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California Highways

Routes 81 through 88

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

81 · 82 · 83 · 84 · 85 · 86 · 87 · 88


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 81



Routing

From Route 215 east of Riverside to Route 15 south of Devore.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined to run from Route 395 east of Riverside to Route 31 south of Devore.

In 1969, Chapter 294 changed "Route 395" to "Route 15".

In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "Route 15" to "Route 194" and "Route 31" to "Route 15".

In 1982, Chapter 681 changed "Route 194" to "Route 215".

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This routing was LRN 276, defined in 1959.

X-ed Out Pre-1964 State Shield Route 81 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 81 between 1934 and 1964. Based on research, it looks like the number was not in use during that time as a signed route number.

 

Status

Unconstructed It is unsigned, and no specific routing was ever determined. This was in the planning stages, but there are no local roads meeting the definition of a traversable highway.

TEA-21 funded the reconstruction of the Route 81 (Sierra Avenue) and I-10 Interchange in Fontana. Although the legislation noted that Sierra Avenue is Route 81, it is not signed as Route 81 and doesn't appear to be formally part of the route.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; unconstructed. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 81:

  • Total Length (1995): 31 miles unconstructed
  • Milage Classification: Urbanized: 31.
  • Counties Traversed: Riverside, San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 81 was first defined in 1933 as the route from "[LRN 71] to [LRN 1] N of Smith River", and was codified in 1935 into the highway code as roughly that routing:

"[LRN 71] to [LRN 1], staying north of the Smith River"

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This is present-day Route 197 between US 101 and US 199.


State Shield

State Route 82



Routing

(a) From Route 880 in San Jose to Route 280 in San Francisco.

(b) The relinquished former portion of Route 82 within the City of San Jose is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 82, the City of San Jose shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 82 and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished former portion of Route 82, including any traffic signal progression. The city may apply to the department for approval of a business route designation in accordance with Chapter 20, Topic 21, of the Highway Design Manual.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

082 in 1964In 1963, this route was defined as "(a) Route 101 near Ford Road south of San Jose to Route 101 in San Francisco. (b) Route 101 near Alemany Boulevard to Route 87 in San Francisco." There also was the following condition: "Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 89 of Chapter 1062 of the Statutes of 1959, construction of all or any portion of subdivision (b) of Route 82 may be commenced at any time, if the City and County of San Francisco has conveyed or does convey to the State of California, without charge, all real property presently acquired by it for the construction of said subdivision (b) of this route or such portion thereof." This appeared to be a long-standing contention: that San Francisco must provide the land for the consturction.

In 1968, Chapter 282 truncated the definition to "Route 101 near Ford Road south of San Jose to Route 280 in San Francisco." and transfered the condition to I-280. This chapter also transferred the portion from I-280 to US 101, as well as the entire part (b) routing, to I-280.

In 1988, Chapter 106 changed the origin to be "Route 101 near Blossom Hill Road in San Jose"

In 2010, Chapter 448 (AB 1670, 9/29/10) renumbered the routing as (a) and added subsection (b) covering the relinquishment from Route 101 to Route 880.

In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Jose on Route 82 from Route 880 to Route 101 (near Blossom Hill Road), under terms and conditions determined to be in the best interest of the State, as stated in the relinquishment agreement scheduled to be approved by the City at their November 29, 2011 Council Meeting. Authorized by Chapter 448, Statutes of 2010, which amended Section 382 of the Streets and Highways Code.

In 2013, Chapter 525 (SB 788, 10/9/13) reworded the definition to reflect relinquishments:

(a) From Route 880 Route 101 near Blossom Hill Road in San Jose to Route 280 in San Francisco.

(b) The relinquished former portion of Route 82 within the City of San Jose is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 82, the City of San Jose shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 82 and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished former portion of Route 82, including any traffic signal progression. The city may apply to the department for approval of a business route designation in accordance with Chapter 20, Topic 21, of the Highway Design Manual. Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of San Jose the portion of Route 82 from Route 101 to Route 880 in that city if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

(1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 82 shall cease to be a state highway.

(3) The portion of Route 82 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(4) The City of San Jose shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 82, including any traffic signal progression.

(5) For the portion of Route 82 that is relinquished under this subdivision, the City of San Jose shall install and maintain within the jurisdiction of the city signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 82 to the extent deemed necessary by the department.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield US Highway Shield This is the former surface routing of US 101; it was signed as US 101 until the 1964 route realignment and the signing of Bypass US 101 as US 101. It was the original portion of LRN 2, defined in 1909. Note that the route of current Route 82 in downtown San Jose differs from the route of US 101 when it ran down the El Camino routing: instead of continuing on West Santa Clara Street east to Market, Route 82 south turns right at San Jose Arena onto Montgomery Street (northbound Route 82 uses Montgomery to Autumn Street, then makes the left turn on West Santa Clara at the arena). Route 82 southbound then uses San Carlos Street northeast to reconnect with Market; this rerouting may have occured as a result of the construction of the I-280/Route 87 interchange and occured several years before San Jose Arena was finished.

The Historic Aerials site permits closer examination of the intersection of Mission Road (former El Camino Real/US 101) and Oak Avenue, where the current road turns to the southeast to meet up with Chestnut Avenue. In 1946, the existing westerly routing crossing Colma Creek closer to Colma was already in existence, but Mission Road still returned to El Camino Real at its south end, about a thousand feet south of the current Chestnut/El Camino intersection. By 1956, Mission was widened in the South San Francisco portion, but truncated to Chestnut Avenue, crossing Colma Creek near where Mission and Oak presently intersect via the road that is now "Antoinette Lane." Some time between 1968 and 1980, the section of historic El Camino Real/US 101 along what is now Antoinette Lane between the creek and Chestnut Avenue was bypassed by the current, modern routing of Mission Road southeast of Oak Avenue, and truncated to not cross the creek.

X-ed Out Pre-1964 State Shield Route 82 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 82 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route: High Priority Project #1942: El Camino Real Grand Blvd initiative in San Mateo County. $3,000,000.

In August 2011, it was reported that owners of more than 50% of the properties on The Alameda have given verbal agreements to support the formation of a Maintenance Improvement District to fund a $4 million makeover of the segment. The makeover funding comes primarily from a Metropolitan Transportation Commission grant with some additional funding from the San Jose Department of Transportation. The grant was based on the vision offered of raised medians with landscaping and pedestrian refuges, new lighting, gateway and neighborhood markers, enhanced pedestrian crosswalks and corner sidewalk bulb-outs. It would stretch from Stockton Avenue down The Alameda to where it meets Fremont Street and Schiele Avenue.

In August 2011, the San Francisco Chronicle reported on the Grand Boulevard Initiative. The Grand Boulevard Initiative is an ongoing effort to transform the street into "a destination of valued places," spur development and improve the pedestrian feel of a roadway that now varies in width from 129 feet in Millbrae to 46 feet in Burlingame, where the eucalyptus trees on either side are protected as part of the city's cultural heritage. Additional details may be found in the full article from the Chronicle.

[Grand Initiative]In October 2011, more information on the Grand Boulevard Initiative was published. The plan includes removing two lanes of traffic from Lafayette Street in Santa Clara to Showers Drive in Mountain View and turn them into bus-only lanes running down the middle of the road. The express buses would be sleek and look more like light-rail trains, with ticket areas in the median and signals that turn green as a bus approaches an intersection. A 3-inch curb would separate the bus lanes from cars, enough to alert motorists who may wander into the transit-only lanes. The curbs would be low enough to allow emergency vehicles access. For this initiative to be realized, the VTA needs city councils in all six cities along El Camino within the county to endorse the changes, in addition to approval from Caltrans (VTA will be submitting the plan in June 2012) as El Camino is a state route. Money for the project is coming from the ½¢ transit-only sales tax approved in 2000 to bring BART to the South Bay and make other rail and bus improvements. The VTA will also seek some federal funding. The El Camino changes could cost $240 million, with $75 million possible from Washington.
(Source: San Jose Mercury News, 10/23/2011)

In October 2011, the CTC approved $11.2 million to install closed-circuit video cameras, vehicle detection systems and improved traffic signals along Route 82.

 

 

Naming

Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). This route has officially been designated as "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 1569, in 1959.

The segment of Route 82 between Page Mill Road (PM 24.04) and San Francisquito Creek (SCL/SM County line, PM 26.37) in the City of Palo Alto is named the "Betty Meltzer Memorial Highway" This segment was named in memory of Elizabeth T. (Betty) Meltzer, best known in Palo Alto for her environmental efforts, including being a key organizer of the "Dream of a Thousand Trees for El Camino Real Project" in Palo Alto, and cofounder with Ellen Wyman of Palo Alto Tomorrow, an organization that successfully promoted sensible growth in downtown Palo Alto. Betty Meltzer was born on May 3, 1939, in San Francisco to Anna Rose and Sam Taylor, and moved to Palo Alto in 1948, where she graduated from Palo Alto High School in 1956. Betty Meltzer graduated from Smith College in 1960 and received her master's degree in education from Stanford University in 1961. Beginning in the mid 1980's, Betty Meltzer began her community organizing for a better Palo Alto with the cofounding of Palo Alto Tomorrow. Betty Meltzer was also a graduate of the first class in 1987 of the "Leadership Palo Alto" (later "Leadership Midpeninsula") program designed to train both citizens and government people on how to contribute to local civic betterment. Betty Meltzer was an active member in the Palo Alto Garden Club and the Palo Alto Women's Club. Meltzer taught in the Palo Alto Unified School District for five years, trained blind people how to read, and for many years tutored elementary school students who had reading disabilities. Meltzer served on the board of the former Peninsula Conservation Center Foundation (PCCF), now Acterra, and was especially active in creating the Business Environmental Network, which gave awards to environmentally outstanding businesses. Betty Meltzer was cofounder with Susan Rosenberg of the Trees for El Camino Project which aided the City of Palo Alto in obtaining the funding for hundreds of new trees along the 4.3 miles of El Camino Real in Palo Alto. Betty Meltzer, who was known for her tenacious attitude and steadfast commitment to her work for the City of Palo Alto, was able to work with the Department of Transportation to relax the department's regulations on the planting of trees in road medians in order to realize her dream of seeing Palo Alto's portion of El Camino Real become a welcoming, tree-lined boulevard. Betty Meltzer died on September 29, 2008. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 30, Resolution Chapter 74, on 7/16/2009.

 

Other WWW Links

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 


Overall statistics for Route 82:

  • Total Length (1995): 52 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 7,200 to 54,000
  • Milage Classification: Urbanized: 52.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 52 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 52 mi; Minor Arterial: 0.5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Clara, San Mateo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

LRN 82 was first defined in 1933 as the route from "Etna Mills to Montague". In 1935, it was codified into the highway code as that routing.

In 1959, Chapter 1062 changed the origin to "[LRN 20] near Weaverville".

This is present-day Route 3; it is unclear how this was signed before 1964 — it may have been part of Route 36.


State Shield

State Route 83



Routing

From Route 71 to Route 10 near Upland.

(b) The relinquished former portion of Route 83 within the City of Upland is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 83, the City of Upland shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow, including any traffic signal progression, and maintain signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 83.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 71 to Route 30 near Upland.".

In 1999, this was changed to end at Route 210 instead of Route 30, reflecting the 1998 renaming of Route 30 (AB 1650, Ch 724, 10/10/99). This had the net effect of moving the terminus of Route 83 from 19th Street in Upland (Route 30) to the new freeway (Route 210). However, the portion between former Route 30 and Route 210 is unconstructed—according to the Caltrans postmile log, Route 83 ends at Postmile 14.193, which is at the former Route 30 (19th St.).

With respect to offramps in Upland, Ali Pezeshkpour writes:

Upland chose to place on and off-ramps for the new freeway at Mountain Avenue and Campus Avenue (Mountain Ave for access to Mt. Baldy, Campus for access to the 1,000 new homes and mall in being built in Upland). Then, around 1998-99, Upland chose to relocate Campus Ave. and create a new alignment about .5 miles to the east, which is the distance between the major north-south arterials of the city of Upland. This means that Mtn. Ave and Euclid Ave are 1 mile apart, and Euclid and the new Campus are 1 mile apart. Thus, the possibilty of adding ramps to Euclid in the future would be left open. Also, in an unusual note, posts were placed along Euclid to prepare the street for new shields and signs for freeway entrances, but were later removed. Sound-wall construction had gaps in the walls around Euclid left until about 6 months ago when they were filled in, but the recently constructed power lines paralleling the freeway and crossing Euclid were done in a way that they would go around any ramps that could be built. The retaining wall around Euclid was also constructed in an odd manor, as if to suggest that they could be removed when the time came to place ramps at Euclid. Grading was also done on curbs where ramps could be added about 6 months ago.

In 2006, AB 3030 and SB 246, Chapter 248, 8/26/2006 permitted relinquishment in Upland: (1) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the commission may relinquish to the City of Upland the portion of Route 83 that is located within the city limits or the sphere of influence of the city, upon terms and conditions that the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state. (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (A) The portion of Route 83 relinquished under this subdivision shall cease to be a state highway. (B) The portion of Route 83 relinquished under this subdivision may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (c) The city shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 83, including any traffic signal progression. (d) For relinquished portions of Route 83, the city shall maintain signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 83. [Added by SB 246 (Chapter 248, 8/26/2006)]. This right of way was relinquished in June 2008.

In 2010, AB 1318, Chapter 421, 9/29/10, changed the terminus from Route 210 near Upland to Route 10 near Upland.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

(Old Route 83 sign)State Shield This route was LRN 192, defined in 1933. It was not signed as part of the intial set of signed routes in 1934.

X-ed Out Pre-1964 State Shield According to a map of the San Bernardino area from 1941, Route 83 was signed along Gilman Springs Road from US 60 to Route 79. However, this designation appears to have disappeared by 1964; the exact date of disappearance is unknown. [Thanks to Ali Pezeshkpour for providing that information.]

 

Status

There may be some plans to upgrade a portion of this route. According to "LA Freeway Enthusiest" in October 2002, there was an article in the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin about a plan to upgrade Route 83 (Euclid Ave) from Route 71 in Frontera to Route 60 in Ontario; the plan called for a widening of the narrow section by the Chino state prison and improvements within the Ontario section south of Route 60.

In June 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Upland, under terms and conditions as stated in the cooperative agreement, dated October 17, 2007, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 507, Statutes of 2006, which amended Section 383 of the Streets and Highways Code.

 

Naming

The northbound and southbound sections of Route 83 in Chino between Route 60 and the Kimball Avenue exits are officially named the "Correctional Officer Jesus "Jesse" Sanchez Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Correctional Officer Jesus "Jesse" Sanchez, who, in 1972 at 24 years of age, became a permanent correctional officer at the California Institution for Men. Officer Sanchez had worked his way through the ranks for such a promotion as part of the federal government's new Work Incentive Program. Previously, Officer Sanchez had graduated from the Correctional Officers School in Soledad with good grades and was an excellent employee. Officer Sanchez was ambitious and always asked what else he could do to be a better officer and colleague. Upon receiving word of his promotion, Officer Sanchez moved his family to Pomona, assured of his future. Tragically and shortly thereafter, Officer Sanchez was gunned down during an ambush while escorting a prisoner to San Bernardino County Court, along with his partner George F. Fitzgerald, about a mile from Euclid Avenue on Edison Street in Chino. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 83, Resolution Chapter 122, on 9/7/2010.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 83:

  • Total Length (1995): 14 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 12,000 to 37,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 2; Urbanized: 12.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 11 mi; FAS: 3 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 12 mi; Collector: 2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, Chapter 767 added a number of segments that all became part of LRN 83: [LRN 3] near Mt. Shasta to Lassen National Park, Lassen National Park to [LRN 29] at Mineral, Lassen National Park-Mineral Road to [LRN 29] near Morgan (part of this was LRN 86), [LRN 29] near Deer Creek Pass to [LRN 21] near Indian Falls, and [LRN 21] near Blairsden to [LRN 38] near Truckee. In 1935, all these segments were codified into the highway code as follows:

  1. [LRN 3] near Mt. Shasta to Lassen National Park
  2. Lassen National Park to [LRN 29] near Morgan
  3. [LRN 29] near Deer Creek Pass to [LRN 21] near Indian Falls
  4. [LRN 21] near Blairsden to [LRN 38] near Truckee

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 3 (US 99; present-day I-5) near Mount Shasta to Lassen National Park.

    This was signed as Route 89. It ended near Old Station in Lassen National Park.

  2. From Lassen National Park to LRN 29 (Route 36) near Morgan.

    This segment was signed as Route 89 between Lassen National Park and the junction with Route 36 5 mi E of Mineral (near Deer Creek Pass). The remainder to Morgan Springs (4 mi) is cosigned as Route 36/Route 89.

  3. From LRN 29 (Route 36) near Deer Creek Pass to LRN 21 (Alternate US 40; present-day Route 70) near Indian Falls.

    This was signed as Route 89.

  4. From LRN 21 (Alternate US 40) near Blairsden to LRN 38 (US 40) near Truckee.

    This was signed as Alternate US 40 between LRN 21 (Alternate US 40; present-day Route 70) and Route 49. It was signed as Route 89 from Route 49 to US 40 in Truckee.


State Shield

State Route 84



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near San Gregorio to Route 101 at Woodside Road in Redwood City.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was covered by the first two segments of the definition: "(a) Route 1 to Route 35. (b) Route 35 to Route 238."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 rewrote segments (a) and (b) and relocated the discontinuity to US 101, making this segment the new (a): "(a) Route 1 near San Gregorio to Route 101 at Woodside Road in Redwood City. (b) Route 101 at Marsh Road in Menlo Park to Route 238."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    084-114Route 84 was not defined as part of the original set of state signed routes in 1934; it was defined by the highway commission in January 1961. This was an extension to LRN 107. By 1963, between Woodside and US 101, there were two alignments:

    • A northern alignment corresponding to the original surface routing. This was LRN 214. This corresponds to the current Route 84 between US 101 near Redwood Park and Woodside.

    • A southern alignment that was proposed as LRN 107. This originally was Route 84, but is now the present-day unconstructed Route 114, and runs via Menlo Park.

     

    Status

    There are no local roads that fit the definition of a traversable local highway between Woodside Road and Marsh Road. This was a San Mateo County Measure A project.


  2. Route 101 at Marsh Road in Menlo Park to Route 880.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was covered by the original segment (b): "(b) Route 35 to Route 238."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 rewrote segments (a) and (b) and relocated the discontinuity to US 101, making this segment the new (b): "(a) Route 1 near San Gregorio to Route 101 at Woodside Road in Redwood City. (b) Route 101 at Marsh Road in Menlo Park to Route 238."

    In 1988, Chapter 106 split segment (b) and made the definition more specific: "(b) Route 101 at Marsh Road in Menlo Park to Route 880. (c) Route 880 to Route 238."

    Before the reconstruction of the Dumbarton Bridge and the construction of the Newark bypass freeway between the east end of the bridge and I-880, Route 84 followed Thornton Avenue from Route 84 southeast to I-880.

    In October 2005, the Governor signed AB 1462 which changes the existing law that authorized a city or county in which a planned transportation facility was to be located on Route 238 in Alameda County to develop and file with the California Transportation Commission a local alternative transportation program that addresses transportation problems and opportunities, and provides for the use of revenues from the sales of excess properties acquired for the planned state facility in order to fund the local alternative program, but limits the use of revenues from excess property sales to highway purposes. It also extends the applicability of the provision that the commission may not approve a local alternative program under these provisions after July 1, 2010 to a Route 84 between existing Route 238 and I-880 in Alameda County. (Chapter 619, October 6, 2005)

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Route 84 was not defined as part of the original set of state signed routes in 1934. This was LRN 107 (defined in 1933), and includes the Dunbarton Bridge. The route existed in 1939, but the signage is unclear. It was signed as Route 84 in 1961.

    The Dunbarton Bridge was originally a private toll bridge. It was purchased by the state in 1951 for $2.25 million.

     

    Status

    The portion of Route 84 from US-101/Marsh Road to the junction with Route 114 (Bayfront Expressway), is now signed as Route 84 (in addition to the Willow Road portion, which is really Route 114 but signed as Route 84). New signage along US 101 also points out that the Bayfront Expressway is now Route 84. In fact, at the Willow Road/Bayfront Expressway junction, westbound Route 84 drivers are now directed to continue on Bayfront, instead of the older signed left turn down Willow/Route 114.

    There were plans for a $60 million "Bayshore Expressway extension project" that would parallel US 101 between Marsh and Woodside roads, but these have been put on hold. The existing Bayshore Expressway comes off the Dumbarton Bridge and runs north along the bay as far as Marsh Road. Current plans call for it to be extended to the next interchange, at Woodside Road. There has been a project to widen this segment, and it is now six lanes from the Dumbarton Bridge to the Marsh Road/US-101 interchange. The widening project was (remarkably) completed seven months ahead of schedule.

    According to the San Jose Mercury News, there are plans in early 2009 to raise tolls on the Dumbarton Bridge, likely $1, and likely to be applied to carpoolers as well. They may also add congestion pricing. This is being done to help support the cost of retrofitting the Dumbarton and Antioch spans for earthquake improvements. In February 2010, the toll increased to $5 at all times on the Dumbarton, San Mateo, Richmond-San Rafael, Carquinez, Benicia-Martinez and Antioch bridges. In July 2010, the toll will be extended to carpoolers, who will pay $2.50.

    In July 2010, the Bay Area Toll Authority, which governs all of the region's toll bridges except the Golden Gate Bridge, allocated $75 million in toll money to fund construction of the Dumbarton Bridge retrofit. Caltrans plans to award the funds to a construction firm in August 2010. The winning contractor will begin working shortly thereafter, but no later than September, according to the toll authority. Officials expect to wrap up the project in April 2013, and the construction firm's contract will be tied to finishing the work quickly. The new Dumbarton span is being designed to withstand the most intense earthquake possible in the region. Work includes installing 14 steel pipe piles, replacing deck joints and strengthening the connections from the approaches to the bridge. Although the full cost of the Dumbarton project is budgeted at $365 million — to be funded using toll revenue — it is unlikely to be that high. Construction bids came in as low as $47 million after engineers budgeted $73 million because contractors continue to quote low prices around the Bay Area during the recession. The toll authority still plans to allocate $75 million to give Caltrans breathing room in awarding the contract.

    Dumbarton BridgeIn July 2011, it was reported that Caltrans plans to retrofit the Dumbarton Bridge. The current Dumbarton Bridge was opened to traffic in 1982 linking the cities of Newark in Alameda County and East Palo Alto in San Mateo County. The 1.6 mile long bridge has six lanes (three in each direction) and an eightfoot bicycle/pedestrian pathway. The bridge is a combination of reinforced concrete and steel girders that support a reinforced lightweight concrete roadway on reinforced concrete columns. The current retrofit strategy for the bridge includes superstructure and deck modifications and installation of isolation bearings.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3062: Conduct environmental review of proposed improvements related to the connection of Dumbarton Bridge to US 101. $400,000.

    • High Priority Project #3493: Construction at I-580 and Route 84 (Isabel Avenue) Interchange. $2,000,000.

     

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 35-038 over San Francisco Bay between San Mateo and Alameda counties is named the "Dumbarton Bridge". It was never officially named. The name comes from Dumbarton Point, which itself apparently dates to 1876 when it was named after the town of Dumbarton in Scotland. About the same time, Origin Mowry established a successful landing on the deep slough just south of Dumbarton Point. Railroads also played a part in the growth of the area when the narrow-gauge Santa Clara Valley Railroad was bought by James Fair, James Flood and Alfred "Hog" Davis. They renamed the line the South Pacific Coast Railroad, extended the railroad from Dumbarton Point to Santa Cruz, and eventually offered daily commute service north to the Alameda Pier. In addition, people could catch the railroad's ferry "Newark," which ran daily trips from Dumbarton Point to San Francisco. Eventually that railroad was bought by Southern Pacific and this area became one of the busiest freight junctions in California. In 1907, the railroad built a bridge just north of the current Dumbarton Bridge. In 1927, the original Dumbarton Bridge, the first vehicular crossing of San Francisco Bay, was opened to traffic. It linked southern Alameda County on the east to San Mateo County on the west. Built originally to provide a shortcut for traffic originating in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties, the bridge served industrial and residential areas on both sides. The bridge was built with private capital and then purchased by the State for $2.5 million in 1951. Portions of this old drawbridge remain as fishing piers. Its age and the limitations of a two-lane undivided roadway and lift-span made it necessary for a replacement bridge to be constructed 90 feet to the north. This bridge was opened to traffic in October 1982 as a four-lane, high-level structure. The cost of the complete project was $200 million. Following the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989, Caltrans converted the shoulders to additional travel lanes. It is 8,600 feet long with a shoulder in each direction for supposedly for emergency use (but in reality, too narrow for emergency use) and a two-way bicycle and pedestrian path on the eastbound side. A 340-foot center span provides 85 feet of vertical clearance for shipping. The approach spans on both sides of the Bay are of prestressed lightweight concrete girders supporting a lightweight concrete deck. The center spans are twin steel trapezoidal girders which also support a lightweight concrete deck.
    [Statistics on the Dumbarton Bridge from the Caltrans Dumbarton Bridge site]

     

    Commuter Lanes

    Commuter lanes exist in Alameda County on the approach to the Dumbarton Bridge, from Newark Blvd to west of the Toll Plaza, for 1.8 mi. These were opened in October 1982, were extended in 1989 to University Avenue due to the Loma Prieta earthquake, were shorted back to the toll plaza in 1990, and had the occupancy requirement reduced in 1992. They require two or more people, and are in operation weekdays between 5:00am and 10:00am and between 3:00pm and 6:00pm.

    According to the Mercury News in June 2007, by 2017, there are plans to add HOVs across the Dumbarton Bridge from Newark Avenue to the toll plaza. This is odd, as these lanes already exist.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] From the westerly approach to the Dumbarton Bridge (Route 109) to Route 880. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. Route 880 to Route 238.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was covered by the original segment (b): "(b) Route 35 to Route 238."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 rewrote segments (a) and (b) and relocated the discontinuity to US 101, making this segment the new (b): "(a) Route 1 near San Gregorio to Route 101 at Woodside Road in Redwood City. (b) Route 101 at Marsh Road in Menlo Park to Route 238."

    In 1988, Chapter 106 split segment (b) and made the definition more specific: "(b) Route 101 at Marsh Road in Menlo Park to Route 880. (c) Route 880 to Route 238."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Route 84 was signed as part of the original set of state signed routes in 1934. This segment was part of the 1933 portion of LRN 107. This was signed as Route 84 in 1961, when the CHC approved sign route 84 as "State Sign Route 84 in San Mateo and Alameda counties, extending from the junction with State Sign Route 1 at San Gregorio to the junction with US 50 (I-5W) near Livermore. The route passes through La Honda, Woodside, Menlo Park, Fremont, Newark, Sunol, and Livermore, and extends across the Dumbarton Bridge."

     

    Status

    This segment is not constructed to freeway standards. There are, however, plans to do so. Specifically, there is a new project that provides for construction of a new parkway from I-880 to a point on Mission Boulevard near the Fremont/Union City border. From there Route 84 will be rerouted along a section of Mission Boulevard to Niles Canyon Road where it joins the current route through the Canyon.

    [Acta Route 84 Project]In early 2003, the city councils of Fremont and Union City agreed on a compromise for realigning Route 84. The agreement would have included construction of a portion of the Route 84 parkway between Mission Blvd (Route 238) and Alvarado-Niles Blvd. Route 84 would then continue north on Alvarado-Niles to Decoto Road, and then west on Decoto to the Dumbarton Bridge. Decoto Road would have been widened from Paseo Padre Pkwy to I-880, and the Decoto/Alvarado-Niles intersection would have been improved. The current Route 84 on Mowry, Peralta, Fremont, Thornton, and I-880 would have been decertified and control of the city streets will return to the city of Fremont. However, Union City favored a parkway alignment running from I-880 at Decoto Rd in Fremont to Mission Blvd at 7th St in Union City, while the Fremont city council was opposed to any route running through the city of Fremont. The mayors of the two cities were unable to agree on a compromise, and the project appeared to be dead. However, in June 2005, there was a new proposal. This proposal would involve construction of a portion of the Route 84 Parkway between Mission Blvd and Paseo Padre Blvd. Route 84 would then continue north on Paseo Padre to Decoto Road, and then west on Decoto to the Dumbarton Bridge.

    Route 84 in FremontBoth Paseo Padre and Decoto would be widened. However, according to this note, that proposal was also unsuccessful, as Caltrans did not support it. Now, the Alameda County Transportation Authority has to decide what to do with almost $100 million that for the past 20 years had been slated for realigning Route 84. Union City would get the bulk of the money, $55 million, to build its part of the road from Mission Boulevard to Alvarado-Niles Road. The money also would be used to mitigate traffic problems expected to arise from not building the new connection all the way to I-880. Fremont still will get the money it needs to complete the Warm Springs interchange. Most of the money is expected to come from Caltrans, which will sell the state-owned land that had been intended for Route 84. In June 2006, the parties involved reached a concensus. The selection that received consensus -- known as "Option 2" -- includes only construction of the four lane parkway with a landscaped median between Mission Blvd and Paseo Padre Pkwy. There will be no parkway between Paseo Padre and I-880. Instead, portions of Paseo Padre and Decoto Road will be widened and improved.
    [Thanks to Andy Gross for providing this information.]

    Caltrans has also been working on safety improvements along Niles Canyon Road. The agency has proposed widening and adding both medians and shoulders to the meandering two-lane state highway as well as building nearly two miles of cement retaining walls. The work is designed to reduce fatal accidents along the scenic route from Fremont to Sunol and I-680. Caltrans proposed the project after traffic injury statistics showed that the road had a higher than average percentage of fatal and injury collisions. From 1999 to 2008, there were 426 accidents on the road, resulting in 11 fatalities and 226 injuries, according to Caltrans. However, residents, environmental groups and city officials fear it would increase speeds and diminish the beauty of Niles Canyon, and are strongly opposed. They argue that Caltrans instead should consider measures to slow traffic or ban trucks on the road, which were involved in 38% of the injury accidents. Caltrans also is dealing with concerns from the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, which warned in a letter last month that it might not issue permits for the work if it posed significant threats to habitat along nearby Alameda Creek. The Niles Canyon Railway has also warned Caltrans that the work, which involves cutting into a railway embankment, could force it to shut down its weekend passenger service from Sunol to Fremont during construction.

    Caltrans has divided the work along Niles Canyon Road into three projects. The first, which faced little opposition, involves widening shoulders and improving sight distances along portions of the road in Fremont, Union City and the county, and could be completed by 2013. The third project, a new Alameda Creek Bridge, hasn't undergone environmental review yet. But the second project, which is still under environmental review and calls for removing 439 native trees to make way for retaining walls, has run into strong opposition. The second project would include a 2-foot center median and standard 8-foot shoulders on sections of the road mostly around Sunol. It also would soften curves to allow drivers to see farther down the road. The environmental review period for it has been extended to Oct. 7, 2010, and Caltrans will decide in Spring 2011 whether to move forward with the road improvements.
    [Source: Oakland Tribune, 9/14/10; Mercury News, 9/23/10]

    In March 2010, it was reported that a battle was brewing over the Niles Canyon Widening. Citing safety concerns, Caltrans plans to widen the scenic, winding road by 20 feet in some areas, adding shoulders and a median. The road between Niles, once a bustling moviemaking hub, and Sunol (where the route meets I-680) would remain two lanes. The first phase of the project is already under way. Caltrans has removed about 80 sycamores, oaks, alders and other trees alongside the stretch of the road near the Union City border. But the next two phases have yet to be approved, and residents and environmentalists hope to derail them. Removing the trees has a broad impact on the environment. The trees provide food, shelter and shade for wildlife, as well as control erosion along the creek bed. Caltrans' plans call for retaining walls, replacing Alameda Creek Bridge and adding 8- to 10-foot shoulders on both sides of the road. For every tree that's removed, Caltrans said it will plant three to five to replace them, mostly in the Alameda Creek watershed. Caltrans embarked on the project almost a decade ago, hoping to curb the high number of accidents along the road. From 1998 10 2008, Niles Canyon Road saw 436 collisions, resulting in 13 deaths and 342 people injured.
    (SF Chronicle, 3/10/11)

    In December 2011, it was reported that Caltrans has agreed to stop planning to widen the scenic, 8-mile route between Fremont and Sunol due to environmental concerns, according to a legal settlement reached with the Alameda Creek Alliance. The Alliance sued Caltrans in June to stop the $80 million project, which called for widening the shoulders and adding retaining walls and a median to Route 84. Caltrans has already removed about 100 sycamores, willows and other trees in the canyon in preparation for the widening project; the agency will have to plant replacements. Caltrans had also started repaving the road before Alameda County Superior Court Judge Frank Roesch issued a restraining order in June 2011; Caltrans must now rip up the new pavement and replace the rumble strips it had removed. Note that the settlement only stops the first phase of the project, the portion of the road closest to Fremont. The next two phases are still under review. Caltrans is expected to start over with the first phase, putting forth an environmental impact report and essentially starting the process from scratch.
    (SF Chronicle, 12/14/11)

    In July 2012, it was reported that Caltrans had scrapped their previous approach, and was restarting the Niles Canyon Road project fresh because they want to make the scenic highway as safe as possible. They held a public meeeting where they announced the clean slate approach and heard community inputs for the process. The notion stressed by the audience appeared to be wanting to make the road safer without increasing traffic. The safety concerns were in six areas: (1) Roadside Quality; (2) Limited Use Shoulders; (3) Speed Management; (4) Signs and Markings; (5) Bicycles and Pedestrians; and (6) Intersections and Curves. The details of these problems are on the Caltrans Niles Canyon website. The website presentations also identify proposed short-term, mid-term, and long-term mitigations.
    (Mercury News, 8/1/2012)

    In December 2012, Caltrans introduced new proposals for Niles Canyon Road. These included 16 short-term fixes for Route 84, including placing reflective materials and signs on several underpasses and guardrails, as well as increased signage and visibility. Twelve medium-term solutions included road realignments; relocating railroad abutments; widening roads; building roundabouts; and constructing intersection signals, among other ideas. Caltrans also suggested only implementing safety measures at certain points along the route, including the Rosewarnes Underpass, the low speed areas between bridges, the Palomares/Farwell Underpass, both intersections at Main Street and the Pleasanton/Sunol exit, and the Alameda Creek Bridge. Improvements will most likely involve installing reflective lights at Rosewarnes Underpass, the low speed areas between bridges, the Palomares/Farwell Underpass, both intersections at Main Street and the Pleasanton/Sunol exit, and the Alameda Creek Bridge. Minor widening in these five areas will also be done to allow for speed limit enforcement by California Highway Patrol. In addition, Caltrans will remove vegetation obstructing safety signs, and install new feedback signs, such as electronic ones that report drivers' speeds. These improvements will not be done until at least 2014, as Caltrans wants public feedback and review. There was still concern that Caltrans planned on removing trees.
    (Source: Mercury News, 12/28/2012)

    In May 2014, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR for the Alameda Creek Bridge replacement. The project in Alameda County will replace the Alameda Creek Bridge on Route 84 in the city of Fremont. The project is programmed in the 2014 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $47,074,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. Alternatives for the project include:

    • Alternative 1 – This alternative would construct a 410-foot-long bridge, a 1,050-foot long retaining wall, a 900-foot-long soil nail wall, and a new alignment of Route 84 with 12-foot travel lanes and 8-foot shoulders in each direction.
    • Alternative 2 – This alternative would be similar to alternative 1 with the addition of a 900-foot-long Type 5 retaining wall north of Route 84.
    • Alternative 3A – This alternative would construct a 1600-foot-long bridge, raise the roadway 15 feet west of the bridge, and realign the roadway east of the bridge with 12-foot travel lanes and 8-foot shoulders in each direction.
    • Alternative 3B – This alternative would construct a 450-foot-long bridge, a 200-foot-long soil-nail wall, raise the roadway 15 feet west of the bridge, and realign the roadway east of the bridge with 12-foot travel lanes and 8-foot shoulders in each direction.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  4. From Route 238 to Route 680 near Scotts Corners via the vicinity of Sunol.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was also part of the 1933 LRN 107. It was not part of the original state signage in 1934, but was signed by 1963.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.5] Entire portion.


  5. From Route 680 near Scotts Corners to I-580 in Livermore.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(d) Route 680 near Scotts Corners to I-580."

    In 1988, Chapter106 changed this to "I-580 in Livermore."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 108, and was defined in 1933. It was not part of the original state signage in 1934, but was signed by 1963. On November 22, 1960, the California Highway Commission adopted an alignment for Route 84 that generally extends along Isabel Avenue from Vallecitos Road connecting to I-580 in the vicinity of Collier Canyon Road.

     

    Status

    Caltrans and the City of Livermore have proposed for some time the realignment of Route 84 onto the existing and extended Isabel Avenue from its current First Street routing. The Isabel extension was opened back in August 2001 as a two-lane road now connecting the existing Route 84 to Airway Boulevard near I-580. This roadway will eventually become a four- and six-lane parkway with a future interchange at I-580. In 2003, Caltrans redesignated Isabel as Route 84. [Thanks to Jeffrey Waller and Laurence Maller for this information.]

    According to an observer in July 2004, the new bypass isn't complete; you have to first drive on Airway Blvd (which is the official designation for Route 84, until the rest of the bypass is constructed to connect with I-580 in the next several years). You drive on Airway Blvd for about ¾ mile, then make a right onto another street, and then a left onto the newly constructed bypass. The bypass has one lane in each direction in most parts, and is signed for 50 MPH. It looks like there's enough ROW for an 8 lane expressway, or 6 lane freeway in the future.

    In December 2003, the California Transportation Commission approved a proposal to transfer the location of Route 84 from the alignment through downtown Livermore (Vallecitos, Holmes, and First) to the Isabel Avenue Corridor, with the old alignment being concurrently relinquished to the city. The existing alignment through the city of Livermore is built to conventional highway standards. The Isabel Avenue Corridor is generally built to expressway standards. The alignment along the Isabel Avenue Corridor will be adopted as a controlled access highway from Vallecitos Road to Airway Boulevard. The portion of the route that runs along Airway Boulevard will be adopted as a traversable highway. Airway Boulevard will be used as an interim connection to I-580 until the Isabel Avenue extension and new I-580 interchange is built. Once the new I-580 interchange is built a request will go to the Commission to adopt the new Isabel Avenue extension to I-580. Environmental clearance was received in late 2004 and construction completed in 2009.

    In October 2011, the CTC recieved a request to amend the CMIA baseline agreements related to a project in this area; specifically, for Segment 1 (Widen and realign State Route 84 south of I-580 interchange and relocate utilities, PPNO 0115E), Segment 2 (Construct new local roads north of the I-580/Isabel Avenue Interchange, PPNO 0115F), and Segment 3 (Construct new interchange at Isabel Avenue and a new Portola Avenue Overcrossing, PPNO 0115B) of the I-580/Isabel Interchange project to: • Transfer a portion of the scope of work from Segment 3 to Segment 1. • Shift $600,000 CMIA and $400,000 local funds in close-out savings from Segment 2 to Segment 1 in order to complete this transferred scope of work.

    In June 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen and upgrade Route 84 in the City of Livermore from two to four lanes. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account and includes local funds. Total estimated cost $122,900,000 for capital and support. The project is divided into two construction contracts, along with a follow-up landscaping project that is funded by local funds. Segment 1 (PPNO 0081G) is scheduled to start construction in Fiscal Year 2011-12, and Segment 2 (PPNO 0081H) is currently scheduled to start construction in Fiscal Year 2013-14 using only local funds. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement.

    In November 2011, Caltrans opened the new I-580/Route 84 ramps and the newly realigned Route 84 south of I-580 that will connect with the new interchange, and closed the westbound I-580 Portola Avenue onramp. The two new onramps will serve as new freeway access from Las Positas College and the businesses north of I-580. Commuters will be able to use the new interchange in lieu of cutting through downtown Livermore. Another project to widen Route 84 south of the interchange between Jack London Boulevard and Vallecitos Road is slated to begin in spring 2012.

    In June 2011, the CTC amended the scope and funding for a project that will widen Route 84 from two lanes to four lanes, from north of Concannon Boulevard to Stanley Boulevard and from two lanes to six lanes lanes, from Stanley Boulevard to Jack London Boulevard. Segment 2 of this project will widen Route 84 from two lanes to four lanes, from Ruby Hill Drive to north of Concannon Boulevard. By improving this regional connection between I-680 and I-580, this project will help relieve the highly congested regional commutes between the employment centers in the South Bay and the growing residential areas in Eastern Alameda County and the Central Valley.

    Route Adoption for IsabelIn August 2012, the CTC approved the transfer of the adopted alignment from Post Mile (PM) M27.2 to M28.2 along Airway Boulevard to a new shorter northerly alignment connecting to I-580. A Project Report was approved on August 15, 2007. The Department prepared a Mitigated Negative Declaration that was signed on August 15, 2007. This transfer of alignment will allow existing Route 84 along Airway Boulevard to be relinquished to the City of Livermore and utilize the new connection to the Isabella Avenue/I-580 Interchange. Route 84 is one of four east-west links between the urbanized Bay Area and the Central Valley. On December 11, 2003, the California Transportation Commission adopted Route 84 from Vallecitos Road north to Airway Boulevard and then east on Airway Boulevard to I-580 as a Controlled Access Highway. A Project Report and Environmental document were approved in 2007 for the construction of a new interchange on I-580 at Isabel Avenue. This project provides improved access to I-580 by converting the partial interchange at Portola Avenue to an overcrossing and constructs a new interchange at Isabel Avenue. This will improve the connection between the 2003 adopted Route 84 corridor and I-580. In relation to this, in August 2012 the CTC also authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Livermore on Route 84 (Airway Boulevard), from Isabel Avenue to Route 580, consisting of highway right of way superseded by a transfer of state highway location.

    In August 2012, it was reported that construction has begun on the latest phase of the widening of Route 84 between I-580 in Livermore and I-680 in Sunol. The $40 million project will widen the highway from two to six lanes between Stanley and Jack London boulevards and from two to four lanes from Stanley to Concannon boulevards. The contractor, Bay Cities Paving and Grading, is scheduled to complete the project in March 2014. This is the third part of the five-phase project to widen 10.6 miles of Route 84, also known as Isabel Avenue, between I-580 and I-680. In the next phase of the project to start in 2014 and finish in 2016, Route 84 will be widened to four lanes between Concannon Boulevard and Ruby Hills Drive. This 2.6-mile-long segment will cost an estimated $82.7 million. In an earlier phase of the project, Route 84 was moved out of downtown Livermore to boost the revitalization of the downtown. In the fifth and final stage of the project, three miles of the highway would be widened from two to four lanes between Pigeon Pass and I-680 in Sunol. That project would cost an estimated $277 million -- money that is not yet lined up, according to a report by the county Transportation Commission.

    Constructed to freeway standards from the begining of the Dumbarton Bridge until the junction with Route 880.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] Entire portion; not constructed to freeway standards. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  6. From I-580 in Livermore to Route 4 near Brentwood.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(e) I-580 to Route 4 near Brentwood."

    In 1988, Chapter106 changed this to "I-580 in Livermore."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was an extension to LRN 108 defined in 1959. It was not part of the original state signage in 1934, but was signed by 1963.

     

    Status

    There are some who believe that this section may be used to create the Mid State Tollway. The tollway is a proposal that would start off of I-680 near Sunol, cross I-580 west of Livermore (roughly along the alignment of the Livermore Bypass), and then will extend north to Route 4 near Antioch. A spur will come off the tollway near Brentwood and run SE to the junction of I-580 and I-205. The tollway could be designated Route 84, since it roughly follows the built and unbuilt portions of the route and the spur could be designated Route 239, since it follows the general routing for that unbuilt highway. The tollway was originally supposed to extend to I-80 between Vacaville and Dixon with a spur connecting with I-505 at the 80/505 junction, but that portion was killed due to the need for high-level crossings (150') of the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers plus environmental issues.

    Caltrans documentation from 1994 indicates that the unconstructed portion is from I-580 to Route 4, and from W of Livermore to I-580, replacing the traversible highway. When this 5 mile stretch is constructed, it will reduce the total length of the route to 107 miles. The Route 4 bypass was being construction over portions of Route 84, although most of legislative Route 84 is Vasco Road. However, it appears the bypass was assigned to Route 4.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 22-0176 in Yolo County is named the "Arthur H. Edmonds Underpass". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 135, Chapter 162 in 1982. Arthur H. Edmonds, a Yolo County Supervisor from 1966 to 1981, was the principal proponent for the extension of Route 84 from West Sacramento to east Yolo County.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Freeway

    Unconstructed [SHC 253.5] Entire portion; unconstructed. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.14] Between I-580 and Route 4. Designated by SB 802, Chapter 598, 9/2003. It is believed that the interregional route designation will mean more highway funds for Route 84, and will lead to a better routing.


  7. From Route 12 at Rio Vista to the southerly city limit of the City of West Sacramento.

    (b) The relinquished former portion of Route 84 within the City of West Sacramento is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 84, the City of West Sacramento shall maintain signs within its jurisdictions directing motorists to the continuation of Route 84.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as " (f) Route 4 near Antioch to Route 80 near Broderick via the vicinity of Rio Vista and via Ryer Island." Note that at this time, "Route 80" referred to the current US 50.

    In 1965, Chapter 1372 extended the terminus of this segment to "Route 880 near Bryte via the vicinity of Rio Vista and via Ryer Island." Route 880 at this time is the current I-80.

    In 1976, Chapter 1354 split (f) into two segments: "(f) Route 4 near Antioch to Route 12 near Rio Vista. (g) Route 12 near Rio Vista to Route 880 near Bryte via Ryer Island." (again, note that Route 880 is current Route 80). This transfered the segment within Rio Vista to Route 12.

    In 1981, Chapter 292 deleted (f), and clarified the remaining segment"(f) Route 12 at Rio Vista to Route 80 near Bryte via Ryer Island." It also renumbered Route 880 to Route 80. The former (f) was transferred to Route 160.

    In 2003, SB 104, Chapter 5, 4/21/2003, authorized relinquishment in West Sacramento: Note that the California Transportation Commission may relinquish the portion of Route 84 within the City of West Sacramento to that city upon terms and conditions that the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, per SB 104, chaptered 4/21/2003 (Chapter 5). For those portions of Route 84 that are relinquished, the City of West Sacramento agrees to maintain signs within its jurisdiction directing motorists to the continuation of Route 84 as a condition of the relinquishment. After relinquishment, the last segment of Route 84 shall be defined as "Route 12 at Rio Vista to the southerly city limit of the City of West Sacramento. The relinquishment may happen fast, as it is already on the May 2003 CTC Agenda. This is evidenced by the fact that West Sacramento wants an allocation of $6.199M, but is willing to take over maintenance and ownership immediately, and defer receiving the funds until June 2006.

    In 2010, Chapter 421 changed the terminus from "Route 80 near Bryte via Ryer Island" to "the southerly city limit of the City of West Sacramento" and updated the relinquishment words.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 99 between Route 12 and US 50, and was defined in 1933. The remainder of the route was not defined until 1965. It was not signed before 1964. It runs along Jefferson Blvd in West Sacramento.

     

    Status

    Partially signed from Route 12 to Sacramento. The route includes the Ryer Island Ferry "The Real McCoy" on Cache Slough, which is signed as Route 84. The Real McCoy used to be a cable ferry, but it was retrofitted as a diesel powered boat in the early 1960s when the Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel was constructed and Cache Slough was deepened as part of the Ship Channel. They didn't want freighters severing the cable.

    In 2009, it was reported that the river ferry is being updated. On January 11, 2009, "The Real McCoy", a 62-year-old twin-propeller boat that serves as part of Route 84 was taken out of service. It returned to service in February 2009. Normally the ferry run round the clock, stopping only for twice-daily 20-minute lunch breaks, when river conditions make it unsafe to operate, or when something breaks down and needs fixing, which has been happening often. Caltrans plans to replace the Real McCoy, a flat-bottom, double-ended ferry powered by two engines and propellers that can be turned 360 degrees, but with the state budget crisis threatening funding for transportation projects, it's not certain when. So the ferry will head to dry-dock, where it will get two new engines, a new electrical system, other mechanical fixes and a fresh coat of paint. It was the first dry dock service in eight years for the ferry, whose twin six-cylinder service engines sprung leaks and its hulls were dented from bumping into docks. The Real McCoy carries about 300 to 400 vehicles a day, crossing the river about 200 times.

    In January 2011, a new ferry that will replace the 65-year-old Rio Vista ferry arrived in Alameda. In February 2011, the $4.3 million Real McCoy II ferry will take over from the aging Real McCoy ferry on Route 84 at Ryer Island near Rio Vista in Solano County.

    In September 2011, it was reported that there were numerous problems with the new ferry. It was taken out of service on September 9, 2011, and Caltrans is still working with the boat builder to determine why the vessel keeps breaking down. Engineers have replaced three sets of 6,000 PSI hydraulic hoses. The hoses or fittings failed in each incident, leading to a loss of control. Caltrans has instructed Nichols Bros. to come up with an "action plan" to put the ferry back into service. Caltrans is committed to solving the hydraulic problem before the warranty expires at the beginning of next year. Caltrans continues to pick up the tab for an operator on board the ferry around the clock in case an emergency crossing is required. With the ferry idled, several hundred residents of Ryer Island have been forced to take a long detour to get to Rio Vista and the rest of Solano County. What should be an 800-foot trip across Cache Slough takes travelers more than 23 miles out of their way.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of West Sacramento along former Route 84 (Jefferson Blvd.), from Linden Road to 13th Street, consisting of collateral facilities.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] From Route 12 at Rio Vista to Route 50 near Broderick: unsigned. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Alameda 84 R3.09 R3.35
Alameda 84 R3.85 R4.10
Alameda 84 R4.32 R5.76

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined on July 1, 1964, parts (6) and (7) were continuous (i.e., from Route 4) and ended at I-80 (present-day US 50, a/k/a unsigned I-305). In 1965, the portion from I-80 (present-day US 50, a/k/a unsigned I-305) to I-880 (present-day I-80) was added, making the route continuous from Route 4 to I-880 (present-day I-80); this section was formerly part of Route 16. In 1976, parts (6) and (7) were made discontinuous when the portion from Route 160 to Route 12 in Rio Vista was transferred to Route 12, leaving part (6) running to the new terminus of Route 12 (former Route 160). In 1981, the portion of part (6) from Route 4 near Antioch to Route 12 near Rio Vista was transferred to Route 160.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 84 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 84 between 1934 and 1964.

 


Overall statistics for Route 84:

  • Total Length (1995): 96 miles traversable; 13 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 240 and 57,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 67; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 42.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 7 mi; FAU: 32 mi; FAS: 50 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 30 mi; Minor Arterial: 14 mi; Collector: 52 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Mateo, Santa Clara, Alameda, Contra Costa, Solano, Yolo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that became LRN 84 was defined in 1933 as the route from "[LRN 20] near Willow Creek to [LRN 46] near Weitchpec." It was codified in 1935 into the highway code with this definition, and the definition remained unchanged until 1963.

This was signed as Route 96, but was not the original alignment of Route 96 (which was the route from Klamath to Weitchpec, and then the present route to US 99 (I-5). The resigning of Route 96 to include LRN 84 occured sometime between 1939 and 1963.


State Shield

State Route 85



Routing

From Route 101 near Bernal Road in San Jose to Route 101 near Moffett Boulevard in Mountain View.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 101 near Ford Road to Route 101 near Mountain View."

In 1968, Chapter 282 added the following, which did not change the definition of the route:

Mathilda Avenue, which is part of Route 85 in the City of Sunnyvale, is hereby declared to be a city street within the meaning of Sections 189 and 190, and is eligible for an allocation of funds for grade separation pursuant to Section 190.

The legislature finds and declares that although Mathilda Avenue is presently a portion of Route 85, the commission has approved an alternate routing, the department has commenced acquisition of the property necessary for right-of-way along the new route, and Mathilda Avenue will be returned to the City of Sunnyvale within a few years. Because of the heavy traffic congestion at the intersection of Mathilda Avenue and the Southern Pacific Company's railroad tracks, it is necessary that Mathilda Avenue be eligible for a grade separation allocation as soon as possible.

In 1988, Chapter 106 changed the origin to be "Route 101 near Bernal Road in San Jose"

As freeway, the first section of this route opened was from I-280 near Cupertino to US 101 near Mountain View. In 1992, a 4 lane, 2 mile section in San Jose from Santa Teresa Blvd east to Cottle Road opened. In 1993, the route was extended a mile east (S) to Great Oaks Blvd, and a mile west (N) to Almaden Expressway. The opening of these sections coincided with the opening of Route 87 from Almaden Expressway south to Route 85. The final sections from Almaden Expressway to Route 280 and the short, ¾ mile gap between Great Oaks Blvd and US 101 opened Oct. 19, 1994.

Originally, there was a traversable maintained routing from Route 9 to I-280 along De Anza Blvd and Saratoga-Sunnyvale Rd. It was immediately relinquished when the freeway was completed in 1994, although the state agreed to repave it before handing it over to the cities of Cupertino and Saratoga. This relinquishment is finally before the California Transportation Commission; it was on the July 2000 agenda. As of 2007, there were still a significant number of remaining postmiles, especially in Saratoga.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was only proposed in 1963; it was unsigned. It was the "under construction" routing for LRN 114, defined in 1959. The old surface routing was defined in 1933. The portion of the route between Saratoga and US 101 may have been part of the original signed Route 9 before 1964.

The tricky part is the portion between Route 17 and US 101 in San Jose. There is some evidence that the original definition of LRN 239 used what was Route 85 for a time. Nathan Edgars noted on some Wikipedia work pages that (note: I've changed Nathan's route notation to the notation used here):

The initial definition of [LRN 239] (mostly I-280) said "to [LRN 2] near San Jose". This is inconclusive, but other evidence shows that it used what is now [Route 85] southeast of [Route 17]: the 1959 law creating the F&E System included "[LRN 239] from [LRN 2] south of San Jose to [LRN 5]"; the rest was added by the clause including Interstates. The 1961 law creating [LRN 292] ([Route 87]) specified that it was to end at "[LRN 239] in the vicinity of Pearl Avenue". [LRN 239] was moved in 1961 to "the junction of [LRN 68] and [LRN 69]", and was removed from the F&E System descriptions, as that was part of I-680. At the same time, the F&E System description of [LRN 114] (and [LRN 114] itself) was extended to cover this. Presumably what is now I-880, and was then I-680, between I-280 and US 101 was [LRN 5] until 1961. This would have replaced the old surface routing, which was closer to current I-280 than I-880. [LRN 5] was moved to present I-280 between [Route 17] and US 101 in 1961, replacing part of [LRN 115] (which had been moved there in 1959).

Route 85 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 85 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

Actually, it is near Shoreline Blvd, but the above is the state legislative definition. A small portion near PM R12.0 was up for relinquishment in the city of Campbell [May 2002 CTC Agenda Item 2.3c].

TCRP Project #127 will complete the Route 85/Route 87 interchange. It will also add two direct connectors for SB Route 85 to NB Route 87, and from SB Route 87 to NB Route 85.

In December 2004, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Cupertino, at Cleo Avenue, consisting of a cul-de-sac. The City, by freeway agreement dated October 15, 1990, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State and by letter dated August 27, 2004, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

In February 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Jose along Route 85 from Meridian Avenue to Union Avenue, consisting of relocated or reconstructed city streets, and frontage roads. They also approved relinquishment of right of way in the county of Santa Clara along Route 85 on Branham Lane between 0.1 mile west of Standish Drive and Union Avenue, consisting of a frontage road.

In April 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of San Jose along Route 85 on South Bascom Avenue, Samaritan Drive, and National Avenue, consisting of relocated or reconstructed city streets. They also approved relinquishment of right of way in the town of Los Gatos along Route 85 on Los Gatos Boulevard, Samaritan Drive, and National Avenue, and along Route 17 on Lark Avenue, consisting of relocated or reconstructed city streets.

In March 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Santa Clara along Route 85 at Alameda Plaza Way, consisting of collateral facilities.

In August 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Campbell along Route 85 on South Bascom Avenue, consisting of a reconstructed city street. The County of Santa Clara, by freeway agreement dated December 11, 1990, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State, the street at that date lying within an unincorporated area of the county and has since been annexed by the city. The 90- day notice period expired July 8, 2009, without exception.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $12,010,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Sunnyvale and Mountain View, from 0.3 mile north of Stevens Creek Boulevard Overcrossing to the Route 85/US 101 Separation, that will rehabilitate 33.0 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

 

Naming

This route is named the "Stevens Creek Freeway" from Route 101 in Mountain View to Route 280. It was named after Stevens Creek, which in turn was named after Captain Elisha Stephens, the first man to lead a wagon train across the Sierras in 1844. All 50 of the pioneers survived the trip, as well as two infants born during the journey. In 1848, Stephens settled east of the creek that bears his name. The 160-acre homestead, called Blackberry Farm, still exists today by Stevens Creek Boulevard in Monta Vista. Widely regarded as an eccentric, Stephens befriended two inventors who cluttered his yard with perpetual motion machines and steam-driven plows. Neighbors politely declined his invitations to dinner because the main course was usually rattlesnake. Stephens claimed, "You don't know what's good! Rattlesnakes beat frogs all to pieces." Popular legend credited Stephens with capturing and eating most of the rattlesnakes around Stevens Creek. Stephens moved to Kern County, near Bakersfield, where he died in 1887.
[Information excerpted from the Mountain View Voice]

This entire route is officially named the "West Valley Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 57, Chapter 73, in 1996.

This entire route, except the segment between Prospect Road and Quito Road, in Santa Clara County is named the "Norman Y. Mineta Highway". It was named in honor of Norman Y. Mineta. Born in 1931, in San Jose, California, Mr. Mineta and his family were among the 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry detained in internment camps during WWII. In 1953, Mr. Mineta graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a degree in Business Administration. He then joined the United States Army and served as an intelligence officer in Korea and Japan. From 1967 to 1971, Mr. Mineta served as a member of the San Jose City Council and from 1971 to 1974, he served as Mayor of San Jose, thereby becoming the first Asian-American mayor of a major United States city. From 1975 to 1995, Mr. Mineta represented the Silicon Valley area as a Member of the United States House of Representatives, where his legislative and policy agenda was wide and varied, including major projects in the areas of economic development, science and technology policy, trade, transportation, the environment, intelligence, the budget, and civil rights. As a Member of Congress, Mr. Mineta cofounded the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus and served as its first chair; he also chaired the House Public Works and Transportation Committee from 1992 to 1994, chaired that committee's aviation subcommittee from 1981 to 1988, and chaired its Surface Transportation Subcommittee from 1989 to 1991. He was also a key author of the landmark Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, which shifted decisions concerning highway and mass transit planning to state and local governments and led to major upsurges in mass transit ridership and more environmentally friendly transportation projects. Mr. Mineta was also the driving force behind the passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which officially apologized for and redressed the injustices endured by Japanese Americans during World War II. After leaving Congress, Mr. Mineta chaired the National Civil Aviation Review Commission, which in 1997 issued recommendations on reducing traffic congestion and the aviation accident rate, many of which were adopted by the Clinton administration. In 2000, President Clinton appointed Mr. Mineta United States Secretary of Commerce, making Mr. Mineta the first Asian American to hold a post in the Presidential Cabinet. In 2001, President George W. Bush appointed Mr. Mineta United States Secretary of Transportation, making Mr. Mineta the only Democrat to serve in George W. Bush's Cabinet and the first Cabinet member to switch directly from a Democratic to a Republican Cabinet. During Mr. Mineta's first four years as Secretary of Transportation, the United States saw the lowest vehicle fatality rate ever recorded, the highest safety belt usage rate ever recorded, and the lowest rail fatality level ever recorded. As Secretary of Transportation, Mr. Mineta oversaw the safest three-year period in aviation history and was instrumental in persuading every state in the country to set a maximum blood alcohol content level for automobile drivers at 0.08 percent, a level that has proved to be effective in preventing automobile crashes and improving automobile safety. Mr. Mineta also oversaw the United States Coast Guard's response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, including expanding the number and mission of Coast Guard Port Security Units and developing the Sea Marshal Program and Maritime Safety and Security Teams. Mr. Mineta also guided the creation of the Transportation Security Administration, an agency of more than 60,000 employees charged with protecting Americans as they travel across the United States. On June 23, 2006, Mr. Mineta announced his resignation as United States Secretary of Transportation, effective July 7, 2006, making him the longest-serving Secretary of Transportation in the history of the Department of Transportation. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 25, Resolution Chapter 66, on 7/3/2007.

The portion between Quito Road and Prospect Road in the City of Saratoga is named the "CHP Officer Scott M. Greenly Memorial Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 172, Chapter 140 in 1998. California Highway Patrol Officer Scott M. Greenly, 31, was killed in the line of duty on January 7, 1998. Officer Greenly was killed while making a routine traffic stop before the Saratoga Avenue exit to Route 85 when an out-of-control driver slammed into him as he petted the dog of the woman he had pulled over. Officer Greenly's death prompted the state to pass the "move over'' statute, requiring drivers to move into another lane (if it can be done safely) when they spot an emergency vehicle on the side of the road.

 

Named Structures

The intersection of Route 85 and US 101 in San Jose is named the Michael Evanhoe Interchange. It was named in honor of Michael Evanhoe, who served between 1995 and 2004 as the chief development officer responsible for the planning, programming, project development, marketing, and congestion management functions for the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) in the County of Santa Clara. In that position, Mr. Evanhoe managed the $700 million VTA highway program, and was responsible for long-range transportation planning and programming for VTA, working to address and set the VTA's priorities for discretionary state and federal transportation funds. Mr. Evanhoe worked in the field of transportation since 1965, initially with the Caltrans in its Sacramento, Marysville, and San Francisco offices from 1965 to 1974, and later serving as Assistant Secretary for Transportation in the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency from 1975 to 1978 and Executive Director of the California Transportation Commission from 1978 to 1984. He joined the Sunset Development Company in San Ramon in 1984 and served as Vice President of Operations until 1988, was later appointed as Executive Director of the Golden Triangle Task Force in Santa Clara County from 1988 to 1990, and was subsequently appointed as the Executive Director of the Congestion Management Agency of Santa Clara County in 1990, serving in the latter position until the agency merged with the Santa Clara County Transit District in 1994 to form the VTA. Over the years, Mr. Evanhoe has gained the respect and admiration of elected officials, staff, and business leaders by getting the job done, maintaining a positive work environment, taking on new challenges, and working collaboratively with others. He had substantial responsibilities for construction of the Route 85/US 101 interchange and the widening of US 101. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 152, chaptered September 1, 2004. Resolution Chapter 175.

 

Memorials

Alma Ribbs, Just past Saratoga Ave. This sign was placed by her husband, Richard Wyckoff. The sign includes the names of Alma and the children. Alma Ribbs was seven months' pregnant when she and the twin babies she was carrying (Nina and Robert) were killed by a drunken driver on Route 85 in 1996.

 

Commuter Lanes

Commuter lanes exist along the entire freeway. The portion between Route 280 and Route 237 was opened in February 1990 (NB) and April 1990 (SB). The portion between US 101 and Route 82 was opened in August 1994; the remainder (Route 82 to Route 280) was opened in October 1994. The lanes from Route 237 to US 101 in Mountain View opened in 1998. They all require two or more occupants, and are in operation weekdays between 5:00 AM and 9:00 AM, and between 3:00 PM and 7:00 PM.

HOV lanes also exist in Mountain View between Dana Street and Route 101.

With respect to usage: A 2001 Caltrans survey showed that 6,814 vehicles rode in the carpool lane between Almaden Expressway and I-280, up from 4,837 in 1996.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Santa Clara 85 0.00 1.45
Santa Clara 85 1.74 2.42
Santa Clara 85 2.80 3.08
Santa Clara 85 3.21 3.48
Santa Clara 85 3.55 5.41
Santa Clara 85 5.88 R10.81
Santa Clara 85 R10.86 R15.57
Santa Clara 85 15.70 R23.87

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

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Other WWW Links

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 


Overall statistics for Route 85:

  • Total Length (1995): 24 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 14,100 to 92,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 24.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 0 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 24 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Clara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, the route that would beomce LRN 85 was defined as the route from "[LRN 1] to [LRN 20] N of Mad River". In 1935, it was codified into the highway code as:

[LRN 1] to [LRN 20], staying north of the Mad River

This definition remained unchanged until 1963. This route is present-day unsigned Route 200.


State Shield

State Route 86



Routing
  1. (a) (1) From Route 111 to Route 8 near El Centro.

    (b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish the following portions of Route 86, if the department and the applicable local agency enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment, as follows:

    (1) To the County of Imperial, the portions of Route 86 within unincorporated areas of the county from the beginning of the route at the junction of Route 111 to 0.5 mile south of Fredricks Road.

    (2) To the City of El Centro, the portion of Route 86 within its city limits.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains unchanged from its 1963 definition.

    In 2013, Chapter 525 (SB 788, 10/9/13) added segment (b) and (b)(1) permitting relinquishment within unincorporated areas of the county and within El Centro.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was originally signed as US 99, and was part of LRN 26, defined in 1915/1916. The northbound lanes of the expressway are original US 99. The original route through Coachella and Thermal is along Harrison Avenue, and then diagonally to Pierce (starting at 66th). It was resigned as Route 86 in 1964.

     

    Naming

    This segment is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1956; not accepted.


  2. (a) (2) From Route 8 near El Centro to Route 10 in Indio via the vicinity of Brawley.

    (b) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish the following portions of Route 86, if the department and the applicable local agency enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment, as follows: [...]

    (2) To the City of El Centro, the portion of Route 86 within its city limits.

    (3) To the City of Imperial, the portion of Route 86 within its city limits.

    (4) To the City of Brawley, the portion of Route 86 within its city limits.

    (c) The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment:

    (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder’s recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portions of Route 86 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (3) The portions of Route 86 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (4) The Cities of Brawley, El Centro, and Imperial and the County of Imperial shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 86, including any traffic signal progression.

    (5) For the portions of Route 86 that are relinquished under this subdivision, the Cities of Brawley, El Centro, and Imperial, and the County of Imperial shall install and maintain, within their respective jurisdictions, the city or county signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 86 to the extent deemed necessary by the department.

    (d) Following the relinquishments authorized in subdivision (b), the portion of Route 86 from 0.5 mile south of Fredricks Road to the north junction of Route 78 shall be redesignated as a part of Route 78.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "Route 8 near El Centro to Route 10 via the vicinity of Brawley."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 clarified the terminus to be "Route 10 in Indio via the vicinity of Brawley."

    The section of Route 86 in Brawley was adopted as a Freeway in 1945. A Freeway Agreement had never been executed in the City of Brawley. This section of Route 86 was recently denominated to Controlled Access Highway (CAH) in 2005. It is a four-lane highway with paved shoulders and a median.

    In 2013, Chapter 525 (SB 788, 10/9/13) added segment (b) and (b)(1) permitting relinquishment within unincorporated areas of the county and within El Centro, Imperial, and Brawley, and added the language regarding Route 78 (e.g., (d)).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This was originally signed as US 99, and was part of LRN 26, defined in 1915/1916. It was resigned as Route 86 in 1964.

     

    Status

    A new Route 86 expressway has been built to its entire Route 195 length. The expressway runs from I-10 at Coachella to join Route 86 at Oasis. The segment from Mecca to Coachella will be a joint section of 86 and 111 (it may be signed as such now) upon completion of the remainder of the expressway (at which time, Route 195 will be eliminated). It is unknown whether the signage for Route 195 has yet been removed.

    According to Don Hagstrom in October 2002, Route 86 is to be part of the NAFTA Farm-To-Market Highway. When complete, the NAFTA Farm-to-Market highway will encourage trucks to use the following route between Mexicali and Interstate 10 in Coachella: Route 7 Expressway northbound (Calexico / Mexicali II crossing east of downtown Calexico) to I-8 westbound to the Route 111 expressway northbound to the Route 86/Route 78 Brawley Bypass expressway westbound to Route 86 expressway northbound via the Salton Sea to I-10. I wonder if they will ever consider one route number for the whole thing, as this would be easier to follow. Additionally, on Route 86 there will be one interruption to the expressway in the small town of Westmoreland; the expressway becomes a 4 lane conventional highway with one stop sign and a reduced speed limit in this small town several miles north of Brawley.

    In June 2002, the CTC had on its agenda the relinquishment of 08-Riv-86,111-PM 17.3/21.5,24.5/T30.0 in the City of Coachella. This is likely the original routings that were bypassed by the expressway.

    In July 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Riverside on: Route 86 between Route 86S and Avenue 54 including adjacent right of way along Route 86 for drainage purposes; Route 111 between Route 195 and Route 86S, and between Route 86S and the boundary line between Riverside County and the city of Coachella; and Route 195 between Route 86 and Route 86S, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    In October 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Riverside along Route 86S south of the Coachella city limits between Avenue 52 and Avenue 82, consisting of relocated or reconstructed county roads.

    In April 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Riverside County that will construct a new interchange and roadway improvements on State Route 86S at Airport Boulevard in the city of Coachella. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $21,049,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011- 12. Environmental studies conducted for the project revealed that there would be no adverse environmental impacts associated with the project.

    In December 2012, Caltrans officially renumbered Route 86S as Route 86. They noted that portions of the original highway, which is locally referred to as “old 86”, have been relinquished to the County of Riverside or the City of Coachella and renamed by the local jurisdiction.

    In May of 2003, the Commission approved the Route 78/Route 111 Route Adoption, a Controlled Access Highway bypass around the City of Brawley. Once constructed this will alleviate traffic impacts in the downtown area of Brawley and accommodate increased regional and interregional traffic due to the North American Free Trade Agreement. This will divert heavier traffic away from the downtown area off of Route 86 and improve safety and relieve congestion. In November 2005, the state proposed constructing new at grade connections to Panno Road and on the east side of Route 86 at Legion Road in the City of Brawley. There is a current connection at Legion Road to the west side of Route 86.

    In December 2007, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Riverside, at 0.18 mile southeasterly of Middleton Street, consisting of right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In July 2008, the CTC relinqished right of way in the county of Imperial between Brandt Road and Loveland Road consisting of superseded highway right of way, and relocated and reconstructed county roads, frontage roads and other state constructed local roads.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures for this route:

    • High Priority Project #43: Roadway surface improvements, street lighting, and storm drain improvements to South Center Street (and Forrester Road) from Baughman Road to Route 86 (Note: The legislation has co-signed Route 78/Route 86, but legislatively this section is only Route 86) in Westmorland. South Center Street/Forrester Road is a local feeder street in Westmoreland, California. $640,000.

    • High Priority Project #143. Construct a safety grade separation at the intersection of Route 86S and Ave 66. $3,600,000

    • High Priority Project #926: Construct highway connecting Route 78/Route 86 and Route 111, Brawley. This is likely the route being explored by the CTC back in April 2003. $7,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #2543: Route 86S and Ave 50 highway safety grade separation. $800,000.

     

    Alternate Routes

    In 2002, a new Route 86S expressway, running N of present-day Route 111, opened from I-10 to the vicinity of Pierce near Thermal. The expressway will eventually replace Route 195 in the area and continue to Route 86, bypassing the original US 99 routing along Harrison. In December 2012, Route 86S officially became Route 86.

     

    Naming

    The segment between the City of Imperial and the City of Brawley is officially designated the "California Highway Patrol Officer Franke A. Story Memorial Highway". Officer Story was a dedicated traffic officer killed in the line of duty at the age of 25 years while on a traffic stop on northbound Route 86 at Larsen Road in the early morning darkness of July 19, 1967. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 57, Chapter 73, in 1996.

    The segment between San Felipe Creek Bridge (at Route 78) and the Riverside county line is named the "David E. Peirson and Bill Freeman Highway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 23, Chapter 68, in 1989. Bill Freeman, chairman of the Highway 86 Improvement Association, worked with David E. Pierson, engineer and Imperial County Public Works Director, for the completion of Route 86, which was dedicated to honor their work on October 30, 1987.

    The segment between 82nd Avenue and 66th Avenue, near the communities of Oasis and Valeria, near the Northern edge of the Salton Sea, in the County of Riverside is officially named the "Senator David G. Kelley Highway." Senator David G. Kelley was the state senator for the 37th district (including this area) from 1992 until 2000; before that, he served for 14 years in the California State Assembly. He was born and raised in Riverside County, and graduated from California Poly San Luis Obispo, majoring in citrus fruit production. He was a citrus rancher for over 45 years in the Hemet area. He was active in the Riverside County Farm Bureau since 1955, and also served on the board of directors of the California Farm Bureau Federation. He was active in the establishment of an agricultural preserve program in Riverside County. He has had an ongoing committment to improving the dangerous portion of Route 86 on which many fatal accidents have occurred, commonly known as "Killer Highway," by submitting numerous requests for the funding of improvements and negotiating with the Department of Transportation, the Riverside County Transportation Commission, the Coachella Valley Association of Governments, community leaders, and state and county officials to improve the safety of this portion of the highway. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 106, Chapter 108, August 22, 2000.

    The portion of Route 86 between the Counties of Riverside and Imperial County line and the I-10 junction in the County of Riverside, is named the "CHP Officer Saul Martinez Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Saul Martinez, who was born November 15, 1958, to Fidel and Amparo in Villa Juarez, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Prior to joining the CHP, Officer Martinez was a volunteer for the United Farm Workers of America and worked alongside Cesar Chavez for almost 10 years. Throughout his time with the United Farm Workers, he held several roles, some of which included translator, contract administrator, and negotiator. On May 8, 1989, Officer Martinez graduated from the CHP Academy with Cadet Training Class IV-88 and was assigned to the Indio area where, on a talk radio show “El Protector,” he informed the public about new laws, seatbelt usage, drinking and driving, and other safety issues. He also visited schools to educate children on safety issues, and would often read to the children corresponding books. On May 8, 1997, Officer Martinez and his partner, James “Donovan” Rice, were investigating a vehicle parked on the shoulder of a road north of Palm Springs, when, out of nowhere, an oncoming car, traveling more than 15 feet off the roadway, came rushing towards the officers. Without hesitation, Officer Martinez shoved his partner to safety, only to be struck and critically injured. On May 10, 1997, Officer Martinez’s son, Saul Jr., and his two brothers, Ben and Rafael, received the “Latino Peace Officer of the Year Award” for 1996 on Officer Martinez’s behalf, as he lay critically injured in the hospital. The award was presented by the Latino Peace Officer’s Association of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. Officer Martinez succumbed to his injuries and was pronounced dead on May 16, 1997. At Officer Martinez’s funeral, Governor Pete Wilson met privately with friends and family to present the California Medal of Valor to Officer Martinez’s wife. The Governor said, “The medal is an award to Saul for the courage he gave in sacrificing his own life to save his partner, Donovan Rice. The medal cannot begin to constitute the loss, but through his family, the medal speaks recognition through the state for the loved one they lost. This medal is given on behalf of those lives he touched and made so much better. Fellow officers said he was, and is, the best we had”. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    This segment is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Interstate Submissions

    Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1956; not accepted.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.5] From Route 78 near Brawley to Route 10 in Indio. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.14] Between Route 111 in Brawley and Route 10.

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 86 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 86 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Riverside 86 S21.63 S22.66

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 


Overall statistics for Route 86:

  • Total Length (1995): 93 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 2,550 to 33,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 74; Sm. Urban 8; Urbanized: 11.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 85 mi; FAU: 1 mi; FAS: 5 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 71 mi; Minor Arterial: 17 mi; Collector: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Imperial, Riverside.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, a route was defined from "Lassen National Park-Mineral Road to [LRN 29] near Morgan". Part of this became LRN 83, and part became LRN 86. In 1935, the LRN 86 portion was codified as:

[LRN 83] near Lassen National Park to [LRN 29] at Mineral

This definition remained unchanged until 1963. This is a 5 mi segment of Route 36 from Mineral to Route 89.


State Shield

State Route 87



Routing
  1. From Route 85 in the vicinity of Santa Teresa Boulevard to Route 101 in the vicinity of Guadalupe River.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was defined as:

    Route 85 in the vicinity of Pearl Avenue to Route 101 in the vicinity of Guadalupe River.

    Subdivision (a) of Route 87 shall be added to the state highway system at the time the City of San Jose and the County of Santa Clara have acquired all rights-of-way necessary to construct a freeway on this route to state freeway standards and have conveyed said rights-of-way to the State without charge; provided, that the commission and the department may take all steps necessary to locate and design said freeway or any portion thereof prior to the time it is added to the state highway system.

    In 1965, Chapter 65 allowed construction to begin, changing the caveat to “Construction of subdivision (a) of Route 87, or any portion thereof, may be commenced at the time the City of San Jose and the County of Santa Clara have acquired all rights-of-way necessary to construct a freeway, or any portion thereof, on this route to state freeway standards and have conveyed said rights-of-way to the State without charge.” This was done to permit Route 87 to be incorporated into the design of I-680, then planned to start construction in 1968.

    In 1969, Chapter 1179 changed the caveat on (a) again: “Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 89 of Chapter 1062 of the Statutes of 1959, construction of subdivision (a) of Route 87 may be commenced at any time, if the City of San Jose and the County of Santa Clara has conveyed or does convey to the State of California, without charge, all real property presently acquired by it for the construction of said subdivision (a) of this route or such portion thereof.”

    In 1980, Chapter 777 removed all conditions on this segment.

    In 1988, Chapter 106 changed the origin of this segment to be “Route 85 in the vicinity of Santa Teresa Boulevard”

    The history of the construction of this portion is as follows:

    • 1963 State adopts plan designating the Guadalupe Parkway as a future freeway.

    • 1970. Caltrans stops freeway planning due to budget problems.

    • 1972. The Route 87/I-280 interchange is constructed.

    • 1976. A temporary 4-lane freeway is built from I-280 N to Julian Street.

    • 1988. The temporary freeway is extend from Julian N to Taylor Street.

    • 1992. Median barriers installed. A new ramp from NB Guadalupe Parkway to N First Street opens.

    • 1993. Route 87 S of I-280 opens.

    • 1997. Construction begins on the completion of the Route 87 freeway. This will run underneath W Taylor Street, rising above Skyport and Airport parkways. The Taylor and Skyport interchanges will be SPUIs. Skyport will be the only entry point into the San Jose Airport from Route 87. Estimated completion for this work is 2003. The total cost of this additional work is over $225 million, and involved the movement of more than 470,000 ft² of fill.

    • 2004. The last signal light on Route 87 at the intersection with Hedding was removed in April 2004 as the northbound lanes were opened to make Route 87 in San Jose without any signal lights for its entire length.

    • 2005. Carpool lanes from Route 85 to I-280 are to be completed.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 292, defined in 1961. It was unsigned in 1963. Note: the 1961 law said "Route 239 in the vicinity of Pearl Avenue", but this was technically an error as Route 239 was moved from Route 85 to Route 17 by Chpater 1146 in 1961. Chapter 1698 in 1963 corrected the definition of LRN 292, but of course, it was overtaken by the 1963 renumbering (Chapter 385). It was not signed in

    Route 87 was not defined in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

     

    Status

    The route has two Single-Point Urban Interchanges (SPUIs): one at Taylor Street, the other at a new road going into San Jose International Airport.

    In April 2002, the CTC considered STIP Project #3 [Agenda Item 2.5b.(1)], which would upgrade the current 4 lane highway to a six-lane freeway with HOV lanes from 0.5 km N of I-880 (PM 8.0) to 0.6 km N of Airport Parkway (PM 9.0).

    In June 2002, the CTC considered a STIP project to update the existing four lane highway to a six lane freeway with HOV lanes from Julian St to US 101. This was completed in 2004.

    There is a rationale for the lack of a connector between Route 87 and I-880. The two freeways are close to the eastern edge of Mineta San Jose International Airport, meaning that elevated ramps cannot be built without interfering in the flight path. Route 87 runs parallel to the Guadalupe River, so tunneling to link the freeways does not work. One corner of the crossover is the light-rail maintenance yard for the Valley Transportation Authority, which cannot be easily or cheaply moved. Exits from Route 87 to Taylor Street and from I-880 to Coleman Avenue and First Street are less than a ¼ mi away, and Caltrans requires that ramps be at least a mile apart to avoid merging chaos. Lastly, high-voltage power lines run through the area, which would be costly to relocate.
    [Thanks to Gary Roberts "Mr. Roadshow" for hunting down this information]

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route completed to freeway standards is named the "Guadalupe Freeway".

    The segment of northbound Route 87 commencing with its intersection with Route 280 and ending at Exit 6B, the Julian Street/Santa Clara Street exit in the City of San Jose is named the "Lewis E. Platt Memorial Highway" This segment was named in memory of Lewis E. Platt, president and chief executive officer of the Hewlett-Packard Company (HP) from 1992 to 1999, and chairman of the board of HP from 1993 to 1999. Lewis Platt was born on April 11, 1941 in Johnson City, New York and received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York; and a master's degree in business administration from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He also received an honorary doctorate in engineering science from the University of Santa Clara. He started at HP in 1966, holding a variety of management posts in the company's medical products operations prior to becoming general manager of the Waltham Massachusetts Division in 1974. Thereafter, he served as general manager of HP's analytical group from 1980 to 1984, and was elected a vice president of HP in 1983, managing various aspects of HP's computer business from 1984 to 1988. In 1987, Lewis E. Platt was appointed to the Advisory Committee on Trade Policy Negotiations by President Bill Clinton and served as chairman of one of its task forces, the World Trade Organization Task Force. In 1996, Lewis E. Platt was elected cochair and a member of the board of directors of Joint Venture Silicon Valley and the Tech Network, formed in 1991, to strengthen the local economy and make the area a better place to live, and he was a member of The Business Council, also serving as a member of the California Business Roundtable from 1993 to 1995. While serving as the chief executive officer and chairman of the board of HP, Platt took the time to personally engage in a local transportation measure championed by the Silicon Valley Leadership Group to improve the quality of life and the economic health of Silicon Valley, specifically taking the following steps to promote that measure: (1) Loaning out an HP employee funded by HP for six months to run the countywide campaign for the measure; (2) Serving as fundraising chair for the campaign with Ron Gonzales, who was a supervisor for the County of Santa Clara at that time, serving as his vice chair; (3) Personally raising nearly nine hundred thousand dollars ($900,000) of the one million six hundred thousand dollars ($1,600,000) required to run a competitive campaign for the measure; and through his leadership, HP made a sizable financial contribution, as well as the in-kind contribution of the time and salary of the loaned HP employee. In addition, making fewer than 15 telephone calls, Lewis E. Platt raised the rest of the funds needed for the campaign. Platt also motivated the rest of the fundraising committee through his personal leadership and engagement by chairing meetings of a communitywide committee of 45 diverse leaders. His leadership by example motivated that group to raise the entire one million six hundred thousand dollars ($1,600,000) in less than 90 days. The campaign resulted in the voters' approval of Measures A and B at the General Election held on November 5, 1996, with the additional one-half cent sales tax revenue, which terminated on April 1, 2006, funding 19 road and rail-transit improvements, all completed on time and within budget, just as Lewis E. Platt had promised during the campaign for these measures. Lewis E. Platt died on September 8, 2005. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 37, Resolution Chapter 96, on 7/12/2007.

    Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.


  2. From San Jose easterly of Route 101 to Route 237.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    082 in 1964Unconstructed In 1963, this segment was defined as “(b) San Jose easterly of the Bayshore Freeway to Route 230.” There was also a segment (c), defined as: “(c) Route 230 to Route 480 near the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 89 of Chapter 1062 of the Statutes of 1959, construction of all or any portion of subdivision (c) of Route 87 may be commenced at any time, if the City and County of San Francisco has conveyed or does convey to the State of California, without charge, all real property presently acquired by it for the construction of said subdivision (c) of this route or such portion thereof.”

    [480-87 Interchange, 1967 Conception, from Chris Sampang]In 1968, Chapter 282 truncated segment (c) to be "Route 230 to Route 280 in San Francisco Route 480 near the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.” The deleted portion (Route 230 to Route 480) was transferred to I-80. This was part of the major reworking of freeways in the San Francisco area due to the "Freeway Revolt". Route 87 was originally planned as a full freeway in the ocean to the E of US 101. In 1968, the portion from Route 280 to Route 480 [First Street] was transferred to Route 280 (this was part of LRN 253). The image to the right, from Chris Sampang's pages, illustrates this quite well.

    In 1970, Chapter 1473 truncated segment (b) to terminate at Route 238 (instead of Route 230) and deleted (c). Former segment (c) was transferred to Route 230.

    In 1980, Chapter 777 changed the wording of segment (b) to: “(b) San Jose easterly of Route 101 to Route 237.”

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 289 (defined in 1959). The portion that was transferred to Route 280 and Route 230 was LRN 253.

    Route 87 was not defined in the initial set of state signed routes in 1934.

Commuter Lanes

HOV lanes are planned for or constructed for this route as follows:

  • Coleman Avenue to N of Mission Street. Santa Clara County.
  • N of Mission Street to N of Route 87/I-880 separation. Santa Clara County.
  • From Route 85 to 0.2 miles N of Julian Street. Santa Clara County.

 

Status

Unconstructed Part (2) is completely unconstructed. A route has not been adopted and there have been no studies for future alignment of this route.

Southbound HOV lanes from I-280 to Branham Lane began construction in Fall 2004. S/B direction. This project is being done by VTA. The project was completed in 2007.

In February 2012, there was an update on the project to construct high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane and auxiliary lanes in each direction, construct 13 retaining walls and widen six bridges in San Jose, from 0.3 mile north of Branham Lane to 0.3 mile north of Virginia Street. Evidently, the project is overrunning its budget; the CTC authorized $6,200,000 in supplemental funding.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 87 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 87 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Santa Clara 87 0.00 0.73
Santa Clara 87 4.86 6.25
Santa Clara 87 6.25 6.28
Santa Clara 87 6.51 6.90

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. The portion from Route 101 to Route 237 was added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. The portion from Route 85 to Route 101 was added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1961.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 87:

  • Total Length (1995): 9 miles traversable; 5 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 33,500 to 63,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 0; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 14.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 9 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 9 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Clara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, three segments were added to the highway system: "[LRN 7] near Woodland to State Highway near Yuba City", "[LRN 15] near Marysville to [LRN 21] near Oroville", and "[LRN 3] near Chico to [LRN 21] near Oroville". In 1935, these were formally assigned to LRN 87, which was defined as:

  1. [LRN 7] near Woodland to State Highway near Yuba City
  2. [LRN 15] near Marysville to [LRN 21] near Oroville
  3. [LRN 21] near Oroville to [LRN 3] near Chico

In 1957, Chapter 36 extended the routing and combined two segments, giving:

  1. [LRN 7] near Woodland to [LRN 21] near Oroville
  2. [LRN 21] near Wick's Corner to [LRN 3] near Chico

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 7 (Alternate US 40/US 99W/Route 16; present-day Route 16) near Woodland to LRN 21 (present-day Route 162) near Oroville.

    This was signed as Alternate US 40. It is part of present-day Route 70, and portions are Route 113 and Route 99.

  2. From LRN 21 (present-day Route 70) near Wick's Corner to LRN 3 (US 99E) near Chico.

    This connection was originally unsigned; it is present-day Route 149.


State Shield

State Route 88



Routing
  1. From Route 99 near Stockton to Route 49 passing south of Ione.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This is LRN 97, defined in 1933. It was not signed as Route 88 as part of the initial state highway routing, but was signed by the early 1940s.

     

    Status

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $3,200,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Lodi, from Comstock Road to Route 12, that will rehabilitate 14 miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality.

    In September 2012, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 88 on Baker and Pezzi Roads, consisting of collateral facilities.


  2. Route 49 in Jackson to the Nevada state line via Pine Grove, Silver Lake, and Kirkwood.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(b) Route 49 in Jackson to Route 89 near Picketts in Hope Valley via Irishtown, Pinegrove, Silver Lake and Kirkwood." There was also a segment (c) from "Route 89 near Woodfords to the Nevada state line." However, later in 1963 Chapter 1698 removed the reference to "Irishtown"

    In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed the definition of the terminus to delete the reference to "near Pickets", leaving the terminus as "Route 89 in Hope Valley via Pine Grove, Silver Lake, and Kirkwood."

    In 1986, Chapter 928 combined (b) and (c), giving "(b) Route 49 in Jackson to the Nevada state line via Pine Grove, Silver Lake, and Kirkwood." The segment that had created this discontinuity, ("Route 89 near Picketts Junction to Route 89 near Woodfords") was transferred from Route 89.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 34 (defined in 1915) between Jackson and Picketts (W junction with Route 89). It was LRN 23 [defined in 1911] (signed as Route 89) between Pickets and Woodfords. It was LRN 24 (1933 extension) from Woodfords to the Nevada state line. It was cosigned with Route 4 to the Nevada state line. It was not signed as Route 88 as part of the initial state highway routing, but was signed by the early 1940s.

    This segment is actually one of the older roads in the state. After some failed bond issues, initial construction of the road was funded by bonds in 1862, as a toll road, 16 feet wide, with a maximum grade of 18 per-cent, from Antelope Springs (35 mi E of Jackson) to Twin Lakes/Caples. The original wagon road went N at that point; the immigrant route (current Route 88) climbed to the summit. The roads rejoined at Tragedy Springs. Additional details on the original road may be found at Joel Windmiller's site.

     

    Status

    Since it's construction, Route 88 has run across the top of the Silver Lake Dam. The increase in traffic began to create structural problems for the dam, so in 1998, Caltrans proposed creating a new crossing of the Silver Fork of the American River, just downstream from the dam. Construction started in March 2000, and was bugdeted at $6.5 million, of which $2 was for construction of a new bridge. This new bridge involved the use of the longest pre-cast girders ever placed on a California bridge—almost 40 meters long, weighing more than 70,000 kg.

    In July 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Amador, being a portion of the improved intersection at Route 88 and Route 104, consisting of a relocated and reconstructed county road.

    Between Alpine Village and Paynesville, an "Old State Highway 88" takes a less direct path, with a north terminus at the intersection of Foothill Road and Route 88 in Paynesville. (This is labeled as Old State Highway 88 by MSN's map service and Compass, but as "Carson River Road" by Mapquest.)

    There are plans for improvements to the route near Pine Grove. The public scoping has just begun; project approval is planed for 2012, with construction starting in 2024 and completing in 2028. The goal is to alleviate congestion, improve operations and enhance safety between the intersections at Climax Road and Mount Zion Road. Project components currently being studied include widening SR 88 through the Pine Grove and/or the construction of either a southerly or northerly two-lane bypass route.

    This route continues into Nevada as NV 88 to end at US 395. The designation of the NV 88 dates back to the 1976 Nevada route renumbering; previously, this was NV 37.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1722: Pine Grove Corridor Improvement Project. $400,000.

     

     

    Naming

    This segment from Route 49 to Route 89 is named the "Alpine State Highway". It was named by Resolution Chapter 468 in 1911.

    Historically, the portion of this route from Route 49 near Jackson to Woodfords in Alpine county was called the "Kit Carson Pass Highway".

     

    Named Structures

    The overlook just west of Peddler Hill on Route 88 is officially designated the "Bert Lund Memorial Overlook". Bert Lund was an employee of the Department of Highways. He began as a chainman on a survey crew; he eventually worked his way up to Senior District Engineer in charge of District 10, where he was involved in the creation or upgrading of many of the roads in District 10, including new bridges on Route 12 in the Delta, the making of Route 99 into a limited access freeway, the start of making Route 88 into a year-round, all-weather highway, and the upgrading and maintenance of four Sierra Nevada mountain passes (Carson, Ebbetts, Sonora, and Tioga). Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 144, Chapter 106, in 1994.

    The "John G. Meyer Overlook", in Alpine County (E of Carson Pass). It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 86, Chapter 10, in 1990. John G. Meyer was long-time Caltrans employee, serving over 46 years, the last 15 of which were as a District Engineer in Caltrans District 10. He was instrumental in the completion and improvement of several important highways in Alpine County, including the development of Route 88 as an all-year highway. He was also well known for contributions to the Boy Scouts, the Salvation Army, the United Crusade, and was a member of the Engineers Club, the Rotary Club, the American Society of Engineers, and the Navy League.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.5] Entire portion.

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.14] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 88:

  • Total Length (1995): 122 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,200 to 13,700
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 121; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 0.6.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 122 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 122 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Joaquin, Amador, Alpine.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

In 1933, two segments were added to the state highway system: "[LRN 15] near Sycamore to Woodland-Yuba City Road near Knights Landing", and "[LRN 45] near Glenn to [LRN 47] near Hamilton City". In 1935, these were codified into the code as LRN 88, which was defined as:

  1. [LRN 45] near Glenn to [LRN 47] near Hamilton City
  2. [LRN 15] near Sycamore to [LRN 87] near Knights Landing

In 1959, Chapter 1062 changed the origin of the first segment to "[LRN 15] near Colusa".

This route is signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 15 (Route 20) near Colusa to LRN 47 (Route 32) near Hamilton City.

    This is present-day Route 45.

  2. From LRN 15 (Route 20) near Sycamore to LRN 87 (Alternate US 40; present-day Route 70) near Knights Landing.

    This is present-day Route 45.



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