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California Highways

Routes 49 through 56

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

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State Shield

State Route 49



Routing
  1. (a) (1) From Route 41 near Oakhurst to Route 140 at Mariposa.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was part of a larger segment running from "Route 41 near Oakhurst to Route 120 near Moccasin Creek." In 1984, Chapter 409 split this into two segments: "(a) Route 41 near Oakhurst to Route 140 at Mariposa. (b) Route 140 at Mariposa to Route 120 near Moccasin."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Before 1964, this was a proposed route with routing determined. It was an extension of LRN 65 defined in 1959. This was not part of the original 1934 state signage of Route 49.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 40-048, at the east fork of the Chowchilla River in Mariposa county, is named the "William M. Sell Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1972, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 22, Chapter 46, the same year. William Martin Sell, Jr., (1882-1971), a lifetime resident of the Sierra and hostler, served on the Madera County Board of Supervisors.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] Entire portion.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. (2) From Route 140 at Mariposa to Route 120 near Moccasin.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment was part of a larger segment running from "Route 41 near Oakhurst to Route 120 near Moccasin Creek." In 1984, Chapter 409 split this into two segments: "(a) Route 41 near Oakhurst to Route 140 at Mariposa. (b) Route 140 at Mariposa to Route 120 near Moccasin."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 49 was signed along the route from Jct Route 140 at Mariposa to Jct. Route 24 (now Route 70) near Reno Jct, via Sonora, Jackson, and Nevada City. It was part of a 1933 extension of LRN 65.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] Entire portion.

     

    Named Structures

    Between milemarker 30.5 and 31.0 is the "General John Fremont Historical Plaque". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 145, Chapter 143, in 1994. General John Fremont was born in Savannah, Georgia, on January 21, 1813. He was a teacher of mathematics, and an engineer in the U. S. Topographical Corps. He was involved in many significant explorations and events outside of California. In the mid 1840s, he was exploring the area around the Great Salt Lake. After leaving Great Salt Lake, he explored the upper tributaries of the Columbia, descended the valley of that River to Fort Vancouver, near its mouth, and on 10 November set out on his return. His route lay through an almost unknown region leading from the Lower Columbia to the Upper Colorado, and was crossed by high and rugged mountain chains. Deep snow soon forced him to descend into the great basin, and he presently found himself, in the depth of winter, in a desert, with the prospect of death to his whole party from cold and hunger. By astronomical observation he found that he was in the latitude of the bay of San Francisco; but between him and the valleys of California was a snow clad range of mountains. Fremont undertook the passage without a guide, and accomplished it in forty days, reaching Sutter's Fort, on the Sacramento, early in March with his men reduced almost to skeletons, and with only thirty-three out of sixty-seven horses and mules remaining. He continued, through various expeditions, to explore the great basin and the maritime region of Oregon and California. At one point, he was ordered to leave California by the Mexican authorities, and refused to comply. The Mexican commander, General José Castro, then mustered the forces of the province and prepared to attack the Americans, who numbered only sixty-two. Fremont took up a strong position near Monterey, built a rude fort of felled trees, hoisted the American flag, and, having plenty of ammunition, resolved to defend himself. After four days of siege, General Castro proposed a cessation of hostilities. On 9 May 1846, he met a party in search of him with dispatches from Washington, directing him to watch over the interests of the United States in California, there being reason to apprehend that the province would be transferred to Great Britain, and also that General Castro intended to destroy the American settlements on the Sacramento. In less than a month he had freed Northern California from Mexican authority. He received a lieutenant colonel's commission on 27 May, and was elected governor of California by the American settlers on 4 July. On 13 January 1847, Fremont concluded with the Mexicans articles of capitulation, which terminated the war in California and left that country permanently in the possession of the United States. After even more events, he was elected as Senator from California, and later ran for President against James Buchanan. At the time of the Civil War, he was made a Major General in command of the Western Department.
    [Excerpted from the full biography of General Fremont originally at http://www.johnfremont.com/]

    Near Mormon Creek, there is the "Mormon Battalion Historical Plaque", named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 40, Chapter 95, in 1995. The Morman Battalion was a battalion of 500 Mormons under command of Col. (later General) Stephen W. Kearney, Commander of the Army of the West. They were a key element in the Mexican-American War that resulted in the liberation of California from Mexican Rule. In 1846 this infantry battalion made the longest march in United States Army history, 2.400 miles, from Council Bluffs, Iowa to San Diego, California, to assist in the military defeat of Mexico.


  3. (3) From Route 120 near Chinese Camp to Route 80 near Auburn via the vicinity of Sonora; via Angels Camp, San Andreas, and Jackson; and via the vicinity of El Dorado, Diamond Springs, and Placerville.

    (b) The relinquished former portion of Route 49 within the City of Auburn is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 49, the City of Auburn shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 49. The city may apply to the department for approval of a business route designation in accordance with Chapter 20, Topic 21, of the Highway Design Manual.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this was a single segment running from "Route 120 to Route 20 via Sonora, Angels Camp, San Andreas, Jackson, El Dorado, Diamond Springs, Placerville, and Auburn." Before the year was out, this was split into two segments by Chapter 1698: "(b) Route 120 to Route 80 in Auburn via the vicinity of Sonora; via Angels Camp, San Andreas, and Jackson; via the vicinity of El Dorado, Diamond Springs, and Placerville. (c) Route 80 near Auburn to Route 20."

    In 1965, Chapter 1372 changed the wording further to "Route 120 near Chinese Camp to Route 80 in Auburn via the vicinity of Sonora; via Angels Camp, San Andreas, and Jackson; via the vicinity of El Dorado, Diamond Springs, and Placerville." In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the terminus to "Route 80 near Auburn".

    In 2008, Chapter 635 (AB 1915, 9/30/2008) authorized the requishment of the portion within the city limits of the city of Auburn, with the usual terms and conditions language:

    (1) The commission may relinquish to the City of Auburn the portion of Route 49 that is located within the city limits of that city, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

    (2) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

    (3) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 49 shall cease to be a state highway.

    (4) The portion of Route 49 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

    (5) For the portion of Route 49 that is relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Auburn shall maintain within its jurisdiction, signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 49. The city may apply to the department for approval of a business route designation in accordance with Chapter 20, Topic 21, of the Highway Design Manual.

    The portion within Auburn was relinquished in May 2009.

    In September 2012, AB 2679, Chapter 769, updated the text to recognize that the portion had been relinquished.

    SB 788 (Chapter 525, 10/9/2013) Delted the relinquishment wording to eliminate the requirement for continuity of traffic flow:

    (b) The relinquished former portion of Route 49 within the City of Auburn is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portion of Route 49, the City of Auburn shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 49 and shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portion of Route 49, including any traffic signal progression. The city may apply to the department for approval of a business route designation in accordance with Chapter 20, Topic 21, of the Highway Design Manual.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 49 was signed along the route from Jct Route 140 at Mariposa to Jct. Route 24 (now Route 70) near Reno Jct, via Sonora, Jackson, and Nevada City. Between Chinese Camp and Sonora, a different route is used. Picture a triangle:

    1. One leg is the new route from Route 49/Route 120 to Route 49/Route 108 near Sonora. This is signed Route 49.

    2. Another leg is former LRN 13, and runs from Route 108/Route 120 near 4 mi NW of Chinese Camp to Route 108/Route 49 near Sonora. This is signed Route 108.

    3. The third leg (LRN 40) runs from Route 120/Route 49 near Chinese Camp to Route 120/Route 108 4 mi NW of Chinese Camp). This is signed Route 120.

    Between Route 120 and Route 108 S of Jamestown, this was a new routing for Route 49 defined in 1965. Between Route 108 S of Jamestown and Route 108 near Sonora, this was LRN 13 (1910). Between Route 108 near Sonora and US 50, Route 49 was LRN 65, defined in 1933. The segment between US 50 and I-80 was defined in 1921.

     

    Status

    Chinese Camp to Angels Camp

    In March 2012, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the county of Tuolumne near Sonora along Route 49 at Poppy Hills Drive, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The County of Tuolumne was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate, without protesting such action.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved a locally-administered STIP project for $100,000 in Angels Camp, from Murphy’s Grade Road to downtown Angels Camp, that will construct sidewalks and install landscaping.

    Angels Camp to El Dorado

    In July 2006, the CTC considered Resolution No. R-3637, relinquishment of right of way near PM 18.6, in the County of Calaveras, at 0.1 mile northerly of Angels Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    Between 2002 and 2006, a bypass was constructed of the cities of Sutter Creek and Amador City. The EIR came back with a negative declaration in May 2002 (CTC May 2002 2.2c.(1)). The bypass was a two-lane expressway that opened in mid-November 2006.

    In November 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Sutter Creek, at the entrance to the Sutter Terrace Mobile Home Park, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets.

    In August 2014, the CTC authorized vacation of right of way in the county of Amador along Route 49 near it’s junction with Main Street (this is N of Sutter Creek but S of Amador City), consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The County was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate and did not protest such action.

    In March 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of Amador City, consisting of superseded highway right of way. The City of Amador City, by relinquishment agreement dated March 20, 2003, and by amendment to agreement dated December 29, 2006, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The CTC also considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of Sutter Creek, consisting of superseded highway right of way and reconstructed city street. The City of Sutter Creek, by controlled access highway agreement dated March 17, 2003, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. The City by relinquishment agreement dated March 17, 2003, and by amendment to agreement dated December 29, 2006, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

    In December 2007, five segments of right of way in the county of Amador, between PM 9.0 and 11.7, consisting of superseded highway right of way and relocated and reconstructed county roads, were up for relinquishment.

    Curve near NashvilleIn March 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will improve safety by replacing a compound curve with a single radius curve, widening the lanes and shoulders, and removing trees to improve sight distance along Route 49. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $2,601,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 SHOPP.

    [Route 49 near El Dorado]In February 2009, the CTC approved a project to realign, widen and add shoulders on Route 49 near El Dorado. Depending on the availability of funding, it is estimated that the Department will begin construction in Fiscal Year 2008-09.

    In December 2007, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the townsite of Diamond Springs, county of El Dorado, from approximately 213 feet west of the existing intersection of Route 49 and Pleasant Valley Road to 525 feet north of the existing intersection of Route 49 and Pleasant Valley Road and 256 feet east of the existing intersection of Route 49 and Pleasant Valley Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    Patterson SignalizationIn April 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that is located in the community of Diamond Springs in El Dorado County. The project will signalize and improve the intersection of Pleasant Valley Road (Route 49) and Patterson Drive. Proposed improvements include widening the approaches to the intersection; addition of turn pockets; installation of traffic signals; installation of curbs, gutters, and sidewalks; grading and paving; drainage improvements; and minor landscaping. The project is estimated to cost $4.05 million and is programmed with State ($1,600,000) funds and Local ($2,450,000) funds. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2013/14.

    El Dorado to Auburn

    In May 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Auburn on Route 49, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated April 14, 2009, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 635, Statutes of 2008, which amended Section 349 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    Route 49 in AuburnIn February 2012, the CTC adopted a routing for Route 49 in the city of Auburn. The purpose of this route adoption is to address the lack of continuity of Route 49 through the City of Auburn. On August 30, 2008, the Governor signed Assembly Bill 1915 which amended Section 349 of the Streets and Highways Code and provided the authority to relinquish a portion of Route 49 within the City of Auburn. On May 14, 2009, at the request of the City of Auburn and the California Department of Transportation (Department), the California Transportation Commission (Commission) relinquished a portion of Route 49 to the City of Auburn. The relinquished portion extended from the I-80 interchange, along south Grass Valley Highway, east on Lincoln Way and east on HighStreet to the intersection with Elm Avenue. This stretch of highway is the main thoroughfare through downtown Auburn and was part of a revitalization project proposed by the City called Streetscape Project for Lincoln Way and High Street. Phase 1 of this project was completed on June 28, 2010. The City also wanted control over future projects proposed for construction and to limit the amount of traffic and speed within the downtown area. The City’s General Plan identifies this route as a city street with multi-purpose mixed use. This route adoption as a conventional highway will allow Route 49 to reconnect to I-80 via Elm Avenue. The portion of Elm Avenue to be adopted is 0.3 mile long and is classified as an urban minor arterial. It is a four-lane arterial with a 12-foot median, 5-foot shoulders with curb, gutter and sidewalks on both sides of the road. Access to Elm Avenue between Tuttle Street and the westbound I-80 on ramp is controlled and the median is used as left turn lanes. East of Tuttle Street to the intersection of High Street / Route 49, the 12-foot median becomes a two-way left turn lane and there are several driveways serving local businesses. This section does not have any shoulders, but continues the curb, gutter and sidewalks from the previous section. The portion of Elm Avenue from the I-80 on ramp to the intersection with Route 49 is not included in this adoption, thus maintaining a gap in Route 49 continuity, albeit a smaller gap. Continuity can be obtained through the designation of I-80 between the Elm Avenue and the Grass Valley Highway interchanges as I-80/Route 49. Elm Avenue currently serves as the preferred truck route for truck traffic travelling along Route 49 through the City of Auburn. Trucks travelling south from Grass Valley predominately turn left on Elm Avenue to avoid downtown and then another left on High Street to get back on Route 49. Trucks travelling on I-80 predominately take the Elm Avenue off-ramp to access southbound Route 49. To access northbound Route 49 from I-80, trucks may either use Elm Avenue or Route 49 (Grass Valley Highway). For trucks travelling north from El Dorado County, the preferred truck route diverges from Route 49 once they enter the city due to a tight turning radius that exists at the corner of existing Route 49 and Elm Avenue. Currently, at this location, there are “Truck Route” signs placed by the City to direct trucks to turn left on Lincoln Way and then right on Elm Avenue. On December 12, 2011, the City of Auburn passed Resolution No. 11-123 approving the proposed Route 49 Route Adoption along Elm Avenue.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3321: Improvement of Main Street - Shenandoah Road/Route 49 Intersection, Plymouth. $800,000.

     

     

    Naming

    Much of this route is named the "Gold Country" Highway or the "Golden Chain Highway. It was named for its location, because it links historic towns and points of interest in California's gold country..

    The portion of this route between Sonora and Auburn is officially named the "Mother Lode Highway", per Chapter 839 in 1921. It was named for its location. The "Mother Lode Highway", named in 1921, connects towns and points of interest in California's gold country.

    The segment from the southern city limit of the City of Jackson to the intersection of Route 88 is officially named the "John C. Begovich Memorial Highway". John Begovich was an elected public official from Amador County. He was born on January 17, 1916, in Jackson Gate, California. He graduated from Sutter Creek High School and attended Sacramento Junior College and was a champion athlete at both institutions. In 1942, he enlisted in the United States Army where he rose to the rank of second lieutenant and earned 13 decorations, including the silver star, the bronze star, and three purple hearts. In 1945, he returned to Amador County and was selected to be the county Veterans Service Officer and County Civil Defense Director. In 1955, he was appointed judge in the Amador County Judicial District while retaining his position as Veterans Service Officer. In 1960, he was elected as Senator from the 9th Senatorial District serving Amador and El Dorado Counties and worked on numerous issues important to his constituents and the state, including the bistate park system within the Tahoe Basin, highway improvements, the creation of a second department of the Superior Court for El Dorado County, and a $250,000,000 veterans bill. In 1966, he was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson as one of four United States Federal Marshals in the State of California, serving in that capacity until 1970. In 1976, he was elected Supervisor of District 1, Amador County, where he made care of the elderly residents of the county one of his primary concerns. He was reelected as supervisor in 1980, 1984, 1988, and 1992. He died on November 2, 1999. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 139, Chapter 120, August 30, 2000.

    The portion of Route 49 one mile before and after its intersection with Parrott's Ferry Road, in Tuolumne County is officially named the "Deputy Dave Grant Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Deputy David P. Grant, a 15 year veteran of the Tuolumne County Sheriff's Department with more than 26 years of law enforcement experience. During the late morning of May 31, 2004, Deputy Grant suffered fatal injuries responding to a "plane down" call near the town of Columbia. While responding to the call at a high rate of speed, Deputy Grant's vehicle swerved to avoid colliding with two other vehicles, left the roadway, and struck a tree. Deputy Grant was critically injured and transported to the Sonora Regional Medical Center where, surrounded by family and fellow deputies, he succumbed to his injuries. This was the first loss for the Tuolumne County Sheriff's Department in more than 37 years. At the age of 16, David P. Grant served as an Explorer Cadet with the Sonora Police Department; and was sworn in as a Sonora police officer in 1978. Desiring to broaden his experience in a larger department, Deputy Grant accepted an appointment with the Oceanside Police Department in 1981 and served the City of Oceanside with distinction for eight years. He was sworn in as a Tuolumne County Deputy Sheriff on October 9, 1989. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 132, Resolution Chapter 105, on 8/16/2006.

    The intersection of Route 49 and Elm Avenue in the City of Auburn is named the "James E. Machado Memorial Intersection". It was named in memory of James E. Machado, a deputy sheriff with four years of service with the Placer County Sheriff’s Department, who was shot and killed on July 13, 1978, with his own service weapon, in a struggle with an escaped mental patient. The altercation occurred on the shoulder of the northbound lanes of State Highway Route 49 at Elm Avenue in the City of Auburn. With the help of citizens who witnessed the shooting, the suspect was quickly located by officers of the California Highway Patrol and an officer of the Auburn Police Department. The suspect confronted the responding officers with Deputy Machado’s service weapon, and was subsequently killed when the officers fired several rounds at the suspect. Law enforcement officers from throughout the state attended Deputy Machado’s funeral, and he was posthumously awarded the Placer County Sheriff’s Purple Heart. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 114, Resolution Chapter 102, on August 7, 2014.

     

    Named Structures

    [Stevenot Plaque]Bridge 32-040 over the Stanislaus River in Tuolumne and Calaveras counties is named the "Archie Stevenot Bridge". It was constructed in 1976, and was named by Senate Resolution 338, Page 4758, in 1988. Archie Stevenot (d. 1968), miner, cowboy, rancher, postmaster, and ox team swamper, helped found the California State Chamber of Commerce and was officially named "Mr. Mother Lode" by the California legislature. He was also the founder of the "Mother Lode Association" in 1919, which was the first highway association and promoted the assignment of the number "49" to Route 49.

    The Route 49 Amador Creek Bridge, Bridge No. 26-0043, is named the "Jay-D Ornsby-Adkins Bridge." This bridge was named in memory of Jay-D Ornsby-Adkins, born on December 9, 1985, in Middle Swan, Western Australia. He attended Ione Elementary School in Ione, Amador County, and graduated from Independence High School in Sutter Creek, Amador County, in 2005. He pursued a career in the United States Army and graduated from basic training on December 8, 2006, at Ft. Knox, Kentucky. He was assigned to the Delta Company 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, at Ft. Benning, Georgia, where he continued to train, advance his skills, and prepare for combat, and earned the expert badge for grenade, rifle sharpshooter, and pistol marksman. On March 9, 2007, Jay-D Ornsby-Adkins was deployed to Iraq as a member of the Delta Company 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment; and on April 28, 2007, while on patrol, Private First Class Ornsby-Adkins and three other members of his unit died in combat. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 84, Resolution Chapter 86, on 7/10/2008.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Carson Hill, in Calaveras County, 4 mi S of Angels Camp.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] Entire portion.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] From Route 108 south of Jamestown to Route 108 near Sonora; and from Route 88 near Jackson to Route 50 near Placerville. These segments were added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  4. (4) From Route 80 near Auburn to Route 20 in Grass Valley.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this was a single segment running from "Route 120 to Route 20 via Sonora, Angels Camp, San Andreas, Jackson, El Dorado, Diamond Springs, Placerville, and Auburn." Before the year was out, this was split into two segments by Chapter 1698: "(b) Route 120 to Route 80 in Auburn via the vicinity of Sonora; via Angels Camp, San Andreas, and Jackson; via the vicinity of El Dorado, Diamond Springs, and Placerville. (c) Route 80 near Auburn to Route 20."

    In 1984, Chapter 409 changed the wording of the terminus to "Route 80 near Auburn to Route 20 in Grass Valley."

    The very high Foresthill Bridge for Foresthill Road over the American River was built in the 1970s as part of construction for the abandoned Auburn Dam project; the bridge was built in the case that Old Foresthill Road and Route 49 would be flooded out by the then-forthcoming Auburn Reservoir (which never came to fruition). According to Travis Mason-Bushman, after the construction of the dam, Route 49 would've been placed on the bridge, but as construction halted in 1976, this never materalized (although some officials in Auburn still hope for the dam to be built). Currently, this bridge (located about a half mile from Route 49 on Foresthill Road) is the third-highest in the United States.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 49 was signed along the route from Jct Route 140 at Mariposa to Jct. Route 24 (now Route 70) near Reno Jct, via Sonora, Jackson, and Nevada City. It was LRN 17, and was defined in 1909.

     

    Status

    Route 49 is a currently signed freeway from approximately 1 mile south of the Route 49/Route 20 interchange near Grass Valley, and runs for a length of 5 miles until reaching the Route 49/Route 20 interchange north of Nevada City. This section of freeway was built in the late 60's. There are currently studies under to plan upgrading Route 49 to 4 lanes between Auburn and Grass Valley.

    Although not directly on Route 49, there are plans to retrofit and upgrade the Foresthill Bridge. The bridge was constructed in 1973 for $13 million as a proposed rerouting of Route 49 to avoid low-lying areas that would be flooded when the Auburn Dam was completed. The dam, however, was cancelled and the connection to Route 49 was never constructed, leaving the bridge orphaned and maintained by Placer County. In February 2010, it was reported that the bridge was up for an estimated $71 million seismic retrofitting. Potential contractors were treated to an up-close view of the bridge and briefed on the scope of work to be done, including the complex job of painting the span without letting original lead-based paint particles drop into the river below. Bids were to be advertised in April 2010, and the contract to be awarded in May 2010. Construction could start in August 2010 and last until 2012.
    [Source: Auburn Journal, February 2010]

    La Barr MeadowsIn 2007, the CTC recommended funding $18.568M from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) for the La Barr Meadows widening. In January 2008, the CTC approved the mitigated negative declaration. This project in Nevada County will make roadway improvements that include widening from two lanes to four lanes and construction of a new interchange along a portion of Route 49 near Grass Valley. The project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The total estimated project cost, capital and support, is $40,500,000. The project is funded from $10,966,000 Regional Improvement Program, $10,966,000 Interregional Improvement Program, and $18,568,000 Corridor Mobility Improvement Account. It is estimated that construction will begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09. The project will involve construction activities in an area that is habitat to federally protected migratory birds. The project will also involve acquisition of new right-of-way and residential relocations.

    In March 2009, the CTC adjusted the funding on this due to increased cost. Delays in acquisition of some of the right of way parcels have led to delays in the delivery of design. Some of this was due to problems with ROW acquisition. Another problem was that the need to relinquish four new frontage roads to the County was not originally anticipated, requiring added effort in processing relinquishment activities, including a cooperative agreement, relinquishment agreement, and field surveys. These changes updated the End Design date to April 1, 2009 and the Begin Construction date to July 15, 2009.

    In mid-May 2011, ground was broken on this project, which was now a $29 million project. The project will widen a 1.5-mile stretch to four lanes between Little Valley Road, just north of Alta Sierra, and Cornette Drive, south of Grass Valley. The project also includes the construction of frontage roads, right-turn projects, wider shoulders and the installation of traffic signal at La Barr Meadows Road intersection with the highway. Soundwalls will be constructed at three locations. The project is planned for completion in the fall of 2012.

    In March 2013, the CTC adjusted the funding again, allocating an additional $840,000 in State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funds. The increase is due to a new Construction General Permit (CGP) for storm water discharges, drainage system modifications, increased traffic handling and a low asphalt price index at time of contract award plus a few miscellaneous issues.

    There are also plans to build a controlled access highway route; a segement from PM 6.9 to PM R11.0 has been adopted.

    A new Route 49 alignment is planned between Coloma and Placerville directly paralelling Cold Springs Road.

    The Amador/Sutter Creek bypass of Route 49 is planned to follow a new, straighter alignment from Drytown south to the Route 104/49 junction in Sutter Hill.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] Entire portion.

     

    Naming

    Much of this route is named the "Gold Country" Highway.

    The Route 20/Route 49 NE-bound frontage road in Grass Valley from its intersection with South Auburn Street to its intersection with Bennett Street is named "Hansen Way." This segment was named in honor of the Hansen family of Grass Valley, for their contributions to the community and for their building supply company, Hansen Brothers, that was established in 1953. The Hansen family historically has been very civic minded and has contributed community service and philanthropic gifts to the community. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 10, Resolution Chapter 104, on 9/6/2005.

    The Route 20/Route 49 SW-bound frontage road in Grass Valley from the intersection of East Main Street and Idaho Maryland Road to its intersection with South Auburn Street is officially named "Tinloy Street." This segment was named in honor of the Tinloy family of Grass Valley. The Tinloy family has Chinese roots and its presence in Grass Valley dates back to the 19th century. John Tinloy was born to Kan Tinloy who immigrated to Nevada County from the Canton Province in China during the Gold Rush in the 1880's and owned and operated a store offering Chinese traditional food and artifacts, and this store evolved into a social place, bank, and an employment bureau. He married Alice Chen Shee, and together they raised one daughter and three sons, and the family opened and operated a fine women's apparel store and a grocery store in Grass Valley. The Tinloy family was active in the Methodist Church in Grass Valley. The Tinloy family, stemming from the community activism of John Tinloy, has historically been very civic minded and contributed community service and philanthropic gifts to the community. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 11, Resolution Chapter 121, on 9/14/2005.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 17-049 on Route 20, at the Route 20/Route 49 separation and Empire Street, is named the "Bruce Allen Jensen, Lt. Col., USAF, Bridge". It was built in 1969, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 43, Chapter 220, in 1971. Lieutenant Colonel Bruce Allan Jensen was a casualty of the Vietnam War. As a member of the Air Force, LTC Jensen served our country until August 27th, 1967 in Laos. He was 38 years old and was married. Bruce died when his plane crashed into the land.

    Bridge 26-17, postmile 12.14, commonly known as the "Rancheria Creek Bridge", was officially named the "Amador County Veterans Memorial Bridge". Named by Senate Concurrant Resolution 43, Chapter 106, in 1997.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  5. (5) From Route 20 at Nevada City to Route 89 near Sattley via Downieville.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

    The route between Route 20 near Grass Valley and Route 20 near Nevada City is signed as Route 49, although it is legislatively Route 20.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 49 was signed along the route from Jct Route 140 at Mariposa to Jct. Route 24 (now Route 70) near Reno Jct, via Sonora, Jackson, and Nevada City. It was LRN 25. The portion from Route 20 to Downieville was defined in 1909; the portion from Downieville to Route 89 was defined in 1933.

     

    Status

    The route between Sattley and Sierraville is signed as Route 49, although it is legislatively Route 89. This results in signs for 49 North and 89 South ... and the reverse of this going the other way.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $18,800,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Downieville, from 0.3 mile south of Downie River Bridge to 0.2 mile north of Yuba Pass camp ground that will rehabilitate 25.2 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the road surface, minimize the costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] Entire portion.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  6. (6) From Route 89 near Sierraville to Route 70 near Vinton via Loyalton.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

    The route between Satley and Sierraville is signed as Route 49, although it is legislatively Route 89.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 49 was signed along the route from Jct Route 140 at Mariposa to Jct. Route 24 (now Route 70) near Reno Jct, via Sonora, Jackson, and Nevada City. Route 70 was Alternate US 40 before 1964, and at one point was signed as Route 24.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.12] Between Route 41 and Route 89.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Nevada 49 R13.26 R13.45
Nevada 49 R13.54 R14.47

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 49 was signed as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934.

 


Overall statistics for Route 49:

  • Total Length (1995): 295 miles. There is a 3.7 mile unconstructed adopted routing parallel to the existing route in and near Sutter Creek in Amador County.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 400 to 43,000.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 286; Sm. Urban 9.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 295 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 9 mi; Minor Arterial: 286 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Yuba Pass (6701 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Madera, Mariposa, Tuolumne, Calaveras, Amador, El Dorado, Placer, Nevada, Yuba, Sierra, Plumas.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 49 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from Calistoga to Lower Lake. It was extended in 1933 from [LRN 8] near Napa to [LRN 49] near Calistoga. It was codified in the 1935 state highway code as:

"[LRN 8] near Napa to [LRN 15] via Calistoga and Lower Lake"

It remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. This was signed as Route 29 in two segments:

  1. Between Calistoga and Middletown, it was signed as Route 29, and is present-day Route 29.

  2. Between Calistoga and Middletown, it was signed as Route 53. It is present-day Route 29.


US Highway Shield

US Highway 50



Routing

US Highway Shield Business Route Shield From Route 80 west of Sacramento to the Nevada state line near Lake Tahoe via Placerville.

 

Alternate Routes

Alternate US 50 is signed along a route consisting of county milage and portions of Route 88 and Route 89. It runs from US 50 near Pollock Pines, then S and E on Sly Park Road and Mormon Emigrant Trail, including a 20 mi segment of National Forest Highway 5. It joins Route 89 at Picketts Junction, continuing until the north Route 89 junction. From there it follows Route 89 until it rejoins US 50 at the foot of Meyers Grade.

In the portion of the route not cosigned with existing state milage, there are temporary postmiles that do not fit state standards. The route is a detour routing for those times when US 50 is closed. This happens frequently enough that it was felt to be appropriate to sign the route as Alternate US 50.

The mile markers were put in after the 1997/1998 winter season for ease of managing the snow removal operations. During the 1997/1998 winter, when the large slides closed US 50 and snow removal operations were made all season long to the Trail, the lack of markers made control of operations difficult. The markers were placed the following spring/summer. Despite the choice of labels, those portions of Alternate US 50 not already in the state highway system (i.e., Route 88 and Route 89) have not been added to the state highway system; they are county or forest roads maintained by the appropriate jurisdictions. In particular, Sly Park Rd. and Mormon Emigrant Trail are El Dorado County roads and are not state highway. Mormon Emigrant Trail was repaved for use as the detour as a part of the contract to repair US 50. There are Alternate US 50 postmiles on Mormon Emigrant Trail; those are used by CHP and Caltrans as reference when the road is in use as Alternate US 50. There are also Alternate US 50 shields posted along the route, and some signs showing distance to control cities, coupled with an Alternate US 50 sign package (i.e. shields). These are covered when not in use.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield As defined in 1963, Route 50 was the route from Route 80 in Sacramento to the Nevada state line near Lake Tahoe via Placerville. The "Route 80" referred to in this routing is what is now Route 51, i.e., Business Route 80.

In 1981, Chapter 292 changed Route 50 to run from "Route 80 in West of Sacramento". The Route 80 referred to in this definition was the new definition of Route 80 that was the bypass around Sacramento, so this effectively added the former portion of Route 80 between Route 51 and the new junction with Route 80 to Route 50. The segment added is FAI 305, meaning it is acually interstate milage, but isn't signed as interstate milage. Note that the added segment is signed as Business Route 80 ("Capitol City Freeway").

The interchange of US 50 with Sunrise Blvd. is larger than normal, because Sunrise Blvd was, for a short time in the 1970s, designated as Route 65 south of US 50 in anticipation of the freeway routing. This route was relinquished in 1976. On one of the piers for the overcrossing, you can see where it used to call the structure "50/65 separation." The interchange was a cloverleaf until around 2001, when it was converted to a partial cloverleaf. According to an article in the Sacramento Bee in January 2004, the city of Rancho Cordova is planning a new US 50 interchange, east of Sunrise Boulevard. The goal of this interchange would be to relieve traffic from Sunrise Blvd, where traffic counts from August 2003 show more than 80,000 cars per day travel on Sunrise Boulevard south of the American River at US 50. The new interchange between Sunrise Boulevard and Hazel Avenue would serve proposed development south of the freeway, including more than 30,000 homes in Rancho Cordova.

In May 2014, the CTC received notice of a draft EIR for comment. The project in question is located partially within the City of Rancho Cordova and partially in unincorporated Sacramento County. The proposed project will construct a new interchange over US Highway 50 (US 50) between Sunrise Boulevard and Hazel Avenue in Rancho Cordova including auxiliary lanes between Post Miles 12.5 and 15.8. The project will also construct a new four lane arterial known as Rancho Cordova Parkway extending south from the new interchange to White Rock Road. The City of Rancho Cordova is serving as the lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Caltrans is the lead agency under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No funding under the purview of the Commission is currently programmed for this project; however, it is anticipated that the Commission will be asked to take action on this project in the future to approve a new public road connection. The alternatives considered for the proposed project include:

  • Alternative 3 (Proposed Project) – This alternative would construct a tight diamond (L-1) interchange and overcrossing structure including four through lanes, one left-turn pocket, shoulders, and a shared bicycle/pedestrian lane on one side of the interchange structure. The eastbound ramps would create a four-way intersection at the overcrossing which would terminate at a T intersection with the westbound ramps. A new four lane arterial roadway (Rancho Cordova Parkway) including paved shoulders for bicycle and pedestrian access would be constructed from where the interchange touches down just south of the Folsom South Canal extending south to a new signalized intersection at White Rock Road. This alternative would also include auxiliary lanes in both directions on US 50 from Sunrise Boulevard to Rancho Cordova Parkway and from Rancho Cordova Parkway to Hazel Avenue.
  • No Build Alternative (2037 Conditions without the Project) – This is the no-build alternative. This alternative assumes certain Tier 1 roadway improvements contained in the SACOG 2035 MTIP and other future roadway improvements planned as part of the City’s General Plan would be constructed but that the proposed Rancho Cordova Parkway Interchange including the Rancho Cordova Parkway connection to US 50 would not be constructed.

The historic aerials site site shows some changes to interchanges in the Sacramento area since 1965. In 1965, the US 50 freeway ended at Folsom Blvd west of Sunrise Blvd. From the EB perspective, there was no left turn to get on the freeway–all lanes were aligned to connect directly to the freeway. To continue onto Folsom Blvd involved a channelized right turn. To continue west on Folsom Blvd at that intersection required a left hand turn.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

According to an article by Richard Bauman in the FEDCO Reporter, this is truly the first state highway. In 1850, the state created the Office of Surveyor General, with the duty to suggest roads. In 1855, there was public demand for a road from the Sacramento Valley to Carson Valley in Nevada, and the legislature passed a bill ordering the Surveyor General to survey a good wagon road over the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and authorized bids for construction of the Emigrant Wagon Road. No funds were appropriated. The funds, however, were raised, and eventually repaid, by April 1857. In November 1858, the road was finally completed. Lack of legislative support for the road led to it being privatized and becoming a toll road.

In 1895, the legislature created the State Bureau of Highways and took over the toll road, then known as the Placerville Road. This road ran from Smith Flat to the Nevada border. It was designated as Calfornia's first official state road on February 28, 1895, and renamed the Lake Tahoe State Wagon Road. Work started on improving the road in 1899 with a legislated grant. Over the years, the road was upgraded from a dirt road, to an oil cover road, to asphalt and concrete. This is the route of present-day US 50. A lot of details on the road may be found at Joel Windmiller's site.

The current definition of Route 50 begins with portion that was never part of the original US 50. This is the short segment of freeway between the US 50/Business Loop 80 interchange (really the Route 50/Route 51 interchange) and the connection with I-80 to the west. This was part of the 1909 LRN 6 between I-80 in W. Sacramento and Route 160 (former US 40), and 1897 LRN 11 between present-day Route 160 (former US 40) and Route 99. It was signed as US 40 between I-80 and Route 160. For a time, the segment was planned to be signed as I-305, but that signage never occured. Although legislatively part of Route 50, this segment is (for the most part) signed as Business Loop 80 (there may be one or two US 50 signs). Lastly, note that the portion between Route 275 west of Sacramento to Route 160 in Sacramento was signed (for a time) as Route 275, although that ended in 1967.

The freeeway portion was built in three segments: the first in 1962 from the Sacramento County line to Sunrise Blvd; the second in 1972 from 34th Street to near Watt Avenue, and the third and final stage in 1975. Note that the original US 50 did not connect between what is now I-5 and US 99 in Manteca, but rather in connected in Stockton on Charter Way (former Route 4).

At Mossdale, where I-5 and CA-120 meet, there are several crossings of the San Joaquin River. At this point, there is an older routing of US-50 (now serving Manthey Road, a frontage road), then the pre-I-5 routing of US-50 (now serving the connector from WB 120 to SB 5). These crossings (including an old SP crossing) were all drawspans at one time (vertical lift for the railroadl; the other two were bascules). Next are the fixed spans of I-5. Then there is the WP (UP) bridge south of I-5, which looks like it used to be a swing span. El Dorado Street in French Camp is also the old US-50, and there are a couple of old state traffic lights and lamp poles in that area. Information on the US 50 routing around Tracy may be found with I-580.

By 1933, US 50 did not extend to Oakland. Rather, US 50 followed Castro Valley Boulevard into Hayward, ending near the current Route 238/I-580 junction, at US 101E (which followed current Route 238 south to San Jose, and current I-580 north to Oakland).

US Highway Shield The remainder of the route is the original US 50. The original 1926 plan did not have US 50 extending to Sacramento; rather, the plan was to have it follow current Alt US 50 to US 40 east of Reno, and end there. The 1928 plan, however, did include US 50, and US 50 was first signed in California in 1928. The 1928 definition had US 50 running from Sacramento to the Nevada-California state line at the south end of Lake Tahoe via Placerville.

In the mid-1930's, former US 48 was combined into the US 50 routing. US 50 originally started near French Camp near Manteca and ran via Tracy and Hayward to San Jose. It was cosigned with US 99 into Sacramento; this segment was LRN 4, defined in 1909.

US 48 started in San Francisco. It (now as US 50) ran E across the Bay Bridge cosigned with US 40 (current I-80; LRN 68. It continued down MacArthur Blvd as US 50 (LRN 5; now I-580) to the vicinity of San Leandro. Old Business Route 50 followed Cypress Street to the Broadway exit, then went down the frontage streets to Grand Ave. and across to MacArthur. Between San Francisco and the vicinity of Hayward (where US 50 turned east), it was cosigned as Alternate US 101. It then travelled E across present I-580 (LRN 5) to what is now I-205. [Part of this was Altamont Pass Road; see the page on I-480 for details] It continued across the route of present-day I-205 to 5 mi NE of Banta (near the present I-5 junction); this was all LRN 5. It then ran N along a routing roughly corresponding the present I-5 to 3 mi NE of Stockton (it was cosigned briefly with Route 4 in Stockton), where it joined US 99 (to this point, it was LRN 5).

In the 1940's, US 50 entered Sacramento on Stockton Blvd, turning left on 5th Ave, right onto Sacramento Blvd, left onto Broadway, right onto 16th Street, and left on M Street/Folsom Blvd, cosigned with Route 16 into Perkins. By 1960, the South Sacramento Freeway (current Route 99, although it was cosigned with US 50 until the 1970s) was constructed to south of Broadway and 29th Street. At the junction of Broadway and 29th (near the current interchange of Route 51, US 50, and Route 99), US 99W and 99E began; US 99W followed Broadway and 15th/16th on the old routing of US 50/US 99 into downtown (this later became Route 160, but was never Route 24 or US 40 in this portion). US 99E however was co-signed with US 50 north via 29th and 30th to Folsom Boulevard, where US 50 then made the right turn going eastbound with Route 16 to Perkins. Around 1954, clearing had begun for the "WX" portion of the US 50 freeway. By the mid-1960s, Route 50 was temporarily placed on the 29/30 Freeway (co-signed with US 99E and I-80) between the current Route 51/US 50/Route 99 junction and Folsom Boulevard; this arrangement only lasted until the El Dorado Freeway (US 50 east of the Route 99 interchange) was completed.

There was also a Bypass US 50, portions of which were LRN 98. The routing had Bypass US 50 continuing north on 65th Street to rejoin US 50/then-Route 16 at Folsom Boulevard.

A part of the WX portion of the Capitol City Freeway (former LRN 11, between Route 99 and Route 160) actually corresponds to formerly signed US 50 (Broadway between Stockton Boulevard and 16th Street, which was US 50 until 1954). It appears that the WX Freeway (including former LRN 11) was also originally proposed to be US 50 as early as 1964; this early designation obviously was not signed in favor of I-80 and was only a temporary plan.

US Highway Shield US 50 ran E out of Sacramento along Folsom Blvd, and was LRN 11 until the Nevada border. The portion between Route 99 and Folsom was defined in 1897, as was the portion between Placerville and Lake Tahoe. The remainder was defined in 1909.

Between Shingle Springs and Perks Corner, US 50 used to take a routing on what is now Mother Lode Drive; the existing freeway bypass was adopted in 1962.

 

Status

General Route Status

[Ocean City Sign]At the beginning of this route is a sign that shows the distance to Ocean City MD. The original version of this sign was often stolen, so it was replaced with a significantly larger sign with three destinations. However, the replacement has a significant error: The milage to Ocean City MD is 3073 mi, not 3037. This has been reported, so who knows how long this incarnation of the sign will last. Thanks to Joel Windmiller for the photo.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $277,000 in SHOPP funding, programmed in Fiscal Years 2012-13 and 2013-14, for repairs in Nevada, Sacramento and Yolo Counties on Route 5, Route 20 and US 50 at various locations that will upgrade crash cushions and guardrail to meet the current National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) 350 standards and improve safety.

Sacramento through Folsom

Business Route Shield In Yolo County, between the Yolo County line and post mile 3.16, US 50 is signed as Business Loop 80. In Sacramento County, between the Yolo County line and post mile 2.48, US 50 is signed as Business Route 80. In other words, the portion between the US 50/Business Route 80 interchange to the junction with I-80 in W. Sacramento is signed as Business Route 80 to provide continuity of signage with the segment of Business Route 80 that runs N to I-80. Note that after the Business Route 80/US 99/US 50 interchange, westbound US 50 is signed on one sign as "CA 99 TO I-80 I-5". The portion that is the former "WX" freeway is signed variously as Business Route 80 or Business Route 80/US 50.

In May 2013, it was reported that Caltrans will close a section of the elevated W-X freeway (US 50) through central Sacramento in each direction for two months in Spring 2014 for major repairs. The construction zone will run from 14th to 26th streets. The $46 million project may be the biggest fix ever on the freeway, which is 45 years old as of 2013. Officials say inspections show the road surface on the elevated bridge section is cracking from years of traffic and water intrusion, and in need of a complete redo. Caltrans plans to add 4 inches of new road surface made out of concrete reinforced with shreds of steel, extending the freeway surface lifespan another 20 years. The work also includes widening all shoulders by 2.5 feet to meet modern width standards, building new safety barriers on the viaduct's flanks, and reinforcing an estimated 144 concrete bridge pillars with steel rods to make them more earthquake resistent. Several ramps and connectors are expected to be closed at some point during the project. They include connectors to and from Route 99, as well as the 10th and 16th street ramps.
(Source: Sacramento Bee, 5/12/13)

In February 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Sacramento along Route 50 adjacent and parallel to the eastbound off ramp to 65th Street, consisting of nonmotorized transportation facilities, namely a pedestrian walkway.

TCRP Project #126 will widen the US 50/Watt Avenue Interchange and do various improvements. In April 2012, the CTC voted to approve $25.9 million for interchange improvements at Watt Avenue. The project will construct multi-modal improvements at the US 50 and Watt Avenue interchange and on Watt Avenue between Kiefer Boulevard and La Riviera Drive. Improvements will include modification of the US 50 and Watt Avenue interchange to a partial cloverleaf configuration, construction of a dedicated transit-way and related facilities to support the initial working segment of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), and construction of a dedicated bicycle and pedestrian pathway through the interchange to separate these modes from vehicular traffic. The project is estimated to cost $50,376,000. The project is funded with State ($32,458,000) funds, Federal ($4,380,000) funds, and Local ($13,538,000) funds. The project is proposed by sponsor for consideration of CMIA Savings. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2012/13.

In December 2012, the CTC approved un-programming $5,112,000 of the $6,280,000 in TCRP programmed for construction. This just reduces the amount for future reimbursement.

TCRP Project #134 will make modifications to the US 50/Sunrise Blvd interchange.

In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing HOV lanes in Sacramento County.

Route 50 BuspoolIn March 2007, the CTC considered a draft EIR regarding a project in Sacramento County is to construct roadway improvements near the city of Sacramento. The project is programmed in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program. The overall project is fully funded. Project Development, however, is fully funded in the Regional Transportation Improvement Program and the Interregional Transportation Program. The total estimated project cost is $165 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The project is programmed in the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account program for $80 million. The following alternatives are being considered:

  • Build Alternative 10D-1: Construct bus/carpool lanes from Sunrise Boulevard to the Oak Park Interchange (US 50/SR 99/I-80 interchange) using existing medians. The new bus/carpool lanes would not be continuous between Sunrise Boulevard and the Oak Park Interchange because of right of way constraints. Two small slivers of acquisition from commercial properties for ramp widening at the Zinfandel Drive Interchange will be required.

  • Build Alternative 10D-3: Construct bus/carpool lanes from Sunrise Boulevard to Watt Avenue. The proposed bus/carpool lanes from Watt Avenue to Bradshaw Road would be constructed in the existing median. Between Bradshaw Road and Sunrise Boulevard, the existing median is not sufficient. New right of way would be acquired to accommodate the new lanes.

  • No Build Alternative.

In September 2007, the CTC approved a resolution to approve a project for future consideration of funding: construct Bus/Carpool lanes near Sacramento on Route 50. This would be the portion roughly from I-5 to Sunset.

In July 2009, the CTC approved an amendment of the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) program project baseline agreement for the Route 50 HOV project (PPNO 6199C) in Rancho Cordova, from Watt Avenue to Sunrise Boulevard. The approved baseline agreement included $67,125,000 in STA Measure A funds for construction ($53,125,000 capital and $14,000,000 for support). Due to reduced sales tax receipts, Measure A funds were not available in this amount. This amendment reduces Measure A funds for construction to $48,702,000, and adds Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) and Proposition 1B State and Local Partnership (SLPP) funds to fully fund construction and construction support.

Folsom through Placerville

In terms of general widening, as of April 2003, there has been widening from Sunrise Blvd to El Dorado Hills Blvd, giving 4 lanes in each direction between Sunrise and Hazel and 3 lanes in each direction from Hazel to El Dorado Hills. Plans call for adding an additional lane in each direction between El Dorado Hills and Shingle Springs. Plans to add lanes west of Sunrise Blvd have not been finalized.

Silva InterchangeIn March 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a new interchange at Silva Valley Parkway. The project will construct a new interchange connection to US 50 that will include a six lane overcrossing, new signalized diagonal off-ramps, diagonal on-ramps, and loop on-ramps. The mainline will be improved to include east and west auxiliary lanes between El Dorado Hills Boulevard and the new interchange. The project will result in significant unavoidable impacts to transportation/circulation and noise. Specifically, the project would result in a lower level of service on the eastbound slip on-ramp resulting in congestion impacting the ability for on-ramp traffic to merge into thru traffic; possible temporary vibration-induced annoyance to residents during hard rock blasting during construction; and temporary construction related noise in proximity to existing residential land north and south of the project site. Mitigation measures and/or alternatives to the proposed project that would substantially reduce or avoid these significant unavoidable impacts are infeasible. The County found that there were several benefits that outweigh the unavoidable adverse environmental effects of the project. These benefits include, but are not limited to, providing transportation facilities to accommodate planned growth as noted in the 2004 County General Plan and the El Dorado Hills Specific Plan; improve traffic circulation to Silva Valley Parkway, El Dorado Hills Boulevard Interchange, Bass Lake Road Interchange, US 50, Serrano Parkway, Latrobe Road, and White Rock Road; improve the El Dorado County sustainable transportation system by augmenting the US 50 HOV and ramp metering facilities; and improve safe pedestrian mobility by providing a significant north-south pedestrian facility crossing of US 50. The County established a Mitigation Monitoring Program to ensure that the mitigation measures specified for the project are implemented. The project is estimated to cost $60 million and will be constructed in two phases. The project is funded with SLPP ($1 million) funds and Local ($59 million) funds. Construction of phase one is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2012/13.

In August 2012, the CTC approved a new public road connection to US 50 at Silva Parkway (Post Mile (PM) 1.8). This is in support to a proposal from the County of El Dorado to construct a new Silva Valley Parkway interchange on US 50 between the El Dorado Hills Boulevard/Latrobe Road interchange and the Bass Lake Road interchange, just east of the Clarksville Undercrossing along the existing Sylva Valley Parkway. The existing Silva Valley Parkway will be renamed Old Sylva Valley Parkway. The purpose of the project is to relieve congestion to US 50 due to commercial and residential development in the areas surrounding the proposed interchange and to accommodate planned growth as noted in the County’s General Plan. Studies for this interchange project started in the 1980’s. The project was approved by El Dorado County in 1990 and by the Department in 1991; however, due to lack of funding the project was put on hold. Since then local development and traffic impact fees have been collected to fund the project and the project was restarted in 2010. Community just west of the proposed new interchange. It crosses under US 50 at the Clarksville Undercrossing. The proposed project will construct a new Silva Valley Parkway interchange with a six-lane overcrossing (four through lanes and two deceleration lanes to the loop on-ramps), diagonal on and off-ramps, and loop on-ramps. The US 50 mainline will be improved to include east and west auxiliary lanes between El Dorado Hills Boulevard and the new interchange. The new Silva Valley Parkway will provide shoulders for bicycle and pedestrian access, while bike and pedestrian access will also be provided along the existing Silva Valley Parkway.

In January 2013, the CTC authorized $1,000,000 to El Dorado County LTC for the Silva Valley Parkway / US 50 Interchange. This project, in El Dorado County at the Silva Valley Parkway, will construct the overpass, on and off ramps, signalized intersection, bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

In October 2011, the CTC amended the CMIA baseline for the HOV Lanes El Dorado Hills Boulevard to Bass Lake project - Phase 1 (PPNO 3283A) to add the scope of the US 50 HOV Lanes - Bass Lake to Cambridge Road Interchange project -Phase 2A, Segment 1 (PPNO 3283B), and update the funding plan and delivery schedule. In addition, this combined project will now use the title, “US 50 HOV Lanes - El Dorado County,” which reflects the original project and added scope. The Commission, at the June 2011 meeting, approved funding for the additional scope under Resolution CMIA-P-1011-07.

In December 2011, the CTC approved $9.5 million in funding to add 2.3 miles for a carpool lane on US 50 between Bass Lake Road and Cambridge Road in El Dorado County.

[Latrobe to Shingle]In September 2008, the CTC also considred reconstructing the El Dorado Hills Blvd/Latrobe Rd Interchange. This project in El Dorado County would reconstruct the El Dorado Hills Boulevard-Latrobe Road Interchange and make improvements to Route 50 associated with the interchange. For the purposes of construction, a portion of this project is included in Phase 1 of the Route 50 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane project from El Dorado Hills Boulevard to South Shingle Road/Ponderosa Road Overcrossing (PM 0.0 to PM R9.1). Phase 1 begins at the El Dorado County line to just west of Bass Lake Road (PM 0.0 to PM 2.9) and is programmed with corridor mobility improvement account funds, congestion mitigation air quality funds, regional surface transportation program funds, and local traffic impact mitigation funds. The total estimated cost of Phase 1, capital and support, is $44,568,000. The cost associated with the interchange improvements is $13,000,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09.

In September 2008, the CTC considered for future funding roadway widening along Route 50 between the El Dorado Hills Boulevard Undercrossing to South Shingle Road/Ponderosa Road Overcrossing (PPNO 3283A). This project in El Dorado County will construct bus-carpool lanes in the eastbound and westbound lanes. Phase 1, from the El Dorado County line to just west of Bass Lake Road (PM 0.0 to PM 2.9), is programmed with corridor mobility improvement account funds, congestion mitigation air quality funds, regional surface transportation program funds and local traffic impact mitigation (TIM) funds. The total estimated cost of Phase 1, capital and support, is $44,568,000. The second phase, from west of Bass Lake Road to South Shingle Road/Ponderosa Road Overcrossing is estimated to cost $55,000,000. Phase 2 is funded entirely from local TIM funds. Construction for both phases is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09.

There are plans to construct a new interchange near the city of Cameron Park. There are also plans to create a new public road connection and interchange near Shingle Springs, at PM ELD 11.4. As of December 2008, the location was better identified as Missouri Flat Road Nof Cameron Park.

In July 2006, the CTC considered Resolution No. R-3639, relinquishing right of way in the County of El Dorado at PM 5.0, at Cambridge Road, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county road.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $11,500,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near El Dorado Hills, from 0.3 mile east of Bass Lake Road to Route 49 Junction in Placerville, that will rehabilitate 49.2 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life.

Placerville through the Nevada State Line

In March 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Placerville along Route 50 between Ray Lawyer Drive and Mosquito Road, consisting of collateral and non-motorized transportation facilities. The City, by relinquishment agreement dated January 14, 2014, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

In May 2012, it was reported that Caltrans is is completing work ahead of schedule on a tunnel under US 50 near the El Dorado Road exit that officials hope wildlife will begin using to get to the other side of the highway. An eight foot tall fence will help funnel the animals to the tunnel entrance. This tunnel is the first to be built under US 50 and, at 203 feet in length and 12 feet high by 12 feet wide, is also the largest in the area.

Ray Lawyer Interchange ImprovementsIn April 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that is located in the City of Placerville in El Dorado County. The project will widen and improve segments of Forni Road, Fair Lane, Placerville Drive, and Ray Lawyer Drive. Improvements to these roadways will be made in conjunction with modifications and improvements to eastbound and westbound US 50 ramps to and from Forni Road, Placerville Drive, and Ray Lawyer Drive. The estimated project cost is approximately $40 million for the overall Western Placerville Interchanges Project, of which the Ray Lawyer Drive improvements are estimated to cost $10,800,000. The project is programmed with State ($5,542,000) funds. The project is proposed by sponsor for consideration of CMIA Savings. The remaining project costs will be programmed as available and applicable from local funds, Traffic Impact Mitigation Fees, Regional, State, and Federal transportation sources. Construction is estimated to begin in 2012.

In May 2012, the CTC approved a public road connection in support of this project at Ray Lawyer Drive. The overall Western Placerville Interchanges project will consist of replacing the existing Placerville Drive/Forni Road overcrossing to meet vertical clearance standards and provide sufficient width for future US 50 widening; constructing new on and off ramps at Ray Lawyer Drive overcrossing; widening of eastbound ramps at Forni Road/Placerville Drive; and widening and overlay portions of Forni Road, Placerville Drive, and Fair Lane. This project also proposes construction of new eastbound auxiliary lanes from Forni Road to Ray Lawyer Drive and westbound from Ray Lawyer Drive to the Placerville Drive interchange; Ray Lawyer Drive will be widened and extended 820 feet south; Forni Road will be realigned and widened and will terminate at a new signalized intersection at the new Justice Center Driveway/Ray Lawyer Drive intersection. The project also includes Class II bike lanes on both sides of Placerville Drive, Forni Road and Ray Lawyer Drive. Sidewalks are included along at least one side of all of the local streets except for Fair Lane. These improvements will provide safer routes for pedestrian and bicycle travelers.

In October 2012, it was reported that construction was complete on $80 million worth of widening and interchange reconfigurations in the Missouri Flat and Forni roads area, including two new lanes on the Weber Creek Bridge.

In December 2009, Caltrans removed a boulder the size of a pickup truck from the highway near Bridal Veil Falls, 17 miles east of Placerville.

In 2007, the CTC considered a number of requests for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). Two requests were funded: $20M for HOV lanes from the El Dorado Cty Line to the Bass Lake Interchange, and $80M for Phase 1 of the HOV lanes from Watt Ave to Sunrise Blvd. Requests to add EB and WB auxiliary lanes from Sunrise to Folsom Blvd, and route improvements from Trout Creek to Ski Run Blvd were not recommended for funding. In May 2008, the HOV project was extended by eliminating the one mile gap between the existing truck lanes, it will also eliminate the existing truck lane merge at the El Dorado Hills Blvd/Latrobe Rd Interchange. Furthermore, the additional work will allow for improved staging of traffic as well as eliminating impacts due to future construction.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,200,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Nevada, Butte, Sutter, El Dorado, and Placer Counties at various locations. These repairs will upgrade metal beam guardrail end treatments to comply with the National Cooperative Highway Research Program Report 350 standards.

In May 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in El Dorado County that will upgrade deteriorating rock wall parapets at seven locations along Route 50 near Echo Lake. The parapets will be upgraded by constructing modified Type 736 concrete barriers on Portland cement slabs. The project is fully funded in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $5,568,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The project will involve construction activities that will result in traffic delays and construction related dust and exhaust emissions. In addition, construction activities will be occurring in the immediate area of the Upper Myers Grade, a National Register Eligible historic property.

In March 2011, Caltrans began a project to repair Route 50 at Echo Summit on the route to Lake Tahoe. Construction will include new guardrails and a 3-foot-high cement barrier in place of the crumbling 18-inch-tall rock and sandbag roadside wall, which was built in the 1930s. A stabilizing slab will be placed under the roadway and masonry along the support wall will be upgraded. Two official detours have been announced. US 50 motorists en route to South Lake Tahoe will be rerouted to Route 16 out of Sacramento to Route 49 and then onto Route 88 and Route 89. Travelers closer to Placerville will be directed onto Route 49 which will lead them to Route 88. A website on the detours may be found at http://www.way2tahoe.com/index.aspx. The construction will begin at the soonest possible date after April 15, 2011.

In June 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of El Dorado, between Elks Club Drive and Sawmill Road, consisting of state highway right of way, for the purpose of constructing a bike path.

In January 2012, the CTC approved $3.53 milllion to construct water quality collection and treatment facilities to comply with the California Regional Water Quality Control Board on Route 50, in South Lake Tahoe, west of Ski Run Boulevard to Wildwood Avenue.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #337: Construct an interchange on US 50 at Empire Ranch Road in Folsom. $1,440,000.

  • High Priority Project #420: Folsom Blvd. (former US 50) transportation enhancements in the City of Rancho Cordova. See also HPP #3795, which seems to provide additional funding. $5,600,000.

  • High Priority Project #3280: Construct Western Placerville interchanges on US 50. $2,400,000.

  • High Priority Project #3795: Folsom Blvd. (former US 50) corridor transportation enhancements between Rod Beaudry Drive and Sunrise Boulevard in the City of Rancho Cordova. This is either an add-on or extra funds for HPP #420. $1,000,000.

 In June 2013, it was reported that the Tahoe Transportation District has plans to reroute US 50 on a bypass around downtown Lake Tahoe. The plan would turn a 1.1-mile section of the current highway, from Pioneer Trail in California to Lake Parkway in Nevada, into a local “main street.”The realignment would allow for environmentally sustainable landscaping, a pedestrian-friendly promenade, a bicycle trail and the kind of transit options local, state and regional officials and business leaders have been clamoring for in the casino corridor for decades.However, the bypass itself would have to be built through at least one neighborhood... meaning that, depending on the chosen alignment, that historic buildings could be flattened along with dozens of other homes and businesses. In support of their plan, Tahoe Transportation District officials released an economic analysis that shows how bypassing US 50 through town would increase retail sales along the corridor by between $16 million and $25 million annually. The district has outlined four realignment alternatives, two of which would place US 50 on a local road called Lake Parkway. Another option would put only westbound traffic on Lake Parkway and make the existing highway one-way heading east. The fourth option would leave US 50 alone and build an elevated promenade, or skywalk, overhead. The alternatives must still go through an environmental review, which is expected to take at least 16 months, before a preferred alternative can be chosen. Final approval by the transportation district, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency and Federal Highway Administration, is not expected for another two or three years.
(Las Vegas Sun, 6/25/2013)

 

Business Routes
  • Sacramento: A 1969 map shows Stockton Blvd between US 50 near P Street and Route 99 near Rangeville Road as BR US 50. A 1942 map shows a Bypass US 50 running along 14th Avenue to Stockton Blvd. At one point this was cosigned with BR US 99.

  • Oakland: A 1940s map shows that, in downtown Oakland, BR US 50 appears to have run along Grand to Broadway, Broadway to 7th, 7th (Route 17 [I-880]) to Cypress, Cypress [Mandala Parkway, now] (Route 17 [I-880]) back to US 50 [now I-580].

 

Naming

The portion of this route in metropolitan Sacramento was named the "El Dorado Freeway".

The interchange of I-5 and US 50 in Sacramento County is named the "California State Engineer Memorial Interchange". It was named in tribute to past, present, and future state engineers and related professionals and in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Professional Engineers in California Government (PECG). The men and women who serve Californians as engineers and closely related professionals throughout state government are persons of skill, intelligence, and advanced training who deserve to be recognized for their dedicated service. California’s state engineers and related professionals have paid a high price in serving our state with at least 37 on-the-job deaths in their ranks over the last century. The Legislature desires to promote the safety of the state’s employees and to encourage motorists traveling in and through the state to exercise caution and care when encountering a work zone. California’s state engineers design and inspect the state’s highways and bridges, ensure that schools and hospitals are safe during earthquakes, improve air and water quality, work to reduce fossil fuel emissions, and perform countless other professional functions that create jobs and protect public safety in our state. The Professional Engineers in California Government (PECG) was organized in 1962 in the San Francisco Bay Area area to represent state engineers and address the safety concerns associated with state service, and 2012 represents the 50th anniversary of the organization. PECG represents approximately 13,000 professional engineers, architects, land surveyors, engineering geologists, and closely related professionals serving the public in state government. Nam ed by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

The portion of this route between I-5 and Route 99 is known as the "WX Freeway" (because it overlays W and X Streets).

The interchange at Hazel Avenue and US 50 in the County of Sacramento is named the "Senator Dave Cox Memorial Interchange". Named in memory of State Senator Dave Cox, who was first elected to the California State Senate in November 2004, and was reelected in 2008. Senator Cox represented the residents of the First Senate District, which includes all or portions of the Counties of Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Lassen, Placer, Plumas, Modoc, Mono, Nevada, Sacramento, and Sierra. Senator Cox served as Chair of the Senate Committee on Local Government, Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, and as a member of the Senate Committee on Banking, Finance and Insurance, the Senate Committee on Energy, Utilities and Communications, the Senate Committee on Public Employment and Retirement, and the Senate Committee on Health. Senator Cox was first elected to the California State Assembly in November 1998, and the voters overwhelmingly re elected reelected him in 2000 and 2002. In March of 2001, the Members of the Assembly Republican Caucus elected then Assembly Member Cox to serve as their Assembly Republican Leader, a position he held until January of 2004. During his tenure as Assembly Republican Leader, Dave Cox led efforts to successfully unite the Republican Caucus against proposals to raise billions of dollars in new taxes while advocating for a stronger economy and jobs climate. Dave Cox led the fight against tripling of the car tax and helped trim waste from the state budget, freeing up money needed to fund essential education, public safety, and health care programs. Senator Cox served as a Member of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Transition Team. In January of 2009, Senator Cox was awarded the Patti Mattingly Distinguished Legislator Award by the Regional Council of Rural Counties. Senator Cox was recognized as the California Building Industry Association Outstanding Legislator of 2003, and as Legislator of the Year by the American Electronics Association in 2002, the Consulting Engineers and Land Surveyors of California in 2001, and the California Business Properties Association in 2001. Senator Cox was awarded the President’s Award by the California State Association of Counties in 2001 in recognition of his commitment to developing sound public policy and service to the citizenry of California. In 2004, the Northern California Power Agency named Senator Cox as its State Legislator of the Year. The California State Sheriffs’ Association recognized Senator Cox as one of their Outstanding Senators in 2005, 2007, and 2008; and Prior to his election to the State Assembly, Senator Cox served for six years on the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors. Senator Cox also served as a member of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District Board of Directors, Senior Warden for St. Francis Episcopal Church of Fair Oaks, and a member of the boards of directors for the American Red Cross, the Sacramento Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, Easter Seals, and KVIE-Channel 6, where he served as Chairman in 1982. Senator Cox earned a Bachelors in Business Administration at the University of San Diego in 1961, and a Master of Science in Taxation Degree at Golden Gate University in 1983. It was named in honor of Senator Cox’s service to his constituents, the Senate of the State of California, and to all residents of the state. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 97, Resolution Chapter 105, on August 31, 2012.

In 1996, the portion that is cosigned as Business Loop 80 between I-80 and the Route 50/Route 99/Route 51 interchange was renamed the "Capital City Freeway".

The overcrossing that spans Route 50 at Ray Lawyer Drive in the County of El Dorado is named the "Staff Sergeant Sky R. Mote Memorial Overcrossing". It was named in memory of Staff Sergeant Sky R. Mote, who was assigned to the 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion at Camp Pendleton, California. Staff Sgt. Mote was killed August 10, 2012, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, along with two other Marines. Staff Sergeant Mote was born in Bishop, California, and raised by his father and his new wife, in El Dorado, California. From an early age, he spoke of joining the military, motivated in part by a love of airplanes and the desire to work with them. Staff Sergeant Mote graduated from Union Mine High School in El Dorado in 2003 and joined the Marines that same year. He deployed to Iraq as a bomb-disposal specialist, and twice to Afghanistan to work with the Marines special forces. After his death, people who served with Staff Sergeant Mote spoke about his heroism in battle. In one case, a captain spoke of stepping on an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan, and of how Mote found his way to him, applying tourniquets and preventing him from bleeding to death. Staff Sergeant Mote received the Navy Cross, a Purple Heart, a Navy-Marine Corps Commendation Medal, a Navy-Marine Corps Achievement Medal, two Combat Action Ribbons, and three Good Conduct Medals. By his undaunted courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of certain death, Staff Sergeant Mote saved his comrades from further injury or possibly death, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 97, Resolution Chapter 37, on 05/30/14.

The portion of this route commencing at post mile 38.5, which is west of Ice House Road outside of Pollock Pines, and terminating at post mile 40.5 in El Dorado County is named the "Stephanie Marie Frazier Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Stephanie Marie Frazier, who was born on October 12, 1980 and passed away on December 16, 2000, when she was just 20 years of age, from injuries sustained in an automobile accident on US 50 near Ice House Road. As a child, Stephanie attended Tabernacle Baptist School in Concord, California until the eighth grade, and subsequently attended high school at Liberty Union High School in Brentwood, California, where she was on the volleyball team, basketball team, and swim team. After graduating from high school in 1998, Stephanie attended Diablo Valley College in Pleasant Hill, California as a full-time student where she was on the student council and supported herself financially through her employment with Dennis Tierney and Associates. Stephanie's dream was to attend the University of California at Davis, and she had been accepted to transfer there in the fall of 2001, to major in managerial economics. Stephanie's life was taken on December 16, 2000, when another car crossed over the center divider on US 50, just west of Ice House Road, and hit the car in which Stephanie and her sister, Lindsey, were riding. The accident occurred during finals week, and for the first time in its history, Diablo Valley College awarded an honorary associate of arts degree in Stephanie's memory during its graduation ceremony. After the accident, Stephanie's family worked diligently with the Department of Transportation to improve US 50 where the accident occurred, analyzing 14 years of accident data, and hiring a highway traffic consultant who suggested specific improvements to make that portion of the highway safer. In July 2006, the majority of those changes were completed, including restriping the dangerous section, doubling maintenance patrols, and in 2007, a special deicing agent will be placed on the road. The Frazier family also established a nonprofit foundation in Stephanie's memory, the Stephanie Marie Frazier Memorial Foundation, to provide meals to families whose children are hospitalized. Through their program, the Network of Care, which serves 31 hospitals in 12 counties throughout the state, they have helped over 10,000 families with the gifts of comfort, hope, and nourishment. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 22, Resolution Chapter 88, on 7/10/2007.

Historically, the portion of this route from Route 160 to South Lake Tahoe was part of "El Camino Sierra" (Road to the Mountains).

Another name historically applied to the portion of this route from E of Smith Flat to Lake Tahoe is the "Lake Tahoe Wagon Road".

The portion of this route from Bradshaw Road to the eastern Sacramento County Line is named the "William Alexander Leidesdorff, Jr. Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of William Alexander Leidesdorff, Jr., a prominent civic leader and pioneer in the successful quest for California to become the 31st state in the United States. He was Treasurer of the City of San Francisco, owned the largest home in the city, constructed the first City Hotel, built the first commercial shipping warehouse, and donated the land to build the first public school in California. Born in St. Croix, Virgin Islands in 1810 to Anna Marie Sparks, an African woman, and William Leidesdorff, Sr., a citizen of Denmark In 1841, Leidesdorff sailed the first United States shipping vessel, the Julia Ann, into the sleepy Mexican fishing Village of Yerba Buena, modern day San Francisco, to establish a world maritime center. In 1843, he was naturalized as a Mexican citizen in order to facilitate acquiring a vast land grant from the Mexican authorities in the Sacramento Valley, and was an early advocate of creating dual United States citizenship. In 1844, William Alexander Leidesdorff, Jr. obtained title to Rancho Rio de Los Americanos, well over 35,000 acres of prime real estate along the south bank of the American River. His global trade and commerce projects financed, developed, and helped stabilize the Sacramento Valley. In 1845, he accepted the position of United States Vice-Consul to the Mexican Alta California region; as such, he was the first African-American diplomat in history, and was affectionately known as the "African Founding Father of California". In 1846, he was an active leader in the Bear Flag Revolt during the Mexican-American War. He went on to captain the first and only steam ship in California prior to the Gold Rush of 1848, the Sitka. His maiden steam voyage up the Sacramento River is immortalized on the California State Seal and recognizes his vision for increased maritime transportation of California's agricultural products to world markets. In 1848, prior to his untimely death from brain fever, he received official notification of vast quantities of gold on his immense cattle and wheat ranch along today's Route 50 corridor. He is buried near the entrance of the Old San Francisco Mission Delores Sanctuary. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 131, Chapter 41, May 3, 2004.

The portion of US 50, in the vicinity of eastbound Post-mile 08.533 and westbound Post-mile 08.598 in the community of Shingle Springs in El Dorado County, is named the "CHP Officer Douglas "Scott" Russell Memorial Freeway" This segment was named in memory of Douglas "Scott" Russell, who was born on September 18, 1960, in Castro Valley. He graduated from Amador High School in 1978, where he played offensive tackle on the football team, saxophone in the school band, and clarinet in the marching band, and he later attended Chabot College for two years before joining the California Highway Patrol (CHP) Academy. After graduation from the academy in October of 1985, Officer Russell, CHP badge number 11619, served four years in Hayward. Officer Russell later had assignments in the Bridgeport area and the Investigative Services Section, where he was selected to serve on the Campaign Against Marijuana Program. In June of 2000, Officer Russell was assigned to the Placerville area. Officer Russell was admired for his keen investigative skills, strong work ethic, enchanting sense of humor, impressive athletic ability, stunning professionalism, and heartfelt concern for the safety and well being of others. Officer Russell was well respected by his fellow officers and supervisors, which earned him Officer of the Year in 2003. In his spare time, Officer Russell was an avid golfer and forged many life-long friendships while on the golf course. On July 31, 2007, Officer Russell was tragically struck by a fleeing suspect's vehicle as he deployed a spike strip to end a pursuit on eastbound US 50 in the community of Shingle Springs in El Dorado County. Officer Russell was married to the love of his life, Lynn McCourtney, in April of 1997. They enjoyed dining out with friends, spending time in their backyard oasis, and entertaining during the Christmas holidays. In 2007 Lynn was diagnosed with breast cancer. Officer Russell went into battle alongside his wife. He was a wonderful caregiver and even shaved his head in show of support when his wife was undergoing chemotherapy. Officer Russell is survived by his wife, Lynn M. Russell, as well as his mother Betty Elliot, sister, Heidi Kaye, nephew Scott Kaye, and nieces Danielle and Dawn Kaye. Officer Russell will always be admired for his hard work and dedication to the CHP and the citizens of California. Officer Russell was an outstanding man and will never be forgotten. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 100, Resolution Chapter 70, on 8/4/2010.

 

Named Structures

Bridge 24-004, the bridge over the Sacramento River connecting Sacramento and Yolo counties, is named the "Pioneer Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1966.

The Mather Field Road overcrossing in Rancho Cordova is named the "Alice Livingston Memorial Overcrossing". Alice Livingston was born Elisa Espinosa, the third of eight children, on August 4, 1936, in Norwalk, California. He graduated from Huntington Beach Union High School and Orange County Coast Community College. In 1958, she moved to Spain, working for the United States government as a civil service employee. She married an airman in the US Air Force and gave birth to her first daughter Terrie. In 1962, she returned to the United States, settling in El Cajon, California, where she gave birth to her second daughter Susan. In December 1979, she moved with her younger daughter to Sacramento, California, and began more than 20 years of service with the California State Assembly as a member of the Assembly stenography pool. In January 1980, Alice Livingston joined the staff of the Assembly Committee on Revenue and Taxation, chaired by then Assembly Member Wadie Deddeh. In 1983, she began working for then Speaker pro Tempore Frank Vicencia. In March 1987, she began working for the Assembly Transportation Committee, where she provided exemplary service as committee secretary under several chairs over the course of 15 years; including former Assembly Members Richard Katz (1987-95), Antonio Villaraigosa (1995-96), and Larry Bowler (1996-97), then Assembly Members and current Senators Kevin Murray (1997-99) and Tom Torlakson (1999-2001), and finally Chair Assembly Member John Dutra. Alice Livingston grew to serve as a mentor to others in the position of committee secretary, and was ultimately designated to help train staff for the position. In May 2002, she fell ill and was later diagnosed with lung cancer, ultimately succumbing to the condition at the age of 65 on the morning of Thursday, June 6, 2002. In the midst of her illness, she continued to inquire about her colleagues in the Legislature and the daily business of the Assembly Transportation Committee, requesting copies of the Senate and Assembly Daily Files and offering several times to "come in and help out at work". During her years of service to the Legislature, and most notably her tenure as a committee secretary, Alice Livingston served with great distinction and ceaseless dedication, observing the highest standards of conduct and ethics as a professional Legislative staff member. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 223, Chapter 144, on September 3, 2002.

The bicycle bridge on the Hazel Avenue overpass over US 50 is named the George M. Clark Memorial Bicycle Bridge. It was named in memory of George M. Clark (1938-1996), who died while on a hike looking for new species of flowers in Lake County, California. He worked at Aerojet General Corporation as a chemist, was an avid outdoorsman and was President of the California Native Plant Society. As a resident of Orangevale, he commuted by bicycle to his job at Aerojet every day; and was instrumental in convincing the County of Sacramento to construct a bicycle bridge over US 50 at Hazel Avenue between Fair Oaks and Rancho Cordova to provide a safe bicycle route through this heavily traveled corridor. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 151, August 19, 2004, Chapter 149.

Bridge 25-0005, the "Weber Creek Bridge" in El Dorado county, is officially designated the "El Dorado County Vietnam Veterans Bridge". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 7, Chapter 51, in 1993.

Bridge No. 25-0098 and Bridge No. 25-0099 near the junction of Alder Creek and the South Fork of the American River are officially designated the "El Dorado County Veterans Bridges". They were built in 1990, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 58, Chapter 134, in 1994.

 

National Trails

Lincoln Highway Sign This part was part of the coast-to-coast "Lincoln Highway" between the Nevada border and the junction with US 40 into San Francisco. The Lincoln Highway presently would encompass not only US 50, but a portion of I-5 and a portion of I-580.

Victory Highway Sign This route (in fact, the entire original US 50 route) was also part of the "Victory Highway".

Santa Fe Trail Sign The portion of the route between Stockton and the California border was part of the original "Santa Fe Trail".

The portion of this route from Placerville to Lake Tahoe was named the "Pioneer Trail".

 


Overall statistics for US 50:

  • Total Length (1995): 108 miles.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 10,000 to 193,000.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 60; Sm. Urban: 20; Urbanized: 28.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 5 mi.; FAP: 103 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 108 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Echo Summit (7382 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Yolo, Sacramento, El Dorado.

 

Interstate Submissions

Interstate Shield The portion of US 50 from the Business Route 80/I-80 interchange in W. Sacramento to the Business Route 80/Route 99/US 50 junction in Sacramento, approximately 5 miles, is still on the books as being chargable I-305, although that specific route number is not used by the state. The FHWA Interstate Route log, however, shows it as 8 miles. I-305 was approved as chargable interstate in May 1980.

US 50 was submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1968; not accepted.

 

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Other WWW Links

 

Commuter Lanes

HOV lanes are in the planning stages for the following segments: 9th Street to Mayhew, Mayhew to Sunrise Blvd.

As of November 2002, according to Joe Rouse, the last segment of the HOV lanes on US-50 in Sacramento and El Dorado Counties was open. The HOV lanes begin at Sunrise Blvd and end at El Dorado Hills Blvd/Latrobe Rd. They are part time lanes, restricted only from 6 - 10 AM mornings and 3 - 7 PM evenings. The widening project also included reconstruction of the Sunrise interchange from a full cloverleaf to a partial cloverleaf interchange, and adding new lanes at the Hazel Avenue interchange.

This carpool lane will eventually be extended eastward to Ponderosa Road and may extend westward into downtown Sacramento. Work has also just started on adding a carpool lane on I-80 between Longview Drive and Riverside Avenue in Roseville. Once this project is complete (2005), additional widening work will then take place between Riverside and CA-65. This may either come in the form of an extension of the carpool lane, a new mixed-flow lane, or auxiliary lanes. Carpool lanes are also planned for I-80 from Longview west to I-5.

In July 2005, the CTC received a notice of EIR preparation for Route 50 in Sacramento County. The alternatives being considered are Alternative 5B — Construct HOV lanes with eastbound drop ramp at 10th Street and westbound drop ramp at 16th Street; Alternative 6B — Construct HOV lanes with eastbound drop ramp at 10th Street and westbound drop ramp at 21st Street; Alternative 7B — Construct HOV lanes with eastbound drop ramp at 21st Street and westbound drop ramp at Riverside Boulevard; Alternative 10D — Construct HOV lanes in the median without drop ramps; and No Build.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.4] From Route 49 near Placerville to the Nevada state line near Lake Tahoe.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Yolo 50 0.00 2.69
Sacramento 50 L0.28 L2.48
Sacramento 50 R0.00 R2.89
Sacramento 50 R3.00 R4.59
Sacramento 50 R5.75 R6.24
Sacramento 50 R9.53 R10.00
Sacramento 50 R10.25 R10.73
Sacramento 50 12.08 12.84
El Dorado 50 18.04 18.64
El Dorado 50 18.97 19.32
El Dorado 50 20.16 20.48

 

Freeway

Business Route Shield [SHC 253.1] Entire route. Signed as US Highway except for portions in Sacramento and Yolo counties. It is signed as Business Loop 80 from Route 80 to Route 51. It is constructed to freeway standards from Route 80 to Placerville, from Placerville to Smith Flat, and from Camino to Pollock Pines. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 40 was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.13] Entire route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 50 was first defined in 1915 by Chapter 283, which authorized the location and survey of a route "commencing at the town of Rumsey, in the county of Yolo and following generally the meanderings of Cache Ck...to the town of Lower Lake, in the county of Lake" (this was later repealed in 1935). The 1919 Third Bond Act defined a similar route running from Rumsey to Lower Lake. In 1933, the route was extended with a portion from [LRN 50] near Rumsey to [LRN 7] near Woodland. The route was codified in the 1935 highway code as:

"[LRN 15] to Sacramento via Rumsey and Woodland"

This definition remained until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as Route 16 between Route 20 (LRN 15) and Capitol Ave. in Sacramento. It was signed as Route 24 (although this is no longer part of Route 24) between Capitol Avenue and E across Broadway until Freeport Blvd (Route 24/US 99W junction).


Unsigned

Unsigned State Route 51



Routing

Business Route Shield From Route 50 in Sacramento to Route 80 east of Sacramento. Per SHC Section 351.1: Route 51 is signed as Interstate Business Loop 80.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, Route 51 was defined to run from Route 5 to Route 5 near Santa Ana. That route was part of LRN 2. It ran along Orangewood Avenue from I-5 east to Main Street, passing south of what is now Edison Field, and then along Main Street south back to I-5 (thanks to Calvin Sampang for hunting that out). The routing was deleted in 1965 by Chapter 1372.

State Shield In 1981, Chapter 292 defined the current routing. This is a former segment of I-80 that was bypassed by new construction for I-80. The original plan, however, was to have this segment, as well as the segment from US 50 to I-80 (legislatively US 50, signed Business Route 80) upgraded to proper interstate standards, and have the current I-80 routing be I-880. But that didn't happen (see I-80 for details), thus resulting in the creation of Route 51 (Business Route 80).

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Before the construction of the US-50 and I-80 freeways through Sacramento, this route was:

  • US 99E between US 50 and the US 99E/US 40 interchange (present-day Route 160/Business 80 interchange). This was LRN 98, defined in 1933 (see LRN 98 for the specific street routing). Route 160 is the former US 40 route.

  • US 40/US 99E between the US 99E/US 40 interchange and LRN 288 N of Arcade (present-day I-80 junction). This is part of LRN 3, defined in 1909.

The freeway construction began in May 1950, but delays due to material shortages and weather put of major construction until 1952. The first 2.9 mile 4-lane stretch opened on May 12, 1955. Lots of construction details can be found on Joel Windmiller's Elvas Freeway site.

Pre-1964 State Shield Route 51 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 51 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

This is the existing section of Business Loop 80 between the US-50/Route 99 interchange and I-80. Construction was done on a section near the north end of the I-80/Business Route 80 interchange to replace what is known as the Elvas Freeway, since it is currently only a two lanes in each direction freeway for a portion near Cal Expo. The section that was built is currently being used by Sacramento RTD to operate their light rail system. This is not consistantly signed, although you can see the designation on the milage markers.

There has been an ongoing project to widen the connector ramp from westbound I-80 to westbound Business Route 80 (Route 51) northeast of Sacramento. The connector is currently 2 lanes, and is a huge bottleneck for the morning commute. One extra lane is being added. This meant widening the bridge that carries WB Business Route 80 over WB I-80 as well as eliminating the second exit to Watt Avenue (there is already a Watt Ave exit right after the ramp split).

In August 2013, it was reported that Caltrans is pursuing plans to close the E Street onramp in east Sacramento. This will permit them to squeeze another milelong lane onto the freeway from J Street to the bridge over the American River. The eastbound side of the freeway currently drops from five lanes to three in the space of a quarter mile near E Street, making that stretch of freeway the worst pinch point in the region. The reconfiguration, considered minor at a cost of $6 million, would allow the state to extend the fourth lane another mile to nearly the foot of the American River bridge. Although Caltrans has legal authority to close the ramp, Jones said the agency is seeking input from the city and will check in with area residents as well. Caltrans ultimately will have to do an environmental analysis to justify the change. The ramp closure date is likely three years away, officials estimate.

 

Commuter Lanes

HOV lanes are planned for the segment from the US 50/Route 51/Route 99 separation bridge to N Street.

 

Naming

Previously, this route had the following names:

  1. The portion of this route from Route 160 to Route 50 was named the "Elvas Freeway".

  2. The portion of this route between Route 160 and the Marconi Curve was named the "North Sacramento Freeway". North Sacramento refers to the community of North Sacramento, which was originally an independent city. North Sacramento was originally a suburb of Sacramento, developed in the 1940s north of the American River. It was annexed in 1964, but the city name is still used in some mailing addresses. Recently, North Sacramento has become the urban arts district of Sacramento (and also gained the moniker of "Uptown Sacramento"). Sacramento refers to the City of Sacramento CA, which is based off of the name of the main river in the city. The Spanish name, "Holy Sacrament," was applied to the Feather River in 1808; it was later assumed that the lower Sacramento was the same stream. In 1817 the two main rivers of the valley were recorded as Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, but the course of the former was not identified with the name until the 1830s. The city was laid out in 1848-1849 and named after the river by John A. Sutter, Jr., and Sam Brannan. The county, one of the original 27, was named in 1850.

  3. This route has been known as the "29/30" Freeway, based on it crossing over 29th and 30th Streets in Sacramento.

  4. At one time, the portion between the Marconi Curve and Route 80 was named the "Roseville Freeway".

In 1996, the Sacramento Regional Planning Authority (SACOG) decided to name the entire Interstate Business Loop 80 freeway as the "Capitol City Freeway".

 

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Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Sacramento 51 0.00 1.71
Sacramento 51 4.05 4.41
Sacramento 51 5.20 5.84
Sacramento 51 5.95 6.18
Sacramento 51 6.28 6.63
Sacramento 51 6.63 7.74
Sacramento 51 7.74 7.85
Sacramento 51 7.85 8.06
Sacramento 51 8.30 8.86

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of this route that is former US 40 was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

 


Overall statistics for Route 51 (Business Route 80):

  • Total Length (1995): 9 miles.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 111,000 to 159,000.
  • Milage Classification: Urbanized: 9.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 8 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 9 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Sacramento.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that was to become LRN 51 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as the route from Santa Rosa to Shellville. In 1933, the route was extended from Sebastopol to [LRN 1] near Santa Rosa. In 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as:

"[LRN 104] near Sebastopol to [LRN 8] at Shellville via Santa Rosa"

In 1937, Chapter 841 changed the terminus of the route to Sears Point from Shellville.In 1951, the route was extended on both ends: the origin was changed to "[LRN 56] near Valley Ford", and the terminus was changed to "[LRN 8] near Sonoma". Signage was as follows:

  1. Between Valley Ford on Route 1 (LRN 56) and Sebastopol on Route 12 (LRN 104): The route was unsigned. It is present-day unconstructed Route 12. Before 1964, Route 12 was signed between Sebastopol and Route 1 along the present-day Route 116.

  2. Between Sebastopol and cosigned Route 12/Route 37 (now the Route 121/Route 37 junction) 1 mi W of Schellville: Signed as Route 12.

Confusion between the LRN and the signed route may be the source of the rumors that between the late 1960s to the late 1970s, there was a proposed Route 51 that was an (unconstructed) bypass in the Sonoma Valley around the towns of Boyes Hot Springs and Sonoma, that basically followed the alignment of Arnold Drive, on the West side of the valley.


State Shield

State Route 52



Routing

From Route 5 east of La Jolla to Route 67 near Santee.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This routing is unchanged from its 1963 definition. Route 52 was established as part of the California Freeway and Expressway System in 1959 (former LRN 279). The portion of Route 52 from I-5 to I-805 was adopted in 1962 and opened to traffic in 1970. The portion from I-805 to I-15 was adopted in July 1972 and opened to traffic in 1988. In July 1989, the California Transportation Commission (CTC) adopted the plan for the then unconstructed segments of Route 52 from I-15 to Route 67. I-15 to Mast Boulevard opened for traffic in December 1993, and Mast Boulevard to Route 125 opened in November 1998. The portion of Route 52 from Route 125 to Route 67 was completed in Spring of 2011.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This routing was unconstructed in 1963, although the routing had been determined. It was LRN 279, defined in 1959.

Pre-1964 State Shield Route 52 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 52 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

Freeway is currently complete from Route 5 to Mast Blvd and Mission Gorge Road in Santee. An extension between Mission Gorge Road and Route 125 in Santee is under construction, and should have been completed by Winter 1997.

In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Santee along Route 52 at Cottonwood Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

[TCRP Project 84]In May 2001, the CTC considered TCRP Project #84. The project is to construct a new six-lane freeway to Santee by extending the existing Route 52 from its current terminus at Route 125, near Mission Gorge Road, to Route 67. The new freeway will provide an improved connection from the eastern areas of San Diego to the employment centers to the north and west. The original TCRP application programmed $45,000,000 of TCRP funds for “Unit 4,” Route 125 to Cuyamaca Street. “Unit 5,” Cuyamaca Street to Route 67, was to be funded from other sources, including State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). Construction of “Unit 4” was delayed due to TCRP and STIP funding not being available. The STIP funds were programmed in Fiscal Year 2008-09 and the TCRP funds were on hold due to the previous suspension of allocating new funds. The current proposed construction for “Unit 4” and “Unit 5” has the projects on near concurrent schedules. The Region has fully programmed the capital portion of right-of-way acquisition with Transnet funds. The Transnet revenues will not begin to be collected until 2008 and the Region would need to advanced the funds through the use of bonds. In effort to reduce the finance charges associated with bonding, it is proposed to swap the TCRP funds with Transnet funds for right-ofway acquisition. Therefore, the funds that had been originally programmed for “Unit 4” construction could now be spent on “Unit 5” Right of Way. Demolition has begun for the extension from Route 125 to Cuyamaca Street. In April 2006, the CTC considered a proposal to amend the project application to: revise the project scope; redistribute $20,000,000 from Construction to Right of Way; and update the project schedule and funding plan. The current schedule for completion is: Phase 1: FY 1989/1990; Phase 2: FY 2007/2008; Phase 3: FY 2007/2008; Phase 4: FY 2010/2011.

As of March 2008, construction had begun on the eastward extension of Route 52. There is grading work being done at the Route 52/Route 125 interchange to install a roadway leading east from this interchange. There is also grading that appears to be for a future overpass being done on both sides of Cuyamaca Avenue along the El Cajon/Santee city limits (near Prospect). This section of Cuyamaca has the San Diego Trolley tracks down the center divide, which might require an extra-high overpass or a rather unusual ramp configuration if on-off ramps are planned there. In May 2008, work began on a new Fanita Drive bridge.

In February 2009, the CTC was noticed that Caltrans and the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) recommended that the Route 125 to Route 67 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) project be reprogrammed as a corridor, with funding levels to be based on the state funds previously allocated by the California Transportation Commission (Commission), including AB 608 adjustment, and available local and federal funds. This included the following segments:

  • Route 52 Unit 4: Route 125 to Cuyamaca Street, 4-lane freeway (PPNO 0260)

  • Route 52 Unit 5A: Magnolia Avenue to Route 67, 4-lane freeway (PPNO 0260G)

  • Route 52 Unit 5B: Cuyamaca Street to Route 67, 4-lane freeway (PPNO 0260H).

In April 2011, it was reported that Route 52 had been completed to Route 67. There is a half exit WB at Fanita, a diamond plus a loop from Cuyamaca NB to Route 52 WB, a half-diamond EB to Magnolia, and a high speed wye at Route 67.

A portion of the original routing has been relinquished: between PM 12.6 and PM 13.1, per the March 2001 CTC Agenda.

In February 2008, the CTC relinquished a portion of the route in San Diego, at Sycamore Landfill Road northerly of Mast Boulevard, consisting of relocated and reconstructed city streets and frontage roads.

In March 2013, the CTC authorized $3,937,000 to overlay 7.2 lane miles of pavement to mitigate settlement and to improve safety and ride quality on a segment in the city of San Diego, from 0.5 mile west of Convoy Street to 0.4 mile west of Route 163/Route 52 separation.

In May 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Santee along Route 52 from Olive Lane to Railroad Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #2735: Route 52 East Improvments (San Diego). $6,000,000.

 

 

Naming

The portion of this routing that is completed to freeway standards is named the "Soledad" Freeway. It has also been known as the "San Clemente Canyon" Freeway. This naming appears to be from local usage based on location.
(Source)

 

Named Structures

The bridge on Route 52 that crosses over West Hills Parkway in Santee, California is named the "Border Patrol Officer Neil Wilkie Hepburn Memorial Bridge". This bridge was named in memory of Border Patrol Officer Neil Wilkie Hepburn, born in Dundee, Scotland, on July 3, 1972. He immigrated to the United States on May 27, 1981, and settled in the desert of southern California. In 1996, Border Patrol Officer Hepburn became a United States citizen and graduated from San Diego State University with a degree in criminal justice. While at San Diego State University, he participated in the marching band and symphonic band. In 1998, Border Patrol Officer Hepburn joined the United States Border Patrol and served with Horse Patrol, a specialized unit of the United States Border Patrol, at the Imperial Beach Station for 8 years. He was known for his ability to "MacGyver" everything. Border Patrol Officer Hepburn served as a supervisor at Campo Station I-8 Check Point, as an emergency medical technician, and as a supervisor of the canine program. Border Patrol Officer Hepburn was learning to play bagpipes with other border patrol agents, was a member of the Tierrasanta Parent-Teacher Association, and volunteered as an AYSO soccer coach and as a little league baseball coach in Tierrasanta. Border Patrol Officer Hepburn lost his life tragically in a head-on collision with a drunk driver while on his way home from work in the early morning hours of September 7, 2007, on Route 52 in San Diego. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 144, Resolution Chapter 133, on 9/5/2008.

The Oak Canyon Bridge on Route 52 in Santee, located between Post Mile 11.662 and Post Mile 11.799, is officially named the "Deputy Sheriff Kenneth James Collier Memorial Bridge" This structure was named in honor of Kenneth James Collier, who was born June 4, 1970, in Portsmouth, Virginia, and moved to San Diego with his family in 1977. He grew up in the Santee area and graduated from Santana High School in 1988. Collier attended Grossmont College and California State University, San Diego, where he majored in administration of justice, and he first became intrigued with a career in law enforcement through conversations with deputies coming to and going from the Santee Sheriff's station near where he worked. Collier began his law enforcement career with the San Diego County Marshal's Office in 1997, working as a field service officer and later a court service officer. In 2000, the marshal's office merged with the San Diego County Sheriff's Department, where Collier continued on as a court service officer. In August 2001, he was hired as a Detention Court deputy sheriff and continued to serve in detention facilities, the Detentions Training Unit, and the Court Services Bureau. In July 2006, Ken Collier was hired as a law enforcement deputy sheriff and joined the Santee station in September 2006. Deputy Collier was described by his supervisors as a steadfast and dependable people person, and he received a commendation for his dedication and dependability, as well as an Exemplary Performance Certificate. He was well liked and respected by his colleagues. Deputy Collier is survived by his fiancee, Karen Li, whom he was to marry on what would have been his 40th birthday, June 10, 2010, in Kauai, Hawaii, his sister Nancy Robinson, and his brother Lauren Collier. Deputy Collier was killed in the line of duty, at 39 years of age, in the early morning hours of February 28, 2010. Shortly after 3:00 a.m., Deputy Collier and his ride-along sheriff's dispatcher, Ryan Debellis, came upon a driver heading eastbound in the westbound lanes of Route 52 in the City of Santee. Deputy Collier advised dispatch and attempted to overtake the wrong-way driver by driving his patrol vehicle in the center median shoulder when it struck a bridge abutment. After rolling several hundred feet, Deputy Collier was ejected into a ravine that Mr. Debellis also managed to reach moments before the patrol vehicle burst into flames, Despite the valiant efforts of fellow deputies and officers from all over the county, emergency medical responders, and hospital personnel, Deputy Collier succumbed to his injuries. Mr. Debellis made a full recovery. The fact that a suspect was arrested and will be charged is of little consolation for the tragic loss of Deputy Collier to his loved ones, friends, colleagues, and the community he served. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 175, 9/14/2010, Resolution Chapter 157.

The EB Route 52 to NB I-15 connector, bridge 57-0968G, in the City of San Diego is named the "Citizens for 52 Bridge. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 122, Chapter 62 in 1988. In 1979 Assembly Member Jim Ellis formed "Citizens for 52", an organization of concerned citizens from along the then proposed Route 52.

 

Commuter Lanes

HOV lanes are planned for this route (by 2011) between I-805 and Route 125.

 

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Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 52 0.00 5.62
San Diego 52 6.13 9.88
San Diego 52 13.00 13.58
San Diego 52 13.89 14.71
San Diego 52 14.71 15.50
San Diego 52 15.50 17.30
San Diego 52 17.30 17.50

 


Overall statistics for Route 52 (as of 1995):

  • Total Length (1995): 8 miles traversable; 9 miles unconstructed. However, my notes from 1995 show that the unconstructed portion started at a point from the railroad tracks E of Route 15; by 1997, construction had reached Mission Gorge Road, and by now, may have been completed as far as future Route 125.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 8,500 to 87,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: Urbanized: 17.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage (for construction as of 1994): FAP: 10 mi; FAU: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 17 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 52 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act, running from Tiberion to Alto. It was codified into the highway code in 1935 as the same thing, "Tiberion to Alto".

In 1947, Chapter 1233 changed the terminus from "Alto" to "[LRN 1]", making the route from LRN 1 to Tiburon. It ran from US-101 near Mill Valley to Tiberon. It corresponds to present-day Route 131.


State Shield

State Route 53



Routing

From Route 29 to Route 20 via Clearlake.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, Route 53 ran from Route 29 to Route 20 via Lower Lake. In 1994, Chapter 1220 changed "Lower Lake" to "Clearlake".

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This was LRN 49, although apparently this was originally part of LRN 50. The original signage (if any) is unclear, as Route 53 was not part of the set of state signed routes announced in 1934. It is possible that this is a former routing of Route 29. It was originally much longer, including the portion between Middletown and Lower Lake. In 1964, that portion was transferred to Route 29.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Status

As of February 2000, the Route 20 corridor is a hot spot. Mendocino, Lake, and Colusa Counties have all agreed that they would like to see 4 lane road all along the corridor, which is considered a rural principal arterial. In Lake County, rather than upgrading Route 20 along the North shore of the lake, the principal arterials will be Route 29 and Route 53 along the South side of the lake. Project Study Reports in progress for the following:

  1. Extending the Route 20 expressway NE of Ukiah into Lake County.
  2. Extending the Route 29 freeway portion S from Lakeport to Kelseyville.
  3. Upgrading Route 29 from Kelseyville to Lower Lake to 4-lane expressway
  4. Building a bypass of Lower Lake starting on Route 29 and running NE to Route 53.
  5. Upgrading the Route 53 Clearlake Expressway to freeway.
  6. Construction of an interchange at Route 53 and Route 20.
  7. Upgrading Route 20 to 4 lanes between the beginning of the Coast Range mountains E to I-5 at Williams.

In July 2006, the CTC considered Resolution No. R-3636, relinquishing right of way near PM 1.2/1.5, in the City of Clear Lake, between Cache Creek and Old Highway 53, consisting of reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

In June 2007, the CTC considered a project in Lake County consisting of roadway improvements along Route 53 near Clearlake. The project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $640,800. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2007-2008. In April 2008, a Negative EIR declaration was received, and the project was up for consideration of funding. This project will make improvements, including extending existing turn pocket lanes and constructing new turn pocket lanes, along a 4.5 mile portion of Route 53 near Clearlake. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $21,758,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009-10.[Detailed Map]

In June 2011, the CTC approved $6.1 million to repave stretches of Route 29 and Route 53 in Lake County. The Route 29 work will go from just south of the junction with Route 53 in Lower Lake to just north of it. For Route 53, the work will go from Route 29 to just north of 40th Avenue in Clearlake.

 

Naming

The portion of this route from Route 20 to Little Lake was named the "Yolo and Lake Highway" by Resolution Chapter 283 in 1915.

Route 53 from its junction with Route 29 in Lower Lake to the Junction of Route 20 in Clearlake Oaks is named the “Lake County Veterans Memorial Highway”. This segment was named in honor of the men and women who have served in the Armed Forces of the United States of America to protect and defend our country and the freedom, rights, and privileges enjoyed by all Americans. In particular, this naming honors Lance Corporal Ivan Wilson, who was raised in the City of Clearlake in Lake County. Lance Corporal Ivan Wilson joined the United States Marine Corps in 2005. In 2007, he served in Iraq with the 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, and he served in Afghanistan in 2008. On July 21, 2008, Lance Corporal Ivan Wilson died while supporting combat operations in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom. Lance Corporal Ivan Wilson was Lake County's first military service member to die in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 136, 6/2/2010, Resolution Chapter 34.

 

Business Routes
  • Clearlake: Old Highway 53 (not signed as Business Route)

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.13] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 53:

  • Total Length (1995): 7 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 6,400 to 14,100
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 3; Sm. Urban 4.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 7 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Lake.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 53 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from Rio Vista to Fairfield. In 1921, Chapter 831 extended the route by adding "The improved county road extending from the town of Rio Vista in the county of Solano to the city of Lodi in the county of San Joaquin, crossing the Sacramento River at Rio Vista, thence crossing Brannan, Andrus, and Tyler Islands to the San Joaquin Cty Line between Tyler and Staten Island to the mainland in San Joaquin Cty on to the improved county highway, thence through Thornton in an general easternly and southernly direction to Lodi." This was codified in 1935 into the state highway code as:

"Fairfield to [LRN 4] near Lodi via Rio Vista"

In 1951, Chapter 1562 changed "Fairfield" to "[LRN 7] near Fairfield". This route (LRN 7 near Fairfield to LRN 4 near Lodi via Rio Vista) was signed as Route 12.


State Shield

State Route 54



Routing

Route 54 is from Route 5 near the Sweetwater River to the southern city limits of El Cajon.

The relinquished former portion of Route 54 within the City of El Cajon is not a state highway and is not eligible for adoption [as a state highway].

The City of El Cajon may not impose any special restriction on the operation of buses or commercial motor vehicles on the relinquished former portion of Route 54 if that restriction is in addition to restrictions authorized under other provisions of law.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route was defined in 1963 as the route from "Route 5 near Sweetwater River to Route 8 near El Cajon." This route was part of the original freeway plans for San Diego.

In 1999, SB 557, Chapter 99, July 13, 1999 permitted the California Transportation Commission to reliquish the portion of Route 54 located between the S city limits of El Cajon and Route 8. Prior to this, the definition of the route had been "From Route 5 near Sweetwater River to Route 8 near El Cajon."As of the date of relinquishment, the definition of Route 54 was defined by SB 557 to be "From Route 5 near Sweetwater River to Route 8 near the eastern city limits of the city of El Cajon." The segment was not relinquished in the CalTrans Photologs released in 2001.

In 2003, AB 1717 (Chapter 525, 9/25/2003) changed the definition to correct the relinquishment, but change "eastern city limits" to "southern city limits".

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Before the 1964 renumbering, this route was LRN 280 (defined in 1959). It was unsigned.

Route 54 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 54 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

Unconstructed Unconstructed from Route 125 to Route 94. There is also an unconstructed freeway routing from Route 94 to Route 8 that would replace the current traversable surface routing. The existing route (Jamacha Road, County Route S17) does not meet state highway standards. The portion of Route 54 between 0.6 mi E of Briarwood (the W junction with Route 125) and Jamacha Road has been incorporated into the Route 125 tollway.

There also appear to be plans to convert Route 54 between I-5 and Route 125 to full freeway, with an interchange with the Route 125 tollway. Once this is complete, San Diego will have a full freeway circumfrential highway.

In September 2011, the CTC approved $1,619,000 to construct a median barrier on Route 54 from east of Briarwood Road to east of Sweetwater road and on State Route 125, from a half-mile west of Elkelton Place to Elkelton Place. The barrier is to “reduce the number and severity of collisions” in the area.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #1307: Construct sound barriers at the I-805/Route 54 interchange, National City. $680,000.

 

Naming

The portion of this routing that is constructed to freeway standards is named the "South Bay Freeway". It was named by location. The Caltrans naming log only shows it being named from Route 805 to Route 94. This was originally to be called the "Belt Line" Freeway, and was part of the "Inner Loop" with Route 52 and Route 125.

The portion of Route 54 from its westernmost point to its intersection with Route 125, in the County of San Diego, is officially named the "Filipino-American Highway". This segment was named in honor of the Filipino-American Community, which has made many contributions to California and the nation. Among the many past and present Filipino-American historical figures is Carlos Bulosan, a novelist and poet best known for the semi-autobiographical "America is in the Heart," who was active in labor politics along the Pacific coast of the United States and edited the 1952 yearbook for I.L.W.U. Local 37, a predominantly Filipino-American cannery union based in Seattle. Other Filipino-American historical figures include, Philip Veracruz, a labor leader who helped to found the United Farmworkers Union with Cesar Chavez, and Major General Edward Soriano, the only Filipino-American to have attained the rank of general in the U.S. Armed Forces. Major General Edward Soriano was born in Pangasinan and migrated to the United States with his family at an early age. In 2001, he was the director of operations, readiness, and mobilization at the office of America's Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans. In the County of San Diego, Filipino-Americans are the largest Asian Pacific Islander group, making up 4.3 percent of the population of the country, with many living in National City, Chula Vista, and Southern San Diego. Major Filipino-American groups in the County of San Diego include the Filipino American Educators Association of San Diego County, the Council of Philippine American Organizations of San Diego County, and the Filipino American Chamber of Commerce of San Diego County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 157, Resolution Chapter 145, on 9/12/2006.

 

Named Structures

Bridges 57-845, 57-844, the Route 54/Route 5 interchange, is named the "George R. Volland Memorial Bridge". George R. Volland, United State Navy veteran of three wars, died of a heart attack brought on by the effort he exerted to assist the children who were injured in a tragic bus accident in Martinez on June 23, 1976. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 60, Chapter 30 in 1998.

The overpass on South Woodman Street that crosses Route 54, also known as the Filipino American Highway, in the City of San Diego is named the "Itliong-Vera Cruz Memorial Bridge". It was named in honor of Larry Itliong and Philip Vera Cruz. Larry Itliong was a Filipino American labor leader who founded the Filipino Farm Labor Union (FFLU) in 1956. He was also a member of the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC). He was born in 1913 in the Pangasinan Province of the Philippines and immigrated to the United States in 1929. His first involvement in a labor strike was one year later in 1930. Itliong was a self-taught labor leader and was instrumental in leading protests in California and Alaska. After he founded the FFLU, Larry Itliong became the assistant director of the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee (UFWOC) which eventually became the United Farm Workers (UFW). Itliong is viewed as “one of the fathers of the West Coast labor movement”. On Sept. 8, 1965, Filipino farm workers, known as manongs, organized by Itliong began the grape strike that set the stage for the boycott that would lead César Chávez and thousands of farmworker families to create the nation’s pioneering agricultural labor union, the UFW. Mexican and Filipino workers had been historically pitted against one another to suppress wages or break strikes. Yet Itliong approached César Chávez, then busy organizing the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA). For the first time, Filipino and Mexican workers became “brothers,” eventually forming one organization — the UFWOC — with Itliong as an assistant director, one of several Filipino leaders on the executive board. Larry Itliong resigned from the UFWOC in 1971 and dedicated the remainder of his life to improving the lives of retired Filipino farm workers, and to a wide variety of community and civic projects, many of which were related to the Filipino American community. He died in 1977. Philip Vera Cruz was also a Filipino American labor leader, a farm worker, and a leader and activist for the Asian American civil rights movement. He was one of the founders of the AWOC, which later merged with César Chávez’s NFWA and gave birth to the UFW. Philip Vera Cruz was a long-time vice president of the UFW. Vera Cruz was born in Ilocos Sur in the Philippines in 1904 and immigrated to the United States in 1926. Vera Cruz also worked in canneries and restaurants and attended Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington, for a year. He joined the National Farm Labor Union which was affiliated with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations in the 1950’s. Along with Larry Itliong, Philip Vera Cruz convinced César Chávez and Dolores Huerta’s predominantly Mexican/Latino NFWA to join the Grape Strike and Boycott of 1965 demanding better pay and benefits. One week later César Chávez and Dolores Huerta joined the strike that eventually brought an end to the unfair wages and benefits with a 300 mile pilgrimage from Delano to Sacramento. After Philip Vera Cruz resigned from the UFW in 1977, he remained loyal to the UFW and the unionizing movement and maintained his dignity as a Filipino American supporting his community and fighting for worker’s rights. He affirmed an embodiment of internationalism and believed in serving the people instead of making profits. He died in 1994. The contributions of Larry Itliong and Philip Vera Cruz and other Filipino American farm workers were instrumental in starting the Grape Strike and Boycott of 1965. Together the Filipino and Mexican farm laborers formed the United Farm Workers union (UFW), which would not have been as successful without this coalition of Filipino and Chicano workers coming together in unity. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 156, Resolution Chapter 145, on September 02, 2014.

 

Business Routes

There is signage for a "Business Route 54" in El Cajon. This is maintained by the city, and at least one point, uses the wrong shield (Interstate instead of State).

 

Commuter Lanes

HOV lanes exist from 0.7 mi N of the Woodman Street overcrossing to 0.6 mi E of the Briarwood Road overcrossing. These lanes opened in August 1996, require two or more occupants, and operate weekdays between 6:00am-9:00am WB, and 3:00pm-7:00pm EB.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 54 0.00 5.53
San Diego 54 6.61 6.70

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 54:

  • Total Length (2000 est.): 11 miles traversable; 5 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 22,900 to 58,000
  • Milage Classification: Urbanized: 16.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 16 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 16 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 54 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as the route from near Michigan Bar to Drytown. In 1933, it was extended from [LRN 11] near Perkins to [LRN 54] near Michigan Bar. In 1935, it was codified into the highway code as

"[LRN 11] near Perkins to Drytown passing near Michigan Bar and Huot's Ranch."

In 1961, Chapter 1146 simplified the definition by changing the terminus to "[LRN 65] near Drytown" and eliminating routing language. It was signed as Route 16, and ran between US 50 (LRN 11) and Route 49 (LRN 65).


State Shield

State Route 55



Routing

From Newport Beach to Route 91 in Santa Ana Canyon.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

The definition of this route is unchanged from 1963.

On March 17, 1954, the California Highway Commission adopted Route 55 as a Freeway. Route 55 begins at the Pacific Coast Highway, Route 1, near the city of Newport Beach and runs north to Route 91. This section of Route 55 was brought into the Freeway & Expressway System in 1959 and it is part of the National Highway System (NHS). On October 31, 1962, a Freeway Agreement with the county of Orange was executed for this segment of Route 55.

In 2009, AB 344 (Chapter 238, 10/11/2009) authorized relinquishement of the portion in Newport Beach by adding the following to the legislative definition:

(b) The commission may relinquish to the City of Newport Beach the portion of Route 55 that is located between Finley Avenue and the Newport channel bridge, within the city limits of the City of Newport Beach, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state.

(c) A relinquishment under this section shall become effective immediately following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(d) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall occur: (1) The portion of Route 55 relinquished under this section shall cease to be a state highway. (2) The portion of Route 55 relinquished under this section shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81.

(e) The City of Newport Beach shall ensure the continuity of traffic flow on the relinquished portions of Route 55, including, but not limited to, any traffic signal progression.

(f) For those portions of Route 55 that are relinquished, the City of Newport Beach shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 55.

Note: In May 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Newport Beach on Route 55 between Finley Avenue and the Newport channel bridge, consisting of highway right of way deleted by legislative enactment. Authorized by Chapter 238, Statutes of 2009, which amended Section 355 of the Streets and Highways Code.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 55 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) at Newport Beach to Jct. Route 18 (US 91, later Route 91) near Olive. This was LRN 43 (defined in 1931). It ran N along Newport Blvd from Route 3 (LRN 60, later US-101A; now Route 1) turning N onto Tustin Avenue near Santa Ana and continuing N to Route 18 (LRN 43, later US 91, now Route 91).

 

Status

Constructed to freeway standards between 3 mi S of Route 73 and Route 91. The first segment opened in 1962. The last segment opened in 1990, when the route was extended from I-405 to 19th St. Carpool lanes were added in 1999.

In November 2010, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Orange along Route 55 at Chapman Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

In May 2013, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Newport Beach on Route 55 between Finley Avenue and the Newport channel bridge, consisting of highway right of way deleted by legislative enactment. Authorized by Chapter 238, Statutes of 2009, which amended Section 355 of the Streets and Highways Code.

[Alton Ave]In June 2006, the CTC received the Final EIR on a project to modify the Alton Ave overcrossing and add High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) drop ramps in the cities of Santa Ana and Irvine. The total estimated project cost, escalated to the construction year, is $92.6 million. The project is being divided into two construction phases: Phase I will be the overcrossing, and Phase II will be the HOV drop ramps. Phase I is scheduled to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2008-09. This project is being funded by the Measure M Regional Improvement Program, Measure M Growth Management Area Program, local dollars from the cities of Santa Ana and Irvine, and other local sources. Route 55 creates a boundary between the cities of Santa Ana and Irvine. Interchanges at MacArthur Boulevard and Dyer Road exist that link these two cities. Growth trends in both cities have generated traffic congestion and have created the need for additional circulation improvements. In 1982, the Irvine Business Complex identified the need for a four-lane overcrossing connecting Alton Avenue on each side of Route 55, and in April 1986, the city of Santa Ana identified the Alton overcrossing as a priority project. The proposed project would entail construction of a four-lane overcrossing connecting Alton Avenue on each side of Route 55. This addition would add high-occupancy-vehicle (HOV) direct access drop ramps to and from Route 55 to the Alton Avenue overcrossing. The purpose of the project is to provide a transportation link across Route 55, support circulation between the cities of Santa Ana and Irvine, relieve local traffic congestion, support planned development and growth in the cities of Irvine and Santa Ana, and improve HOV access as indicated by the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA). The 2002 traffic studies done in the project vicinity show that congestion is anticipated to increase as urbanization and growth continues. By 2025, 13 of 16 local street intersections studied (cities of Irvine and Santa Ana traffic models) showed that they would operate at an unacceptable Level of Service (LOS) E or F. HOV access to and from Route 55 is currently limited to Dyer Road and MacArthur Boulevard. The 2002 traffic studies also showed that traffic volumes resulted in congestion between the Dyer Road and MacArthur Boulevard interchanges and that weaving sections to the mainline resulted in a LOS of F. Construction of HOV direct access ramps at Alton Road would improve conditions at Dyer Road and MacArthur Boulevard. This would reduce HOV traffic from those interchanges and distribute it onto Alton Avenue. This would improve surface street operations as well as the Route 55 mainline operations. Alton Avenue is not continuous between the cities of Santa Ana and Irvine nor does it currently cross or connect to Route 55. The preferred selected alternative is the Alton Ave HOV direct access ramps. In order to execute this project, Commission approval is required for the new public road connection to Route 55. The additional HOV access was identified by OCTA in the 1987 Orange County Transitway Concept Design Study, the 1996 Caltrans Route Concept Report, the 2004 State Transportation Improvement Plan, the 2004 Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Regional Transportation Improvement Plan (RTIP), and the 2004 SCAG Regional Transportation Plan (RTP).

In March 2011, the CTC approved constructing an auxiliary lane between interchanges from Dyer Road off ramp to the Edinger Avenue on ramp to address the weaving operations of vehicles and increase the level of service.

In 2005, Northbound Route 55 had its control city changed from "Riverside" to "Anaheim/Riverside".

In December 2005, the OCTA elminated from consideration plans to widen Route 55, into which Route 91 feeds, and to widen Ortega Highway (Route 74) in South County.

In June 2007, the OCTA outlined a 5-year plan for the use of the 2nd Measure M funds that included adding lanes on Route 91 between I-5 and Route 57 and between Route 55 and the Riverside County border; adding lanes on I-405 between I-605 and Route 55; a new NB lane on Route 57 between Orangewood Avenue and Lambert Road.

[Extension Map]In May 2007, the OCTA approved a 14-month study to examine how to relieve congestion at the end of the Costa Mesa Freeway (Route 55) in Costa Mesa. The contract calls for LSA Associates to receive up to $275,000 to develop concepts for improving access to and from the route, which currently ends at 19th Street. State plans for the freeway include an extension from 19th Street to the vicinity of Industrial Way near the city limits of Newport Beach. The study will explore alternatives to the extension and ways to improve traffic flow in the area. Slides related to this study were presented in May 2008. There were a number of alternatives presented: (a) no-build, (b) the current easterly freeway extension plan, (c) a transportation management system alternative, (d) improving conventional highways, (e) "vertical terminal enhancement", (f) an elevated freeway along Newport Bl, (g) a cut-and-cover freeway along Newport Bl. The goal is to have the study completed by Fall 2008.

In February 2010, it was reported that Costa Mesa officials are beginning a project study aimed at relieving gridlock where Route 55 ends on Newport Boulevard. The report will examine various proposed solutions and look at the project’s effect on local businesses and residents, according to the Daily Pilot. Costa Mesa took on the expansion project more than a year ago.
[Source: "Traffic jam goes to study", Daily Pilot, 2/18/2010

 

Naming

Route 55 from Route 91 to Costa Mesa is officially named the "Costa Mesa Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 177, Chapter 86, in 1976.

Before 1976, this route was named the "Newport" Freeway. Newport refers to the community of Newport, which was named in 1892. The McFadden brothers, who had come from Delaware, started a lumber business in that community in 1873, named their steamer Newport in 1876, and had the townsite of Newport platted in 1892.

The southbound portion of Route 55 between Katella Avenue and Chapman Avenue, in Orange County, is officially named the "Paul Johnson Highway". This segment was named in honor of Paul Johnson, who began his broadcasting career in the 1950s at a rock and roll station in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Paul Johnson interrupted his career to serve in the United States Army in 1956 and 1957; and after his military service, Paul Johnson returned to broadcasting and relocated to Los Angeles. Paul Johnson appeared in the 1969 motion picture "Paint Your Wagon" and was one of 60 men that sang the musical score for the movie. Paul Johnson sang bass and appeared in several opera productions and in numerous television commercials. Johnson began traffic reporting in 1982 on the radio at several Los Angeles stations, including, KNX, KZLA, KACE, KXEZ, and KSRF. Since August 1988, Paul Johnson had been a part of KNBC's on-air team. During his tenure with KNBC, Paul Johnson served as a weather and traffic report anchor and contributor. Johnson delivered traffic information daily to millions of southern Californians for 28 years, and ended nearly all of his reports urging viewers to buckle up and be safe on the road. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 179, 9/14/2010, Resolution Chapter 160.

The Route 55/Route 91 interchange is named the "Mark Denis Melbourne Memorial Interchange". Mark Denis Melbourne was a fixture on southern California radio, giving traffic reports for four decades. He was regarded as one of the most respected broadcasters in southern California and was used as the "image voice" for KFI 640 AM. He was also a part-time communications instructor at the University of Southern California, and was regarded as having loved to share his knowledge of broadcasting with others. He advocated reporting traffic without panic and with caring, and was willing to help frustrated drivers avoid bottlenecks. He was also the unidentified voice on the monorail that ferries visitors around Disneyland. He died of a fatal illness in the year 2000 in his home in Anaheim Hills at the early age of 59. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 50, Chapter 104, on August 8, 2002.

 

Commuter Lanes

Commuter lanes have been constructed between Baker Street in Costa Mesa and Route 91 in Anaheim. These lanes opened in November 1985, require two or more occupants, and are always in operation.

The August 2005 CTC agenda had an item regarding a negative environmental impact report regarding modification of an overcrossing and the addition of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) drop ramps in Santa Ana and Irvine (DEIR).

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Orange 55 T2.22 R2.52
Orange 55 R2.73 R2.92
Orange 55 R3.03 R6.40
Orange 55 R6.84 R7.18
Orange 55 R7.66 R8.06
Orange 55 R9.56 R9.91
Orange 55 10.22 10.79
Orange 55 10.86 13.69
Orange 55 16.84 17.07
Orange 55 17.46 17.83

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 55:

  • Total Length (1995): 18 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 37,000 to 223,000
  • Milage Classification: Urbanized: 18.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 18 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 18 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Orange.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that become LRN 55 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from San Francisco to Santa Cruz. In 1935, this was codified into the state highway code as:

"The Skyline Boulevard from San Francisco to [LRN 5]"

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. The routing ran along Skyline Blvd from approximately Route 1, LRN 56 in San Francisco to LRN 5 (Route 17). It was originally signed as Route 5, and was renumbered as Route 35 to avoid the conflict with I-5.


State Shield

State Route 56



Routing

From Route 5 north of La Jolla to Route 67.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

The definition of this route remains unchanged from 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Before the 1964 renumbering, this route was LRN 278 (defined in 1959). The routing was determined, but the highway was unconstructed.

Route 56 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 56 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Naming

The segment from Route 5 to Route 15 is officially named the "Ted Williams" Freeway. Ted Williams achieved national recognition for his outstanding career in professional baseball. He was born in San Diego in 1910, and began his professional baseball career in 1936 at the age of 17, when he began playing for the San Diego Padres of the Pacific Coast League. He played for the Boston Red Sox for a total of 19 seasons, and was named most valuable player for the 1946 and 1949 seasons. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 21, Chapter 74 in 1993.

 

Status

Unconstructed Unconstructed from Route 15 to Route 67. There are no current plans to construct a state highway in this segment. There is no traversable highway identified.

TCRP 86Constructed a fully access controlled freeway from I-5 to I-15. This project was completed in June 2004. The new constructed portion is a joy to drive, as its lightly traveled, and still very much in a semi-rural state, save for a few retail developments and some homes popping up in the distance. It appears there is sufficient right of way for up to 10 lanes in the future. In July 2006, the CTC considered modification of the project funding related to the landscaping portion is currently under construction in 2006. TCRP funds, the amount of $3,430,000, were set aside for a future traffic operations project. However, costs to R/W have increased due to the final condemnation case. The traffic operations project will be funded in a future STIP cycle.

However, there is not a connector from the NB I-5 to WB Route 56, and from SB I-5 to EB Route 56. According to an article in the San Diego Union-Tribune, motorists will be required to exit the freeway and use surface streets to make those transitions. This is because "Caltrans typically requires that 1,500 vehicles an hour pass through an interchange at peak travel times to necessitate a direct connector. Until recently, Caltrans contended that neither connection met that threshold. Moreover, the connectors would cost nearly $140 million. Caltrans spokesman Tom Nipper said spending $140 million to benefit 1,500 vehicles an hour didn't seem like a wise investment, so Caltrans and the San Diego Association of Governments decided to spend the region's limited transportation dollars on more pressing projects." Later meetings resulting in Caltrans updating its traffic projections and agreeing that the ramp connecting westbound 56 to northbound I-5 needs to be built before 2020. However, it still may take as long as 10 years to perform the necessary environmental studies, and design and build that segment. As for the ramp from SB I-5 to EB Route 56, the consensus was to put off construction of that ramp and concentrate on the west-to-north connector. The web site on the connector construction may be found at http://www.sandiego.gov/5_56freewayconnectors/index.shtml

In San Diego: In July 2005, the CTC received a notice of EIR preparation for Route 5 and Route 56 in San Diego County that would provide a connector between Route 5 and Route 56 near Del Mar Heights (NOP). The alternatives being considered are:

  • No Project.
  • Direct Freeway-To-Freeway Connector Ramps.
  • Freeway-to-Freeway Connector Ramps with Loop.
  • Local Street Improvements.
  • Local Street Improvements with West to North Direct Freeway-To-Freeway Connector Ramp.

In June 2012, Caltrans started soliciting comments on the proposals. Options include building direct connectors between the freeways, adding auxiliary lanes on I-5, doing a mix of both, or doing nothing. The price tag to do something ranges from $95 million to $250 million. Up to 27 homeowners' properties could be affected, but no homes would be displaced entirely, according to Caltrans documents. Caltrans is hoping to select an option by the end of this year so crews can work concurrently with the I-5 corridor project. Construction will begin when funding is available, likely sometime after 2020. For more than 10 years Caltrans, the San Diego Association of Governments and the city of San Diego have been studying a proposed project to address mobility at the interchange and conducting public workshops to create options. Visual, noise and right-of-way impacts were the primary issues. Based on those concerns, 17 alternatives were developed and all eventually but five were eliminated. Of those, the first would connect westbound Route 56 to northbound I-5 and southbound I-5 to eastbound Route 56 with two-lane, freeway-to-freeway ramps that would add two lanes on westbound Route 56 and one lane on the eastbound side between Carmel Country Road and El Camino Real at a cost of about $260 million. The second option adds an auxiliary lane on southbound I-5 between Del Mar Heights and Carmel Valley roads and includes improvements on westbound Route 56 for an estimated cost of $100 million. The third proposal is a hybrid of the first two plans, connecting westbound Route 56 to northbound I-5 with a two-lane, freeway-to-freeway ramp. It adds an auxiliary lane on southbound I-5 between Del Mar Heights and Carmel Valley roads as well two lanes on westbound Route 56 and one lane on eastbound Route 56 between Carmel Country Road and El Camino Real for an estimated $170,000 million. Plan four, called the hybrid with a flyover, connects westbound Route 56 to northbound I-5 with a two-lane, freeway-to-freeway ramp. It includes a connector ramp from eastbound Carmel Valley Road to eastbound Route 56 and adds an auxiliary lane on southbound I-5 between Del Mar Heights and Carmel Valley roads. This option would also add two lanes on westbound Route 56 and one lane on eastbound Route 56 between Carmel Country Road and El Camino Real, all at a cost of about $205 million to $225 million. All proposed alternatives would replace and enhance the Del Mar Heights Road overcrossing and include operational improvements at existing ramps and intersections in the project area. Approximately $15.8 million has been programmed for the project through federal and local funds. It is included in TransNet, a voter-approved, half-cent tax for transportation projects. If all goes as planned, construction would begin between 2020 and 2030 and take two years to complete. More information can be found at KeepSanDiegoMoving.
(Source: The Coast News, 6/18/12)

According to Carl Rogers, the southbound connector from I-15 is not yet complete. There are pillars constructed for a distribution ramp though. As an interim option, there is a frontage road funneling SB I-5 traffic to Route 56. The eastbound Route 56 connector to southbound I-15 is still under construction; in fact, a sharp 90-degree at-grade turn is presently in place.

Portions of the original routing have been relinquished. For example, at the June 2000 meeting of the California Transportation Commission, the original routing in the City of Poway was considered for relinquishment (Agenda Item 2.3c).

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #702: Construction of the I-5 and Route 56 Connectors near San Diego, California. $6,400,000.

 

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 56 T0.18 2.00
San Diego 56 2.00 6.20
San Diego 56 6.20 9.00

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 56:

  • Total Length (1995): 16 miles, some of which is unconstructed.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 13 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 56 (the coast route, part of today's Route 1) was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from Carmel to San Simeon. In 1921, Chapter 837 extended the route by declaring "the county road extending from San Simeon SE-ly to the town of Cambria is hereby...declared to be a state highway".

In 1931, Chapter 82 extended it further by adding the segment from Cambria to San Luis Obispo to the route. As of 1931, the Coast Route (LRN 56) terminated state jurisdiction near Cambria. A county highway then connected it to Route 2 at San Luis Obispo. It was included in the highway system to provide a through drive and extending to a connection with an existing state highway. The more interesting aspect of the rationale was that it was also implementing a policy to increase milage in the southern portion of the state.

In 1933, it received a number of additional extensions: (a) a segment from [LRN 2] near Las Cruces via Lompoc and Guadalupe to [LRN 2] near Pismo; (b) [LRN 56] near Carmel to Santa Cruz; (c) Santa Cruz to San Francisco via Coast; (d) State Highway near the Southerly end of the Marin Peninsula to the Marin-Sonoma County Line via the Coast Route; (e) Russian River near Jenner to Westport; and (f) Ferndale to [LRN 1] near Fernbridge. In 1935, all of these extensions were captured in the highway code as follows:

  1. [LRN 2] near Las Cruces via Lompoc and Guadalupe to [LRN 2] near Pismo.
  2. San Luis Obispo to San Francisco along the coast via Cambria, San Simeon, Carmel, and Santa Cruz
  3. State Highway near southerly end of Marin Peninsula to the Marin-Sonoma County Line via the Coast Route
  4. Russian River near Jenner to Westport
  5. Ferndale to [LRN 1] near Fernbridge

In 1943, Chapter 661 permitted the commission and the department "to abandon and relocate any portion or portions of [LRN 56] as now established and laid out between the intersection of [LRN 56] and [LRN 55] south of San Francisco and the town of Farallon City in San Mateo County and to take any and all action necessary for such abandonment and relocation. Such abandonment may be effected prior to relocation and pending relocation the commission and the department may adopt and maintain any traversable road around the portion or portions so abandoned." This was done because of the excessive number of rock and mudslides on portions of LRN 56/Route 1 which made maintenance excessive and endangered the public.

In 1951, Chapter 1588 filled gaps north of San Francisco and added a branch near Leggett Valley. This combined the third through fifth segments into:

State highway near southerly end of Marin Peninsula to [LRN 1] near Fernbridge via the coast route through Jenner, Westport, and Ferndale; provided however that Section 600 of this code shall be applicable to those portions of said road added to the state highway system by this section, the same as if said portions had been added by the Collier-Burns Act of 1947, and the Department of Public Works shall not be required to maintain any such portion or portions of said route until the same have been laid out and constructed as a state highway

In 1955, Chapter 1488 removed the language related to Section 600. It also reworded the definition of the last segment to be "State highway near southerly end of Marin Peninsula to [LRN 1] near Fernbridge via the coast route through Jenner, Westport, and Ferndale, including lateral connection with [LRN 1] near Leggett Valley "

In 1957, Chapter 36, deleted the reference to "Carmel" from segment (b).

In 1959, Chapter 1841 changed segment (a) to refer to "the vicinity of Lompoc and Guadalupe."

There were no further changes before the 1963 renumbering. This route was all signed as Route 1. The final definition was:

  1. From LRN 2 near Las Cruces via the vicinity of Lompoc and Guadalupe to LRN 2 near Pismo.

  2. From San Luis Obispo to San Francisco along the coast via Cambria, San Simeon, and Santa Cruz.

  3. From LRN 1 near the southernly end of the Marin Peninsula to LRN 1 near Fernbridge via the coast route through Jenner, Westport and Ferndale, including a lateral connection with LRN 1 near Leggett Valley.



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