for the project was adopted by the County Board of Supervisors and a preferred alignment and interchange were selected. The FEIR specified that subsequent design refinements for the road extension, interchange, and frontage road would be evaluated in a Tier 2 construction level environmental document. The County prepared the FSEIR to satisfy the requirements for evaluating the preferred alternative in a Tier 2 construction level environmental document. The FSEIR was prepared for the entire US 101/Willow Road Interchange Project. However, for construction and financing purposes, the County split the project into two phases as follows:

    • Phase I is programmed in the Proposition 1B State and Local Partnership Program (SLPP) and consists of a new roadway extension on Willow Road, from Misty Glen Place to Hetrick Road. This phase will construct a new two lane roadway with 12' travel lanes and 8' shoulders; installation of left turn lanes and right turn pockets at Willow/Pomeroy and Willow/Hetrick intersections; drainage facilities, including underground storm drain collection and two infiltration basins. The project is estimated to cost $6,500,000 and is programmed with SLPP ($1,000,000) and Local ($5,500,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2009-10.

    • Phase II is programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and will continue the roadway extension on Willow Road, from Hetrick Road to Thompson Road. This phase will construct frontage road improvements between Willow Road and Sandydale Drive; a new interchange at US Route 101, a cross street and drainage facilities. The project is estimated to cost $32,000,000 and is programmed with STIP ($10,000,000), Federal ARRA ($500,000), and Local ($21,500,000). The County has applied for $1,000,000 in SLPP Cycle 2 funding and if approved, the amount of Local funds will be $20,500,000. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2010-11.

    In January 2014, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Mateo County that will reconstruct the existing interchange at US 101 and Willow Road in the cities of Menlo Park and Palo Alto.

    In August 2008, Caltrans released a bid to widen the highway and construct retaining walls and drainage systems in San Luis Obispo County in and near Pismo Beach at various locations from 0.2 KM North of Route 227 to 0.2 KM South of the US 101/Route 1 separation.

    In September 2012, construction started on on a K-rail median barrier designed to prevent head-on collisions and plunges into deep ravines along a 5-mile stretch of US 101 south of Arroyo Grande. The $2.8 million barrier will run from the Los Berros Road undercrossing near Nipomo to the undercrossing where vehicles enter southbound US 101 from Traffic Way. All but one of the at-grade highway crossings through that stretch will remain open; one crossing that serves a private driveway just south of El Campo will be blocked by the barrier. Caltrans initiated the project in response to a rising number of traffic collisions at the at-grade highway crossings. The barrier is also designed to prevent vehicles from crossing the median into oncoming traffic or plunging into ravines between the north- and southbound lanes. As initially proposed, the barrier would have blocked cross traffic at all of the highway crossings, including one at Laetitia Vineyard Drive. But it was particularly aimed at closing the El Campo Road crossing, where the accident rate had been steadily climbing. The crash frequency at El Campo Road rose from three in 1998 to 10 in 2008, according to Caltrans statistics released in 2010. At that time, a total of 185 collisions resulting in three fatalities and 101 injuries had been reported along the five-mile stretch of highway. But residents along El Campo Road, the operators of Laetitia Vineyard & Winery and Arroyo Grande city officials objected to closing those two crossings. People living along El Campo Road and operators of Laetitia Vineyard & Winery said blocking those intersections would require residents and winery visitors and workers to drive miles out of their way. Arroyo Grande officials said the closures also would send more traffic through the city as drivers sought to turn around. As a result, Caltrans agreed to add flashing yellow lights to cross-traffic warning signs and to leave all but one of the crossings open. It appears the warning beacons may have helped, based on Caltrans’ recent crash statistics: In the seven months prior to installing the beacons, seven multiple-vehicle crashes were reported along the five-mile stretch. In the first seven months after they were installed, only one multiple-vehicle crash has occurred.
    (Source: Santa Maria Times)

    Crews from CalPortland Construction in Santa Maria started work on the barrier Aug. 28 and are expected to finish around the end of February, weather permitting, Cruz said.

    The Cuesta Grade is a 7% grade around Cuesta Peak into San Luis Obispo. It was the site of a major construction project on US 101. This project added truck climbing lanes, improving drainage, stabilizing retaining walls, and widening shoulders, and was the third major reconstruction of the grade. The first one, in 1937, reduced the number of curves along the route from 71 to 12; the second one, in 1990-91, focused on the northern approach to the Grade.

    In December 2009, the CTC vacated right of way in the city of Pismo Beach along Route 101 at 0.13 mile west of North 4th Street, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In December 2004, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the City of Atascadero, at San Ramon Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets and frontage roads. The City, by cooperative agreement dated July 27, 2004, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In August 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Salinas along Route 101 on Airport Boulevard, De La Torre Street, and Moffett Street, consisting of collateral facilities. It also authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Monterey adjacent to Route 101 on De La Torre Street, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In September 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to reconstruct the existing two-lane structure with a four-lane overcrossing, add left turn lanes, reconstruct all access ramps within the project limits, and construct roadway improvements in and near Salinas from 0.6 mile south to 0.2 mile north of the Airport Boulevard Overcrossing on Route 101. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes federal and local funds. The total estimated project cost is $36,603,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11.

    Boulevard Overcrossing on Route 101. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes federal and local funds. The total estimated project cost is $36,603,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Luis Obispo County that will widen the Los Osos Valley Road overcrossing and the adjacent bridge crossing over San Luis Obispo Creek in the city of San Luis Obispo. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and includes local funds. The total estimated project cost is $19,584,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 STIP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological, paleontological, and cultural resources and impacts to aesthetics, water quality, noise, and air quality to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to biological resources in the project area will be mitigated in accordance with the Biological Opinion rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Potential impacts to paleontological resources will be mitigated by implementing a paleontological resource plan. Potential impacts to water quality will be mitigated through implementing BMPs and a storm water pollution prevention plan. Potential noise impacts will be mitigated by including construction sound control measures and limiting night work. Potential impacts to aesthetics will be mitigated by implementing a lighting plan and a landscape plan. Potential impacts to cultural resources will be mitigated by stop work requirements if a cultural resource is found.

    In December 2011, the CTC also approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Luis Obispo County on US 101 that will build a concrete median barrier, remove the existing metal-beam guardrail and temporary railing, and replace the sand-filled barrel array with a crash-cushion system. The project will also extend the existing southbound left-turn lane and add northbound and southbound acceleration lanes at the intersection of US 101 and Tassajara Creek Road. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated cost is $6,988,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012/13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological resources and aesthetics to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to biological resources will be mitigated through the use of ESA fencing and the use of Caltrans standard bird protection specifications. In addition, median barrier openings will be placed to reduce animal entrapment on the highway. Potential impacts to aesthetics will be mitigated by implementing a landscape plan for the project.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct roadway improvements including intersection improvements and lane additions in the city of Paso Robles near the intersection with Route 46. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $14,060,000 for capital and support. Specifically, the City of El Paso de Robles and the San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG) in cooperation with Caltrans are working on a project to provide operational and access improvements along US 101 and at the US 101/Route 46 E interchange within the limits of the City of El Paso de Robles. The proposed project improvements include the relocation of the existing isolated 16th Street southbound SR 101 off-ramp to 17th Street and the construction of a new 17th Street southbound US 101 on-ramp, creating a new public road access to US 101. This new connection, just south of the US 101/Route 46 E interchange, will help reduce congestion and decrease delays on the local street grid and improve operations on the US 101/Route 46 E interchange. At the US 101/Route 46 E interchange Route 46 E is a four-lane expressway and US 101 is a four-lane freeway facility. Improvements to alleviate congestion for the westbound Route 46 to southbound US 101 left turn movement are needed since ramp capacity is often exceeded during the peak hours. The excess demand causes a traffic queue past the northbound US 101 off-ramp intersection and into the westbound Route 46 E through lane. In order to provide additional capacity to the southbound US 101 on-ramp, the proposed project includes re-striping on Route 46 E and widening of the on-ramp to provide dual left turn movement onto southbound US 101 from westbound Route 46 E. To avoid weaving problems along this section of US 101, the project also includes the construction of an auxiliary lane on southbound US 101 from Route 46 to the new proposed exit ramp at 17th Street. The 16th Street exit ramp is an isolated single lane exit ramp that has two separate connections to Riverside Avenue approximately 210-feet apart. These two separate connections can result in driver confusion and the potential for wrong way movements. The limited freeway connections within the Route 46 corridor along US 101 contribute to greater congestion and longer delays on the local street grid. Relocating the existing exit ramp to the 17th Street/Riverside Avenue intersection accommodates the addition of an entrance ramp to southbound US 101 and improves the existing isolated exit ramp condition while relieving congestion on the local street system.

    There are currently plans for a "Prunedale Freeway" to provide an alternative to the safety and capacity problems that exist on the current route, which serves as the "Main Street" of the Prundale urbanized area north of Salinas (see http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist05/prunedale/index.htm). In November 2000, Caltrans narrowed the field of alternatives to the following (construction planned for 2007):

    1. No build. This would keep the existing roadway as it is except for a couple of interchange improvements already planned (San Miguel and the Route 101/Route 156 interchange improvement).

    2. Improve existing alignment. This would upgrade existing Route 101 to a six-lane freeway. New interchanges are proposed at the Russell/Espinosa Roads, Blackie Road/Reese Circle, and at Crazy Horse Canyon/Echo Valley Roads. Substantial improvements would be made to the existing Route 156 / Route 101 interchange. Access onto Route 101 from existing driveways and local roads would be redirected to the interchanges via new access or frontage roads. More local trips would be possible without needing to get onto Route 101.

    3. The Alternative 4 East Bypass (4 lane freeway on new alignment). This swings the widest eastward from the current alignment. Caltrans and many local officials see this alternative as having the least amount of impacts to the environment and causing the least number of residential homes to be lost.

    As of February 2004, it appears that Alternative 4 East (the new-terrain routing from Espinosa Road/Russell Road in Salinas north to near Echo Valley Road in Prunedale) has been chosen. As a result, it is likely that the US 101/Route 156 expressway between the south Route 156/US 101 interchange and Echo Valley Road will become solely Route 156. There is no info as to what the southern portion of the El Camino Real expressway from Espinosa Road to Route 156 will be.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved $687,000 for landscape mitigation at the Airport Blvd. interchange in south Salinas.

    Prunedale ImprovementsIn September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Monterey and San Benito Counties that will construct an interchange on Route 101 and modify existing local roads near the Monterey/San Benito County line. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund and the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Total estimated project cost is $90,600,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement. The project will mitigate potential impacts to water quality, aesthetics, and riparian habitat. The project will also require construction activities in the habitat of the California tiger salamander, the Southwestern pond turtle, and the California red-legged frog, all of which are federally listed threatened and endangered species. The project contains mitigation measures to reduce impacts to these species to a less than significant level.

    San JuanIn May 2011, the CTC approved a new public road connection at San Juan Road to US 101, near the Monterey/San Benito county line, in the county of San Benito. San Juan Road, Cole Road and Dunbarton Road are the primary local roads to be modified by this project. San Juan Road is a two-lane undivided county road that connects to US 101 from the west to form a T-intersection. Acceleration lanes to both directions of US 101 are provided off of San Juan Road. Cole Road is a two-lane undivided county road that connects to southbound US 101 from the west to form a skewed-intersection. To access northbound US 101, Cole Road extends through a median crossing. Dunbarton Road intersects US 101 on the southern end of the project limits and serves as the primary southbound connection in that vicinity. An analysis, conducted on existing traffic volumes in June of 2008, found that during peak traffic periods the US 101 intersections of San Juan Road, Dunbarton Road, and Cole Road each operates at a Level of Service “F”. Traffic volume increases have led to fewer gaps in traffic for the motorist to merge onto the highway. Currently, vehicles from both directions of travel on US 101 can directly access Dunbarton Road, and Cole Road west of US 101. San Juan Road can be accessed directly only from southbound US 101. To get onto San Juan Road from northbound US 101, a motorist has to either turn onto Dunbarton Road (North) or make a U-turn at Cole Road. With two lanes of highway traffic in each direction, access to these roads is especially difficult. During a three-year study period between September 1, 2004 and August 31, 2007, it was found that most highway segments and intersections within the proposed project limits had collision rates higher than the statewide average for similar facilities. In particular, these studies show, the San Juan Road intersection has a collision rate 300 percent higher than the statewide average. The southbound US 101 traffic approaching Cole Road and San Juan Road are on a 6 percent grade which tends to increase stopping sight distances. The proposed project would construct a combination compact half diamond/one-quadrant cloverleaf interchange. San Juan Road, on the west side of US 101, would be realigned and extended to the north where it then turns and crosses US 101 as an overcrossing. Cole Road would be extended southerly until it connects to San Juan Road at a T-intersection. On the east side of US 101, a new frontage road would be constructed off of San Juan Road towards the south. This new frontage road would be constructed parallel to US 101 and end with a cul-de-sac at Marilyn Lane. Marilyn Lane and Ballantree Lane are private roads to be connected to this frontage road. Access to Dunbarton Road (North) from US 101 would be removed. Dunbarton Road (North) would become a frontage road ending with a cul-de-sac. The north end of Dunbarton Road (South) would only allow right in and right out traffic movement. The existing median crossover at Cole Road would be removed. The gaps in the median barrier on US 101, within the project limits, would be closed with a concrete barrier. After the completion of the project, it is proposed that the local roads constructed as part of the project be relinquished to Monterey County and San Benito County within their respective areas. The current capital cost estimate for the project is $46.2 million. This project will be funded using a combination of the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program which includes the Regional Improvement Program and the Interregional Improvement Program, local matching funds from TMAC, American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 Funds (Federal Stimulus) and Trade Corridor Improvement Funds in the 2012-2013 fiscal years.

    [New Road Connection]In November 2007, the CTC considered the addition of a public road connection to US 101 at Sala Road. This new interchange will essentially replace an existing at grade connection located to the south at Russell/Espinosa Roads and it is expected to improve both safety and operations on US 101. The Russell Road/Espinosa Road connection currently has a collision rate higher than the statewide average for similar facilities. The project is expected to be open to traffic in the Fall of 2012. Specifically, in the vicinity of Russell and Espinosa Roads, the plan is to construct a new section of access controlled four-lane freeway from 0.2 miles north of the Boronda Road interchange to approximately Martines Road. The alignment of US 101 would be elevated to accommodate modifications to the existing at grade connection of Russell and Espinosa Roads. Undercrossing structures would be constructed to facilitate the connection of Russell and Espinosa Roads to enhance local circulation. Since no freeway access would be allowed at this location, a new interchange at Sala Road will be needed. This segment of mainline US 101 would be constructed primarily to standard freeway geometrics except where it conforms to existing conditions at the northern end of the segment. Design exceptions for all nonstandard features have been approved. Median width would range from 21 to 70 feet and median barrier would be constructed from the undercrossing structure at Russell and Espinosa Roads to existing concrete median barrier at Martines Road. A new interchange and local road, Sala Road, would be constructed approximately 0.62 miles north of Russell/Espinosa Road. To facilitate merge/diverge traffic movements, auxiliary lanes would be constructed along the new freeway segment between the northern ramps at the Boronda Road interchange and this new interchange. The new interchange at Sala Road would connect to Harrison Road to the east via Sala Road. The interchange would consist of three directional ramps and a westbound to southbound loop-ramp. No ramp would be constructed in the southwest quadrant. Initially, the overcrossing structure would accommodate two lanes with left-turn channelization. However, the structure would be constructed with consideration for the future widening to four lanes with left turn channelization.

    There is also an unconstructed-adopted segment from Salinas to Route 156; 12 miles parallel to the traversable route. When completed, this portion of US 101 will become Route 156.

    In April 2006, the CTC received the notice of the preparation of an Environmental Impact Report for construction of a new interchange near San Juan Bautista in Monterey County (PM 100.0/101.3). The project is currently programmed as “environmental only.” The following alternatives are being considered: (·) Alternative 1A: Spread Diamond Interchange – Located approximately midway between Dunbarton Road to the south and San Juan Road to the north; (·) Alternative 1B: Compact Diamond Interchange – Same location as Alternative 1A, with interchange ramps and frontage road closer to alignment of highway; (·) Alternative 2: Compact Diamond Interchange – Located near the San Juan Road/ Route 101 intersection, with frontage road on east side of Route 101; (·) Alternatives 4, 5, 9A and 9B: Same general location as Alternative 2, with variations on the interchange configuration and the frontage road alignment; (·) No Build. The potential impacts include floodplain encroachment, drainage, hazardous waste, and visual impacts. Proposed mitigations include avoidance of service station acquisition, visual resource mitigation, and new alternative north of the floodplain and Elkhorn Slough.

    In 2007, the following requests for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) were made, but not recommended for funding: Operational improvements Phase 1b in San Luis Obispo county ($5,432K requested); widening and adding Intelligent Traffic Systems from Milpas to Cabrillo Hot Springs in Santa Barbara County ($28,613K requested); widening of the Santa Maria River Bridge ($58,540K requested); and the addition of HOV lanes from Casitas Pass Rd to Milpas St in Santa Barbara County ($12,600K requested); Freeway conversion, San Juan Rd interchange in Monterey County ($50,800K requested).

    Santa Clara County

    In Spring 2003, widening was completed on a four-lane section of US 101 between Bernal Road in San Jose and Cochran Road in Morgan Hill, bringing it to four lanes in each direction including one HOV lane. This added 7.5 miles more of commute lane operating the usual 5-9 and 3-7 period from Morgan Hill all the way to Redwood City.

    280-yerba-buena mapIn October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of fuinding a project in Santa Clara County that will construct one additional lane in the southbound direction from south of the Story Road Interchange to south of the Capitol Expressway Interchange, modify the Route 101/Tully Road Interchange to a partial cloverleaf interchange, and rebuild the existing Tully Road Overcrossing. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program, and includes Federal Demonstration funds and local funds. Total estimated project cost is $62,975,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

    In January 2011, it was reported that work was beginning on the Tully Road interchange reconstruction. The first step was demolishing sections of the overpass that opened in the 1950s. The project is expected to cost $45 million and take 16 months. The project will include replacing some of the cloverleaf ramps with diagonal exits similar to those at Lawrence Expressway and US 101; addition of a merging lane on southbound US 101 between Tully and Capitol; addition of an additional lane southbound between Story Road and the expressway; and replacing and widening the Tully Road bridge with an additional lane in each direction, widening the shoulders to eight feet and raising the bridge to allow trucks to more easily pass underneath. Construction was to have begun in late 2011, but the state's budget delays pushed back the start until 2011. However, the delay and the recession resulted in a bid $10 million under the projected cost.

    In June 2012, it was reported that Caltrans announced the completion of a $45 million project to relieve traffic congestion at Tully Road and US 101 in San Jose. The project constructed an additional lane on southbound US 101 from south of Story Road to north of the Capitol Expressway, and added a southbound merging lane from Tully Road to Capitol Expressway. In addition to the added lanes, the entire highway interchange at Tully Road was replaced and enhanced with traffic signals and wider off-ramps.

    In 2007, the CTC considered a number of requests for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). one request was funded: construction of auxiliary lanes from Route 85 to Embarcadero in Santa Clara County ($84.93M). Requests to widen the route from Yerba Buena to I-280/I-680 in Santa Clara County, and to widen the route from Route 25 to Monterey Rd in Santa Clara County were not recommended for funding. In August 2010, the CTC amended the CMIA baseline agreement for the US 101 Improvements (I-280 to Yerba Buena Road) project (PPNO 0460C) to update the project delivery schedule. Construction will now begin in September 2010 and complete in June 2013, with project close-out completing in June 2014.

    In June 2011, it was reported that the California Transportation Commission has recommended allocating $24 million in state bonds for a $31.1 million project to realign the ramps and ease the merging issues that occur at the Capitol Expressway. Among the likely improvements: The ramp to north US 101 from Yerba Buena Road will be widened to two lanes with a metering light installed; a new ramp to north US 101 from the road between Yerba Buena and the expressway will be added, allowing traffic from Yerba Buena to enter the freeway before Capitol rather than merging with expressway ramp traffic; and the southbound US 101 off-ramp to Yerba Buena will be widened to two lanes and realigned to exit directly from US 101.

    In June 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Jose along Route 101 on N 31st Street, consisting of a relocated or reconstructed city street and an adjoining nonmotorized transportation facility, namely a pedestrian walkway.

    In May 2010, Caltrans began a $24 million repaving of the 15-mile stretch of US 101 from the San Jose airport to Route 85 in South San Jose. Crews will remove the top three inches of highway, installing rubberized asphalt that will allow water to seep through the pavement and drain off to the side of the road. It's a type of pavement that greatly reduces visibility problems in the rain when water sprays off tires. Caltrans hopes to repave nearly all eight lanes and 67 ramps by Labor Day 2010. That will be the first of $300 million worth of upgrades planned for US 101 through 2012. About $120 million is coming from state bonds approved by voters in 2006, and gas taxes, local sales taxes and stimulus funds will cover the rest. In Fall 2010, workers will begin rebuilding the Tully Road interchange and adding an extra southbound lane from Story Road to Capitol Expressway — a $60 million project expected to take two years. In 2011, a third project will lengthen carpool lanes and add merging lanes from the Route 85/US 101 interchange in Mountain View to Palo Alto, a $103 million effort. Lastly, merging lanes and updated metering equipment will be added from Palo Alto to Menlo Park for an additional $113 million.
    (Source: San Jose Mercury News, 5/6/10)

    In June 2001, the CTC had on its agenda addition of a northbound lane through San Jose, Route 87 to Trimble Road in Santa Clara county. There are also plans to widen the route to 3-lanes + HOV each direction from Burnett Road to Route 85. In June 2002, plans were unveiled to widen the route from Marsh Road to Ralston Avenue in Belmont. The widening between Bernel Road to Burnett Road (four to eight lanes) is TCRP Project #3, requested by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority. Per SB 1318, 9/28/10, this project was authorized for $25,000,000.

    The addition of the northbound lane from Route 87 to Trimble Road is TCRP Project #5, again requested by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority. According to a poster on m.t.r, in May 2003 new southbound lanes between Route 85 and Cochrane Road were completed making US 101 8 lanes (with variations of 10 lanes in certain spots) between San Francisco, all the way down to Morgan Hill for nearly 70 consecutive miles.

    In June 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Jose, at Channing Avenue and Seaboard Avenue, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

    In May 2010, the CTC approved amending the CMIA baseline agreement for the US 101 Auxiliary Lanes – Route 85 to Embarcadero Road project (PPNO 0483I) to: (1) Update the project scope by eliminating two segments of southbound auxiliary lanes and by extending the existing dual high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes in both directions of Route 101. (2) Update the overall project funding plan by shifting local funds by increasing Environmental (PA&ED) from $3,534,000 to $3,971,000, increasing Plans, Specifications, and Estimate (PS&E) from $7,182,000 to $8,180,000, and decreasing Right of Way (R/W) from $6,612,000 to $5,177,000. The current project scope consists of adding auxiliary lanes in each direction from Embarcadero Road to Route 85. Based upon traffic operations and geometric analyses performed during the completion of the environmental process, the selected preferred alternative excludes the following two auxiliary lane segments from the project scope: (1) The southbound auxiliary lane from south of the San Antonio Road Interchange to the point of existing auxiliary lane between the Charleston Road on-ramp and the Rengstorff Avenue off-ramp, has been excluded due to its undesirable merge conditions at the Charleston Road on-ramp. (2) The southbound auxiliary lane from the Rengstorff southbound on-ramp to the existing auxiliary lane, between the Old Middlefield on-ramp and Shoreline Boulevard, has been excluded because it would have created a non-standard merge condition for the Old Middlefield Way on-ramp and also would have resulted in the relocation of a roadway maintenance facility in this area. The savings resulting from the elimination of these two auxiliary lane segments will be utilized to extend the existing dual HOV lanes in both directions. Under the current conditions, a transition from dual HOV lanes to a single HOV lane occurs in both directions on Route 101 near the Route 101/Route 85 interchange. The forecasted traffic volumes predict that by 2015, the HOV lane demand will exceed the capacity of a single HOV lane for this segment of Route 101. The traffic operation analyses have concluded that the extension of the existing dual HOV lanes to a point just north of the San Antonio Road interchange will provide congestion relief on Route 101 in both directions.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct auxiliary lanes, lengthen existing high occupancy vehicle lanes, and construct roadway improvements between Embarcadero Road and Route 85. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and includes local funds. Total estimated project cost is $102,258,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The project differs from the baseline agreement in that it proposes to extend the existing dual HOV lanes in addition to the original auxiliary lanes originally proposed.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved funding $84,930,000 for the state-administered CMIA project to construct US 101 Auxillary Lanes from Route 85 to Embarcadero Road.

    In August 2011, it was reported that the CTC approved $84.9 million in funding for construction of merging lanes on US 101 from Palo Alto to Mountain View.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved reducing the original CMIA allocation for construction by $29,059,000 (reflecting construction contract award savings), from $73,850,000 to $44,791,000 from the US 101 Auxiliary Lanes (from Route 85 to Embarcadero Road) project (PPNO 0483I) in Santa Clara County. The contract was awarded on November 17, 2011

    In May 2012, it was reported that the three-mile stretch of US 101 between Route 85 in Mountain View and Embarcadero Road in Palo Alto will be getting double HOV/Toll lanes. This project also includes the addition of merging lanes. The total cost will be $72 million ($56 million in state bonds and $16 million from VTA); $18 million below engineers' estimates. There are also plans to widen the southbound Oregon Expressway onramp, add a lane on the southbound Old Middlefield Way onramp and install meters at northbound Amphitheatre Parkway and San Antonio Road ramps. Estimated completion is late summer 2013.

    In September 2009, the CTC amended a project located on Route 101 in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. The current project will: a) Widen Route 101 to add auxiliary lanes in each direction from the Marsh Road Interchange in San Mateo County to the Embarcadero Road Interchange in Santa Clara County. b) Widen/modify various on/off-ramps at four interchanges within the project limits. c) Re-construct Ringwood Pedestrian Overcrossing and Henderson Underpass to accommodate the auxiliary lanes. d) Install Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) equipment within the project limits. The amendment eliminate the Henderson Underpass structure (which would have to be rebuilt anyway as part of an upcoming rail project), updated the funding plan, and split the project into three segments: Segment 1 (PPNO 0658B) – US 101 Auxiliary Lanes: Embarcadero Road to University Avenue; Segment 2 (PPNO 0658C) – US 101 Auxiliary Lanes: University Avenue to Marsh Road; and Segment 3 (PPNO 0658D) – US 101 Replacement Landscaping: Embarcadero Road Interchange to Marsh Road Interchange.

    In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of San Mateo along Route 101 on Airport Boulevard, consisting of a reconstructed city street.

    In October 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties will construct auxiliary lanes in each direction on Route 101 from the Embarcadero Road Interchange in the city of Palo Alto (Santa Clara County) to the Marsh Road Interchange in the city of Menlo Park (San Mateo County). The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local funds. Total estimated project cost is $111,389,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved baseline agreement. (what's odd about this is that it seems to be the project they amended the previous month). In May 2010, it was reported that San Mateo County transportation officials approved $30 million for this project. The funding will allow the Caltrans to start the four-mile freeway-widening project. The state expects to seek construction bids later this year and start building in early 2011. The work is expected to last through 2013. The project is part of a larger Caltrans effort to add auxiliary lanes to the busy freeway. The agency is currently adding auxiliary lanes between Millbrae and San Mateo, and there are plans to add the lanes south of Embarcadero to Route 85. The project will also include the installation of better metering lights at nearby on-ramps, which will be widened to include carpool-lane entrances onto the freeway. Crews will have to reconstruct the Ringwood Avenue pedestrian bridge over US 101 in Menlo Park and widen the Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct bridge. Caltrans has already secured $74.2 million from two separate state funding pots for the project, plus $1.8 million from the federal government. The county had already committed $6.9 million, and its latest contribution will bring the funding total for the project to $113 million. Construction broke ground on this project in July 2011.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved funding around $3.8 million toward creating auxiliary lanes along US 101 between Embarcadero Road and University Avenue.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved reducing the original CMIA allocation for construction by $9,191,000 (reflecting construction contract award savings), from $24,377,000 to $15,186,000, from the US 101 Auxiliary Lanes from University Avenue to Marsh Road project (PPNO 0658B) in San Mateo County. The contract was awarded on June 1, 2011.

    In July 2011, legislation was approved to permit the VTA to construct express lanes in locations outside its authority. As background: In 2004, a bill was approved to create express lanes on US 101 in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. Starting in 2015, motorists would be able to opt to pay to travel in the lanes, a tool to ease congestion that is currently used in other parts of California. However, under this law, the express lanes were to be monitored by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, whose jurisdiction ends at the San Mateo County border. The VTA would have been unable to construct and maintain the express lane along the 6-mile stretch of US 101 between Redwood City and the county border. The new legislation permits VTA to construct and maintain that 6-mile stretch.

    In May 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Santa Clara County that will replace the San Francisquito Creek Bridge on Route 101 at San Francisquito Creek, which divides the Cities of East Palo Alto and Palo Alto, and the Counties of San Mateo and Santa Clara. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $15,676,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013- 14. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 SHOPP.

    In March 2013, it was reported that Caltrans, in partnership with San Mateo County, East Palo Alto and Menlo Park, plans to reconstruct the current full cloverleaf interchange of US 101 and Willow Road to "address deficiencies impacting motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians by eliminating traffic weaves and providing adequate space for vehicles to stack on freeway off-ramps," according to the agency. The six designs under consideration -- four using variations of a partial cloverleaf, and two using a diamond configuration -- range in cost from $38.2 million to $54.9 million for construction costs and right-of-way acquisitions. A half cloverleaf design, labeled "1B" in the staff report with an estimated price tag of $42.5 million, appears to be the leading contender after consultants reviewed the designs. The city of East Palo Alto has also expressed its support for that configuration. One key request from Menlo Park was to evaluate the feasibility of adding a median bike lane along Willow Road, through the interchange. The staff report states that a median lane presents some safety issues, as drivers aren't used to it and it exposes bicyclists to traffic on both sides at intersections. The design team concluded that the option wasn't viable.
    (Source: The Almanac, 3/26/13)

    San Mateo/San Francisco Counties

    In February 2010, it was reported that the City of San Mateo has started work to improve the US 101 intersection at Poplar Avenue. The four-way intersection at Amphlett Boulevard features stop signs in three directions, while motorists coming off the freeway travel without stopping. In some cases, drivers are forced to make left turns or enter US 101 while cars speed off the freeway in their path or turn in front of them. The interchange has a much higher rate of accidents—in fact, 37% more! City officials are working on options, and hope to narrow down potential fixes through the public works commission. The city has a $150,000 fund to complete the planning. Currently, the only ideas on the table came from a November 2004 study, and include included adding a median in Poplar to restrict turning access, eliminating the interchange altogether or moving it north to the Peninsula interchange, which provides access only to northbound US 101. However, the option to move the onramp to the Peninsula interchange will be unlikely, as Burlingame officials would have to add a lane to the street and have indicated they would not be willing to do so. Further, if the Poplar interchange were to be eliminated, the bulk of the traffic for drivers trying to enter or exit southbound US 101 would move to the Third and Fourth avenue junction, which would result in unacceptable levels of traffic.
    [Source: "San Mateo to fix dangerous Highway 101 intersection", Oakland Tribute, 2/14/2010]

    In August 2010, it was reported that detailed plans have been released to replace the interchange at Broadway in Burlingame, which is used by about 33,000 drivers daily. The $73 million project includes a new seven-lane overpass across the freeway north of the existing four-lane crossing. Unlike the current bridge, which connects both sides of the freeway with a winding road requiring turns, the new overpass will be a straight shot connecting Rollins Road to the west with Bayshore Highway to the east. Airport Boulevard would move 100 feet to the north to connect to the overcrossing, requiring the demolition of the 76 Phillips Conoco gas station at 1200 Bayshore Highway and its adjacent parking lot. As many as three additional businesses near the freeway also could lose their properties. The current mazelike setup, which includes 19 approaches and connections to the freeway, will be made simpler, and all the onramps and offramps will be replaced. With the release of the state environmental report from Caltrans -- which is partnering with the city of Burlingame and the San Mateo County Transportation Authority on the project -- the biggest remaining obstacle is funding. The city expects about half the money to come from the county's half-cent transportation sales tax. City officials also have secured a $4 million grant from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and plan to set aside $8 million in proceeds from Burlingame's recent 2 percent hotel tax hike, although the city has only earmarked $500,000 toward the project so far. Burlingame Public Works Director Syed Murtuza said the city has been asking the federal government to make up the difference. With environmental clearance, it should be easier to convince politicians the plan is ready for construction.
    [Source: San Jose Mercury News]

    In May 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct roadway improvements including the replacement of the Broadway overcrossing. The project is not fully funded. The project is currently programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program for project development in the amount of $8,218,000. Total estimated project cost is $74,500,000 for capital and support. Depending on the availability of funds, construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the above project: Reconfigure the existing US 101/Broadway interchange in the city of Burlingame. (PPNO 0702A) This project in San Mateo County will reconstruct the US 101/Broadway Interchange in the city of Burlingame. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program for Project Development only. Total estimated project cost is $74,500,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to wetlands and waters of the U.S to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to wetlands in the project area will be mitigated by purchase of mitigation bank credits and other methods determined through consultation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

    In June 2010, it was reported that studies are beginning to improve the US 101/Route 92 interchange. Officials from three local transit agencies are splitting a $450,000 study that by the end of Summer 2011 should map out why cars move so slowly through the area, and what can be done about it. The purpose of the study is to figure out if there are any quick and easy fixes for operational problems in the interchange. C/CAG, MTC and the county Transportation Authority will each pay $150,000 to fund the study.
    [Source: Oakland Tribune, 6/9/10]

    In January 2011, results from the study were disclosed. Five options are being considered. The favored option includes converting the existing cloverleaf configuration to a “partial cloverleaf” configuration. This would require the elimination of two loop ramps and the construction of diagonal off-ramps. Cost for the work is expected to be up to $15 million and San Mateo is currently sitting on a $2.8 million grant from the federal government for the design and construction of the project. The city is also seeking about $5 million for the project from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. The focused study also favored an option that calls for constructing partial cloverleafs at the interchange with the widening of Route 92 by one lane in each direction. The other three options include:

    • Conversion of the northern half of the interchange to a diamond configuration. The two existing loop ramps would be eliminated. The existing westbound-to-northbound diagonal ramp would be widened. A left-turn lane would be added to northbound El Camino Real. The existing southbound-to-westbound diagonal ramp would be relocated to fit the new intersection which would be controlled by a traffic signal.
    • Conversion of the northeast quadrant of the cloverleaf to a diamond configuration. The northbound-to-westbound loop would be eliminated, with a northbound left-turn lane on El Camino Real provided. The westbound-to-northbound ramp would be widened for additional lanes and signalized at El Camino.
    • Conversion of the existing full cloverleaf configuration to a diamond configuration with modifications to the Route 92/Delaware Street interchange. The westbound on-ramp from Delaware would be connected to the westbound off-ramp to El Camino Real. The off-ramp from eastbound Route 92 to Delaware would be eliminated. Traffic wishing to reach Delaware Street would exit at El Camino Real, proceed through the intersection of the off-ramp and onto the eastbound on-ramp.

    Note: With the closure and removal of a portion of the Central Freeway in San Francisco between Fell Street to Turk in 1996 as part of the 1989 earthquake damage, Route 101 is now signed on Van Ness Ave. from the Central Freeway. In early 1997, the Central Freeway was reopened in the northbound direction, but is not presently signed as Route 101.

    The portion of this route defined as "the approach to the Golden Gate Bridge" in the legislative definition depends on Section 72.1 of the State and Highways Code. This section (defined by Senate Bill 798, Chapter 559, 9/29/99) defines the Central Freeway Replacement Project. This involves demolition of the existing Central Freeway, construction of a new freeway between Mission Street and Market Street, construction of appropriate ramps to the new freeway, and an improvement of Octavia Street from Market Street north. According to Robert Cruckishank, as of Summer 2004, the new Central Freeway in San Francisco is taking shape, with piers constructed and steel beams being lowered into place for what will be the viaduct itself. The freeway will end at Market Street and what had been a freeway north of Market will become Octavia Boulevard, a "Parisian-style" landscaped road.

    (By the way, Octavia Street is named after Miss Octavia Gough, the sister of Charles Gough, who was on the commission to lay out the streets west of Larkin Street known as the Western Addition. This comes from an obituary of Gough, published in the San Francisco Call, dated July 27, 1895. It eliminated the former supposition that Octavia meant the eighth street back from Divisadero. It documents the relationship of Charles Gough to Octavia Street and; almost surely, to Steiner Street, named for Gough's good friend. Steiner was delivering water in the pioneer days when Gough was delivering milk.)

    According to reports, demolition of the existing freeway west of Mission Street (the remains of the double-deck section built in 1957-9) began in January, 2003 and continued for 180 days, with penalties of $9600/day for each day it runs over (a closure party—the end of the freeway revolt—was held in March 2003). Construction of the new Octavia Blvd on the land previously occupied by the freeway from Market Street to Fell Street east of Octavia Street began in October, 2003 and was originally scheduled to be completed in September, 2004. During demolition, Mission, Market, and Oak Streets under the freeway will be closed on some weekends. Other streets are apparently subject to longer closures. A new section of elevated freeway, with two lanes in each direction (plus a right-turn lane at the very end) will be built from Mission Street to Market Street, replacing the current northbound-only structure. Construction began in February 2004 and is to be completed in February, 2006. Because the new structure will meet Market Street at grade, McCoppin Street between Market Street and Valencia Street will be closed. Caltrans is not allowing anything to be built under the freeway structure because they may need access to it from underneath, so some of the space underneath may continue to be used for parking lots. [Thanks to a posting by Eric Fisher on m.t.r for this information.]

    In early September 2005 (about a year late), the long-awaited replacement for San Francisco's Central Freeway was opened. Where the freeway structure was, drivers heading north or west descend from the freeway at Market Street and are greeted by a boulevard with poplar trees in the middle and Chinese elms on each side of the four-lane thoroughfare between faux historic lampposts. The central roadway with its lines of trees is framed by a one-way path on each side reserved for local traffic—the east side is for drivers heading north and west side is for those heading south. Even with parking lanes and a sidewalk, the result is a passage that measures just 133 feet from side to side. There are a number of awkard features to the design, but most reports seem to feel it is an improvement.

    Routing in San Francisco. There's lots of confusion about the current routing of US 101, because of problems with signage in the city of San Francisco. After the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, US 101 N was rerouted to exit the Central Skyway at Mission St., then NE to Van Ness Ave. US 101 S was rerouted along Van Ness Ave and South Van Ness Ave to the Central Skyway on-ramp. However, there are signs labeled "To US 101" on Central Freeway N at 7th Street, making people believe that US 101 exits there. Similarly, the "To US 101" signs southbound make people think US 101 exits at 5th Street. This is wrong. According to Caltrans, US 101 officially is routed on the Central Freeway. It is neither 7th or 5th St. Hence, to follow US 101, take the Central Freeway. Note that the signs at 5th St. and 7th St. were specifically requested by the City of San Francisco; subsequent surface street signing to direct people to US 101 is the city's responsibility. The city has placed such signs; according to a missing piece of the Photolog uncovered by Joe Rouse, the path is 7th to McAllister to Leavenworth to Turk to Van Ness, with the route to US 101 being signed at each junction (in addition to several reassurance trailblazers on 7th Street).

    According to Joe Rouse, the Central Freeway is officially still part of US 101, even after the post-Loma Prieta modifications. Prior to the quake, the Central Freeway ended at Golden Gate and Turk; Turk and Golden Gate were part of US 101 between the Central Freeway and Van Ness Avenue. After the Central Freeway was lopped off at Fell Street, Golden Gate and Turk were decommissioned as state highways and a break in the official routing was created on US 101 at Fell Street, with the route resuming at Van Ness and Golden Gate. Van Ness Avenue south of Golden Gate Avenue (and Mission Street for that matter) have never been officially adopted as state highway.

    After the Central Freeway was lopped off at Fell Street, signage for US 101 was extended on Van Ness south of Golden Gate and on Mission Street, but this is signage only—not route adoption. While the Central Freeway's future was being debated, the City of San Francisco requested that Caltrans direct traffic bound for NB 101 so that those coming from the Bay Bridge were directed to exit at 5th Street (and then continue down Harrison to 7th), and NB 101 traffic was directed to continue to 7th Street via I-80. From there, to get to US 101 motorists were directed to use 7th to McAllister to Leavenworth to Turk to Van Ness. But this is signage only—these streets were never adopted as part of US 101. The purpose was to get motorists to bypass the confusing mess at the Market/Van Ness/Mission intersections. The state did leave a sign for 101 North at the turnoff to the Central Freeway from WB I-80, again most likely for motorists's benefit, since there are two onramps to WB I-80 downstream of the 5th Street exit. It was also useful if you were coming from the Bay Bridge and you somehow missed the exit to 5th Street, as you could still get to US 101 North via the Central Freeway.

    Although the signage for the Central Freeway from the south indicated that it was for Mission and Fell Streets, signage for US 101 North was also left on that connector to the Central Freeway (where the offramp for 9th Street splits off). Once on the Central Freeway itself, 101 North traffic was directed to exit at Mission. So if you were coming from the south and didn't see the signs directing you to 7th Street, you were okay too.

    With the completion of Octavia Blvd, it appears that traffic from the south and from the east are once again directed to use the Central Freeway to continue on NB US 101, rather than use the 7th or 5th Street exits. The exit number listing for WB I-80 will have to be corrected to show that Exit 1B is now for US-101 North. It currently does not show this. So what is the planned alignment for US 101 in this area? It appears that the plan was to continue to sign the Mission Street exit as the exit to continue north on US 101, with the mainline touchdown to Octavia Street being treated as an exit. This makes it look like US 101 is exiting itself. But nothing is finalized. Although the signage may show route continuity via Mission and Van Ness, officially, there is a gap in Route 101 from where the freeway ended at Fell Street to the intersection of Van Ness and Golden Gate Avenues. The southern end of this gap might be moved to the new end of the freeway at Market Street.

    In December 2000, the CTC had on its agenda adoption of a traversable highway a segment of Route 101 in San Francisco from PM R5.0 (PK R8.0) at Erie Street to PM 5.3 (PK 8.5) at Golden Gave Avenue.

    There appear to be some plans to make a portion of this route in San Francisco into an underground tollway. The San Francisco Chronicle published an article on 2/18/2001 where it indicated that transportation planners "said the city should look into building ``supercorridor'' roads under Van Ness Avenue, 19th Avenue, and Fell and Oak streets." The suggested 19th Avenue tunnel would run five miles, from Junipero Serra Boulevard through Golden Gate Park and up to Lake Street, with exits at Brotherhood Way, Ocean Avenue, Quintara Street, Lincoln Way and Geary Boulevard. The Van Ness tunnel would run almost two miles, from about Fell to Lombard Street, with exits at Broadway and Geary Boulevard. Along Oak and Fell, the planners suggest an underground road running more than half a mile from Laguna to Divisadero streets. However, the roads would would violate the long-standing general plan for San Francisco, which calls for no new highway capacity.

    In March 2001, the CTC had on its agenda relinquishment of a segment of the original routing from PM 22.1 and PM 23.9 in the City of South San Francisco.

    [Doyle Drive]Doyle Drive/Presidio Parkway. There are also plans to reconstruct the Doyle Drive portion from Lombard St/Richardson Ave to the Route 1 Interchange in San Francisco. Existing Doyle Drive was built in 1937 and is substantially unchanged from then. Elevated sections consist of complex steel truss girders on foundations of doubtful strength. It is located in a 'liquefaction zone' making it especially liable to earthquake damage. The road was built with 2×3 10ft (3m) travel lanes, no median, and no real shoulders.

    The permitted design of the Parkway has 3 lanes northbound to the bridge and 4 lanes southbound off the bridge, the extra lane so there can be a clean 2+ 2 lane split leading away from the bridge into a pair of surface arterials Marina Blvd and US 101 (Richardson, Lombard). They will be modern 3.6m (12ft) wide lanes and there will be shoulders both sides and a grassed median. Close to half the length will be underground (in two pairs of cut and cover tunnels of 260m and 310m) or elevated. At each end the Parkway will transition to signalized arterial standard roadways, not expressway.
    [Source: "Calif to spend $billion+ on pretty Presidio Parkway without even talk of tolls, but want P3!?!", Tollroadnews, 1/26/2010. This article also has diagrams of the elevation and how each segment will be divided by roadway type.]

    The environmental studies for this project are part of TCRP Project #22, requested by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority. More information can be found at http://www.doyledrive.org/. It appears that there may be an extra toll on the Golden Gate Bridge to help pay for repair of the dangerous Doyle Drive approach, which handles 91,000 vehicles a day. The toll, which has not yet been set, probably would fluctuate, rising during times of heavy traffic to a high of around $2. Doyle Drive is particularly dangerous because lanes are too narrow by 2 to 3 feet, there's no barrier separating opposing traffic, there are no shoulders and the structure is seismically fragile. According to San Francisco transit officials, Doyle Drive has almost three times the typical number of accidents for a facility of its type. Toll revenues would be used to help pay for the $810 million project to replace the 70-year-old Doyle Drive with a wider, safer, sturdier roadway. The federal government would pay an additional $35 million. San Francisco officials have collected the bulk of the money from state and local sources and hope to begin construction by 2009. Construction cost (not project cost) of the 2.6km (1.6 miles) of seven lane (4 lanes SB, 3 lanes NB) expressway is estimated at $1,045m or $387m/km, ($653m/mile), and $57m/lane-km ($93m/lane mile.)

    In 2007, the CTC considered a number of requests for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). One request were funded: construction of aux lanes from Embarcadero to Marsh Rd in San Mateo County ($60M). The Doyle Drive replacement in San Francisco County was not recommended for funding. However, in August 2007 the CTC amended the project (TCRP #22), which is an environmental study for reconstruction of Doyle Drive, from Lombard St./Richardson Avenue to Route 1 Interchange in City and County of San Francisco to update the project schedule and funding plan. TCRP Project #22 is to replace Doyle Drive (US 101) in order to improve the seismic, structural, and traffic safety of the roadway. The redesign of Doyle Drive will have qualities that keep within the setting of the Presidio of San Francisco as a National Park, will incorporate increased intermodal access to the Presidio, and will improve access from local roadways. The project has attracted intense scrutiny from the National Park Service, the Presidio Trust, and the public, as it affects an area of the Presidio where the Presidio Trust is planning the restoration of a river habitat along Tennessee Hollow, as well as the planned expansion of Crissy Marsh. The project is now scheduled to start Phase 1 in FY07/08, with completion estimated for FY12/13. Note that this is just for the environmental study!

    Part of the problem with the Doyle Drive reconstruction is a provision included in the $58 million federal offer: the new Doyle Drive must become a toll road that would help pay back the construction costs. This has resulted in a lot of opposition from the North Bay that would pour south - particularly from Marin County. This opposition may endanger the effort to replace the road, threatening to entangle it in the same kind of political morass that stalled construction of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge and caused its cost to soar. Marin officials have called the proposal to charge a $1 to $2 toll on the road unfair to North Bay commuters, who account for 75 percent of the morning southbound traffic on Doyle Drive, and labeled the proposal "a Marin commuter tax." Regional transportation officials, on the other hand, believe the federal money may be the only chance to fix the dangerous structure. The issue needed to be resolved quickly: to qualify for the federal money, San Francisco needs the legal authority to charge tolls on Doyle Drive by March 31, 2008. San Francisco needed the state Legislature to pass a law allowing the city to collect tolls, yet the political dispute seems to have cowed Bay Area legislators who planned to introduce that legislation. Election year politics are part of the argument; the other part is that since Doyle Drive is a state highway, Caltrans should pay to replace the narrow, seismically fragile viaduct. But Caltrans didn't build the road originally: The Golden Gate Bridge district built the road with no shoulders, no median and narrow lanes in 1933 as part of the bridge project. In 1945, it was turned over to the state Division of Highways, predecessor to Caltrans, according to a history compiled by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority. But the bridge district didn't give up its interest in Doyle Drive. In 1955, it asked the state to rebuild Doyle Drive and make it wider. When the state came up with a plan for an eight-lane highway with a median, San Franciscans objected, and the state Legislature passed a bill requiring San Francisco's approval to widen the highway. Numerous attempts to come up with a plan - and money - to replace Doyle Drive without adding more lanes of traffic have fallen victim to community opposition and a lack of funding. The current plan, with an estimated cost of $1.1 billion, is the result of about 15 years of planning, studies and negotiations. The so-called "Presidio Parkway" design was selected in 2006 after planners, engineers and community groups winnowed down 16 options to one that features a combination of a high viaduct, two short tunnels, and an open sunken roadway, all with a landscaped median. The existing Doyle Drive, which carries 120,000 vehicles a day, is near the top of the state's list for bridges in need of replacement. Its six lanes are narrow, its road has no shoulders and opposing lanes of traffic are separated only by a line of plastic stakes. According to Caltrans, Doyle Drive is rated a 2 out of 100 on the Federal Highway Administration's structural safety index. The current funding plan for replacement, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, has the state contributing about $475 million from a variety of accounts, San Francisco chipping in $68 million from sales tax revenues, and the federal government adding $58 million from the Urban Partnership program. That federal program requires congestion tolling - tolls that rise and fall with congestion in an effort to dissuade drivers from traveling when traffic is heaviest. There's still a gap of about $460 million.
    [Source: San Francisco Chronicle, February 19, 2008]

    In May 2008, the Golden Gate district considered a congestion toll plan. The district already plans to increase by a dollar its current toll of $5 for those who pay with cash and $4 for those who use FasTrak. The congestion-based toll would add a dollar more during the periods of 7 to 9 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. on weekdays and 3 to 7 p.m. on weekends and holidays. This would be part of a federal program that would bring $158 million in federal funds to the Bay Area for transportation projects, including Doyle Drive. North Bay drivers and politicians - particularly those from Marin County - objected to the Doyle Drive toll idea, and bridge directors from the north side of the span pledged to fight what they called "a Marin commuter tax." As part of a regional compromise, the bridge board agreed to collect a congestion-based toll on the bridge but only if it could use the revenue to fund improvements to Golden Gate buses and ferries. The board also voted to ban use of any of the money to pay for Doyle Drive improvements.
    [Source: San Francisco Chronicle, May 9, 2008]

    In Mid-December 2008, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, acting as the San Francisco Transportation Authority board, certified the environmental impact report for the Doyle Drive replacement project and officially selected the $1 billion Presidio Parkway design for construction. This clears the way for the federal government to approve the project, which is expected by the end of 2008. The authority hopes to complete engineering and design, and begin construction, by 2010. The new Doyle Drive is expected to open in 2014. The design chosen includes stretches of elevated and at-grade roadway and two tunnels, with six lanes of traffic, three in each direction, shoulders, and a median. The parkway design was favored by community committees in 2006. Some relatively minor changes have been made the past two years to satisfy officials at the Presidio National Park and neighbors concerned about pedestrian safety.
    [Source: San Francisco Chronicle, December 17, 2008]

    In March 2009, it was reported that Doyle Drive was among 57 transportation projects in California chosen to receive the first wave of 2009 federal stimulus funds. The Doyle Drive replacement is expected to create about 500 jobs. The commission plans to disburse the money in April 2009 for the 1.2-mile Doyle Drive project, pending a commission environmental approval. The rebuilding of Doyle Drive will cost about $1 billion. Before the commission's decision Wednesday, sources for all but about $100 million of the funding had been identified. Both U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Democrats from San Francisco, have said that securing full funding to replace Doyle Drive is a top priority. They're looking to the economic stimulus windfall from Washington to cover the remaining tab. If the money comes through, construction could begin by the end summer 2009, instead of in 2010, with completion anticipated in 2014, state and regional transportation officials said. The roadway is used by more than 100,000 vehicles a day.

    In April 2009, the CTC accepted the EIR on the Doyle Drive project. The purpose of the project is to improve the seismic, structural, and traffic safety of the roadway that is approaching the end of its useful life. Doyle Drive, the southern approach of US 101 to the Golden Gate Bridge, is 1.5 miles long with six traffic lanes. The proposed project will replace the existing facility with a new six lane facility and southbound auxiliary lane, between the Park Presidio Interchange and the new Presidio access at Girard Road. In April the CTC also allocated $50,000,000 in funding from the Federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

    In January 2010, construction started with the closure of a sharp hook-shaped curve that veered off of Doyle Drive before the toll plaza and passeed beneath the highway to Park Presidio. The southbound Doyle Drive off-ramp to southbound Route 1 will be periodically closed, and starting in February 2010, the northbound Route 1 to southbound Doyle Drive connection will be closed for a year and a half for construction. The official detour uses Lombard Street, Van Ness Avenue and Geary Boulevard. Drivers approaching Doyle Drive will be warned of the closures with electronic signs. Those missing the warnings will be able to use a "last chance" detour at Lincoln Boulevard or Merchant Road via the visitors parking area at the south end of the bridge.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved amending Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) Project 22 and re-allocate previously allocated funds for the Route 101; environmental study for reconstruction of Doyle Drive, from Lombard Street/Richardson Avenue to Route 1 Interchange in the city and county of San Francisco. Specifically, this reprogrammed $1,300,000 TCRP from Plans, Specifications & Estimate (PS&E) to Construction Support, and reallocated previously allocated funds from PS&E to Construction Support. This change related to an Emergency Limited Bid (ELB) contract that is being used to relocate some of the utilities. Although the use of such approach will help advance the delivery of that contract by about 20 months, the Federal Highway Administration does not recognize the ELB as an approved method of delivery, prohibiting federal funds use on this contract (and the original plan was to use Federal demonstration funding). Note that most of the Doyle Drive/Presedio Parkway project is being done through a public-private partnership (called P3 funding); in particular, P3 is being used for Phase II construction.

    Work began on the first tunnel in July 2010. The $116 million Battery Tunnel, funded by federal stimulus dollars and $33 million in local funds, is under construction in the Presidio along with an elevated 1,340-foot long viaduct just south of Doyle Drive that would take drivers into city. When the 1,036-foot long tunnel initially opens around Labor Day 2011, the five lanes inside will handle both northbound and southbound traffic until a second northbound tunnel is built where the existing Doyle Drive now stands. Traffic in the tunnel will be separated by a moveable Renderings show the two Battery Tunnels, with the southbound tunnel at right.

    In February 2012, it was reported there there may be some funding kerfluffles for the Doyle Drive project. Specifically, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority needs to come up with $60 million so that Golden Link Partners, a private consortium that has entered into an unusual public-private partnership, can begin construction of the second phase of the project. The authority needs to have firm funding sources within months so that the consortium can secure private financing by the end of June and proceed with the second half of the work. The shortfall was caused by two problems. First, $34 million in state transportation funds that have been pledged to the project will note arrive quickly enough. The Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the Bay Area's transportation planning and financing agency, has proposed advancing the money to San Francisco and getting paid back over the next several years. But the California Transportation Commission, which has had objections to the public-private approach on Doyle Drive, must approve that proposal. Secondly, there is a $26 million gap that resulted when the idea of redirecting federal money earmarked for two other Bay Area transportation projects didn't get congressional support. Construction crews have been building the first part of the 1.6-mile Presidio Parkway - the new name for the connection to the Golden Gate Bridge - since the end of 2009. The work includes a new US 101/Route 1 interchange, a southbound high viaduct and the southbound Battery Tunnel. By Spring 2012, the first phase will be completed, and a temporary bypass paved. Traffic will be moved off the old Doyle Drive and will share the newly built structures until the rest of the Presidio Parkway is completed in early 2015. Demolition crews will tear down the old concrete viaducts and roadways. The existing narrow approach to the Golden Gate Bridge was built in 1937 as part of the bridge project. It's now considered unsafe because it lacks a median and shoulders, is seismically fragile and sits atop unstable soils.
    (Source: SF Chronicle, 2/6/2012)

    Golden Gate Bridge. Lastly, note that the Golden Gate Bridge is not part of US 101. The Golden Gate is maintained by the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway, and Transportation District. However, the Golden Gate Bridge is part of a Safety Enforcement-Double Fine Zone, per Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999 and a Safety Awareness Zone per SB 988, Chapter 593, September 29, 2006. The Golden Gate Bridge will also be undergoing a seismic retrofit under TCRP Project #143. The Golden Gate Bridge opened in 1937.

    In January 2010, it was reported that the Golden Gate Bridge District was working on plans to raise money for the bridge. Ideas include elevator rides to the very top of the Golden Gate Bridge's international orange towers, or a chance to tour the famed structure's catwalks beneath the busy roadway. Some of the ideas are in this article from the LA Times.

    In July 2010, a Metropolitan Transportation Commission committee approved $5 million in funding for the design of a suicide barrier on the Golden Gate Bridge. The barrier will cost $45 million and the bridge district said it will not spend money on the project - meaning federal, state or private funding must be found. If it is, the system would take about 18 months to install. The barrier plan calls for a net extending 20 feet below and 20 feet from the side of the span. The net would be made from stainless steel cable and would collapse slightly if someone jumped in, making it difficult to get out, bridge officials said. The district would buy a "snooper" truck with an elongated arm to get people out, although such rescues might be rare because the net is expected to act as a deterrent. Roughly two dozen people jump from the span each year, and more than 1,300 people have jumped from the span since it opened in 1937.

    In January 2011, it was reported that the Golden Gate Bridge District was planning to eliminate human tolltakers, replacing them with electronic toll collection stations. The plan would save $19.2 million over eight years by replacing all 32 toll takers with FasTrak receivers and video cameras. The cameras would record the license plate of every driver without a FasTrak transponder and send a bill to the car's registered owner at the end of the month. Under the plan, the $3.2 million system would be installed late this year and undergo testing before going live in December 2012. The electronic toll collection system, when fully operational, is projected to cost roughly $7.8 million each year, compared with a cost of more than $10 million each year for the current system.
    (Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 1/11/2011)

    In March 2011, it was reported that the main cables of the Golden Gate Bridge would be renovated for the first time since the span opened in 1937. This isn't a replacement (the cables cannot be replaced); it involves chipping the old paint off, vacuuming the chips and repainting the cables. Exterior paint is what protects the 80,000 miles of wire inside the cables from corroding.

    In September 2011, it was noted that in 2013, the GG Bridge District will face a $75 million payout to help with construction of the new Doyle Drive and $100 million in seismic strengthening costs for its span. Between 2001 and 2011, the district has whittled its deficit from $454 million, then to $132 million and as of 2011 to $87 million by raising bridge tolls, issuing layoffs and cutting bus service, among other steps. However, inflation, capital projects and other factors will require the district to continue to take steps to reduce costs over the next several years. That includes a plan to eliminate all toll-takers on the span late next year, as the bridge goes to all-electronic tolling.

    In May 2012, it was reported that the retrofitting includes replacing the roadway on top of the anchorage house. The work is being accomplished by workers cutting out 25-by-10-foot segments and replacing them with 78, new 38,000-pound prefabricated segments over the course of 300 feet. It is the first time the road over the anchorage house has been replaced since the bridge opened 75 years ago. Most of the span's roadway was replaced in 1986, but at that time the technology was not available to easily pull the road up and off of the anchorage house. That's because the roadway also serves as the roof and ceiling of the anchorage house, the box-like structure the length of a football field at the north end of the bridge, which holds all the cables coming off the span that tie down the structure. Once it is in, the new roadway will be sealed, so water does not get into the anchorage house, as well as paved for a smooth finish. Work on the latest phase of seismic work in the anchorage house also included utility relocation, strengthening existing and building new concrete walls, as well as putting in a stronger foundation with micro piles. They are also replacing the support towers. Work on the first phase of the seismic project, strengthening the north approach, was finished in spring 2002. Work on the second phase, along the south approach, was finished in 2007. Work for the final "Phase 3B" — addressing the anchorage house and the center suspension portion of the span — will cost $200 million and bridge officials are seeking funding for that work in Washington D.C. All work could be finished by 2018.
    (Source: Marin Independent Journal, 4/29/2012)

    In March 2013, it was reported that the Golden Gate Bridge had gone to all-electronic tolling, eliminating the toll-takers. FasTrak holders, who represent a majority of bridge users, will continue to have the appropriate toll amounts deducted from their pre-paid accounts. Motorists who have pay-as-you-go accounts will see that the amounts are deducted from the credit cards they used to set up the account. Such accounts can be set up at the bridge district's website, http://www.goldengate.org/tolls/. Drivers who don't have one of those accounts or FasTrak will receive an invoice in the mail. FasTrak users will continue to pay a discounted toll of $5. Carpools of three or more people will pay $3, while most everyone else will continue to pay $6. Payments also can be made at kiosks or with store clerks at the bridge, gas stations, grocery stores and at other locations along thoroughfares leading to and from the bridge, at first including several locations in Santa Rosa and Petaluma. One-time payments, which also can be made at the district's website, can be made up to 30 days prior to crossing the Golden Gate or 48 hours after doings so. After that window, an invoice is sent to the vehicle's registered owner. Motorists have 21 days to pay the toll without penalty. A $25 fine is tacked on if it is not paid 30 days. The matter is then referred to the DMV, which can place a hold on the vehicle's registration until the fine is taken care of.
    (Source: Press-Democrat, 3/26/13)

    In May 2013, it was reported that work has started to remove the remainder of Doyle Drive. The roadbed, steel trusses, columns and finally the foundation of the structure will be peeled away. Work on the new viaduct, which will take drivers north into Marin, is expected to begin in summer 2013. Three tunnels, a low viaduct and a new interchange to the Marina and the Presidio will be part of the second phase of work as well. The new design will open up views of San Francisco Bay, create new direct access to the Presidio from the new parkway and improve pedestrian and cyclist connections within the Presidio. The major portion of construction is scheduled to be complete by late 2015 with landscaping work to follow through mid-2016.
    (Source: Marin Independent Journal, 5/8/13)

    In September 2013, is was reported that after 15 years of planning and searching for funding, the bridge district's Board of Directors approved the purchase of the $26.5 million barrier - designed to prevent head-on collisions. The barrier would be installed in late October or early November of 2014 during a 52-hour weekend closure. Lindsay Transportation Systems would build the barrier at 12 inches wide, 32 inches tall and 11,538 feet long. It would consist of steel walls filled with compressed concrete in attached segments that would be moved with a pair of "zipper trucks" to adjust lane configurations on the six-lane span.
    (Source: SFGate, 9/19/13)

    General

    The following portions of this are currently constructed to freeway standards: (1) from Route 5 to 4 miles west of Ventura, ending at Sea Cliff (approx 80 miles); (2) from Punta to the western city limits of Goleta (approx 17 miles); (3) near Rufgio St Beach (approx 5 miles); (4) from Gaviota to Solvang (approx 20 miles); (5) from Route 176 to Nipomo (approx 19 miles); (6) from Arroyo Grande to 1 mile north of San Luis Obispo (approx 17 miles); (7) from Santa Margita to Paso Robles (approx 19 miles); (8) from San Miguel to 2 miles north of King City (approx 22 miles); (9) through Salinas (10 miles); (10) from Gilroy to San Jose (33 miles); (11) the Bayshore Freeway in San Jose to San Francisco.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #246: Operations and management improvements, including Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) technologies on US 101 in Santa Barbara County. $800,000.

    • High Priority Project #429: Seismic retrofit of the Golden Gate Bridge. Note that the Golden Gate Bridge is not part of US 101. This appears to be supplemental funding for TCRP Project #143, and might even be a kickstart for that project, as it hasn't been discussed at the CTC level. The funding is likely insufficient, being cut down from the requested $11M. $8,800,000.

    • High Priority Project #525: Construct US 101 Auxiliary Lanes from 3rd Ave in the City of San Mateo to Millbrae Ave in Millbrae. $3,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #943: US 101 Operational Improvements in San Jose. $4,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #961: Construction of US 101 Auxiliary Lanes, Marsh Rd. to Santa Clara County Line. $1,800,000.

    • High Priority Project #1092: Widen the Santa Maria River Bridge on US 101 between Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County. $2,720,000.

    • High Priority Project #1335: Construct new interchange and related road improvements on US 101 near Airport Blvd, Salinas. $1,936,000.

    • High Priority Project #1565: Interchange improvements at Rice Avenue and US 101 in the City of Oxnard. $2,640,000.

    • High Priority Project #1955: Improvements to US 101 ramps between Winnetka Ave. and Van Nuys Blvd. $320,000.

    • High Priority Project #2245: US 101 Corridor Improvements — I-280 to the Capitol-Yerba Buena Interchange. $4,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #2606: Replace South Access to the Golden Gate Bridge—Doyle Drive. Supplemental fundings ppears to be in HPP #3808. $8,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #2701: Construct US 101 bicycle/pedestrian overpass at Millbrae Ave for the San Francisco Bay Trail. $1,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #3062: Conduct environmental review of proposed improvements related to the connection of Dumbarton Bridge to US 101. $400,000.

    • High Priority Project #3099: Modify and reconfigure Kanan Road interchange along US 101 in Agoura Hills. $4,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #3808: Replace South Access to the Golden Gate Bridge—Doyle Drive. This appears to be additional funding in HPP #2606. $6,000,000.

     

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between the intersection with Boronda Road and the intersection with the San Benito-Monterey County line. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

    The Golden Gate Bridge, per Senate Bill 988, Chapter 593, September 29, 2006.

    Route 101 between Golden Gate Avenue and Lyon Street in the City and County of San Francisco, per Senate Bill 1491, Chapter 121, July 10, 2008.

     

    Naming

    Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). This route (from Route 5 to Route 82) has officially been designated as "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 1569, in 1959. Note that there are other roads that are likely the original El Camino Real, in particular, portions of Monterey Road from S of Gilroy to downtown San Jose.

    The I-5/I-10/Route 60/US 101 interchange, commonly referred to as the East Los Angeles Interchange, is named the “Medal of Honor Recipient , Eugene A. Obregon, USMC, Memorial Interchange” (it was originally named the “Marine Private First Class Eugene A. Obregon Interchange”). This interchange was named in memory of Medal of Honor Recipient Eugene A. Obregon, USMC. While serving as an ammunition carrier with Golf Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during the Korean War, PFC Obregon was killed in action on September 26, 1950. The machine-gun squad of Private Obregon was temporarily pinned down by hostile fire; and during this time, he observed a fellow marine fall wounded in the line of fire. Armed only with a pistol, Private Obregon unhesitantly dashed from his cover position to the side of the fallen marine. Firing his pistol with one hand as he ran, Private Obregon grasped his comrade by the arm, and despite the great peril to himself, dragged the marine to the side of the road. Still under enemy fire, Private Obregon was bandaging the marine's wounds when hostile troops began approaching their position. Quickly seizing the wounded marine's rifle, Private Obregon placed his own body as a shield in front of the wounded marine and lay there firing accurately and effectively into the approaching enemy troops until he, himself, was fatally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. By his courageous fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty, Private Obregon enabled his fellow marines to rescue the wounded marine. By fate and courage, Private Obregon is one of the valiant Mexican Americans to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor for bravery. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 109, Resolution Chapter 66, on 6/26/2008.

    The portion of US 101 from North Mission Road to North Alameda Street, including the on ramp and off ramp of North Vignes Street, in Los Angeles County is named the "Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriff Juan Abel Escalante Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Juan Abel Escalante, who faithfully served the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department and the residents of Los Angeles County as a deputy assigned to the Custody Division. Deputy Escalante was a United States Army Reservist awarded the Armed Forces Reserve Medal, Army Service Ribbon, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, and the Army Achievement Medal. He is remembered as a passionate, loving husband to his wife, Celeste, a loving son to his parents, Anna and Cesar Powell, a caring father to his children Alexander, Julian and Marisa, and a thoughtful sibling to his brothers, Edgar and Cesar. Deputy Escalante was killed in the line of duty outside his home in the City of Los Angeles on August 2, 2008. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 103, 9/7/2010, Resolution Chapter 117.

    The segment of US 101 from the Route 5/Route 10/Route 60/US 101 to the "four-level" interchange (i.e., the Route 110/US 101 interchange) is named the "Santa Ana Freeway". It was named by its location. A good article on the history of the "four-level" interchange may be found on the KCET website.

    The portion of US 101 between Hollywood Boulevard (milepost marker 6.520) and Cahuenga Boulevard (milepost marker 7.459), in the County of Los Angeles, is named the "Los Angeles Police Officer Ian J. Campbell Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Los Angeles Police Officer Ian J. Campbell, who was born in Valley City, North Dakota. His father was a doctor who served honorably in World War I. Officer Campbell's parents were of Scottish descent. At 13 years of age, after his father died of cancer, Campbell and his mother moved to Los Angeles. Officer Campbell attended and graduated from Fairfax High School, and then attended Los Angeles City College. At approximately 12 years of age, Officer Campbell started playing the bagpipes, taking lessons from renowned Pipe Major David Aitken, winning best bagpiper in the novice category at the Scottish Highland Games held in Santa Monica. At 19 years of age, Officer Campbell enlisted in the United States Marine Corps, where he was trained as a radio operator, served two combat tours during the Korean War, and was honorably discharged from the Marine Corps as a Staff Sergeant, having been awarded the Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal with four bronze stars, and the United Nations Korean Service Medal. Upon his discharge from the Marine Corps, Officer Campbell returned to Los Angeles and attended undergraduate school at the University of California at Los Angeles. Officer Campbell entered the Los Angeles Police Academy and, on May 5, 1958, he graduated from the academy, successfully completing his probationary period as a Los Angeles police officer while assigned to the West Los Angeles Police Station, thereafter being transferred to the Hollywood Division of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD). On March 9, 1963, Officer Campbell was conducting a stop of a suspicious vehicle at Gower Street and Carlos Avenue in Hollywood when he was kidnapped at gunpoint, forcibly taken to a deserted onion field south of Bakersfield, and executed. Officer Campbell was 31 years of age at the time of his death and had served the LAPD for five years. On March 13, 1963, bagpipes were played for the first time for an officer of the LAPD at the funeral of Officer Campbell, a tradition that continues to this day following the line-of-duty death of every LAPD officer. On June 26, 1965, as a memorial to Officer Campbell, the Ian Campbell Memorial Trophy was awarded to the best aggregate bagpiper in the novice category at the Scottish Highland Games, a tradition that continues to this day. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012. In March 2013, signs honoring Officer Campbell, whose slaying by kidnappers was chronicled in the book and movie "The Onion Field," were placed alongside the Hollywood Freeway to mark the 50th anniversary of the famous case.

    The interchange of the US 101, Route 134, and Route 170 freeways is named the "Bruce T. Hinman Memorial Interchange." Officer Bruce T. Hinman was on routine motorcycle patrol on Route 170 at US 101 when he stopped to assist a disabled motorist. A drunk driver traveling at 60 m.p.h. along US 101 attempted to change routes by driving over a raised berm, then across the freeway and onto the dirt shoulder where he crashed into the disabled vehicle. The impact spun the disabled vehicle around, striking the motorist, who was using the freeway call box, and knocking Officer Hinman to the ground. The car came to rest with its rear wheels on top of the officer's chest, suffocating him. Officer Hinman, 34, was placed on life support but died a week later. He was a nine-year member of the CHP and was assigned to the West Valley Area office directly after graduating from the Academy. CHP Officer Bruce Hinman, an eight-year CHP veteran, was said to be the first officer in the 26-year history of the patrol's West Valley station to die in the line of duty.

    Officially, the segment of US-101 from Route 110 to Route 134 is named the "Hollywood Freeway". The first segment of the Hollywood Freeway opened in 1940 (as the Hollywood Expressway); the last segment opened in 1948. As for the origin of the name Hollywood, many different stories can be found. A popular explanation is that it was the name given by the wife of founder Horace H. Wilcox who named it after the "Mass of the Holy Wood of the Cross" said by Father Junipero Serra near the site. It may have also been a name borrowed from one of the Hollywoods of the east.

    The segment of US 101 from Route 110 to Route 2 is part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

    The segment of US 101 from Route 134 to the northern end of the Ventura County line is named the "Ventura Freeway". It was named a Senate Concurrent Resolution in 1973. The first segment of the Ventura Freeway opened in 1955; the last segment in 1974.

    The portion of Route 101 from the top of the Conejo Grade to Lewis Road in the City of Camarillo is named the "Adolfo Camarillo Memorial Highway." Named in honor of Adolfo Camarillo, born in 1864 in what would become Ventura County. In 1880, at 16 years of age, took over operations of the 10,000 acre Rancho Calleguas upon the death of his father Juan. Adolfo Camarillo married Isabella Menchaca in 1888 and they moved into an adobe on the ranch and subsequently raised five children. In 1890, Adolfo Camarillo planted two rows of eucalyptus trees, with the help of two Chumash Indians, which arched over what became Route 101 for many years. These trees were designated as Ventura County Historical Landmark Number 3 on August 5, 1968, and were identified as the Adolfo Camarillo Heritage Grove in the Negative Declaration for the widening of Route 101 through Camarillo in 1980. In 1892, Adolfo Camarillo constructed the Queen Anne Victorian Camarillo Ranch House, which is visible to the north from Route 101 and was recommended for designation as a California Point of Historical Interest by the State Office of Historical Preservation on August 5, 2005, and was approved for that designation by the State Director of Parks and Recreation on September 29, 2005. Adolfo Camarillo graduated from the International Business College in Los Angeles in 1895 and was a pioneer in raising lima beans, which became the major crop in Ventura County during that time. He served as a member of the Board of Supervisors of Ventura County from 1907 to 1915. He was a member of the Pleasant Valley School District Board of Trustees for 56 years, serving as presiding officer for a total of 23 years. Adolfo Camarillo donated property for the Southern Pacific Railroad to be constructed through Camarillo in 1898 and this resulted in a station being built that became known as "Camarillo," and the town site for Camarillo was laid out that same year. He gave to the community by donating 50 acres of land for the first high school in Camarillo, which is named for him, and granted land for the new Conejo Grade Route 101 project in 1937, enabling the highway to be constructed across the entire width of the original Rancho Calleguas from the Conejo Grade to the Union Pacific Railroad, formerly the Southern Pacific Railroad, tracks adjacent to downtown Camarillo, He was a leader in a number of organizations in Camarillo and California, including the Ventura County Fair Board, the Camarillo Chamber of Commerce, Los Rancheros Visitadores, and the California Lima Bean Growers Association. He was a director of the California State Fair Board and of the Bank of A. Levy. He also bred and raised a stable of Morgan-Arabian horses, now famously known as the "Camarillo White Horses," which represented the community at many events, including the Pasadena Rose Parades and the opening of the Oakland Bay Bridge in 1936, and were ridden by him at many Los Rancheros Visitadores trail rides. Adolfo Camarillo was known affectionately as "The Last Spanish Don" because he cherished and preserved the Spanish traditions of early California. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 116, Resolution Chapter 74, on 7/3/2008.

    The portion of US 101 in the County of Ventura is named the "Screaming Eagles Highway". Named in honor of the 101st Airborne Division ("Screaming Eagles"). The 101st Airborne Division traces its lineage to World War I with the formation of the 101st Division on July 23, 1918, and subsequently has been involved in every major war that the United States has participated in since then. It was instrumental in the success of the D-Day Invasion, in the Operation Market Garden in Holland, in Bastogne for the Battle of the Bulge, in Vietnam for Operation Nevada Eagle, and in many other courageous missions worldwide. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 54, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 85.

    Throughout Santa Barbara Country, this freeway is called the "El Camino Real 101" Freeway.

    Between Santa Barbara County and the San Jose area, it is simply named "El Camino Real".

    The interchange of Route 154 and US 101, in the County of Santa Barbara is named the "CHP Officer James C. O’Connor Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Officer James Christopher O’Connor, who was born on July 9, 1956. On December 23, 1982, Officer James Christopher O’Connor, graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy and was assigned to the West Valley area. He completed motorcycle training on February 28, 1985, and was transferred to the Ventura area, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer O’Connor was killed in the line of duty on November 15, 1990, at approximately 1524 hours. He and three fellow motor officers were traveling home from a divisionwide motorcycle training day in Santa Maria. A 1986 Ford Thunderbird, driven by a 78-year-old driver, failed to turn her vehicle at a curve and crossed over the center line into the group of officers. Officer O’Connor was struck head-on and thrown approximately 60 feet. During the impact, he was knocked out of his helmet and boots. Officer O’Connor’s fellow officers called for help and immediately began cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). He was transported to a nearby hospital, but succumbed to his injuries. Officer O’Connor was a good man and a good officer. He was known for his skill in riding motorcycles and his ability to get into accidents when driving an automobile. One day, while on patrol, Officer O’Connor managed to crash his patrol car into the center divider at approximately 75 mph while trying to split traffic. It was named in recognition of Officer James Christopher O’Connor’s contributions and sacrifice in serving the Department of the California Highway Patrol and the citizens of California.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    US 101 from mile marker 9.67 in Monterey County to mile marker 36.16 in Santa Barbara has been formally submitted for inclusion in the “National Purple Heart Trail”. The National Purple Heart Trail was established in 1992 for the purpose of commemorating and honoring men and women who have been wounded or killed in combat while serving in the United States Armed Forces. It courses its way across the vast majority of the United States. In 2001, pursuant to SCR 14, the Legislature designated portions of I-5 and I-80 as California's selections for inclusion in the National Purple Heart Trail. In 2009, the state legislature found it was appropriate to designate additional portions of the state highway system for inclusion in the National Purple Heart Trail in order to honor the men and women who have been wounded or killed in combat while serving in the United States Armed Forces. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 12, Resolution Chapter 84, on 8/24/2009. Additionally, in 2013, the portion of US 101 in the County of Santa Barbara from mile marker 36.16 to the Santa Barbara and Ventura County line, and the entire portion of US 101 in the County of Ventura was also designated for inclusion in the National Purple Heart Trail. The latter portions were designated by Senate Concurrent Resolution 27, August 29, 2013. Resolution Chapter 88.

    The portion of US 101 from the south edge of the Santa Maria River Bridge to Santa Maria Way in Santa Barbara County is designated the “Officer Loren D. Scruggs Memorial Highway.” This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer Loren D. Scruggs. Officer Scruggs attended high school and college in Santa Maria in Santa Barbara County, and, after joining the CHP, served his entire career in that community. On April 23, 1971, Officer Scruggs, at the age of 35 years, was killed in the line of duty near the Betteravia Avenue offramp on US 101. He had stopped a vehicle for a registration violation, but was approached by another driver who asked for directions, and who subsequently pulled out a gun and shot Officer Scruggs, and the killer fled but his body was later found with self-inflicted wounds. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 57, Resolution Chapter 38, on May 14, 2008.

    The portion of US 101 from the Madonna Road exit in San Luis Obispo to the Santa Barbara Road exit in South Atascadero is named the "Alex Madonna Memorial Highway". This segment was named in honor of Alex Madonna. Alex Madonna was a San Luis Obispo native, born in 1918 in a house that was on property that is now a part of Camp San Luis Obispo. He lived with his mother and older sister near the Mission San Luis Obispo, and graduated from San Luis Obispo High School in 1937. While still in high school, Madonna started a construction company with a Model T Ford truck and a pick and shovel. This construction company built the San Luis County Regional Airport; completed work on many projects involving the construction of US 101 within the County of San Luis Obispo (included grading and plant mixed surfacing of Route 101 from one mile south of Templeton to Paso Robles, construction of five bridges and pedestrian undercrossings on Route 101 from 1.5 miles west of Santa Margarita to Atascadero, resurfacing and installing pavement markers on Route 101 from the Vineyard Drive Overcrossing to the South Paso Robles Overhead, and ramp repair on Route 101 at Atascadero Creek); building a good portion of Route 101 from Salinas to Buellton; repaving portions of Route 1, Route 41, and Route 46; consutruction of the final stretch of I-5; and construciton of a bridge on Route 58 and Route 166. Alex Madonna also was responsible for opening the world famous Madonna Inn in San Luis Obispo in 1958. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 97, Resolution Chapter 83, on 07/11/2006.

    The interchange at Route 101 and Route 46 East, and any subsequent interchange constructed to replace that interchange, in the City of Paso Robles is named the "California Highway Patrol Officer Brett J. Oswald Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Officer Brett James Oswald, who was born in 1962, to his parents Richard and Linda Oswald, in San Rafael, California. Officer Oswald graduated from Sam Barlow High School in Gresham, Oregon in 1980, received his associates degree from Central Texas College in Killeen, Texas in 1991, and furthered his education by completing courses at Rio Hondo Community College in Whittier, California, and Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, California. Prior to joining the California Highway Patrol, Officer Oswald held several jobs, including film development, fabricating counter tops, custodial work for a local junior high school, military, and even assisting with his family's business. Officer Oswald, badge number 13164, graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1990 as a flight officer, and was assigned to the Santa Fe Springs Area Office. Officer Oswald subsequently served as a traffic officer in the King City Area Office, a flight officer in the Paso Robles Coastal Division Air Operations Office, and a traffic officer in the Templeton Area Office. Officer Oswald proudly served a total of 20 years and one month as a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Oswald was killed in the line of duty on June 27, 2010, in Paso Robles, California, when he was struck by a vehicle while waiting for a tow truck on the side of the road. He responded to a report that a vehicle had hit a tree on South River Road in Paso Robles. After investigating, Officer Oswald determined that no accident had occurred and that the vehicle was abandoned. He called for a tow truck and was waiting next to his patrol car, when a passing vehicle crossed the double yellow lines and struck the patrol car. The force of the impact pushed the patrol car into him. Officer Oswald was transported to a local hospital where he later died from his injuries. In his spare time, Officer Oswald enjoyed reading, photography, making people laugh, working on his property, and a good cigar from time to time. Above all else, Officer Oswald enjoyed spending time with his family. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 117, Resolution Chapter 63, June 29, 2012.

    The portion of US 101 between Madonna Road (Exit 201) and San Luis Bay Drive (Exit 196) in the County of San Luis Obispo, is named the "Christopher Meadows Memorial Highway." It was named in memory of Christopher Meadows, a Bay Area native who made San Luis Obispo his home after he began his studies at Cal Poly in 2003. Mr. Meadows graduated from the Orfalea College of Business in 2007 and was active in the leadership of his business fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi. Mr. Meadows chose a career to help others, obtained an Emergency Medical Technician certificate from Cuesta Community College in San Luis Obispo, and began working at the San Luis Ambulance Service. Mr. Meadows began his service with the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue (SAR) unit in February of 2008. Mr. Meadows’ energy, personality, and strong desire to help others drove him to strive for a high level of success in all his endeavors. Mr. Meadows had completed his probationary period with the SAR unit, received the award of 2009 Probationary Member of the Year in the unit, and, as a full member of the unit, was soon to be promoted to Medical Team Leader. Mr. Meadows was working with the SAR unit at the Oceano Dunes on May 24, 2009. He was responding to a medical emergency when a tragic accident claimed his life, a risk he took willingly to help others. Mr. Meadows is the first member of the SAR unit to be lost in the line of duty. According to longstanding tradition, the Board of Supervisors and the Sheriff’s Office of San Luis Obispo County joined in a resolution to christen a Patrol and Rescue Boat in Christopher Meadows’ honor. Mr. Meadows’ spirit also lives on in the form of the Christopher Meadows Memorial Paramedic Education Fund, which has awarded paramedic scholarships to four students since 2010. CAL-FIRE, Cal Poly College of Business, Cuesta College, Dignity Health Central Coast, the French Hospital Medical Center, the Morro Bay Fire Department, the Morro Bay Fire Fighters’ Association, the Oceano Dunes District of the Department of Parks and Recreation, San Luis Ambulance, the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors, the San Luis Obispo County Deputy Sheriff’s Association, the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Advisory Council, the City of San Luis Obispo Fire Department, the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue, the Sierra Vista Regional Medical Center, and the State Park Peace Officers of Oceano Dunes District all support this resolution as a fitting tribute to Mr. Meadows’ service and sacrifice.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    The portion of US 101 between Spring Street in Paso Robles and Santa Barbara Road in Atascadero in San Luis Obispo County is named the "Vernon L. Sturgeon Memorial Highway" It was named in honor of Vernon L. Sturgeon. Although born in Chandler, Arizona, he attended schools in Paso Robles and followed in his father's footsteps as a milk distributor in San Luis Obispo County for 20 years. Sturgeon served on the Paso Robles City Council for eight years and as the Mayor of the City of Paso Robles for three years. He was elected to the State Senate for Senate District 29 in 1961, and served in the Legislature until 1966, when that district was reapportioned. At that time, he became a key advisor to Governor Ronald Reagan, serving as the Governor's Legislative Liaison Officer, starting in 1967, and also serving as Chief Deputy Director of the Department of Public Works. He was appointed by Governor Reagan to the Public Utilities Commission in 1969, and was later reappointed by Governor Jerry Brown, making him one of the few people to be appointed to the same position by both governors. He served on the commission until 1979, which included a three year term as president of the commission. In has various capacities, he played a significant role in securing the temporary site for the original Cuesta College, and was instrumental in securing funds for a number of projects and California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo. Also, through his efforts, the library at Hearst Castle was made available to University of California students for research. He also carried the appropriations bill in the Senate for funding the construction of Route 46 from Paso Robles to the coast in San Luis Obispo County. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 72, Resolution Chapter 96, on 8/15/2006.

    The section of US 101 between Exit 305 at post mile 64.63 and Exit 310 at post mile 69.37 in the County of Monterey is officially named the Soledad State Prison Correctional Officers Memorial Highway honoring John V. Mills, William C. Shull, Robert J. McCarthy, and Kenneth E. Conant. It was named in memory of corrections personnel that had been killed in the line of duty. Specifically, between January 1970 and May 1971, three correctional officers and a correctional employee were attacked and killed in the line of duty at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Correctional Training Facility, formerly known as the Soledad State Prison, in a string of violent inmate uprisings. John V. Mills, born in July 1944 in Riverside, California, grew up in Fresno, attended Long Beach State College, served two years in the Army, and had just been assigned to the medium security Y-Wing in relief of another officer who was on vacation. On January 16, 1970, Officer Mills was locked in the cell block with 95 inmates, and was attacked and beaten to death at approximately 6:30 p.m. by inmates in retaliation for the shooting deaths of three other inmates at the prison. Officer Mills was a 14-month veteran correctional officer of the prison and resident of Monterey, who left a widow and a son. William C. Shull, born in June 1930 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, attended Gettysburg High School, served 22 years in the Army, retiring with the rank of Master Sergeant, and was awarded the Bronze Star and Army Commendation Medal. On July 23, 1970, Officer Shull was assigned to the recreational building 1-Yard exercise area in relief of another officer who was unable to work that day, and was found lifeless at 9:30 a.m. by an inmate, having been beaten and stabbed to death by inmates in retaliation for the shooting deaths of three other inmates at the prison. Officer Shull was a one-year veteran correctional officer of the prison and resident of Seaside, who left a widow and four girls. Robert J. McCarthy, born in August 1927 in Oklahoma, served 21 years in the Army, retiring with the rank of Sergeant. On March 4, 1971, Officer McCarthy was conducting a count of the inmates in X-Wing, at 11:15 p.m., when an inmate, claiming he needed to mail a letter, lured Officer McCarthy to his cell door and stabbed him. Valiant efforts by hospital staff and an inmate in the infirmary stabilized Officer McCarthy’s condition, but he died after he was transferred to the military hospital at Fort Ord. Officer McCarthy was a veteran correctional officer of the prison since 1966 and a resident of the City of Marina, who left a widow and two children. Kenneth E. Conant, born in December 1921 in Denver, Colorado, attended the University of Denver and the University of Southern California. On May 19, 1971, Mr. Conant, a correctional employee, was sitting at his desk preparing to conduct a disciplinary committee hearing with two prison officials when they were attacked by two inmates who entered the office with handmade knives, and Mr. Conant was fatally stabbed while the prison officials received minor injuries. Mr. Conant was a 20-year veteran of corrections work and a resident of Salinas, who left a widow and a son. It was named on 09/06/13 by SCR 23, Res. Chapter 95, Statutes of 2013.

    The section of US 101 in Salinas is the "Veterans Memorial Highway". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 133, Chapter 103, in 1994.

    Newpaper ArticleThe portion of US 101 from milepost 312 to exit 317, south of Chualar, in Monterey County, is named the "Bracero Memorial Highway". This segment was named in honor of the Mexican nationals, known as Braceros, who were legally contracted to work mostly in the agricultural and railroad industries in the Salinas Valley, and elsewhere, to alleviate a labor shortage during World War II. Two tragic, preventable incidents illustrate their unsafe working conditions. On June 17, 1958, approximately 50 Mexican Braceros were being transported from a Soledad labor camp to perform field work in the Salinas Valley. The truck transporting them was a flat bed truck converted to have a covered metal top, wooden benches, and only narrow exits at the end of the vehicle. Purportedly, two gasoline cans were in the truck for two days prior to the incident, which the driver claimed were emptied the day before the accident. The driver did not inform the passengers that they should not smoke because there were gasoline cans in the truck. One of the men lit a match igniting a flash fire in the passenger compartment of the vehicle. Twelve men died immediately of asphyxia and second, third, and fourth-degree burns as they were trapped in the vehicle, two more men later died, and an additional 17 Mexican Braceros were hospitalized. At that time, there was no state law prohibiting carrying gasoline cans in vehicles, and no criminal charges were brought. The National Safety Council considered the fire the worst noncollision vehicle tragedy in the nation since 1944. The second incident occured on September 17, 1963, on a lonely stretch of railroad track paralleling US 101 at Thomas Ranch Road in the City of Chualar, near Salinas, California, 32 Bracero farmworkers lost their lives and another 24 were injured in the biggest single fatal vehicle accident in California history and the worst of its type in United States' history. The Braceros who were injured and killed were being transported in a truck converted into a bus without the approval of, or inspection by, any government agency, on the way to harvest celery for one dollar ($1) per hour, when struck by an oncoming train. Legal immigrant farmworkers continue to cross the border to work in many parts of California without being provided safe working conditions or being treated with dignity and respect, and so in recognition of the Braceros' contributions and sacrifice in the Salinas Valley and elsewhere in California, this segment was dedicated. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 113, 08/17/2010, Resolution Chapter 86. Image of the Salinas Californian, Sept. 18, 1963. More details in this article from the Mercury News.

    The portion of Route 101 north of Chualar between Payson Street and Esperanza Road in Monterey County is named the Caltrans Highway Maintenance Lead Worker Michael (Flea) Feliciano Memorial Highway. This segment was named in memory of Michael (Flea) Feliciano, who was born on January 25, 1949, in Monterey, California. He graduated from Pacific Grove High School and Monterey Peninsula College where he majored in Police Science. He played varsity baseball all four years in high school, was the first athlete at Pacific Grove High School to receive All Mission Trail Athletic League three years in a row as a varsity pitcher, and played as a semi-pro baseball pitcher from 1967 to 1976. He worked for 14 years for the City of Seaside Parks Department and was responsible for all irrigation of parks, islands, and medians; and also worked for the Fort Ord Golf Course and the Garnerville Ranchos District. In 2004, Michael (Flea) Feliciano was the District 5 Maintenance Lead Worker of, and an eleven year employee with, the Department of Transportation (Caltrans). He was a state-certified water auditor, a member of the Northern California Turf Council, and a member of the National Crisis Prevention Institute. On February 25, 2004, Michael (Flea) Feliciano's crew was returning to the maintenance yard in Salinas after closing a lane due to storm flooding on Route 101 when an errant driver crossed the highway median and slammed into the truck Michael (Flea) Feliciano was driving, killing Michael (Flea) Feliciano. Michael (Flea) Feliciano was the 159th Caltrans worker to be killed in the line of duty since 1924. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 120, Resolution Chapter 141, on 9/8/2006.

    The section from Route 82 in San Jose to I-80 in San Francisco is named the "Bayshore" Freeway. It was named by its location. One map shows it as the "South Valley" Freeway in Santa Clara County (between Route 82 and Monterey Street), but that seems not to be a name recognized by Caltrans.

    The portion of US 101 from Fair Oaks Avenue (milepost marker 44.83) to Route 87 (milepost marker 39.92) in the County of Santa Clara is named the "CHP Officer Charles Lilly Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Charles Richard Lilly, who was born on June 24, 1937, to Charles and Margaret, in Portola, California. In 1964, Officer Lilly, badge number 4029, graduated from the CHP Academy with the Cadet Training Class III-65 and was assigned to the San Jose area. Officer Lilly was a genuine person, a dedicated officer, and family man. He was known for his charisma and his ability to get along well with others. In his spare time, Officer Lilly enjoyed listening to music and attending church. He also had a keen interest in law and attended a semester at Lincoln Law University in San Jose, California. On October 29, 1967, Officer Lilly was killed in the line of duty during a routine traffic stop. As the officer was exiting the patrol car, his partner drove on to pursue another vehicle. A third vehicle, the driver of which was later known to be intoxicated, veered off the road and fatally struck Officer Lilly.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    Route 101 between Ralston Avenue in Belmont and Route 92 is named the "Civilian Women Volunteers All Wars Memorial Freeway". It was named in honor of the civilian women volunteers that have run recreation centers and libraries on military institutions, taught in hospitals and schools, provided health care, and run orphanages. in a large number of wars. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 83, Chapter 36, approved March 15, 2000.

    The section between US 101 near Brisbane and US 101 in San Francisco was at one time called the "Hunters Point Freeway". This route was adopted in late 1963. It was named by location.

    The hill on Route 101 between Greenbrae and San Rafael is called "California Park Hill". California Park was housing development begun about 1910 in this area.

    The curve on Route 101 in San Francisco just north of Army Street to just south of Vermont Street is named "Hospital Curve", because the highway runs behind San Francisco General Hospital.

    Route 101 through Morgan Hill is also named the "Sig Sanchez Highway". Sig Sanchez was a San Jose Councilman. During his tenure as mayor and as a county supervisor, the passion and perseverance of Sig Sanchez overcame several obstacles so as to allow the building of the Morgan Hill Bypass on Route 101 in the County of Santa Clara. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 46, Chapt. 1994 in 1994.

    Route 101 in San Mateo County between the Santa Clara County line and the Ralston Avenue exit is named the Military Servicewomen's Memorial Highway. It was named in recognition of the contribution made by our country's women in the defense of the United States. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 171, Chapt. 154, September 1, 1998.

    Route 101 between the San Franciso International Airport and the Broadway-Burlingam Exit is named the "Officer Dave Chetcuti Memorial Highway". Millbrae Police Officer Dave Chetcuti, 43, became the first officer from that city's police department to be killed in the line of duty, April 25, 1998. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 97, Chapter 158 in 1998.

    Route 101 in San Francisco from the San Mateo County line and the junction of I-80 is named the "James Lick Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 37, Chapter 122 in 1951. James Lick (1796-1876) worked in his youth as an expert organ and piano maker, following this trade some twenty years in Argentina, Chile and Peru. He arrived in San Francisco just before the gold rush with about $30,000 and made investments in what was then outlying real estate. He built the famous hotel known as the Lick House and continued to purchase real estate which kept being absorbed by the city as it grew. He also built a large flour mill in San Jose. As a result of investments he was very wealthy at the time of his death and left several million dollars for scientific, charitable and educational purposes. He financed the observatory atop Mt. Hamilton.

    From Route 80 in San Francisco until the freeway portion ends, it is named the "Central Skyway" or "Central Freeway".

    The segment from Route 1 to Waldo Point is named the "Golden Gate Bridge Freeway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 11, Chapter 39 in 1954. The name comes from the fact that the route crosses the Golden Gate Bridge. The bridge, in turn, was named after the straight, which was named by Frémont in 1846 in analogy to the Golden Horn in Europe. He chose the name because he foresaw the day when riches of the Orient would flow through the gate, but he could not forsee that the discovery of gold in a few years would give the name new significance.

    Historically, this entire route was called the "Coast Highway".

     

    Named Structures

    Colloquially, the intersection of US 101 and Route 110 is called the "Four Level Interchange". Plans for it were unveiled in 1947 and it was constructed and open to traffic by 1949 or 1953-54, depending on who you believe. (SCAQMD and Library of Congress say 1949; Caltrans' own website says 1953; a historian at USC has material on the Web that says 1954). According to the Automobile Club, by the early 1950s the uppermost roadway was open for traffic on the Hollywood Freeway. The connections to the Harbor/Pasadena Freeway were completed a year later. This was the world's first four-level interchange. The Four Level itself has been recognized as a historic resource in its own right for some time. This has resulted in ill-advised cosmetic modifications, such as a cast-concrete bridge rail installed because it was considered to look "historic" (in fact the Four Level opened with very modern-looking steel bridge rails), as shown in the famous 1954 photo Caltrans Public Affairs has put online.

    At the South Ventu Park Road exit in Newbury Park is the "Stagecoach Inn Historial Plaque". This marks the original location of the historic Stagecoach Inn.

    Bridge 52-241 over the Ventura River in Ventura county is named the "Senator James J. McBride Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1962, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 9, Chapter 18, in the same year. State Senator James F. McBride served the people of Ventura County in the California Assembly and Senate from 1933 to 1961.

    Tunnel 51-172R in Santa Barbara county is named the "Gaviota Gorge Tunnel". It was built in 1953.

    Bridge 44-053, the Lime Creek Bridge in Monterey County, is named the "Harvey Robert Huss Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1975, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 59. Harvey Robert Huss, Caltrans maintenance worker, lost his life on February 11, 1973 while attempting to rescue to occupants of a car threatened by a mudslide on Route 1 near Big Sur. Mr. Huss was posthumously awarded the Medal of Valor, California's highest civilian award for heroism.

    Bridge 44-177, over the Salinas River in Monterey county, is named the "Skinner-Serrano Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1971, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 105, Chapter 37, in 1992. United States Army Cpl. Rodolfo Carillo "Rudy" Serrano, 21, was killed in action in Dinh Tuong Province, South Vietnam, on April 1, 1968. United States Marine Corp PFC Walter Francis Skinner, 19, was killed in action in Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam, on February 25, 1968.

    The interchange of I-680, I-280, and US 101 in the City of San Jose is named the "Joe Colla Interchange." This interchange was named in memory of Joseph Anthony Colla, who actively served the San Jose community during the 1970s as a pharmacist, bike racer, bike race promoter, and San Jose City Council Member. Councilman Joe Colla worked in the 1970s alongside future mayors Norman Mineta and Janet Gray Hayes to help the City of San Jose develop economically and culturally and become described as "San Jose, a City with a Future". Colla is best known for a stunt involving the US 101/I-680/I-280 interchange. Construction started on that interchange, and then stopped as then-Gov. Jerry Brown suspended most highway building in the state in a cost-cutting measure. Road crews disappeared and what remained was a 200-foot ramp suspended in the air with rebar sticking out of both ends. The ramp was dubbed San Jose's "Monument to Nowhere." In the pre-dawn hours of a sunny but chilly January day, Colla got a crane operator to lift a Chevy on top of the unfinished ramp. Then the feisty councilman and drugstore owner jumped in a helicopter, which dropped him off next to the car. A photograph was snapped of Colla with arms outstretched and the caption: "Where Do We Go From Here?"As a direct result of Councilman Joe Colla's exploits, including posing the question, "Where do I drive from here?" from atop the unfinished interchange, and identifying the monolith as "A Monument to Nowhere." This made Colla a true urban legend. After the car stunt, he organized a 300-car caravan to Sacramento to push for the interchange's completion. Eventually the City of San Jose received the necessary funding and the interchange project was completed. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 102, August 30, 2010, Resolution Chapter 107.

    The intersection of Route 85 and US 101 in San Jose is named the Michael Evanhoe Interchange. It was named in honor of Michael Evanhoe, who served between 1995 and 2004 as the chief development officer responsible for the planning, programming, project development, marketing, and congestion management functions for the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) in the County of Santa Clara. In that position, Mr. Evanhoe managed the $700 million VTA highway program, and was responsible for long-range transportation planning and programming for VTA, working to address and set the VTA's priorities for discretionary state and federal transportation funds. Mr. Evanhoe worked in the field of transportation since 1965, initially with the Caltrans in its Sacramento, Marysville, and San Francisco offices from 1965 to 1974, and later serving as Assistant Secretary for Transportation in the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency from 1975 to 1978 and Executive Director of the California Transportation Commission from 1978 to 1984. He joined the Sunset Development Company in San Ramon in 1984 and served as Vice President of Operations until 1988, was later appointed as Executive Director of the Golden Triangle Task Force in Santa Clara County from 1988 to 1990, and was subsequently appointed as the Executive Director of the Congestion Management Agency of Santa Clara County in 1990, serving in the latter position until the agency merged with the Santa Clara County Transit District in 1994 to form the VTA. Over the years, Mr. Evanhoe has gained the respect and admiration of elected officials, staff, and business leaders by getting the job done, maintaining a positive work environment, taking on new challenges, and working collaboratively with others. He had substantial responsibilities for construction of the Route 85/US 101 interchange and the widening of US 101. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 152, chaptered September 1, 2004. Resolution Chapter 175.

    Bridge 35-252 on US 101, the Route 92/Route 101 Interchange in San Mateo, is named the "Harold "Bizz" Johnson" Interchange. Congressman Harold T. "Bizz" Johnson, state Senator from 1949 to 1958, who served in the House of Representatives from 1958-1980, was instrumental in helping establish the Rails-to-Trails program. He also promoted water development projects and sided with consumer-owned electric utilities against the economic and political clout of big investor-owned systems like Pacific Gas and Electric Co. He also successfully broadened language in the Surface Transportation Assistance Act to allow bridges over highways, railroads and other physical features to qualify for funding under the Act's bridge replacement provisions. It was built in 1971, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 42, Chapt. 155 in 1985.

    Bridge 35-232 is also named the "Leslie Charlene Curtis Memorial Bridge". This name was assigned by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 84, Chapter 129, in 1985. Leslie Charlene Curtis, 19, was killed in 1985 by a drunk driver at the then notoriously unsafe intersection of South Norfolk and Route 92.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Gaviota, in Santa Barbara County, at the S end of the Gaviota Tunnel.
    • Camp Roberts, in Monterey County, 8.5 mi N of San Miguel.

     

    National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

    Arrowhead Trail Sign This portion of this route from Route 110/Figueroa Blvd to Route 2 (Santa Monica Blvd) was part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

    National Old Trails Road Sign This portion of this route from Route 110/Figueroa Blvd to Route 2 (Santa Monica Blvd) was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

    New Santa Fe Trail Sign This portion of this route from Route 110/Figueroa Blvd to Route 2 (Santa Monica Blvd) was part of the "New Santa Fe Trail".

    National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign This portion of this route from Route 110/Figueroa Blvd to Route 2 (Santa Monica Blvd) appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

    Pacific Highway Sign Lone Star Trail Sign This route appears to have been part of the "Pacific Highway". It also appears parts of the original route were part of the "Lone Star Trail".

     

    Business Routes
    • Los Angeles: Ventura Blvd (formerly signed, now deprecated as a business route)
    • Ventura: Main Street
    • Salinas: Boronda Road east to Main Street; Main Street south to Salinas Street; Salinas Street south into John Street (Route 68) east; John Street (Route 68) east to Abbott Street; Abbott Street south near Spreckels and to the half-interchange/half at-grade with the US 101 expressway near the Gould Road at-grade
    • Gonzales: Alta Street
    • Soledad: Front Street
    • Greenfield: El Camino Real
    • King City: First Street, Broadway
    • Atascadero: Traffic Way, El Camino Real.
    • Santa Maria: Route 135 south to Santa Maria Way, and Santa Maria Way east back to US 101
    • San Luis Obispo: Marsh Street. This shares signage with Route 1. Portions may be on Monterey Street.
    • Paso Robles: Spring Street
    • Pismo Beach/Grover Beach: Price Street
    • Arroyo Grande: Traffic Way. This is wrong-way multiplexed with Route 227 at its end.
    • Gilroy to Morgan Hill: Monterey Highway (some of this is former business route).

     

    Memorials

    Christopher G. Williams, Southbound US 101 @ Blackie Road in Prunedale, CA. The accident was 6/10/98 and the sign actually went up the first year the assembly bill was adopted (2001). Chris was killed on his Harley Davidson motorcycle by a hit and run drunk driver on the evening of Salinas' Big Hat Barbeque (kickoff to the California Rodeo in Salinas, CA) and the driver was later apprehended in Santa Cruz County. The driver was eventually sentenced to 11 years, 8 months in prison and has since been released after serving 5 years. Chris was the father of 3 children. Chris was a generous, fun, caring, loving father, brother and friend. He was 36 years old and worked for Pacific Bell in San Jose and commuted to and from Salinas daily and would not hesitate to stop and help a driver on the side of the road. He worked hard for his family and loved life. His three young children were the most important things in his life and after the accident the kids were split up and their lives have been a challenge without their father.
    (Information provided by Laurie R. Moreno, Chris's sister)

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.6] From Route 27 (Topanga Canyon Boulevard) to Route 46 near Paso Robles; and from Route 156 near Prunedale northeasterly to Route 156.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Los Angeles 101 S0.00 S1.32
    Los Angeles 101 0.00 0.11
    Los Angeles 101 1.00 6.72
    Los Angeles 101 6.83 7.06
    Los Angeles 101 7.19 8.36
    Los Angeles 101 8.40 9.08
    Los Angeles 101 9.29 27.59
    Los Angeles 101 33.59 33.83
    Los Angeles 101 34.83 35.16
    Los Angeles 101 35.19 36.84
    Los Angeles 101 37.37 37.69
    Ventura 101 0.58 1.37
    Ventura 101 1.54 1.73
    Ventura 101 3.86 4.58
    Ventura 101 4.85 7.35
    Ventura 101 7.48 8.36
    Ventura 101 8.50 8.76
    Ventura 101 13.49 16.19
    Ventura 101 21.60 22.50
    Ventura 101 22.50 23.12
    Ventura 101 23.46 23.98
    Ventura 101 25.60 30.94
    Santa Barbara 101 0.54 1.24
    Santa Barbara 101 1.24 22.44
    Santa Barbara 101 23.53 23.87
    Santa Barbara 101 24.29 24.91
    Santa Barbara 101 R56.84 58.00
    Santa Barbara 101 87.40 90.27
    San Luis Obispo 101 12.12 R19.60
    San Luis Obispo 101 27.29 27.61
    San Luis Obispo 101 27.96 30.36
    San Luis Obispo 101 43.35 43.80
    San Luis Obispo 101 43.88 44.14
    San Luis Obispo 101 44.37 44.59
    San Luis Obispo 101 45.45 46.20
    San Luis Obispo 101 46.60 47.04
    San Luis Obispo 101 56.40 57.28
    San Luis Obispo 101 57.81 58.54
    Monterey 101 85.01 R89.50
    Monterey 101 R90.73 R91.00
    Santa Clara 101 R17.38 R17.98
    Santa Clara 101 R23.58 R23.81
    Santa Clara 101 R24.36 R24.59
    Santa Clara 101 R26.71 31.24
    Santa Clara 101 31.40 40.59
    Santa Clara 101 40.86 41.19
    Santa Clara 101 41.88 42.13
    Santa Clara 101 42.50 44.99
    Santa Clara 101 45.57 47.14
    Santa Clara 101 47.76 50.47
    Santa Clara 101 51.84 52.45
    San Mateo 101 0.01 0.72
    San Mateo 101 0.86 5.52
    San Mateo 101 5.58 6.16
    San Mateo 101 6.23 6.95
    San Mateo 101 7.66 13.12
    San Mateo 101 13.34 13.58
    San Mateo 101 14.68 14.91
    San Mateo 101 16.36 17.59
    San Mateo 101 17.80 26.11
    San Francisco 101 0.00 4.13

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] From Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles to near Fell Street in San Francisco; signed as US Highway. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    The portion from Route 5 to the Route 10 interchange was to have been designated I-105; this was deleted as chargeable interstate in August 1965. The entire length of this portion of US101 was submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1945; it was not accepted.

     

    Commuter Lanes

    In San Mateo County, a HOV lane runs (in both directions) from Whipple Avenue to the Santa Clara county line, for a length of 6.6 mi. This was opened in July 1991. It requires two or more occupants, and operates on weekdays during the following hours: 5:00-9:00AM, 3:00-7:00PM.

    In Santa Clara County, a HOV lane runs (both directions) from the San Mateo county line to the vicinity of Bernal Road, for a length of approximately 25 miles. The portion between the San Mateo County Line and Guadalupe Parkway was opened in November 1986 and extended twice in 1988; the portion between Guadalupe Parkway and Route 280 was opened in April 1993; and the portion between Route 280 and Bernal Road was opened in June 1990. All require two or more occupants, and operate on weekdays during the following hours: 5:00-9:00AM, 3:00-7:00PM.

    With respect to usage: A 2001 Caltrans survey showed that use of the HOV lane in the San Francisco Bay Area fell from 14,110 vehicles in 1996 to 9,093 in 2001. During the busiest hour of the morning, more than 1,500 cars used the HOV lane, which is about the same number of cars as in each non-carpool lane. Note that the 2001 survey showed that US 101 has the distinction of the slowest speed for carpoolers at 28 mph during the afternoon.

    There are plans to add a reversible HOV lane through San Rafael from Sir Francis Drake Blvd to N San Pedro Road in Marin County. This is TCRP Project Caltrans. In August 2005, this was amended to be two HOV lanes, instead of a single reversable lane.

    There also appear to be plans to address the HOV gap between south of the Coleman School Pedestrian Overcrossing to North San Pedro Road Undercrossing.

     

    Other WWW Links


  2. From a point in Marin County opposite San Francisco to the Oregon state line via Crescent City.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The definition of this segment remains unchanged from 1963, other than it changing from (c) to (b).

    Portions of this route are now Route 254, as surface routings have been replaced by freeway. Another "old US 101" segment is present-day Route 271. It also appears that State Street in the Ukiah, Calpella, and Redwood Valley areas is a former segment of US 101, in particular, the segment from Route 253 to downtown Calpella.

    Note: Licensed carriers of livestock are exempted from certain limitations of access when those carriers are directly en route to or from a point of loading or unloading of livestock on specified portions of Route 101 located in the Counties of Del Norte, Humboldt, and Mendocino from its junction with Route 1 near Leggett north to the Oregon border, if the travel is necessary, incidental to the shipment of the livestock, and certain conditions are met. This examption expires on January 1, 2015. However, if the director of the Department of Transporation determines that certain safety improvements to a portion of Route 101 have resulted in the reclassification of the entire segment as a terminal access route pursuant to specified provisions of the Vehicle Code, the exemption may be repealed. (ACR 349, Statute Chapter 172, 8/4/11)

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    N of San Francisco, US 101 (which was signed since the mid-1930s) was LRN 1, defined in 1909, N to 5 mi NE of Crescent City. It was LRN 71, defined in 1919, from this point (the junction with US 199) to the Oregon border.

    Chris Sampang observes that there are quite a few surface streets that are likely old US 101 routings, having been bypassed when the freeway N of Willits was completed. He identifies these as:

    • Garberville and Redway: Redwood Drive
    • Sylvandale to Pepperwood: Avenue of the Giants/Route 254
    • Scotia: Main Street
    • Rio Dell: Wildwood Avenue. At one time, US 101 was on Pacific Avenue.
    • Alton: Old State Highway (found near the Route 36 junction)
    • Fortuna: Fortuna Blvd and Main Street
    • Worswick to Beatrice: Route 211 from Worswick to Fernbridge, Eel River Drive from Fernbridge to Beatrice, Old State Highway south of Loleta. Eel River Drive. Tompkins Hill Road north of Beatrice may also be old US 101, US 101 here follows the railroad and that makes more sense.
    • Spruce Point: Broadway Street, now known as South Broadway.
    • Eureka: Broadway, 5th (NB) and 4th (SB) Streets.
    • Arcata: G Street
    • McKinleyville to Clam Beach: Central Avenue
    • Clam Beach: Clam Beach Drive
    • Moonstone to Trinidad: Scenic Drive.
    • Trindad to Patricks Point: Patricks Point Drive, maybe Old Stagecoach Road
    • Big Lagoon: Roundhouse Creek Road, Oceanview Drive, A Street, Redwood Highway, later seemingly rerouted to Roundhouse Creek Road and Lynda Lane (it is unclear if the Redwood Highway here was actually connected to US 101)
    • North of Big Lagoon: There's a routing (unnamed) that appears to go through some state park
    • Dry Lagoon: Old State Highway, which takes a routing to the east of Dry Lagoon.
    • Exit 753 north to Exit 765: Old Highway 101, paralleling Prarie Creek on a straighter alignment than the current freeway; part of it (at the junction with Red Park Road in the Prarie Creek Redwoods near the Humboldt/Del Norte county line) is named Redwood Highway.
    • Klamath: Klamath Mill Road and Klamath Avenue
    • Crescent City: If US199 actually ended in the city itself, then Parkway Drive would be an old routing of US 199 at first, and then possibly a pre-freeway version of US 101 after US 199 was made to end north of Crescent City. One possible pre-freeway (but post-US 199 move out of Crescent City itself, if US 199 had ever been there) route is Railroad Avenue and Wonderstump Avenue; another longer one is the route from Crescent City to Smith River via Northcrest Drive, Lake Earl Drive to Tryon Corner, and then Fred D. Haight Drive from Tryon Corner to Smith River. West First Street and Oceanview Drive north to near the Oregon stateline might also be a part of a pre-expressway route. (A second Oceanview Drive begins across the Oregon state line 3/4 mile north of the border eventually meeting up with 101 in Brookings; this name might've been one continous route pre-expressway.)

    Note also that in Cloverdale, part of Cloverdale Blvd was likely part of US 101, and was cosigned with Route 128.

     

    Status

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $24,413,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Sausalito, Corte Madera and Larkspur from the Golden Gate Bridge to Corte Madera Creek that will rehabilitate 45.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life. They also approved finding to repave an 8.5-mile stretch of US 101 in Marin from Vista Point at the Golden Gate Bridge to Lucky Drive in Larkspur. The work will begin in Fall 2011. Additionally, Caltrans is repaving US 101 between Terra Linda and Route 37 in southern Novato, and another segment of the route will be repaved as part of a widening project on US 101 north of Route 37 to just north of Atherton Avenue.

    There have been some small relinquishments, either of current routings or past routings. CTC June 2000 Agenda Item 2.3c included relinquishment resolutions for Marin County PM 16.3-18.3 in the City of Novato, and San Francisco PM G4.7-5.3 in San Francisco.

    In December 2011, it was reported that the overpass that connects Paradise and Tamalpais drives in Corte Madera will get $1.2 million to address problems that were causing it to sink into bay mud beneath the structure, causing pavement to dip. The CTC approved funding to repair the trouble spot; existing fill will be replaced with lightweight concrete material to stop the pavement from sinking and dipping. A contract for the work is expected to go out to bid next month with work starting in July 2012.

    In January 2013, it was reported there was opposition to the Corte Madera overpass project. This is proposed $143 million construction project that would create elevated freeway segments and demolish a pedestrian overcrossing along the Larkspur and Corte Madera stretch of US 101. Caltrans and Transportation Authority of Marin officials say the project — which has racked up $7 million in expenses — is needed to improve safety, reduce congestion and enhance multi-modal access in the area. Critics say the outdated, monstrous Los Angeles-style proposal should be scrapped. Under the project, a 44' flyover would be built to take drivers from southbound US 101 into Corte Madera, ending at Wornum Drive. Drivers coming off Sir Francis Drake heading south would use a newly built road next to the freeway to make a more smooth and safe transition onto the freeway. A barrier would also be put in place to make sure traffic headed north through the interchange from Lucky Drive continues through to East Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, stops at a light and then continues north to get to US 101. The community believes the project is not designed to increase capacity on the freeway, does not address flooding issues that occur with every winter storm, doesn't adequately address the traffic problem on Sir Francis Drake Boulevard and will degrade the bicycle and pedestrian connection across US 101. In February 2013, it was reported that Caltrans offered to create a 7-member committee to explore alternatives. It was also reported that Corte Madera officials have formally opposed the closure of Nellen Avenue — a potential roadblock for the planned southbound improvements — and have demanded a full environmental impact report if the project moves forward. The Town Council and members of the public are especially opposed to the construction of a 33-foot tall flyover to take drivers from southbound US 101 and Sir Francis Drake Boulevard into Corte Madera, ending at Wornum Drive.
    (Source: Marin Independent-Journal, 1/27/13, 2/7/2013, 2/12/2013)

    In February 2013, it was reported that Larkspur has joined Corte Madera in demanding the creation of a full environmental impact report for the controversial project to rearrange the Larkspur-Corte Madera stretch of US 101. Larkspur cites a lack of project alternatives, inadequate public circulation of the draft state study, significant visual and aesthetic impacts, understated impacts to local traffic and a lack of detailed flooding mitigations as some of the proposed project's problems. The letter states removal of trees from around the highway, the construction of a large flyover and tall concrete walls will block views of Mount Tamalpais, decreasing visual enjoyment of the area and segregating the Redwood Highway area from greater Corte Madera and Larkspur. Larkspur emergency personnel are also concerned the project design will reduce local response times to the highway stretch from the south end of the Greenbrae interchange to the Wornum Drive overpass.
    (Source: Marin Independent-Journal, 2/22/2013)

    In September 2012, it was reported that Caltrans was working on plans for construction of the Greenbrae Interchange project on US 101. The purpose of the project is to reduce traffic congestion within the Greenbrae/Twin Cities Corridor by alleviating the short merging, diverging, and weaving areas along US 101. The plans for SB US 101 from Sir Francis Drake Boulevard include an auxiliary lane with an exit onto Fifer and an extended merge onto US 101. An overpass, meanwhile, carries southbound US 101 traffic to an exit onto Wornum Drive.

    In July 2013, it was reports that a concensus is starting to be reached regarding the southbound lanes near the Greenbrae interchange. The planning group wants to study having two lanes exit onto Sir Francis Drake Boulevard from southbound US 101, having three lanes over the Corte Madera Creek from Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, keeping the Greenbrae pedestrian overcrossing intact, adding auxiliary lanes from Sir Francis Drake Boulevard to Tamalpais Drive and allowing a right turn from Fifer Avenue onto Nellen Avenue. As far as northbound traffic lanes are concerned, the group was unable to reach complete consensus. Most of the group, except San Rafael Mayor Gary Phillips and Marin County Supervisor Katie Rice, supported the creation of an auxiliary lane from Tamalpais Drive, studying an interchange from the San Rafael-Richmond Bridge to US 101, widening east Sir Francis Drake Boulevard to two lanes and exploring options to allow better merging from the highway to the San Rafael-Richmond Bridge. A proposal to study a right-turn lane from eastbound Fifer Avenue to southbound Nellen Drive was unanimously supported.
    (Source: Marin Independent-Journal, 7/23/13, 8/26/13)

    In September 2013, the county finally settled on a plan for the Greenbrae interchange. Board members ultimately voted in favor of, with amendments, one of the authority staff plans that would spend $39.6 million on mostly bicycle and pedestrian improvements, a majority of which were proposed by the working group. The board voted to spend $500,000 on a feasibility study to connect US 101 to the San Rafael-Richmond Bridge, $4.5 million for new regional and local bus stops, $250,000 for a feasibility study for undercrossings on Wornum Drive, $9 million to widen the bicycle pathway over Corte Madera Creek, $500,000 to extend a bicycle path from Fifer Avenue to Wornum Drive, $2 million for sidewalk and pedestrian improvements for Redwood Highway, $500,000 for colored asphalt treatments, $500,000 for widening eastbound Sir Francis Drake Boulevard onto the southbound collector lanes, $4 million to extend the eastbound auxiliary lane from Sir Francis Drake Boulevard to just before the San Rafael-Richmond Bridge, $2 million for a feasibility study to widen east Sir Francis Drake from one to two lanes, $11.4 million to help the Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit train extend from San Rafael to Larkspur — with up to $3 million dedicated to the Andersen Drive crossing in San Rafael — and $4.5 million to study completing the North-South Greenway — a mostly auto-free alternative to US 101 — and studying building Wornum Drive undercrossings.
    (Source: Marin Independent Journal, 9/27/13)

    In January 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Rafael along Route 101 on Myrtle Avenue, Grand Avenue, and Linden Lane, consisting of collateral facilities. The City, by letter dated December 3, 2013, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In September 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Marin and Sonoma Counties that will construct a northbound high occupancy vehicle lane from Route 37 to Atherton Avenue and a southbound HOV lane from Route 37 to Rowland Boulevard; construct a southerly interchange at San Antonio Road and Route 101, including frontage roads with pedestrian/bicycle facility; replace the bridge over San Antonio Creek and realign the roadway curve; construct an interchange at Petaluma Boulevard including frontage roads with pedestrian/bicycle facility; and construct roadway improvements in the cities of Novato and Petaluma. The project is fully funded using Corridor Mobility Improvement Account, Traffic Congestion Relief Program, State Transportation Improvement Program, federal and local funds for $274,000,000, capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Of course, there are always delays to projects such as this. For example, in May 2011, the CTC received notice of increased costs and delays. The reason? For the southerly interchange, (1) two additional easements were needed for placing the bike-path and a portion of the southbound on-ramp at the Southerly Interchange inside the Olompali State Park limits—as a result, additional cultural and biological studies were required and may there may need to be an amendment to the biological opinion; (2) placing the bike-path and a portion of the southbound on-ramp at the Southerly Interchange on the Olompali State Park property saves a significant number of existing trees along southbound Route 101 and also improves access to the Olompali State Park. External stakeholders including State Parks, County of Marin, and the Marin Bicycle Coalition support the revised design. This revised layout will also eliminate a future realignment of Route 101 when the currently unfunded Phase 2 of the overall Marin-Sonoma Narrows Corridor is built. (3) An additional 9,000 feet of a North Marin Water District (NMWD) waterline needed to be relocated as a result of the above described design changes. (4) The newly proposed frontage road south of the Olompali Park will extend over a hillside area with a potentially active landslide. A more detailed geotechnical investigation and monitoring is needed to conclusively determine if the hillside is stable. In other cases, challenges for right of way acquisition slowed work.

    In July 2013, it was reported that Petaluma’s welcome sign ("the flyswatter"), may soon have to come down. As Caltrans reconfigures the Petaluma Boulevard South interchange with US 101, the sign welcoming northbound motorists to the Egg Basket of the World is in the way. But any changes won’t be permanent, said Onita Pellegrini, chief executive of the Petaluma Chamber of Commerce. When the sign comes down — whenever construction needs the space — it could stay down for two years during the highway work. It could go back up sooner if city-owned or even private land can be found for it. The northern sign is on city land. The simple, orange-painted metal sign has a horizontal oval top with “Petaluma” in the center with the outline of hills behind it. The year the city was incorporated, 1858, is bracketed by “Sonoma County” on the underside curve. Underneath, between the steel support posts, are signs of the city’s service clubs including Lions, Kiwanis, Elks and Rotary. The sign is on Caltrans property, so replacing a service group sign or even accessing it is complicated. The city has to make sure anything put on the sign doesn’t distort a driver’s view, isn’t flashing or reflective.
    (Press Democrat, 7/22/13)

    In March 2014, it was reported that the Sonoma County Transportation Authority approved $4.5 million to buy land to widen US 101 to six lanes through Petaluma, but it will be at least three years, and perhaps longer, before there is a remedy to the bottleneck that has plagued commuters for years. One of the two remaining four-lane sections of US 101 in Sonoma County from Windsor south to the Marin County line now is nearly ready for construction, though transportation officials have not secured the $90 million needed to widen the highway from just north of Corona Road to the Petaluma River.

    In April 2014, it was reported that some Petaluma city officials are hoping new revenue generated from an anticipated county sales tax measure could lead to the completion of highway widening from Petaluma to the county line. If Sonoma County officials choose to put a sales tax measure on the November ballot, Petaluma City Councilmember Mike Healy said prioritizing funding for Route 101 would be critical to the completion of the project. County officials are considering several options to raise funds to repair the county's 1,400 miles of roads, which have been rated some of the worst in the Bay Area. A proposal for a new sales tax or the extension of the county's existing Measure M transportation sales tax, passed in 2004 to widen Route 101, are just two avenues being discussed for the November ballot.

    For Marin/Sonoma Counties, in 2007, the CTC considered a number of requests for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). Two requests were funded: Marin-Sonoma Narrows Seg. A (Novato) ($82.4M), and construction of aux. lane from WB I-580 to NB US 101 ($20M) in Marin County. Requests to add HOV lanes from Wilfred Av to Santa Rosa Av in Sonoma County, adding HOV lanes from Railroad Av to Rohnert Park Expwy in Sonoma County, adding HOV lanes from Steele to Windsor River (North Ph A) in Sonoma County, the Marin-Sonoma Narrows Seg. B (Novato-Petaluma) in Marin/Sonoma County, and adding HOV lanes near Airport and operational improvements (North Ph B) in Sonoma County were not recommended for funding. The funding plan was updated in December 2007. The funding plan was modified again in February 2009. In August 2010, the CTC amended the CMIA baseline agreement for the US 101 HOV Lanes - Wilfred project (PPNO 0781E) to update the project delivery schedule, specifically moving the end of construction to December 2013 with close-out ending in January 2015.

    In June 2012, the CTC amended the CMIA baseline agreement for the MSN Corridor project to increase the project scope and update the project funding plan. Specifically, the project scope was amended to add Contracts A2, A3 and C3 to the Marin-Sonoma Narrows Corridor scope of work:

    • Contract A2 (PPNO 0360M): This contract will add 0.4 mile of southbound HOV lane on Route 101, in the City of Novato, Marin County.
    • Contract A3 (PPNO 0360S): This contract will add 1.7 miles of northbound HOV lanes on Route 101 in Marin County.
    • Contract C3 (PPNO 0360R): This contract will replace/widen the Route 101/Route 116 separation bridges, modify the Route 101/Route 116 Interchange and construct a sound wall in the City of Petaluma, Sonoma County.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,350,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Santa Rosa, at River Road intersection; also at Shiloh Road intersection (PM 28.0), that will reconstruct two intersections and install signals to bring pedestrian facilities to ADA standards and improve safety at the intersections.

    In May 2012, it was reported that construction crews will start a $1.1 million project to connect the two stretches of Sixth Street in Santa Rosa that end at the highway, with completion due in October. In 2005, Caltrans built the Route 101 overpass at Sixth Street in Santa Rosa but never built the street under it. The work includes the new stretch of road, new sidewalks, landscaping and a stoplight at Davis and Sixth. The stoplight will be at about the end of the downtown southbound offramp from US 101; to avoid traffic backing up the offramp, part of the offramp will be re-striped to two lanes from the current one. Caltrans originally planned to connect the two parts of Sixth Street as part of its US 101 widening project but dropped the Sixth Street work to shave costs. Before US 101 was elevated, Sixth Street did connect. Part of the construction project involves digging up the old road now buried.

    [Rohnert Park]In June 2008, the CTC approved amending the scope of the Sonoma 101 Central – Phase A CMIA project by adding an additional 1.3 miles of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes using $8,000,000 in local funds. The proposed amended project would be a combination of the CMIA approved Central - Phase A project with the Central - Cotati Grade project (a portion of the original Central – Phase B project). The proposed amended project would complete 5.0 miles (of 6.4 miles planned) of the Central HOV project from Pepper Road in Petaluma to Rohnert Park Expressway in Rohnert Park. The remainder of the Central- Phase B project would be constructed at a future date when funding becomes available. The full Central HOV lane project proposes widening Route 101 from four to six lanes in Sonoma County. The project is 6.4 miles long extending from Old Redwood Highway in Petaluma to Rohnert Park Expressway in Rohnert Park. The new lanes are part of the Highway 101 Corridor Management Plan that will provide for continuous HOV lanes from just north of the Golden Gate Bridge in Marin County to Windsor River Road north of the city of Windsor in Sonoma County. The Central HOV project also upgrades the highway to current standards, adds auxiliary lanes, and provides Intelligent Transportation System elements, such as changeable message signs, vehicle detection systems, ramp metering systems and stations, advisory variable speed signs, and communication network links. To reflect funding constraints and potential delivery challenges associated with a slide area on southern end of the Cotati Grade, the Central HOV project was segmented into Phase A and Phase B prior to the time of CMIA program adoption. Central – Phase A was included in the adopted CMIA program, Central - Phase B was not. The Central – Phase A project proposes to complete the northern 3.7 miles of the full Central HOV project from Railroad Avenue in Cotati to Rohnert Park Expressway in Rohnert Park and is fully funded and on schedule to begin construction in July 2009. The median section of the Cotati Grade is wide enough to provide for the two additional lanes, standard outside shoulders, and six foot inside shoulders. In September 2012, the CTC approved an additional $4,610,000 for this project.

    In March 2009, the CTC again amended the STIP regarding the widening of Route 101 from a four to a six-lane highway with the addition of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes between north of Pepper Road to the Rohnert Park Expressway. Caltarns and the SCTA proposed to transfer $2,947,000 in RIP shares from R/W capital to construction ($1,747,000) and construction support ($1,200,000). A corresponding amount of local Measure M funds will be transferred from construction and construction support to R/W capital. The amount of $3,000 RIP will remain in R/W capital to cover previous expenditures. There is no change to the total project cost and the project scope remains consistent with the amended baseline approved in June 2008. The purpose of this amendment was to consolidate R/W capital to one funding source. Existing R/W capital has both STIP and Measure M, and this amendment will result in R/W capital being fully funded by Measure M (with the exception of $3,000 in prior expenditures). Given the State's fiscal environment, this amendment will provide fund flexibility and will simplify the accounting of only one funding source for R/W capital.

    In August 2010, there was a report on the construction in Rohnert Park. By the end of 2010, a new southbound offramp to Wilfred Avenue will open, taking drivers onto a new bridge over Commerce Boulevard. At the same time, the Santa Rosa Avenue overpass will reopen, but it no longer will connect to US 101. Instead, it'll meet up with the Wilfred offramp. As a result, drivers on Santa Rosa Avenue wanting to get onto US 101 will have to go down to Wilfred and then take the US 101 onramp there. The $40 million widening of US 101 from Santa Rosa Avenue to Rohnert Park Expressway is on track to finish on schedule in 2012. Once complete, the entire project will have used 60,000 metric tons of asphalt, 182,000 cubic meters of fill, 11,000 cubic meters of concrete and 3 million kilograms (6.6 million pounds) of steel. Crews are making steady progress on the new northbound overpass at Commerce Boulevard, with concrete and steel columns sunk 100 feet deep. Once that overpass is complete, traffic both ways will be rerouted to it while the old southbound overpass is knocked down and a new one built.

    At the end of November 2011, Caltrans opened the extra lanes between Rohnert Park Expressway south to Petaluma Boulevard North.

    In June 2012, Caltrans provided an update on various projects in Rohnert Park and Petaluma. In early June 2012 through July 2012, construction crews completed repaving of US 101 from Rohnert Park Expressway to Petaluma Boulevard North. The paving eliminated the uneven pavement through Rohnert Park and over the Cotati Grade. In mid-June, Caltrans opened up the new Golf Course Drive segment under US 101 that will connect to Wilfred Avenue, giving drivers another way to get from one side of Rohnert Park to the other. In late August or early September 2012, the new Wilfred Avenue/Commerce Boulevard overpasses on US 101 were scheduled to open, providing drivers three lanes in both directions. The third lane will be the carpool lane during commute hours, allowing carpoolers to speed by other drivers from about Petaluma Boulevard North to downtown Windsor. With respect to the remodeling of the East Washington Street interchange in Petaluma, it was ahead of schedule, with the next step occuring in July 2012 when four girders weighing 76.5 tons each are expected to be erected over Washington Creek as a bridge for a new northbound onramp that will run behind the Raley’s shopping center. The onramp will gradually drop to the highway’s level to allow traffic to merge onto US 101 south of Lynch Creek. Once the remodeling is completed, westbound traffic on East Washington will have to use the new onramp to go north on US 101. The existing left turn onto the current northbound onramp will be eliminated. Eastbound traffic will continue to be able to use the current onramp.
    (Roadwarrior Blog, 6/3/2012)

    In October 2012, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Rohnert Park along Route 101 on Golf Course and Redwood Drives, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In July 2012, it was reported that the HOV lane had opened southbound between Novato Creek and Route 37 as part of the first phase of the massive Marin Sonoma Narrows Project. The northbound lane was scheduled to open in early August.

    In January 2011, the CTC approved the public road connection for the proposed Redwood Landfill Interchange on US 101 in Marin County, which is part of the Marin Sonoma Narrows High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) project. The Marin Sonoma Narrows project proposes improvements to US 101 by adding HOV facilities from the junction of Route 37 in the City of Novato to just north of the Corona Road Overcrossing in the City of Petaluma, a distance of approximately 16 miles. The Marin Sonoma Narrows project proposes HOV operational improvements and proposes upgrading the existing expressway portion of US 101 to a controlledaccess freeway. The existing facility at the proposed Redwood Landfill interchange location is a four-lane expressway with two 12-foot lanes in each direction. A significant portion of the existing facility in this segment does not meet current design standards for horizontal alignment and vertical profile. The shoulders are variable width with the outside shoulders varying from 5 feet to 8 feet and the inside shoulders varying from 2 feet to 4 feet. The non-paved median varies in width from 11 feet to 51 feet and contains a double thrie-beam barrier. Local traffic accesses the expressway using various driveways and at-grade intersections. The proposed Redwood Landfill Interchange will close all direct access to US 101 and will construct a new diamond-type interchange at the existing Redwood Landfill Overcrossing. The existing fourlane expressway will be reconstructed to provide a six-lane freeway with two mixed flow lanes and one HOV lane in each direction. The new interchange will construct new on and off-ramps at the Redwood Landfill Overcrossing. Frontage roads will be constructed to provide access to the freeway for local traffic. The expressway to freeway conversion will improve traffic flow and safety by providing a new interchange, frontage roads and bike paths. The Redwood Landfill Interchange will improve the movement and circulation of heavy trucks using with the nearby landfill facility.

    Redwood LandfillIn August 2011, it was reported that the CTC approved $1.492 million to complete design work for a redesigned interchange at the Redwood Landfill just north of Novato and $400,000 to finish designing a realignment a curve along US 101 near San Antonio Creek. The project will also include frontage roads with bike lanes on both side of US 101, with the one on the westside stretching from San Antonio Road south to Olompali State Historic Park. The frontage roads will allow Caltrans to eliminate Olompali and San Antonio Road's intersections with US 101 as well as those of private driveways, permitting the route to become truly limited access. Eventually, US 101 from Novato to Petaluma will be widened to three lanes in each direction as part of Caltrans' Novato Narrows project. The frontage roads and revised landfill interchange is estimated to cost $74 million. The San Antonio curve realignment, designed to improve safety and reduce flooding at the creek, is estimated at $71 million with a construction start tentatively set for late 2014.
    (Source: Road Warrior Blog)

    In May 2012, the CTC approved $29.7 million for remodeling of the interchange at the Redwood Landfill and construction of frontage roads that will eliminate intersections with San Antonio Road, Olomapli State Historic Park and a few private driveways. The project is estimated to cost a total of $76 million, including design, relocation of utilities and environmental mitigation. Completion is scheduled for 2015.

    In mid-July 2013, it was reported that piles were being driven near the Novato Creek Bridge as part of the work to widen the Marin-Sonoma Highway 101 Narrows, which aims to relieve the bottleneck that frustrates drivers on a daily basis. Three separate projects in Marin and one in Sonoma County are part of a new round of work on the project. In Marin, two will lengthen the US 101 carpool lane in Novato, while the other will see improvements to the Redwood Landfill interchange. The contractor is working to expand the carpool lane southbound from north of Novato Creek to Rowland Boulevard, a little more than half a mile. That work — which includes widening the Novato Creek Bridge at a cost of about $4 million — involves driving the piles. Crews are also extending the carpool lane northbound from Atherton Avenue to south of the Redwood Landfill, about 1.5 miles in total. That work will cost about $15 million. Work on the carpool lanes should be done by the end of 2013. In addition, work on the Redwood Landfill interchange work is continuing. It includes widening the overpass on US 101 and construction of frontage roads in the area. That work will cost $28 million and will be completed in 2014. In Petaluma, work is under way on the north end of the Narrows project. A $120 million project there will reconstruct the Petaluma Boulevard South interchange, replace the Petaluma River Bridge, widen nearly three miles of frontage roads, provide new pedestrian and bicycle improvements and replace the northbound Route 116 bridge and widen the southbound Route 116 bridge to accommodate future carpool lanes on US 101. This work will not complete the project. The Narrows — so named because the number of lanes on US 101 narrow to two in each direction — still has a large portion in the middle that needs to be addressed. The latest projects represent only the initial phases of a $700 million plan to widen US 101. About half of that money has been acquired so far. The entire Narrows project calls for widening the 16-mile stretch of US 101 between Route 37 and the Old Redwood Highway interchange in north Petaluma.
    (Marin Independent-Journal, 7/18/13)

    In November 2013, it was reported that Caltrans opened 2,640 new feet — a half-mile — of southbound carpool lane between just north of Novato Creek and Rowland Boulevard in Novato. Ghilotti Bros. Inc. crews are also extending the carpool lane northbound from Atherton Avenue to south of the Redwood Landfill, about 1.5 miles in total. That work will cost about $15 million. The work is expected to completed by the end of 2014.

    In June 2011, the CTC approved $45 million for rebuilding the US 101 bridges over the Petaluma River. The money will be used to replace two of the four separate bridges at the south edge of Petaluma. Two of the bridges are north and southbound structures that cross the river and two cross Route 116.

    In August 2009, the CTC adjusted funding and schedule for the Sonoma Narrows project.

    In Marin County, transportation planners in June 2010 indicated they are thinking about opening up the carpool lane on portions of US 101 to solo drivers — as long as they pay a fee.

    In February 2009, the CTC approved a project on US 101 involving the construction roadway improvements including reconstructing and widening the East Washington Street/US 101 interchange in Petaluma.

    In April 2013, it was reported that work on the center section of the 17-mile Marin-Sonoma Narrows project began. This two-projects-in-one segment includes a $77 million contract for a new Petaluma Boulevard South interchange, new frontage roads and replacement of the dual Petaluma River bridges with one, six-lane bridge to accommodate future carpool lanes. The nine-mile section between Novato and Petaluma, commonly referred to as the narrows, will be converted from expressway to freeway status by closing uncontrolled access. Wider frontage roads will feature bicycle access. A $28 million contract will provide for the replacement of the northbound US 101 overpass of Lakeville Highway/Route 116 and widening the southbound span. The construction contracts do not include the previous land acquisition, design and engineering costs. Construction of the Route 116 sections is expected to finish in the winter of 2014, with the Petaluma Boulevard South work to be done in the winter of 2015. Ghilloti Brothers and Myers JV won the bids for the projects.
    (Source: Press-Democrat, 4/1/13)

    In January 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding roadway improvements that include the construction of an additional high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction between Old Redwood Highway and the Rohnert Park Expressway in the cities of Petaluma, Cotati and Rohnert Park. The project will construct roadway improvements to a 6.4 mile long section of Route 101 in Sonoma County. The improvements will include the construction of an additional HOV lane in each direction. The additional lanes will be constructed in the existing median. The project is programmed with corridor mobility improvement account funds, state transportation improvement program funds, and local funds. The total estimated project cost, capital and support, is $118,250,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

    In July 2012, it was reported that the new interchange at Old Redwood Highway was in doubt. The issue was whether the city can pay its share with former redevelopment dollars. The $42.5 million budgeted for the Old Redwood Highway interchange includes about $15 million from Petaluma redevelopment funds - and 80% of it has been disqualified by the state Department of Finance. Petaluma is appealing, but had not received a response from the state as of July 2012. When the Legislature abolished redevelopment agencies throughout the state last year, it required agencies to submit lists of contracted projects, creating so-called “enforceable obligations.” Those projects would be allowed to keep redevelopment money already committed while other funds would be redistributed to help balance the state budget and to other taxing entities in the county. In Petaluma, the Old Redwood Highway redesign was identified as a redevelopment priority in 2003. The city and the Sonoma County Transportation Authority, which administers local transportation tax money, signed cooperative agreements in May 2010 to fund environmental review, design and construction. In addition to Petaluma's portion, other funding includes $21.4 million in Measure M county sales tax proceeds and $4.6 million in state funds. The project is set to go to bid in September or October 2012.
    (Source: Press-Democrat, 7/9/12)

    [Santa Rosa]In December 2008, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Sonoma County that would widen the existing four-lane route to six lanes between the Steele Lane interchange and the Windsor River Road interchange in the unincorporated community of Windsor. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The project is programmed with Corridor Mobility Improvement Account, local, and federal funds. The cost of the project is $120,260,000. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement. Construction of the project impacts aquatic habitat of steelhead, coho, and shinook salmon, which are federally-listed species; and western pond turtle, northwestern pond turtle, northern red-legged frog, and foothill yellow-legged frog, which are state species of concern. Additionally loss of mature vegetation and redwood trees, permanent impacts to waters of the U.S., and the public controversy regarding the project resulted in an environmental impact report being completed for this project. Due to mitigation such as revegetation, tree replacement, aesthetic design treatments, riparian and aquatic habitat restoration, and relocation of identified turtle and frog species encountered during surveys, impacts were determined to be less than significant.

    In March 2007, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way on US 101 in the city of Rohnert Park, at Rohnert Park Expressway, consisting of reconstructed city street. The City of Rohnert Park, by cooperative agreement dated March 9, 1999, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    Rohnert Park ImprovementsIn June 2007, the CTC considered a resolution to authorized roadway improvements in Rohnert Park. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program and Corridor Mobility Improvement Account Program. The total estimated project cost is $86,300,000. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2007-08. AThe project will involve construction activities in the environmentally sensitive habitat of the California tiger salamander. In addition, the project will also remove 150 mature redwood trees.

    There are a number of projects under consideration for this route:

    [Willits Map]Willits Bypass (US 101/Route 20). There are several alternatives under consideration here, most of them bypassing the city on the east, one on the west. This would be a new four-lane freeway on a new alignment near Willits; the EIR is currently in circulation. [July 2002 CTC Agenda; 2.2b.(1)]. Additional details on this bypass can be found on the Caltrans Willits Bypass Page . The recommended route is LT, which will leave current US 101 at the Upper Haehl Creek interchange, and rejoin current US 101 at the Quail Meadows Interchange.

    As part of the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) program, the Willits Bypass was submitted for $177M in funding, but this funding request was not funded.

    A negative environmental impact declaration was received in July 2007

    Willits BypassIn February 2008, a route was adopted for the Willits Bypass. As part of this, a portion of former Route 101 will be designated as Route 20 (and may require legislation to make the route contiguous). As shown in the map to the right, the open dashed line is the freeway alignment adopted in 1968 that is being rescinded. The solid heavy line is the new alignment. The heavy solid dashed line is the 1968 freeway alignment being retained. The project proposes to construct a four-lane freeway bypass with full access control, two interchanges, and three grade separations east of Willits. The freeway will depart from existing Route 101 approximately 0.3 miles south of the Haehl Overhead and will end approximately 1.8 miles south of Reynolds Highway along the existing Route 101 alignment just south of the at-grade rail crossing of the Northwestern Pacific Railway. The bypass will provide access to Willits and Fort Bragg at interchanges toward the north and south ends of the project. Frontage roads and driveways to local roads will be constructed as needed to provide access to landlocked parcels. A portion of the January 11, 1963 freeway route adoption will be rescinded as part of this proposed freeway route adoption as shown on the route location map. The proposed freeway route adoption will link the portions of the January 11, 1963 route adoption remaining in effect. The Department recommended redesignating a portion of existing Route 101 to Route 20 from 0.3 miles south of Haehl Overhead to existing Route 101/ Route 20 junction, in town as Route 20 in order to provide a link from Route 20 to Route 101 on its new alignment. Relinquishment of the existing Route 101 from Route 20, in town, to near the north end of the bypass would occur after project construction. Relinquishment would transfer the State's right of way, title, and interest of a section of Route 101 to the City of Willits and to Mendocino County.

    The Willits Bypass dates back to 1962. A project report recommending construction of a four-lane freeway facility on Route 101, to bypass the City of Willits, was approved in 1962. As a result of this Report, a bypass route was adopted by the California Highway Commission on January 11, 1963. In 1969, improvements to Route 101 were made. A segment of freeway south of Willits was constructed and right of way was acquired. Due to funding shortfalls and a shift in transportation philosophies, further development of the bypass project stopped. In 1987, the Commission directed the Department to re-evaluate the adopted route and to consider other alternatives to satisfy the “new” required environmental process. In 1988, a Project Study Report (PSR) investigating the feasibility of constructing a four-lane freeway bypass around Willits was approved. This approved PSR authorized environmental studies to be completed. During the course of the studies, the Department investigated a wide range of alternatives. In the 1992 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), the Commission partially funded the Willits Bypass project, programming $60.5 million for construction and $9 million for right of way. Engineering and environmental studies continued on the many alternatives under consideration through 1994, but due to funding shortages and resource redirection, by 1995, progress halted. With a new route adoption, construction should proceed. It is interesting to note that there are five signalized intersections on the existing alignment within the project limits, the only signalized intersections on Route 101 between San Francisco and Eureka.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved the Willits Bypass for future consideration of funding. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes federal demonstration funds. Total estimated project cost is $232,394,000 for capital and support.

    In September 2010, after meeting with US Army Corps of Engineers regulators, it was announced that Caltrans has determined that 20 months is not sufficient time to complete the full wetland assessment and mitigation documentation required to obtain a "404 permit" for the project to bypass US 101 around Willits, and has withdrawn the project.

    In August 2011, there was a report on the agreement between Caltrans and the City of Willits regarding how Main Street will be returned to city control after the bypass is completed. Assuming the city signed the agreement timely, CalTrans has yielded on several main sticking points: it has agreed to address the Sherwood Road interchange, limit bypass construction traffic on city roads, fix the drainage and access problems in front of Willits High School and provide $4.48 million to upgrade all sidewalks on US 101 from the Route 20 interchange north to the city limits to meet current American's with Disabilities Act requirements. By relinquishment law, CalTrans must certify to the California Transportation Commission and to the California Legislature any roadway being relinquished is in a "state of good repair." The actual definition of "state of good repair" has been the meat of much of the relinquishment discussion. The vague standard, codified by the Legislature in the relinquishment statute, has been interpreted differently by city residents and CalTrans officials. Precedent suggests the intent of the "state of good repair" standard means the highway should not to require significant maintenance for a period of 20 years. The Willits city engineer is also concerned about the poor documentation of the CalTrans right of way, unclear documentation about bridge conditions, and a series of issues with the surface and subsurface drainage along the right of way. The bridges in question are nearly 100 years old.

    In March 2012, the CTC approved $135.5 million to construct the Willits bypass. Opponents vowed to continue fighting the project, which runs through wetlands east of the city. The 5.9 mile bypass is expected to be completed in 2016. Caltrans will begin seeking bids May 1, 2012. Land clearing could begin by winter. The cost of the project, including impact reports, permits, land purchases and mitigations for the loss of wetlands is expected to be about $210 million.

    In September 2012, the CTC approved $107 million in construction contracts for the first phase of the US 101 Willits bypass. Caltrans hopes to begin construction by late fall 2012, but environmentalists said they would be seeking a court order to block the planned work.

    Even as late as February 2013 there was opposition to the bypass. According to one editorial, the proposed routing will not help the traffic in Willits. Instead, the Caltrans plan is believed to result in lasting harm to Little Lake Valley. According to this editorial, 75% of traffic that clogs the intersection at US 101 and Route 20 is local traffic that will still clog this intersection until it is redesigned. The Caltrans bypass would actually add to the backup problem with another stop sign at the southern interchange. Two-thirds of the big trucks will still be in town on business or using Route 20. The community had developed a bypass project, but the community proposal was rejected by Caltrans. The community-supported bypass would improve the distribution of local traffic and help relieve the existing congestion on Main Street, especially at the junction of US 101 and Route 20. It would also provide a creekside trail for pedestrian and bicycle use.

    In August 2013, it was reported that Caltrans may face fines or even be forced to stop work on the Willits Bypass project, as it is out of compliance with environmental regulations. The freeway goes right through a sensitive wetlands area, so Caltrans is required to do $50 million in environmental improvements to compensate. .However, the US Army Corps of Engineers says Caltrans failed to get a qualified contractor and meet required deadlines for the environmental work. The Corps calls the violations "very serious."

    The LA Times reported on the dispute over the bypass in August 2013. Opponents have decried the environmental destruction, contending that a two-lane bypass would have been far less damaging and should have been considered. They have conducted studies that indicate the project's traffic-carrying capabilities far exceed expected volumes, and last year filed a federal suit citing violations of the Clean Water Act and National Environmental Policy Act — laws not even conceived of in the 1950s. Plenty of residents are fed up with the protests, saying the project at last will relieve Main Street's traffic jams while modernizing infrastructure for countless Californians who don't wish to stop in town at all. Caltrans district spokesman Phil Frisbie said the agency followed regulations in winning approval for the project, agreeing to a massive mitigation plan to enhance nearly 2,000 acres of the watershed in exchange for compacting 60 acres. So far, only the southbound lanes have been funded. They will be striped for two-way traffic while Caltrans seeks more financing.
    (Source: Los Angeles Times, 8/24/13)

    In September 2013, Caltrans resumed hauling dirt to the project, but can only haul it at night through the town of Willits. During this time, two demonstrators chained themselves to a truck for more than eight hours, backing up a string of trucks and stopping work on the project.

    Laytonville Bypass (US 101).

    Hopland Bypass (US 101).

    Marin-Sonoma Narrows Project. This project proposes freeway, High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) improvements, and pedestrian/bicycle improvements to the US 101 corridor. Running 17-miles in length, it begins south of the Route 37 interchange in the City of Novato (Marin County), continues through the narrower non-freeway portion of US 101 between Novato and Petaluma known locally as the "Novato Narrows", and ends south of the Old Redwood Highway in the City of Petaluma (Sonoma County). For more information, see http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist4/projects.htm.

    [Map]In April 2006, the CTC considered approval of the a TCRP project application amendment for $15,400,000 in new TCRP funding for Project #18 – Route 101, which will widen eight miles of freeway to six lanes from Novato to Petaluma (Novato Narrows) in Marin and Sonoma Counties. The goal of the application was to program $600,000 in TCRP funds for Plans, Specifications, and Estimates (PS&E); program $1,000,000 in TCRP funds for Right of Way (R/W); program $13,800,000 in TCRP funds for Construction; and update the project schedule and funding plan. The overall project is to construct an HOV lane in both the northbound and southbound directions of Route 101 from Route 37 in Novato to the Old Redwood Highway in Petaluma. The project will convert the section from north of Atherton Avenue to Route 116 from a fourlane expressway to a six-lane freeway. In addition, the project includes provisions for interchanges, extension of frontage roads, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities. East Washington Street Interchange improvements on Route 101 are part of the overall project. The existing northbound off-ramp does not have enough storage capacity to handle the traffic. Therefore, traffic is stored on the mainline causing congestion in the northbound direction. The existing southbound on-ramp does not have standard geometrics and enough tapering to allow for traffic to merge into the mainline, creating congestion in the southbound direction. The goal is to have the improvements to the off- and on-ramps be compatible with the future HOV lane project. However, as of 2007, environmental studies and preliminary engineering have been delayed due to the inability to hire consultants to complete the technical studies. Complicating this is the requirement of the United States Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS) for additional surveys to determine the impacts on the Red Legged Frog within the project limits. As of April 2007, the estimated completion dates are: Phase 1: FY 2008/2009; Phase 2: FY 2007/2008; Phase 3: FY 2007/2008.

    This was updated in September 2007, with a approved resolution to redistribute $10,900,000 from Construction to PS&E, and designate two sub-projects: TCRP Project #18.1 – Route 101, East Washington Interchange and receive transfer $1,600,000 in TCRP funds from Project #18; and TCRP Project #18.2 – Route 101, San Antonio Curve Correction and to receive transfer of $2,900,000 in TCRP funds from TCRP Project #18.

    In January 2008, this project was updated to be consistent with CMIA funding.

    In May 2008, increased construction costs led to reduction in scope and division of the project. The CMIA element (PPNO A0360F) constitutes only a portion of the overall Marin-Sonoma Narrows (“Narrows”) project. The scope of the overall Narrows project (mostly unfunded) extends 16 miles from Route 37 in Marin County to north of the Corona Overcrossing in Petaluma (Sonoma County). It includes the addition of HOV lanes, and the construction of interchanges, frontage roads and other pedestrian facilities. It also includes the installation of traffic operation system (TOS) elements such as monitoring stations and ramp metering on the mainline and ramps. The May 2008 reduced the HOV lane limits in the southbound direction by one mile in order to fully fund the construction of the San Antonio Road Interchange. Constructing the San Antonio Interchange now will significantly reduce the number of left and right turn access points in the corridor, allowing effective management of the freeway traffic. This will provide significant benefits in the form of reduced recurrent and non-recurrent congestion. In addition, the construction of this new interchange positions the corridor for the future addition of an HOV lane in each direction. The amendment also divides the project into three portions:

    1. A1PPNO 0360F - $77.3 Million - Highway 101 Marin-Sonoma Narrows (MSN) – HOV lane (Contract A1) This contract constructs a NB HOV lane from Route 37 to Atherton Avenue and a SB HOV lane from Route 37 to Rowland Boulevard. Completion of this project would extend the existing HOV lane system north of Route 37. The other project improvements include constructing soundwalls and installing TOS elements, such as monitoring stations and ramp metering on mainline and ramps.
    2. B1PPNO 0360J - $67.4 million - US 101 Marin-Sonoma Narrows (MSN) – Southerly Interchange (Contract B1) This contract constructs a new interchange and frontage roads to serve the San Antonio Road. These improvements implement access control and will become the first step in converting the facility from expressway to freeway. New frontage roads will eliminate existing direct driveways access to and from US 101, eliminate a left turn movement across travel lanes on US 101 and provide new pedestrian and bicycle facilities. The right of way acquisitions will accommodate some future phases of the overall “Narrows” project. The intent is to affect each property owner only once and also to acquire as much right-of-way for the overall MSN project as the current funding and favorable real estate market conditions will allow for.
    3. B2PPNO 0360H- $58.1 million - US 101 Marin-Sonoma Narrows (MSN) – Petaluma Blvd. South Interchange (Contract B2) This contract constructs a new interchange, frontage roads, and equipment for ramp metering. These improvements implement access control and will become the first step in converting the facility from expressway to freeway. New frontage roads will eliminate existing direct driveways access to and from US 101, eliminate a left turn movement across travel lanes on US 101 and provide new pedestrian and bicycle facilities. The right-of-way acquisitions will accommodate some future phases of the overall “Narrows” project. The intent is to affect each property owner only once and also to acquire as much right-of-way for the overall MSN project as the current funding and favorable real estate market conditions will allow for.

    In February 2010, the CTC amended this project (TCRP Project 18.1 – Route 101; widen eight miles of freeway to six lanes, Novato to Petaluma (Novato Narrows) in Marin and Sonoma Counties – East Washington Interchange) to reprogram $1,000,000 in funds from Right of Way (R/W) to Plans, Specifications & Estimate (PS&E), and reallocate previously allocated funds from R/W to PS&E. They also changed the implementing agency for PS&E and R/W from Caltrans to the City of Petaluma, and split the project into a roadway contract and a follow-up landscape contract.

    One interesting note is that this project was affected by use of metric units. Caltrans had completed 65 percent PS&E using metric units when the design work had to be stopped because the final funding plan with the local partners was not finalized. The funding finally became available in June 2009. However, Caltrans's Metric Exception policy was set to expire in June 2010. Therefore, the PS&E and R/W had to be completed by this deadline if the already completed design work was to be salvaged, as the change in units would have required significant rework. Caltrans could not commit to deliver PS&E and R/W within this time constraint, and the City of Petaluma wanted to deliver PS&E and R/W by the Metric Exception deadline and salvage the completed PS&E work. Caltrans agreed to grant the Metric Exception and make the City of Petaluma the implementation agency for PS&E and R/W.

    In August 2010, the CTC approved amending the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) baseline agreements for the Route 101 Marin-Sonoma Narrows - HOV Lane (PPNO 0360F), Route 101 Marin-Sonoma Narrows - Southerly Interchange (PPNO 0360J), and Route 101 Marin-Sonoma Narrows - Petaluma Boulevard South Interchange (PPNO 0360H) projects to update the funding plan for each project, update the project scope and the schedule for the Southerly Interchange project, update the schedule of the Petaluma Boulevard Southerly Interchange project, and to split-off a landscaping and soundwall mitigation project (PPNO 0360L).

    Note that not all of these projects may actually be funded and constructed. The long term plan is to make US 101 four-lane all the way up to the Eureka area. It is being done as funds become available.

    In April 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Mendocino along Route 101U (Geyser Road) from the Sonoma County line to Route 101, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    In June 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Mendocino on Route 101U in the Confusion Hill area, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    In December 2009, the CTC approved for future funding a project that will repair, upgrade, or replace 36 existing drainage facilities on Route 101 from 0.4 miles north of Baechtel Creek Bridge in Willits to 0.2 miles south of Cummings Road Undercrossing near Leggett. The project is fully funded in the State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $5,979,000, capital and support. It is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2011-12.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $472,000 in SHOPP funding for repair work on US 101 near Cotati, at Sierra Avenue to remove slide material, stabilize failed slope, reconstruct embankment and place erosion control and Rock Slope Protection at one location damaged by heavy rainfall. They also approved $1,854,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Cloverdale, at East 1st Street to remove slide material, construct tieback wall, install drainage system, and reconstruct the highway at one location damaged by severe storm.

    In December 2008, the CTC reallocated the funding on TCRP Project #18, effectively moving funds from Plans, Specifications, and Estimates (PS&E) to Project Approval and Environmental Documentation (PA&ED).

    In April 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of two segments of US 101 near Sonoma: 04-Son-101-PM 15.4 in the County of Sonoma, and 04-Son-101-PM 53.9/56.2 in the County of Sonoma. The first is right of way in the County of Sonoma, at Santa Rosa Avenue and Roberts Lake Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way. The second is right of way in the County of Sonoma, between the Preston Overhead and the Mendocino County Line, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    In January 2007, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way on US 101 near Sonoma between the Preston Overhead and the Mendocino County line, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    In October 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the county of Mendocino, about 300 feet northerly of the Pieta Creek Bridge, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    In October 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Ukiah along Route 101 on East Perkins Street, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing HOV lanes between Santa Rosa and Windsor. This construction was completed in November 2010. He also proposed completing the Willits and Hopeland Byasses.

    TCRP Project #159 will redesign and reconstruct the Steele Lane Interchange.

    Additionally, a number of segments have recently been upgraded to freeway status. These include:

    • A 3.5 mile section from US 199 to Crescent City City Limits
    • A 17 mile section from Klamath River Bridge to Newton B. Druary Scenic Highway (1.2 miles of it is 2 lanes)
    • A 24 mile section from Big Lagoon Road to Arcata
    • A 15 mile section south of Eureka to South of Fortuna
    • A 2.5 mile section through Rio Dell
    • A 46 mile section from Shively Road to Richardson Grove State Park
    • A 8 mile section from Mendocino County Line to south of Piercy
    • A 11 mile section from Jct 1 at Leggett to Cummings
    • A 16 mile section from Ukiah Street to south of Ukiah
    • A 45 mile section from Cloverdale to Petaluma
    • A 25 mile section from Novato to Golden Gate Bridge.

    The following portions are constructed to freeway standards: (1) from the Golden Gate Bridge to 2 miles north of Novato (approx 30 miles); (2) from Petaluma to 3 miles north of Cloverdale; (3) through Ukiah (approx 12 miles). From this point north, there are a couple sections of 2 mile signed freeways. Route 101 is also freeway from Garberville to Eureka (approx 70 miles); from N of Eureka to Trinidad State Beach (approx 16 miles); near Klamath (approx 5 miles); and from Crescent City to US-199.

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized $24,108,000 for North B - Sonoma Highway 101 Airport Interchange. The project is located in the town of Windsor in Sonoma County. The project will reconfigure two existing partial interchanges at Fulton Road and Airport Boulevard into a single complete interchange by replacing the existing Airport Boulevard Overcrossing at Route 101. The project will also construct soundwalls at selected locations within the project limits. At its April 2012 meeting, the Commission allocated $17,742,000 of CMIA funds and $1,866,000 of State-Local Partnership Program (SLPP) funds. The project funding plan also included $10,392,000 of local funds. The project was advertised in June 2012. When bids were opened on August 8, 2012, the lowest bid came in 12 percent over the Engineer’s Estimate. The two lowest bidders were found to be non-responsive. Eventually, all of the bids were rejected. The project was re-advertised on September 24, 2012. When bids were opened on October 17, 2012, the lowest bid came in 7.9 percent over the Engineer’s Estimate. The Sonoma County Transportation Authority (SCTA) is proposing to cover the funding shortfall of $3,813,000 with a combination of SLPP funds ($1,827,000) and local funds ($1,986,000). The Commission programmed and allocated these additional SLPP funds at its September 2012 meeting. In December 2012, the funding plan was updated.

    In January 2013, it was reported that work has begun on the Airport Interchange. The interchange is one of the most heavily used in Sonoma County, serving the Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport and 6,000 workers in adjacent business parks. The new interchange, costing $34.5 million, is scheduled to be completed in late 2014. Ghilotti Construction of Santa Rosa was the low bidder on the construction project at $28.7 million. Work is expected to begin in June 2013. The new diamond-shaped interchange will feature longer and wider on- and off-ramps that, along with new stoplights and improvements to Airport Boulevard. The new interchange also will require the closure of the onramps and offramps to Fulton Road, although the overpass itself will remain.
    (Source: Press-Democrat, 1/8/2013)

    In March 2009, the CTC received for review a draft EIR concerning a project in Humboldt County to widen, realign and construct roadway improvements on Route 101 from just north of the Mendocino/Humboldt County line to just south of Garberville. The project is not programmed. The project is included in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) Long Lead Projects list consistent with Commission Resolution G-13. This resolution requires the Department to notify the Commission when project development work is begun on SHOPP projects that are not currently programmed. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $5,500,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved $930,00 for a safety project on that will repave 1.7 miles of US 101 near Pepperwood in Humboldt County.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct roadway improvements including realigning a portion of Route 101 near the town of Garberville (HUM PM 1.1 to HUM PM 2.2). The project is fully funded in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $10,053,000 for capital and support. Construction activities will remove mature redwood and Douglas fir trees. In addition, construction activities will occur in the structural root zone of old growth redwoods abutting the existing roadway. The project will also impact the visual setting of the area.

    In April 2012, it was reported that a U.S. District Court judge on Wednesday ordered Caltrans to revise its redwood tree mapping for the Richardson Grove realignment project based on discrepancies found in the agency's data and those provided by the case's plaintiffs. This was done after after another judge carried out a site visit to the grove earlier this month and found that Caltrans incorrectly documented the diameter of one tree and omitted a second tree in its maps. The proposed Caltrans project would realign portions of US 101 in Richardson Grove State Park to allow larger cargo trucks to pass through narrow sections of the route. Caltrans has slated 54 trees for removal. According to the agency, these trees include six small redwoods but no old growth redwoods. A coalition of environmental groups and local citizens argued that the construction could damage the old growth root system even if the trees aren't cut down.

    [Rtes 101/36 near Alton]In August 2008, Caltrans released for bid a project to construct and interchange and frontage road in Humboldt County near Alton on Route 101 from Van Duzen River Overflow Bridge to 0.6 Km North of Drake Hill Road and on Route 36 from 0.5 Km West of Main Street to Main Street. Known as the Alton Interchange, this will upgrade a section of US 101 to full freeway, at the Route 36 Junction.

    In November 2002, the CTC considered vacation of the portion of the original routing in the city of Arcata, from PM 86.63 to PM 87.18 in Humboldt County.

    In November 2007, the CTC reviewed a draft EIR that proposed constructing roadway improvements that included closing median crossings along a portion of Route 101 near Arcata. Total estimated project cost is $38,985,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009-10. The STIP project involves upgrading Route 101 to a four-lane facility and is not fully funded. The project may also include construction of a diamond interchange at Indianola Cutoff and/or signalization of the Airport Road/Route 101 intersection. The project is currently programmed for $5,719,000 in the STIP (RIP) and Federal Demonstration funds. Total estimated project cost is $42,090,000, capital and support. This project should be ready for construction in FY 2009-10, depending on the availability of funds.

    In November 2011, the CTC withdrew roughly $15 million in transportation funds that had been slated for safety and maintenance work along the US 101 corridor between Eureka and Arcata. This money had been set aside back around 2000 through the State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). It was supposed to finance safety improvements between Eureka and Arcata, including repaving, bridge replacements, tide-gate replacements, new lighting and more. Eleven years later, that work hadn't started, and with so many other transportation projects shovel-ready around the state, officials at Caltrans headquarters in Sacramento took the money back. Part of the problem was that the projects were connected to the Eureka-Arcata Route 101 Corridor Improvement project, which aims to install a traffic signal at Jacobs Ave. and an overpass at the Indianola cutoff, among other modifications to the six highway intersections between the two cities. Caltrans and HCAOG opted to combine the two projects in hopes of streamlining the permitting process, but that backfired.
    (Source: North Coast Journal, 11/8/11)

    Eureka ImprovementsIn July 2006, the CTC received a notice of preparation for an EIR for a corridor project consisting of a 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) project and a 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) project. The roadway rehabilitation work programmed in the SHOPP is fully funded. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-2010. The STIP project to upgrade Route 101 to a four-lane facility is not fully funded. The project is currently programmed for $5,719,000 in Regional Improvement Program funds and Federal Demonstration Funds. Total estimated project cost is $42,090,000, capital and support. This project is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2011-2012. There are a number of alternatives being considered.

    According to Compass's Redwood Coast map, a freeway alignment is planned for US 101 between Leggett (where Route 271's south segment and Route 1 have their terminus) and the Red Mountain Creek (where another freeway segment begins) north of Riverdale; this explains why Route 271 is defined as a single-segment route (as presumably it will be extended to the existing non-freeway US 101 through Standish-Hickey State Recreation Area). There are plans to realign the highway near Leggett to avoid a rockslide. In addition to a no-build alternative, there are three build alternatives on slightly different alignments. All three of the build alternatives would realign the highway to the west and construct two bridges to span the South Fork of the Eel River. In February 2006, the FEIR was transmitted to California Transportation Commission staff; it was prepared due to the potentially unmitigable visual impacts associated with the placement of new bridges over a designated Wild and Scenic River. Based on this, in February 2006, the CTC considered a route adoption of a bypass around Confusion Hill as a traversable highway from 1.1 kilometer (0.7 mile) south of Red Mountain Creek to 0.5 kilometer (0.3 mile) south of Red Mountain Creek, in the county of Mendocino. The current adopted alignment from 0.4 kilometer (0.6 mile) north of Tan Oak Park to 1.1 kilometer (0.7 mile) south of Red Mountain Creek will not be altered from the north side of the South Fork Eel River, based on the approved 2002 Route Concept Report (RCR).

    As background, this segment is functionally classified as a rural principal arterial, is part of the California Freeway and Expressway System and is included in the National Highway System (NHS). It is also designated as part of the “SHELL” system (Sub-system of Highway for the movement of Extra-Legal permit Loads). The route is also a high emphasis and focus route on the Interregional Road System (IRRS). Hence, the maintenance of US 101 between the San Francisco Bay Area and Oregon is critical to the economic well being of this area, as it carries high volumes of commercial trucking year round and recreational traffic during the summer months. Developing improvements to assure all weather dependability is essential to this route. A portion of US 101, from 0.6 mile north of Tan Oak Park to the Humboldt County line was adopted as a freeway in 1967 along an alignment on the north side of the Eel River. The existing alignment was later denominated to a controlled access highway. A Project Study Report (PSR) was initiated in spring of 1999 to propose a solution to the unreliability of Route 101 through the Confusion Hill slide area. Frequent road closures due to debris fall and slope movement have been a continual maintenance problem for this portion of Route 101. In 2001, the cost to stabilize the roadway was $3.2 million, and estimated costs of vehicle delays were $665,000. Costs to keep the route open continue to increase, and in 2002/2003, construction costs exceeded $9 million and vehicle delay costs were estimated near $2 million. The PSR approved June 25, 2001 recommended proceeding with project approval and development of an environmental document for realignment of the roadway outside the slide area at Confusion Hill. The project was determined to be consistent with State and Regional transportation planning and would facilitate goods movement. In August of 2003, the Department acquired $72 million in emergency relief funds for emergency repairs and the permanent relocation and restoration of slide-damaged Route 101 at Confusion Hill in Mendocino County. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) allocated $65 million for the permanent relocation of the highway and another $7 million for the emergency re-opening work that has occurred since Winter 2002. FHWA placed several conditions upon funding the project. One condition was that emergency funding be contingent upon construction completion by 2008. Another condition placed upon funding was that the Department must further investigate an alternative for maintaining the existing alignment while investigating relocation alternatives that meet the purpose and need of the project. In 2004, it was discovered that construction of two bridges required an increase in project construction duration from two years to three and an increase in capital cost from $65 million to an estimated $68 to $71 million. The current construction completion date is in 2009.

    According to Caltrans, there were plenty of challenges in building the two bridges that now cross the Eel River in two places, to bypass the slide-prone Confusion Hill area of US 101. Construction crews had to mine 60-foot shafts into the hillside to support the legs of the massive new south span of the bridge, haul more than 400,000 yards of excavated rock and dirt from the construction site and erect a cast-in-place segment bridge, the likes of which are few and far between. The quarter-mile south span of the bypass consists of 68 segments, each of which had to be cast and poured in place, some 255 feet above the river bed. The two bridges were named after and dedicated in memory of a pair of local pioneers, Elizabeth Jane Rosewarne and Mignon “Minnie” Stoddard Lilley. The bypass is scheduled to be opened to southbound traffic in early July 2009, and to northbound traffic by October 2009.

    In June 2011, the CTC approved $3 million to decommission an old stretch of US 101 in the Confusion Hill area near Leggett in Mendocino County, ripping out steel mesh, lights and the pavement to keep them from falling into the South Fork Eel River because of continuing landslide there. The landslide forced Caltrans to realign US 101 there.

    [Confusion Hill[In 1962, the California Highway Commission adopted 20 miles of US 101 in Mendocino County as a freeway from 0.6 mile north of Tan Oak Park to the Humboldt County line. In 1967, a portion of this adopted route, from 0.9 mile south of Red Mountain Creek to 0.8 mile north of Red Mountain Creek (about 7 miles south of Humboldt County line), was realigned and adopted as a freeway by the California Highway Commission. On February 2, 2006, the Commission approved a resolution adopting as a State highway a 0.4 mile segment of US 101 connecting the existing US 101 and the adopted 1967 freeway alignment across the South Fork Eel River in the Confusion Hill area. This route adoption was necessary to provide connectivity on the State Highway System and bypass an existing ancient landslide. At the time, the plan for the bypassed portion of the existing highway was to be relinquished to the County of Mendocino. Since then, new negotiations between the Department and the County have modified the areas to be relinquished, obliterated and retained by the Department as shown in the route adoption map. The area retained by the Department will become a much needed debris material storage area and will provide public access to Red Mountain Road. This proposed route adoption replaces the route adopted as a State highway in 2006 and realigns a portion of the freeway route adopted in 1967. The proposed route adoption and subsequent freeway construction on a new alignment will improve the reliability, safety and operations of the highway at this location. The relocated route will also bypass the only Surface Transportation Assistance Act truck restriction location on US 101 in Mendocino County.

    In July 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Crescent City along Route 101 at Elk Creek, consisting of nonmotorized transportation facilities, namely the Harbor Trail Bridge and trailhead.

    In September 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Del Norte County that will rehabilitate the Route 101 Klamath River Bridge. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated project cost is $9,543,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope as described for the preferred alternative will be consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (ND). Due to potential impacts to biological resources, visual resources, hydrology and water quality, cultural resources, and the local economy, an Initial Study was completed for the project. Based upon environmental studies and proposed environmental commitments, including minimization and avoidance measures, incorporation of BMPs, limited hours of construction, and the presence of an on-site Native American monitor, the project will not have a significant effect on the environment.

    In March 2012, the CTC authorized $257,000 for a State Administered STIP Transportation Enhancement Project on US 101 in Del Norte County, 01N-DN-101 2.7/8.8 In and near Klamath. Construct Native American art designs, install native plantings, and replace existing fencing with decorative fencing that matches local aesthetic theme.

    In December 2011, the US Department of Transportation approved $2,500,000 in funding to make roadway improvements to address safety concerns on the portion of US 101 that runs through Smith River Rancheria tribal lands in the community of Smith River, a little south of the Oregon County line. TIGER funds will make traffic and pedestrian access improvements, including new signage and innovative highway shoulder treatments on the existing road. Investments will also include lighting and related small-scale improvements to assist pedestrians at intersections.

    SAFETEA-LU

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #278: Widening US 101 and reconstructing the off ramps on between Steele Lane and Windsor, CA to reduce traffic and promote carpools. This ties in with a number of already existing projects for US 101 under the TCRP, including TCRP #159 to repair the Steele Lane interchange, and some HOV projects. $5,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #1767: Construct US 101 bicycle-pedestrian project in Marin and Sonoma Counties from north of Athenton Ave to south of Petaluma River bridge. $400,000.

    • High Priority Project #2444: Widen US 101 in Marin and Sonoma Counties from Route 37 in Novato to Old Redwood Highway in Petaluma. HPP #3762 seems to be providing additional funds for this. $12,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #2749: Construct bypass along US 101 around Willits, CA to reduce congestion, improve air quality and enhance the economic lifeline of North Coast. $5,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #3762: Widen US 101 in Marin and Sonoma Counties from Route 37 in Novato to Old Redwood Highway in Petaluma. Note that this seems to be the same project as #2444, so perhaps this is just adding extra money.$15,000,000.

     

     

    Business Routes
    • Ukiah
    • Rio Dell. This is Route 283.
    • Petaluma (Business routing approved by AASHTO in 1997, 4.8 miles)
    • Novato
    • Santa Rosa: Santa Rosa Avenue, Mendocino Avenue
    • Cloverdale
    • Redway via Garberville.

     

    Naming

    Route 1 and Route 101 from Lake Street (at Route 1) in San Francisco to Waldo Point (Jct 1/101, north end of Sausalito) across the Golden Gate Bridge is named the "Golden Gate Bridge Freeway". Named by the State Legislature in 1954.

    Route 101 from the Waldo Tunnel in Sausalito to I-580 in San Rafael is named the "William T. Bagley" Freeway . William Bagley was a State legislator and a member of the California Transportation Commission. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 46, Chapter 111 in 1987.

    Route 101 from Lucas Valley Road N for two miles in San Rafael is named the "Marin County Veterans Memorial Freeway". It was named as a token of gratitude to those veterans who have done so much to preserve the American way of life by the citizens of Marin County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 5, Chapter 49, filed 23 June 1999. Also named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 182 in 1998.

    Route 101 from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Oregon State line is named the "Redwood Highway". The road travels through the redwood forests of northern California. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 174, Chapter 269 in 1957. Note that US 199 is also shown on some maps as the "Redwood" Highway. Widening of the highway to limited access, four-lane expressway started in 1947; it was mostly completed by 1975.

    The US 101 interchange at Route 12 in the City of Santa Rosa is named the "Deputy Frank Trejo Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Deputy Frank Trejo of the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. Deputy Trejo served the residents of Sonoma County faithfully as a deputy sheriff for 15 years, until March 29, 1995, when he was shot and killed in the line of duty while investigating a suspicious motor vehicle in his beat west of the City of Santa Rosa. Deputy Trejo was posthumously awarded the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office highest award, the Gold Medal of Valor, for his sacrifice. Deputy Trejo loved being a law enforcement officer, protecting the public, and serving his community. He was a career lawman with a career spanning 35 years, serving as a police officer for the Cities of Lompoc and Tiburon prior to joining the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. Deputy Trejo was affectionately known as the "old man" in the sheriff's office and is credited with mentoring many younger officers over the course of his 35-year career. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 34, Resolution Chapter 93, on September 15, 2011.

    Route 101, from south of Healdsburg to the Sonoma/Mendocino County line, is named the "Colonel William R. "Bill" Lucius Highway". Col. William B. "Bill" Lucius, USMC, Ret., served as the Mayor of Healdsburg, a member of the Metropolitan Transportation Board (1971-1991) and Chairman of the California Transportation Commission. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 73, Chapter 15 in 1990.

    The portion of Route 101 in Mendocino County, from post mile 32.1 to post mile 33.1, inclusive, is named the "Daniel Broeske Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Daniel Broeske, born on September 30, 1948, in Russell, Kansas. He served in the United States Air Force from 1967 to 1971, inclusive; and graduated from Sonoma State University with a bachelor of arts degree in 1975. He began his career with the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in May 1979 in maintenance and in 1999, he moved to construction as a Transportation Engineering Technician. He had always loved engineering and felt this was the profession that he had always wanted to do. His primary concern on the worksite was safety for the public as well as the highway workers and he was proud to be a Caltrans worker. In 2004, Daniel Broeske received a certificate in recognition of his 25 years of faithful public service with the State of California from Governor Schwarzenegger. He also received a certificate in recognition of his 25 years of service to the citizens of California for his service with Caltrans from Senator Wesley Chesbro and a certificate in recognition and in honor of his 25 years of service and dedication to improving the safety of California's roadways from Assembly Member Patty Berg. He dedicated 26 years of service to the State of California and he spent his life making the roads safer for the traveler and on July 11, 2005, just 10 days after his son, Ian, received his commercial pilot's license, he gave his life in that commitment. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 90, Resolution Chapter 65, on 6/26/2008.

    The portion of Route 101 beween Mill Valley and Corte Madera, specifically from the old Alto Wye where Blithedale met Route 101 is called the "Alto Hill Rise".

    The portion of US 101 between the intersection of Route 271 to the South Fork of the Eel River (Postmile 102.00 to Postmile 106.57) in the County of Mendocino is named the "CHP Officer Thomas R. Adams Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol (CHP) Officer Thomas Richard Adams, who was born on June 12, 1986, to Bruce and Karen Adams, in San Francisco. Officer Adams graduated from Fortuna High School in 2004 and attended Humboldt State University in Arcata and the College of the Redwoods in Eureka, from 2005 to 2006. Officer Adams was employed by a local tree service in Humboldt County prior to becoming a CHP officer. Officer Adams graduated from the CHP Academy on January 23, 2009, and, upon graduation, was assigned to the Oakland area office for one year and seven months, prior to being transferred to the Garberville area where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer Adams, Badge No. 19365, was killed in the line of duty on February 15, 2011, when his patrol car crossed over the center yellow lines of US 101 near Piercy and was struck by an oncoming pickup truck. Officer Adams was a hardworking, dedicated officer who took pride in achieving his lifelong dream of becoming a CHP officer, who was known for being a loyal friend and family member, and who was always there to lend a helping hand when a friend was in need. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 76, Resolution Chapter 114, on September 28, 2011.

    The portion of US 101 between Branscomb Road, milepost marker 69.50, and milepost marker 74.50, in the County of Mendocino is named the "CHP Officer Paul C. Jarske Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Paul Clyde Jarske, who was born December 15, 1934, to Andrew and Mona Jarske, in Hankinson, North Dakota. Officer Jarske graduated from Hankinson High School in 1952 and joined the United States Air Force shortly thereafter. Officer Jarske was married to his best friend, Nancy, on September 27, 1957, and had two wonderful children, Michael and Andrea. After an honorable discharge from the United States Air Force in 1963, Officer Jarske joined the California Department of Corrections at the California Medical Facility in Vacaville until his induction into the California Highway Patrol in 1964. Officer Jarske graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1964 and, upon graduation, was assigned to the Norwalk (Santa Fe Springs) area for approximately two years before being transferred to the Concord area, where he served five years, the Golden Gate Division, where he served seven years, and finally the Laytonville Resident Post Garberville area, where he spent the remainder of his career. Throughout that time, Officer Jarske held several titles, including motor officer, front desk officer, and member of the auto theft unit. Officer Jarske, badge number 3493, was killed in the line of duty on February 24, 1981, when his patrol car veered off the road due to severe weather conditions and plummeted 100 feet before finally coming to rest underwater. An innocent bystander attempted to save Officer Jarske's life and held his head above water until help arrived; however, he succumbed to his injuries at Howard Memorial Hospital. Officer Jarske was a hardworking, dedicated officer who had the physical strength and mental ability to do his job. He was both feared and respected, but was one of the most tenderhearted people around. He was known for being an honest, loyal man with high morals and a great sense of humor and was deeply in love with his wife. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 76, Resolution Chapter 114, on September 28, 2011.

    The portion of Route 101 from Englewood to Sylvandale is named the "Frank P. Belotti Freeway". Additionally, the portion of Route 101 in the area known as the Redwood Freeway, from the Bridge numbered 04-241, over the South Fork of the Eel River at Smith Point, to Myers Flat, a distance of approximately 22 miles, which includes the Frank P. Belotti Bridge, is officially designated as the "Frank P. Belotti Memorial Freeway". Frank P. Belotti, a Eureka mink rancher who served as a Member of the Assembly from 1950 to 1972, was an effective advocate of preserving the unique scenic beauty of the redwood groves and was instrumental in securing the legislation that made possible the freeway bypass of the groves and the preservation of the existing state highway designated as the "Avenue of the Giants". He also organized efforts to repopulate the Capitol Park with gray squirrels. The segment from Englewood to Sylvandale was named by House Resolution 461 in 1961; the other segment was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 54, Chapter 114, in 1994.

    The portion of Route 101 in the area known as the Redwood Freeway, from Myers Flat to Stafford, a distance of approximately 20 miles, is officially designated the "Sam Helwer Memorial Freeway". Sam Helwer, a Caltrans engineer from 1936 until his retirement in 1976, was an acknowledged expert in freeway interchange design. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 54, Chapter 114, in 1994.

    The portion of Route 101 from 0.5 mi S of the Haehl Overhead to 0.5 mi N of Reynolds Highway is named the "Leo Stanley Hulett Highway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 61, Chapter 21, in 1990. Leo Stanley Hulett, elected Mayor of Willits in 1956, worked tirelessly for the creation of the US 101 Bypass that bears his memorial.

    The portion of US 101 from Patrick's Point Undercrossing to four miles north of that undercrossing in Humboldt County as the Everett and Louella Thomas Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Evertt and Louelle Thomas. Everett Thomas, a native son of Humboldt County, was born in Shively in 1911 and began his career with the Department of Public Works, the predecessor of the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in 1930 as a survey crew member in the Kings River Canyon near Fresno. He rose through the ranks at the Fresno office of the department in District 6, working in construction, materials, and right-of-way. In 1952, Mr. Thomas was promoted and transferred to the Stockton office of the department in District 10, where he served as District Materials Engineer and District Maintenance Engineer. In 1963, Mr. Thomas returned to the county of his birth, accepting a promotion and transfer to the Eureka office of the department in District 1, where he served as a supervising highway engineer in the position of Assistant District Engineer. Shortly after Mr. Thomas' return to Humboldt County, the state faced the massive floods of December, 1964, during which Mr. Thomas became the emergency spokesman for the district and was featured in countless media reports concerning highway conditions, detours, and road restoration. His wife, Louella Thomas, was born in Fresno in 1911 and served as an elementary school teacher both in Fresno and in Humboldt County until her retirement in 1973. Everett and Louella Thomas contributed to many civic activities, including the campaign to build a new Humboldt County Library, the purchase of land for the Azalea State Reserve now operated by the Department of Parks and Recreation, and various activities related to the arts. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 69, July 16, 2004, Chapter 120.

    The portion of US 101 between mile posts 57.19 and 58.19 and the portion of Route 36 between mile posts 0.0 and 0.5, including the Alton Interchange, in Humboldt County, is officially named the "Roger M. Rodoni Memorial Interchange". This interchange was named in honor of Roger M. Rodoni, an outspoken and philosophical rancher and 12-year Humboldt County Supervisor who died on April 24, 2008. Born in Scotia on August 13, 1940, Supervisor Roger M. Rodoni was the son of a rancher and a rancher himself, and he was renowned as one of the most influential voices in the Humboldt County agricultural community. A rodeo rider, pilot, hunter, historian, and artist, Supervisor Rodoni attended California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and later taught animal science at the College of the Redwoods for nine years. Supervisor Rodoni was deeply connected to the land and he believed that cattle, timber, and dairy were essential elements of the region's economy. An intelligent, articulate, aware, and involved individual, Supervisor Rodoni provided leadership and guidance as a member of myriad committees and associations, including the Humboldt County Association of Governments, CAL-Trans North District External Advisory Committee, Eel/Russian River Joint Powers Commission, Hazardous Materials Response Authority, Integrated Waste Management Hearing Panel, North Coastal Counties Supervisors Association, Surface Mining and Reclamation Program, and the Humboldt County Budget Task Force. In addition, he served with distinction as a member and First Vice President of the Humboldt/Del Norte Cattlemen's Association and as a member and President of the Local Agency Formation Commission and a member of the California State Association of Counties Board of Directors. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 182, 9/14/2010, Resolution Chapter 162.

    The portion of US 101 in Humboldt County from milepost 68.40 to milepost 71.10 is named the "Veterans' Memorial Highway". This segment was named in honor of all veterans who have served in this country's Armed Forces from the country's birth, both in war and in peacetime, and to pay tribute to the tremendous sacrifices veterans have made to maintain the strength, freedom, and independence of our country. The naming was spurred by Humboldt County veterans groups, assisted by the Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 57, Resolution Chapter 113, on 9/10/2007.

    In Humboldt County, Route 101 from Eureka to Arcata is officially named the "Burns Freeway". It was named by House Resolution 230 in 1949. It was named after State Senator Michael J. Burns of Eureka who was a long-time supporter of State highways and State parks. Senator Burns died in office on May 1, 1949. The district he represented is the location of the Burns Freeway.

    The Redwood National Park Bypass on Route 101 is officially designated the "Don Clausen Highway". Donald H. Clausen was a representative to the United States Congress for the 1st District, from 1963 to 1983. In this role, he was the senior ranking member of the House Public Works and Transportation Committee, where he authored legislation and enlisted the support from his congressional colleagues and the president for a federal appropriation to provide for the construction of the Redwood National Park Bypass project as a way to enhance travel on Route 101 and reduce the conflicts between through traffic and park users. In 1992, the State of California completed the 12-mile bypass of Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park and the Redwood National Park on Route 101 in northern Humboldt and southern Del Norte Counties. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 92, Chapter 62, in 1996.

    The portion of this route from Little River near Trinidad to Patrick's Point Undercrossing is named the "William Z. Hegy Memorial Highway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 53, Chapter 39, in 1988. William Z. Hegy began working for the State of California in 1936 as an Engineering Aid and retired in 1976 as Caltrans District 1 Director.

    The portion of this route from Bridge No. 4-16 to Bridge No. 4-221 near Rio Dell is dedicated to the memory of Dave Ghilarducci. Fire Chief David Ghilarducci was born and raised in Rio Dell and served the community as a volunteer fireperson for 52 years, including 32 years as fire chief. He was the past President of the Humboldt County Fire Chiefs Association, and served as a State of California Deputy Fire Marshal. He organized and led the construction of the Rio Dell Community Park and community hall. In 1992, the City of Rio Dell recognized Dave Ghilarducci for his years of volunteer service; and in 1998 this community leader was recognized by the Rio Dell School District as outstanding alumnus due to his outstanding accomplishments in life and his support of high standards in education. He died on 22 March 2000. Dedicated by Senate Concurrent Resolution 12, Chapter 92, July 26, 2001.

    The section of Former US 101 to the west of Prarie Creek Redwoods State Park, which was bypassed in 1993, is named the "Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway". Newton Drury was the first executive secretary of the Save the Redwoods League, who later served as director of the National Park Service.

    The portion of US 101 from Crescent City to the Oregon state line is called the "Oregon Coast Highway".

    The interchange between US 101 and Route 200 in the County of Humboldt is officially named the "CHP Officer Kenneth E. Marshall Memorial Interchange." It was named on 9/27/13 by ACR 70,Res. Chapter 144, Statutes of 2013. It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officer Kenneth Edmund Marshall, whowas born in December 1936, in Vernonia, Oregon. Officer Marshall graduated from Napa High School, and attended California State University, Sacramento, shortly thereafter. Officer Marshall was employed in a lumber mill near Burney, California, prior to becoming a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Marshall married in September 1956, and had two children. Officer Marshall graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1963 and, upon graduation, was assigned to the Los Angeles Area and later transferred to the San Leandro Area and finally to the Humboldt Area, where he spent the remainder of his career. Officer Marshall, badge number 3285, was killed in the line of duty on January 9, 1968, while pursuing a speeding motorist on US 101 in the County of Humboldt. As Officer Marshall was attempting to overtake the violator, he lost control of his patrol car on the wet roadway as he was traversing through a sweeping left curve and his vehicle slid off the roadway and struck a pole adjacent to the highway.

    The portion of US 101 in Del Norte County between the E. M. Fine Memorial Bridge and the Oregon state line is named the "CHP Officer Ernest R. Felio Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer Ernest R. Felio. Ernest R. Felio was a Navy veteran and courageously served his country during the Korean War. He joined the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and became an officer in 1962. Officer Felio was the recipient of the State of California's highest award, the Medal of Valor. Officer Felio was personally credited with saving the life of a man who was the victim of electrocution as a result of a traffic collision involving high voltage electrical transmission lines. Officer Felio disregarded his own personal safety and rescued the badly injured motorist by removing the motorist from his electrically charged motor vehicle. Officer Felio's compassion for his fellow man was again demonstrated one evening while working his beat. Officer Felio observed a woman with three girls standing next to a road in an isolated portion of Del Norte Canyon. Out of compassion and fear for the family's safety, after learning the family had been victims of abuse and abandonment, Officer Felio transported the family out of the elements and to his home until relatives could be summoned. On the evening of September 7, 1980, Officer Felio's life tragically ended in horrific violence on the side of a cold dark highway in Del Norte County. Officer Felio was shot and killed during the course of a routine traffic stop after making contact with the motorist on Westbrook Lane west of US 101. Officer Felio fulfilled the CHP's Code of Honor in that he laid down his life rather than swerve from the path of duty. Officer Felio's conduct was, at all times, above reproach and projected an exemplary image of one of the finest CHP officers this state has to offer. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 31, Resolution Chapter 70, on 7/3/2007.

     

    Named Structures

    The vista point on Route 101 at the north end of the Golden Gate Bridge is named the "H. Dana Bowers Memorial Vista Point". Dana Bowers served as the Chief of Landscaping for Caltrans.

    Tunnel 27-040, N of the Golden Gate Bridge in Sausalito (Marin county) is named the "Waldo Tunnel". It was named for Waldo Point along Richardson Bay between Sausalito and Mill Valley. The tunnels were built in 1937 and 1954. William Waldo ran for Governor of California in 1853's as a Whig. He lost and moved to Oregon to establish the town of Waldo. He had attempted to develop the area now known as Waldo Point.

    Bridge 10-273, 0.4 mi N of the Sonoma county line on the Russian River in Mendocino county, is named the "F. Walter Sandclin Memorial Bridge" . It was built in 1988, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 76, Chapter 144, in 1989. F. Walter Sandelin was a member of the California Highway Commission from 1943 to 1956 and was instrumental in achieving the widening of US 101 to four lanes.

    The new South Fork Eel Bridge (Bridge number 10-0299, Kilometer Post 160.03), located on Route 101 in the County of Mendocino, is named the Mignon "Minnie" Stoddard Lilley Memorial Bridge. This bridge was named in memory of Mignon "Minnie" Stoddard Lilley, a woman of many facets and dimensions: courageous, intelligent, creative, kind, stern, hard working, musically inclined, honest, religious, impetuous, practical, and also, by all accounts, quite an attractive woman. She was a teacher, environmentalist, homesteader, entrepreneur, healer, visionary, and a true pioneer in every sense of the word. Minnie lived in a time when a person was required to deal with the harsh realities of living on the "frontier." As a teacher, Minnie offered the community something that was important to them and as a person she set a positive example for all by her unselfish concern for all those around her. From 1904 to 1936, Minnie taught in the one room schoolhouses of the Andersonia/Piercy area. Minnie spent her entire teaching career in the County of Mendocino teaching at Usal, Moody, Bear Harbor, Alder Glen, Franklin, and Buck Mountain before settling down and staying in the Andersonia/Piercy area. Minnie can also lay claim to being the first school bus driver in the area because around 1919, having acquired a horse-drawn buggie, she would pick up some of her students and give them a ride to school. Minnie met William G. Lilley while she was teaching at Andersonia and they were married January 25, 1905, at the Grand Hotel in San Francisco. In the spring of 1904, Minnie set out to homestead a claim up the Eel River in the redwoods. For many years Minnie had walked over 5 miles to the schoolhouse so a solitary hike up the South Fork of the Eel River through some "darn tough country" was no big deal to her. A quote from a 1950 Humboldt Times article reads "as soon as the spring rains had subsided enough so that the Eel River could be crossed safely, she went into the depths of the redwood forest, fording on a homemade raft the turbulent waters, and set up her location markers". Minnie then hired a man to build her a simple one room cabin on the property. Minnie loved telling people about her first night in the cabin, all alone way out there in the forest which she spent "with prayer on my lips and a pistol in my hand". Around 1925, Minnie and William bought a 55 acre parcel adjoining the homestead and that property included a particular tree Minnie lovingly called "The Fraternal Monarch." This amazing redwood tree stands over 250 feet tall, is 101 feet in circumference, and has had the center burned out by a fire some 300 years ago. Today this tree is known as "The World Famous Tree House". In 1919, construction of the Redwood Highway through the canyon of the South Fork of the Eel River began; and in 1929, Minnie and William started building a few small cabins near The World Famous Tree House. On May 14, 1931, for the sum of $10, the Lilley's deeded enough land to the State of California to make improvements to the new road that ran through their property. During construction of the highway, the tree house was a camp for the convict labor that was used to work on the road. These men actually used the old burned out tree as a shelter to sleep in. Now that tourists were visiting the redwoods, William and Minnie were in a great position to benefit from this new situation, and one day, Minnie decided to put a gift shop inside The World Famous Tree House and she had a floor, windows, and a door fitted to the measurements of the burned out hole in the redwood. This was one of the very first gift shops on the Redwood Highway. On March 8, 1947, Minnie, a remarkable pioneering woman, passed away and according to her wishes to be with her beloved trees through eternity she was interred in her mausoleum right near The Fraternal Monarch. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 114, Resolution Chapter 140, on 9/8/2006.

    The northern span of the Eel River Bridge, located on US 101 in the County of Mendocino is named the "Elizabeth Jane Rosewarne Memorial Bridge". This structure was named in memory of Elizabeth Jane Rosewarne. Elizabeth Jane Rosewarne was born to William and Elizabeth Sandow on July 12, 1866, in Eagle River, Michigan. Elizabeth met Nicholas Rosewarne, who was born in England, in Nevada City, and they married in 1884. Elizabeth and Nicholas moved to San Francisco, where Nicholas was a cable car conductor, and Elizabeth was a professional seamstress. Elizabeth and Nicholas had three children, Edna, Ray, and Myrtle. Due to Elizabeth's poor health, the doctor recommended she move from the foggy air of San Francisco to a warmer climate. Nicholas traveled by boat to Usal and set out in search of land, selecting a 160-acre parcel bordering on the South Fork of the Eel River, across from Confusion Hill, which he purchased in May of 1896. The following May, Elizabeth and the children boarded one of the vessels of the (Robert) Dollar Steamship Company, sailed to Usal, and from there, traveled by mule over a 10-mile backwoods trail to the homestead carrying essential belongings, including a child-size rocking chair that is still in the family today, strapped between two mules. Elizabeth thrived in the new climate, taking the chores of a pioneer woman in stride and, while a petite woman, could work with a cross cut saw, fish the Eel River for salmon and trout, smoke salmon in the smokehouse, and pack a mule and haul wood on the family horse named Queen. With Nicholas working on the Henry Neff Anderson's railroad between Andersonia (Piercy) and Usal during the week, Elizabeth traveled by horseback with both children strapped on the horse on the mountain trail to Usal, to pick up mail and supplies. On one unforgettable trip to Usal, Elizabeth, carrying a sack of fresh meat, was followed closely by a shrieking panther, and although her horse spooked and jumped over a gate, she and the children managed to hold on tight and make it back safely to the homestead. Elizabeth was an expert at baking her own bread, making her own butter and cream, and growing prized heirloom tomatoes that she traded to her neighbors, and in addition she canned over 400 jars of fruit during the summer from the Rosewarne homestead orchard. She was also an expert seamstress and made all the clothes for her family and also loved to quilt, spending many evenings working on her latest quilt. She loved to fish and kept a daily count of her impressive catch, and her favorite fishing hole was in the eddy of the Eel River, which is the proposed bridge site for the northern span of the Eel River Bridge. After a long day of chores, Elizabeth would hitch up the horse and take her daughter, Myrtle, to visit the neighbors, and in the evenings, the family would use a Parcheesi Board circle Elizabeth made on the back of her round oil cloth to play the game. After Nicholas lost his vision in one eye from a logging accident and then in the other eye from glaucoma, Elizabeth cared for him until his death on May 3, 1922, at age 69. After Nicholas' death, Elizabeth moved across the Eel River to the north end of the Rosewarne Homestead, operating a Texaco Star gas station and a country store to support herself and her youngest daughter, Myrtle. Elizabeth Jane Rosewarne died on January 7, 1949, and is buried in the family plot in Piercy Cemetery in Mendocino County, beside her son, Ray. Elizabeth and Nicholas Rosewarne's homestead is the location for both the southern and northern spans of the Eel River Bridge. The southern span of the Eel River Bridge will be named the Minney Lilley Memorial Bridge, and Minney Lilley and Elizabeth Rosewarne were friends, with Minney being mentioned in Elizabeth's diary and the teacher for Elizabeth's daughter, Myrtle, as well as several of Elizabeth's grandchildren and a greatgrandson. These bridge spans are named after two pioneer women, inspiring women and young girls growing up, or traveling to and from the area, to know that pioneer women played a key role in the history of Mendocino County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 30, Resolution Chapter 69, on 7/3/2007.

    Bridge 20-061, in Sonoma County at Arata Lane is named the "Richard F. Cavness Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1962, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 141, Chapter 105 in 1994. Richard F. Cavness, a native of Healdsburg, was killed on November 5, 1993, on the Arata Bridge on US Highway 101 while unselfishly rendering aid to a stranded motorist.

    Tunnel 20-112, the 4th Street viaduct through Santa Rosa, is named the "Robert L. Bishop Viaduct". Bishop was Mayor of Santa Rosa and and a Highway Commission member from 1956 to 1960. It was built in 1968, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 39, Chapt. 51 in 1971.

    Bridge 20-235, an overcrossing of Route 101 in Rohnert Park in Sonoma county, is named the "Congressman Don Clausen Overpass". It was built in 1973, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 24, Chapter 57 in 1983. Donald H. Clausen was a representative to the United States Congress for the 1st District, from 1963 to 1983. In this role, he was the senior ranking member of the House Public Works and Transportation Committee, where he authored legislation and enlisted the support from his congressional colleagues and the president for a federal appropriation to provide for the construction of the Redwood National Park Bypass project as a way to enhance travel on Route 101 and reduce the conflicts between through traffic and park users. In 1992, the State of California completed the 12-mile bypass of Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park and the Redwood National Park on Route 101 in northern Humboldt and southern Del Norte Counties.

    Bridge 20-252R over First Street in Cloverdale is named the "Gambetta Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1984, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 117, Chapter 101 in 1994. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Gambetta, Sr. were long-time residents of the City of Cloverdale. Mrs. Dena Gambetta served the City of Cloverdale as the unofficial "hostess" of the community. Mr. Albert Gambetta, Sr. served the City of Cloverdale as Planning Commissioner, volunteer firefighter, Councilmember, and Mayor, and thus helped to guide the City of Cloverdale through the midtwentieth century.

    Bridge 04-006, at Dean Creek in Humboldt county, is named the "Elmer Hurlbut Memorial Bridge". It was bult in 1967, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 38, Chapter 115. Humboldt County pioneer and rancher Elmer Hurlbutt, (1882-1967), helped to develop the Garberville Water Company.

    Bridge 04-014, S of Scotia at the Eel River in Humboldt county, is named the "Richard Fleisher Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1965, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 7, Chapter 42, in 1962. Richard Fleisher (d. 1962), realtor and civic leader, was the organizer of the Humboldt County Crab Feed held annually in Sacramento for the California Highway Commission and the State Department of Public Works.

    Bridge 04-016, the Robinson Ferry Bridge over the Eel River in Humboldt county, is named the "Paul E. Mudgett Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1941, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 47, in 1963. Paul E. Mudgett, a member of the Humboldt County Board of Trade for 35 years, died in an automobile accident on US 101 on August 16, 1962.

    Bridge 04-016L, the Rio Dell Bridge over the Eel River in Humboldt county, is named the "Nello J. Barsanti Memorial Bridge". Nello J. Barsanti (1916-1976) was a lifetime resident of the Scotia-Rio Dell area, community leader, education advocate and member of the Fortuna Unified High School Board of Trustees. It was built in 1974, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 231, Chapter 91, in 1977.

    Bridge 04-017, the northbound bridge over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county, is named the "Harold W. Comfort Memorial Bridge". Harold W. Comfort, M.D., cared for the people of southern Humboldt County for a third of a century until his death in 1954 at the age of 60 years. It was built in 1995, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 22, Chapter 55, in 1995.

    Bridge 04-017, the southbound Route 101 bridge over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt County, is named the "James Van Duzen Memorial Bridge". The Van Duzen River is named for one of the county's first settlers, James Van Duzen, formerly of Schyler, New York, who arrived in the area with the Gregg-Wood party in 1849. He established a farm on land at the mouth of the Van Duzen river in 1850. It was built in 1952, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 22, Chapter 55 the same year.

    The Salmon Creek Bridge on US 101 in Humboldt County is named the “James F. McManus Memorial Bridge”. This bridge was named in memory of James F. McManus, who had an exemplary career with the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) for nearly 40 years, McManus was born on May 29, 1929, in Oakland, California. His love for engineering and flying was stimulated by his father's work with the Univac Supercomputer, which was used to schedule the B-19 Bomber project during World War II. McManus attended City College of San Francisco, until he joined the United States Marine Corps during the Korean War. He later returned to college at San Jose State University. In 1954, McManus began his career at Caltrans as a junior civil engineer and immediately impressed his supervisors with his engineering abilities. During his 18-year tenure in District 1 of Caltrans, McManus moved from construction to the laboratory, where he tested materials for roadways, and ultimately into design, planning, and project management, where he worked on the design of numerous highway and freeway projects. After the 1964 flood incident in northern California, McManus worked on the US 101 freeway project and designed a five-mile stretch of the Redwood Freeway south of Myers Flat. He was particularly proud of this project because, in addition to bypassing Myers Flat and avoiding impact to the old growth redwoods and parks south of the Eel River, he successfully convinced the district leadership to change the original alignment of the highway to create his vision of a panoramic view of the magnificent Eel River. The Myers Flat Bypass included five bridges across the Eel River and its tributaries, including the Salmon Creek Bridge. As a leader of the district computer section, McManus developed a revolutionary computer program called MANSCAN, which scheduled the manpower across the many professional disciplines required to design and construct each major project and thereby allowed projects to be more efficiently tracked and planned. This program was renamed PYPSCAN and was used for purposes of program management for many decades. Following his many achievements in District 1, McManus was promoted in 1972 to work in the department's headquarters in Sacramento, California, as a senior transportation engineer. He became a principal engineer in 1982, and was promoted to Deputy Director of District 7 in Los Angeles in 1984, where he oversaw the planning, design, and construction of the monumental Century Freeway project and won Engineer of the Year for Caltrans as a result. In 1986, McManus moved back to Sacramento, California, and was promoted to Career Executive, Level 3. He finished his career as Deputy Chief Engineer and managed programs for the entire state from 1988 until his retirement in 1992 after 38 years of service. James F. McManus died on December 2, 2006. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 9, Resolution Chapter 71, on 7/14/2009.

    Bridge 04-028, over Redwood Creek in Humboldt county, is named the "Ralph A. Miller Bridge". It was built in 1982, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 99, Chapter 162, in 1986. Ralph A. Miller (b. 1904) was employed as a civil engineer by the Division of Highways for 41 years.

    Bridge 04-065 over the south fork of the Eel River, S of Phillipsville, is named the "Charles R. Barnum Memorial Bridge". Charles R. Barnum pioneered the use of fir trees to produce lumber in California. It was built in 1964, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 94, Chapter 229, in 1965.

    Bridge 04-072, at the Eagle Point Viaduct in Humboldt county, is named the "Hod Benedict Bridge". Harold "Hod" Wilson Benedict served as the resident engineer for over 40 projects in Humboldt and Mendocino Counties from 1952 to 1975 and was responsible for the completion of the Redwood Highway. It was built in 1963, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 137, Chapter 127, in 1984.

    Bridge 04-076, at the Eel River in Humboldt county, is named the "George M. Leatherwood Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1958, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 66, Chapter 197 in 1957. George Leatherwood (1904-1956) was a career Caltrans engineer and pioneer aerial surveyor.

    Bridge 04-123, over the south fork of the Eel River, is named the "George J. Cole Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1962, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 5, Chapter 41, in 1963. George J. Cole served as a member of the Humboldt County Commission, as Mayor of Eureka, and as President of the County Supervisor's Association of California.

    Bridge 04-155, over the south fork of the Eel River, is named the "Malcom G. Coomes Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1969, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 86, Chapter 92. Malcolm G. Coombs, who settled in Humboldt County in 1946, was a benefactor to the county and a member of the California State Water Commission.

    Bridge 04-212, over the south fork of the Eel River near Garberville in Humboldt county, is named the "Frank P. Belotti Memorial Bridge" . Frank P. Belotti, a Eureka mink rancher who served as a Member of the Assembly from 1950 to 1972, was an effective advocate of preserving the unique scenic beauty of the redwood groves and was instrumental in securing the legislation that made possible the freeway bypass of the groves and the preservation of the existing state highway designated as the "Avenue of the Giants". He also organized efforts to repopulate the Capitol Park with gray squirrels. It was built in 1969, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 41, in Chapter 101 in 1972.

    The Rio Dell/Eel River Bridge (Bridge 04-221R) is named the "Stanwood A. Murphy Memorial Bridge". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 23, Chapter 91 in 1977. Stanwood A. Murphy (d. 1972), son of Albert Stanwood Murphy, served as the President of the California Redwoods Association and was the fourth generation of his family to head Pacific Lumber Company, founded in Scotia, Humboldt County, in 1869.

    Bridge 04-241, at Smith Point on the Eel River in Humboldt county, is named the "Charles Edward Wagner Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1980, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 132 the same year. Charles Edward Wagner established the first tanbark extraction plant in Humboldt County in 1900 and was a leader in the building of the town of Garberville.

    Bridge 01-005, at Wilson Creek in Del Norte county, is named the "Louis De Martin Sr. Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1957, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 521, Chapter 181 in the same year. Louis De Martin, Sr., settled in Del Norte County in 1875 where he fathered 17 children and built the first bridge over Wilson Creek on what is now Route 1.

    Bridge 01-020, at the Smith River in Del Norte county, is named the "Dr. Ernest Fine Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1940, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 40, in 1941. Dr. Ernest M. Fine (1873-1939) was a Del Norte County country doctor who never sent a bill to a patient.

    Bridge 01-028, at the Klamath River in Del Norte county, is named the "G H. Douglas Memorial Bridge". It is a replacement bridge built in 1965, and was named by Resolution Chapter 223 in 1923. Dr. G.H. Douglas, Crescent City physician and State Assembly Member, worked diligently for the construction of the bridge that bears his memorial, but died in 1923, before its completion. The Klamath River Bridge is well known for its two golden bears. According to the Klamath Chamber of Commerce , the Golden Bears on the Klamath River Bridge weren't always golden. The gold first appeared sometime in the late 50's or early 60's. The bears were originally pained by a group of local businessmen (Herb Fehley , John Menary , Ray Thompson , Pat Murphy, Ward Berg, Johnny Rycraft and Bud Harper to name a few) who decided to give Klamath a face lift. Whenever the Highway Department would restore the bears to their natural state, "The Golden Bear Club" would meet again to restore their trademark "Golden Bears" on the Klamath Bridge. It didn't take too long before the Highway Department realized Klamath liked those Bears golden, and the new Memorial Bridge completed in 1965 greets visitors from around the world with its landmark California Golden Bears.

    The Boyes Creek Viaduct on the Redwood National Park Bypass in Del Norte County is named the Delbert A. Brown Memorial Bridge. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 72, Chapter 95 in 1998. Delbert A. Brown (b. 1931) was a Deputy District Director of the California Department of Transportation and a tireless worker for the creation of the Redwood National Park Bypass.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • In Marin County at the N end of the Golden Gate Bridge.
    • Moss Cove, in Mendocino County, 10.5 mi S of Laytonville.
    • Irvine Lodge, in Mendocino County, 7.9 mi S of Laytonville.
    • Empire Camp, in Mendocino County, 2.5 mi S of Cummings.
    • Trinidad, in Humboldt County, 0.5 mi S of Seawood Drive.

     

    Commuter Lanes

    In Marin County, HOV lanes run southbound from N of the Greenbrae pedestrian overcrossing to S of the Strawberry pedestrian overcrossing, for a length of 3.7 mi. Northbound, the HOV lanes run from S of the Richardson Bay Bridge to N of the Corte Madera overcrossing, for a length of 3.5 mi. These were opened in February 1974 (opened to carpools in June 1976). HOV lanes also run from Route 37/S Novato Blvd to N of the San Pedro undercrossing, in both directions. These opened in July 1987, and were extended in February 1991. All require two or more occupants, and operate weekdays during the following hours: 6:30-8:30am (SB), 4:30-7:00pm (NB).

    HOV lanes are also planned as follows:

    • From Lucky Drive to N San Pedro Road. Planning stages. Marin County. CTC Agenda June 2001: Reversable HOV lane, Sir Francis Drake Blvd to N San Pedro Road.
    • N San Pedro Road to Mission Avenue. Construction starts in March 1998. Marin County.
    • Mission Avenue to I-580. Planning stages. Marin County.
    • In Santa Rosa, from Santa Rosa Avenue to Wilfred Avenue. Sonoma County. Environmental Impact Report prepared.
    • In Santa Rosa, from Wilfred Avenue to Route 12. Sonoma County. Environmental Impact Report prepared.
    • From Route 12 to Steele Lane. This project includes widening the freeway from four to six lanes. The project will also increase capacity of the College Avenue and Steele Lane interchanges. Other features of the project include: (a) Construction of a collector-distributor road on northbound Route 101, between Route 12 and 3rd Street; (b) Construction of auxiliary lanes between College Avenue and Steele Lane; (c) Extending an existing southbound auxiliary lane between College Avenue and downtown Santa Rosa to Route 12; (d) Replacing the Santa Rosa Creek Bridge; (e) Replacing an existing pedestrian overcrossing with a new pedestrian undercrossing at Santa Rosa Creek Bridge; (f) Constructing a new undercrossing at 6th Street; (g) Constructing soundwalls at various locations; (h) Replacing College Avenue Undercrossing; and (i) Constructing retaining walls at various locations. The project has not yet been awarded.

    There are also studies for adding an HOV lane between Santa Rosa and Windsor, and between Rohnert Park and Petaluma, in Sonoma County.

     

    Double Fine Zones

    The five-mile segment between the Eureka Slough Bridge No. 4-22 to the Gannon Slough Bridge No. 4-24 in Arcata. Authorized by SB 1349, Chapter 378, 9/5/2002.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.6] From a point in Marin County opposite San Francisco to Route 1 near Marin City; and from Route 37 near Ignacio to Route 37 near Novato; and from Route 20 near Calpella to Route 20 near Willits; and from Route 1 near Leggett to Route 199 near Crescent City; and from Route 197 near Fort Dick to the Oregon state line.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Marin 101 3.33 3.68
    Marin 101 5.57 6.02
    Marin 101 6.30 6.85
    Marin 101 7.18 7.46
    Marin 101 7.76 8.11
    Marin 101 9.77 10.11
    Marin 101 10.66 11.33
    Marin 101 11.43 12.19
    Marin 101 12.49 14.18
    Marin 101 15.34 15.90
    Marin 101 19.72 19.95
    Marin 101 20.09 20.30
    Sonoma 101 3.86 5.17
    Sonoma 101 13.67 14.02
    Sonoma 101 18.83 19.10
    Sonoma 101 19.10 19.27
    Sonoma 101 19.27 20.09
    Sonoma 101 20.24 22.81
    Sonoma 101 34.41 34.80
    Sonoma 101 36.03 36.45
    Sonoma 101 50.00 52.06
    Sonoma 101 53.34 53.53
    Humboldt 101 86.12 87.83
    Humboldt 101 88.22 88.39
    Humboldt 101 R92.89 R93.11
    Del Norte 101 R27.80 R28.00
    Del Norte 101 R28.19 R28.54
    Del Norte 101 R30.56 R30.87
    Del Norte 101 R31.01 R31.19

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    The portion from San Francisco to Route 37 was submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1947 and 1956; it was not accepted both times.

     

    Other WWW Links

National Trails

California To Banff Highway Sign The portion of this route between the northern California border and Los Angeles appears to have been part of the "California-Banff "B" Line".

Pacific Highway Sign This route appears to have been part of the "Pacific" highway.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

US 101 is one of the earliest state routes. It was originally recommended for the state highways map in 1896, and was adopted into the highway system in 1909. Construction began in 1912.

 

Historical Route

Assembly Concurrent Resolution 92, 1998, designated those portions of US 101 that are still publically maintained and not already designated as part of Historic US 101 as "Historic US 101".

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route (post-1964 US 101) was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 41, Ch. 24 in 1984.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.15] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for US 101:

  • Total Length (1995): 807 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 3,900 to 308,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 487; Sm. Urban 76; Urbanized: 244.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 807 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 807 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Cuesta Grade (1522 ft); Ridgewood Summit (1956 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara, San Mateo, San Francisco, Marin, Sonoma, Mendocino, Humboldt, Del Norte.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "[LRN 53] to [LRN 7] near Dixon" to the highway system. In 1935, it was added to the highway code with that definition as LRN 101. It ran from Route 12 to US 40 near Dixon. This is present-day Route 113.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 102



Routing

From Route 5 near Elkhorn to Route 80 near Auburn.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route remains as defined in 1963.

Around 2000, planning for Route 102 had realigned it from the Auburn-Folsom-Rio Linda-Elkhorn routing of Route 102 (which would've crossed I-80 twice and parallelled Folsom Lake and Elkhorn Boulevard/Greenback Lane) in 1994 to a direct route from Auburn to Elkhorn/Natomas crossing through undeveloped areas in Sacramento and Placer County.

In 2002, the Traversable Highways Report noted that a Feasibility Study has been completed in 1991 but further corridor studies are needed. Budgetary constraints have stalled these studies. Placer County is pursuing Placer Parkway, an access controlled facility to be built to freeway standards between Route 99 and Route 65.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was unsigned proposed LRN 246, defined in 1959.

Route 102 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 102 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; unconstructed. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interstate Submissions

In April 1958, it appears that the designation I-102 was proposed for the route that is now I-210. This was part of the first attempt to assign 3-digit interstates n California. The number was rejected by AASHTO.

 


Overall statistics for Route 102:

  • Total Length (1995): 38 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 11; Sm. Urban 1; Urbanized: 26.
  • Counties Traversed: Sacramento, Placer.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "Napa-Calistoga Road near Rutherford to Napa-Winters Road via Sage Canyon" to the highway system. In 1935, this was codified as LRN 102 in the highway code with the following definition:

[LRN 49] near Rutherford to [LRN 6] via Sage Canyon

This definition remained unchanged until 1963. This route ran from the Route 29/Route 128 junction (the present-day Route 121/Route 128 junction) near Rutherford to the Route 37/Route 128 junction (the present-day Route 121/Route 128 junction) via Sage Canyon. This is signed as Route 128.


State Shield

State Route 103



Routing

From Route 47 in Los Angeles to Route 1.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 103 was defined as the route from Route 5 to Route 395 near United States Naval Air Station, Miramar. This route was along Murphy Canyon Road, 40th Street, and Wabash Avenue. In 1969, Chapter 292 transferred this routing to Route 15.

State Shield In 1984, Chapter 409 redefined the route as "Route 47 in Long Beach to Route 1." This was a segment dropped from Route 47 in 1982. This route was signed as Route 47 after 1964, though the alignment of Route 47 actually splits off about ¼ mi north of the drawbridge from Terminal Island. There were later proposals that extended the Terminal Island Freeway as Route 47 north (i.e., the "Industrial Freeway"—see Route 47 for more information) from its end at Willow Street rather than north of the drawbridge. Route 47 was then switched back to Henry Ford Avenue and Alameda Street in 1982 and the remainder became Route 103 in 1984. The portion of freeway from Route 1 to Willow Street is not state highway anymore (technically, it is Route 103U, where U means "unrelinquished") .

In 1986, Chapter 928 corrected the origin to be "Route 47 in Los Angeles"

 

Pre 1964 Signage History
  • Pre-1969 Route 103: This was the routing that would eventually be Route 15. It was LRN 283, and was defined as part of the state highway system by 1959.

  • Post-1983 Route 103: This was part of LRN 270 defined in 1959. Part of this was originally part of Route 47 (as defined in 1962), which was never under the LRN system.

Route 103 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 103 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

Caltrans has historically wanted an expressway in this area, as part of a series of regional transportation improvements at the southern end of the Alameda Corridor. The Route 47 Expressway is cited in the Southern California Association of Governments Regional Transportation Plan. It would build upon a network of local streets by constructing a high-capacity expressway connecting the Ocean Boulevard/Route 47 Interchange with Alameda Street at Pacific Coast Highway, thereby providing a missing link in the local transportation system. The existing Route 47 extends east from the southern terminus of the Harbor Freeway (I-110) in San Pedro, over the Vincent Thomas Bridge, along Seaside Avenue and Ocean Boulevard, then north across the Cerritos Channel on the Schuyler Heim Bridge, continuing north on Henry Ford Avenue, then onto Alameda Street until its terminus at I-10 in downtown Los Angeles. The Route 103 Expressway is an alternative to the Route 47 Expressway. It also would build upon a network of local streets by constructing a high-capacity expressway that connects existing Route 103, beginning about 0.8 kilometer (km) (0.5 mile [mi]) north of Pacific Coast Highway, to Alameda Street at a point about 0.8 km (0.5 mi) south of the San Diego Freeway (I-405). Currently, to connect from Terminal Island to Alameda Street, vehicles must travel 1.5 km (0.9 mi) north from Ocean Boulevard, then exit at the Henry Ford Avenue off-ramp and travel north through local streets, signalized intersections, and railroad crossings for about 2.0 km (1.2 mi) before joining Alameda Street just south of Pacific Coast Highway. Alameda Street continues north of Pacific Coast Highway for 4.0 km (2.5 mi) and connects to the I-405. About 5.5 km (3.4 mi) north of I-405, Alameda Street connects to the Artesia Freeway (Route 91). The existing Route 103 begins north of the Schuyler Heim Bridge at the Terminal Island Freeway, where Route 47 exits at Henry Ford Avenue. Route 103 continues north to Pacific Coast Highway, where it ends. The Terminal Island Freeway continues past the terminus of Route 103 and ends at Willow Street/Sepulveda Boulevard.
(source)

As a result, Caltrans initiated a $351 million project to start in 2009 with the following goals:

  • Provide a structurally and seismically safe vehicular connection along the critical northsouth corridor between Terminal Island and the mainland that can remain in service following a major earthquake to ensure that ground and vessel transportation are maintained.
  • Improve operational and safety design features of the crossing to facilitate the movement of people, freight, and goods, while meeting current design standards to the maximum extent feasible.
  • Provide a high-capacity alternative route for traffic between Terminal Island and I-405 that reduces traffic congestion and improves safety.

There are a number of alternatives under consideration:

  • Alternative 1. This alternative involves replacement of the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge, construction of a new SR-47 Expressway to provide a high-capacity alternative route along the Alameda Corridor for traffic between Terminal Island and Alameda Street at Pacific Coast Highway, and construction of a flyover that would divert eastbound Ocean Boulevard traffic directly onto northbound Route 47 and across the new bridge. Construction activities for the replacement bridge and Route 47 Expressway are planned to begin in 2009 and be completed in 2011. Construction of the flyover is planned to begin in 2015 and be completed in 2017. With this alternative, a new fixed-span bridge would be constructed, primarily within the existing bridge right-of-way (ROW), but toward the east to avoid impacts to the railroad on the Badger Bridge, immediately to the west; the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge (lift bridge) would be demolished. The replacement bridge would be 13 m (43 ft) wider than the existing bridge due to the addition of standard shoulders, which are not present on the existing bridge. The replacement bridge would include three 3.6-m (12-ft) lanes (two through-lanes and one auxiliary lane), with 3-m (10-ft) shoulders in the northbound direction, and four 3.6-m (12-ft) lanes (three through-lanes and one auxiliary lane), with 3-m (10-ft) shoulders in the southbound direction. Bridge construction would include a southbound off-ramp and northbound on-ramp at New Dock Street on Terminal Island, as well as a northbound off-ramp and southbound on-ramp at Henry Ford Avenue on the mainland side of the bridge. With this alternative, the new bridge would be supported by four piers in the channel, with a minimum vertical clearance of 14.3 m (47 ft) over the mean high water level (MHWL). This clearance would be maintained for the width of the navigable channel, which would be 54.9 m (180 ft), the same as under existing conditions. The new SR-47 Expressway would begin on Terminal Island, at the intersection of SR-47 and Ocean Boulevard, extending north over New Dock Street and onto the new fixed-span bridge. The expressway would extend northward to Alameda Street, south of the intersection with Pacific Coast Highway, a distance of approximately 2.7 km (1.5 mi). The Ocean Boulevard/SR-47 Flyover (flyover) would begin on Terminal Island, about 1,200 m (3,900 ft) west of the Ocean Boulevard/SR-47 intersection, extend eastward along the south side of Ocean Boulevard, and then turn north, cross over Ocean Boulevard and onto the new bridge. The west end of the flyover would be at grade, then rise to a maximum elevation of 21 m (69 ft) to join the new bridge. The elevated portions of the flyover would be supported by fourteen single-column bents, one 2-column outrigger bent, with a total of 15 spans. The flyover would have an overall length of 830 m (2,723 ft), ending at the northerly end point (gore point) of the northbound New Dock Street on-ramp onto the bridge. The left lane of the flyover would converge with the SR-47 through lane to the left; the right lane of the flyover would continue as a northbound SR-47 through lane and would have the option to continue to SR-47 or SR-103. The flyover would be located entirely within the City and Port of Long Beach.

  • Alternative 1A. Alternative 1A is a structural variation of Alternative 1. The main purpose of this alternative is to improve the aesthetics of the replacement bridge over the Cerritos Channel and span a greater horizontal distance across the channel between columns. Other aspects of this alternative, the SR-47 Expressway and Ocean Boulevard/SR-47 Flyover, would be the same as described for Alternative 1.

  • Alternative 2. With this alternative, the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge would be replaced by a fixed-span bridge, and the flyover described under Alternative 1 would be constructed. This alternative also would extend Route 103 to the northwest on a four-lane viaduct to join Alameda Street between Sepulveda Boulevard and I-405. Improvements to Route 103 would begin approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) north of the Schuyler Heim Bridge and extend a distance of approximately 2.6 km (1.6 mi). The viaduct would cross over the Union Pacific Railroad manual yard and San Pedro Branch, through the Southern California Edison (SCE) utility corridor, across the Los Angeles Harbor Department Warehouse 16/17 area, over Sepulveda Boulevard, then parallel the western boundary of the Intermodal Container Transfer Facility (ICTF) to the centerline of Alameda Street. The viaduct would slope to grade south of the Wardlow Road ramps to I-405. Improvements would be made to the existing Route 103 to accommodate the southerly and northerly end connections of the viaduct.

  • Alternative 3. This alternative would preserve the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge and construct a new fixed-span bridge on an alignment east of the existing bridge. Under this alternative, the new bridge would have the same lane configuration as the replacement bridge for Alternative 1. Additionally, the SR-47 Expressway and Ocean Boulevard/SR-47 Flyover described under Alternative 1 would be constructed, and connectivity with SR-103 would be maintained.

  • Alternative 4. This alternative is provided as a means of constructing a new bridge over the Cerritos Channel and, at the same time, preserving the existing bridge. The Schuyler Heim Bridge has been determined to be a historic property and is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. With Alternative 3, the existing bridge would be retrofitted and left in place, but would not be used. However, according to the U.S. Coast Guard, when a bridge is no longer used for its permitted purpose of providing land transportation, the bridge shall be removed from the waterway. Therefore, removal of the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge would be included as a condition of the federal permit for the replacement bridge. This alternative would replace the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge (lift bridge) with a fixedspan bridge, largely along the existing bridge alignment, generally as described under Alternative 1. Also with this alternative, connectivity with the Route 103 would be maintained. The existing Schuyler Heim Bridge would be demolished, as would occur under Alternative 1. With this alternative, however, no roadway improvements would occur, and the flyover would not be constructed. Additionally, the Route 47 Expressway described in Alternative 1 would not be constructed, and the Route 103 Extension to Alameda Street described in Alternative 2 would not be constructed.

  • Alternative 5. This alternative is designed to identify low-cost, easily implementable improvements to the local roadway system as an alternative to constructing more expensive improvements. This Transportation System Management (TSM) alternative focuses on improvements to routes that parallel the proposed SR-47 Expressway, and that serve the same trips.

  • Alternative 6. No Build.

Alternatives that were eliminated included extending Route 103 to I-405 or I-710, with freeway-to-freeway connections. These were just too expensive.

In March 2012, it was reported that the Long Beach City Council voted to seek a grant that would study a proposal to remove the Terminal Island Freeway. The plans are still very preliminary. The goal of local advocates is to turn the freeway into a local street and a large park. The council vote means the city will officially pursue a $300,000 Caltrans grant under the Transportation Planning Grant Program. The section of freeway targeted for removal is on city-owned land, so if the freeway is removed, according to the Long Beach Post, "the surplus land size falls in the arena of some 25-acres that could be used to create a mile-long greenbelt, similar to the Wilmington Park Yards proposal."

In March 2013, the Long Beach City Council tried again. They voted unanimously to (once again) approved a motion to pursue a grant in order to further a study on the removal of the northern portion of the Terminal Island Freeway (I-103) that sits above Pacific Coast Highway in West Long Beach. The Terminal Island Freeway has been at the center of a proposed restructuring since 2010, when community leaders pointed out a simple thing: the existing northern length of the freeway, following the development of the 20-mile long Alameda Corridor and the still-underway modernization of the Intermodal Container Transfer Facility (ICTF) by Union Pacific Railroad, is redundant. Not only do shipping companies use it less and less, the traffic itself matches those of 4th Street along Retro Row (some 13,700 AADT). And if plans for ICTF follow through, you can drop that down to 8,700 AADT–less than the traffic 3rd Street receives in the quiet neighborhood of Alamitos Beach.
(Source: LA Streets Blog)

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 103:

  • Total Length (1995): 2 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 14,000 to 18,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 2.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 2 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added the route from "Calistoga to [LRN 1] near Geyserville" to the highway system. In 1935, this was codified as LRN 103 in the highway code with the following definition:

Calistoga to [LRN 1] near Geyserville

In 1959, Chapter 1841 changed the definition to "[LRN 1] near Geyserville to [LRN 49] near Calistoga".

This route ran from US 101 near Geyserville to the present-day Route 128/Route 29 junction (former Route 53/Route 128/Route 29 junction) near Calistoga. This was signed as Route 128.


State Shield

State Route 104



Routing
  1. From Route 99 near Arno to Route 88 near Ione.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was the original Route 104 as of 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment of Route 104 was part of the original 1934 signage of Route 104 (Jct. Route 12 near Walnut Grove to Jackson via Galt). It was defined in 1909. This was LRN 34. The portion between Route 12 near Walnut Grove and Route 99 is no longer part of the state highway system (see below)


  2. From Route 88 west of Martell to Route 88 southwest of Pine Grove via the vicinity of Sutter Creek.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1970, Chapter 1473 added this segment and segment (c), giving "(b) Route 88 west of Martell to Route 88 southwest of Pine Grove via the vicinity of Sutter Hill. (c) Route 88 southwest of Pioneer Station to Route 26 near West Point."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 changed "Sutter Hill" to "Sutter Creek" and deleted (c). The former (c) was transferred to Route 26.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was defined in 1970. The pre-1970 routing was different (see below).

     

    Status

    The traversable routing for this was along Ridge Road and Climax Road. As of 2002, there were plans to upgrade it to state standards. It currently appears to be signed and postmile marked through Sutter Ridge along Ridge Road.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 104 was part of the original set of routes signed in 1934. It originally started at Route 12 near Walnut Grove, and ran along Walnut Grove Road and New Hope Road to Galt, where it joined the current routings. The portion from Walnut Grove to Galt is no longer part of the state highway system, and is now County Road E13 (Twin Cities Road).

The route also had a different routing E of Ione. From Ione, the 1934 definition of the route continued E along present-day Route 88 to the vicinity of Jackson.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 104:

  • Total Length (1995): 28 miles traversable; 8 miles unconstructed (unconstructed portion adopted post-1995).
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,200 to 7,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 32; Sm. Urban 4; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 8 mi; FAS: 28 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi; Minor Arterial: 3 mi; Collector: 23 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Sacramento, Amador.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 defined the following segments, all of which became part of LRN 104:

  • Coast Road near Jenner to [LRN 1] near Cotati
  • [LRN 1] near Petaluma to [LRN 8] near Shellville
  • [LRN 8] to [LRN 7] through American Canyon

In 1935, LRN 104 was defined in the highway code with the following definition:

  1. [LRN 56] near Jenner to [LRN 1] near Cotati
  2. [LRN 1] near Petaluma to [LRN 8] near Shellville
  3. [LRN 8] to [LRN 7] through American Canyon

In 1935, a new routing was defined for LRN 7, which filled a previous gap in LRN 7 between Benecia and the N end of the bridge, and obviated the need for (c) This was captured in 1937 by Chapter 841, which removed the American Canyon route and changed the east end of (b) from Shellville to Napa Y, making the definition for (b): "[LRN 1] near Petaluma to [LRN 8] near Napa Y"

In 1939, Chapter 473 changed the terminus of (b) back to Shellville.

The route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 56 near Jenner to LRN 1 near Cotati.

    This was originally signed as Route 12; it is present-day Route 116.

  2. From LRN 1 near Petaluma to LRN 8 near Shellville.

    The signage of this segment before 1964 is unclear; it is present-day Route 116.



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