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California Highways

Routes 41 through 48

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

41 · 42 · 43 · 44 · 45 · 46 · 47 · 48


State Shield

State Route 41



Routing
  1. From Route 1 in Morro Bay to Route 46.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 41 was signed along the route from Cambria to Yosemite Park, via Paso Robles and Fresno.

    US Highway Shield Between Route 1 and US 101 3 mi S of Paso Robles, this segment was also signed as US 466, and was LRN 125. E from Paso Robles, Route 41/US 466 ran along the present route of Route 46. US 466 was signed as part of the initial signage of US highways in the mid-1930s. LRN 125 was defined in 1933.

    Between 3 mi S of Paso Robles and Shandon, the route was signed as Route 41. It was part of 1933 LRN 125. This was part of the original 1934 signage of Route 41.

    US Highway Shield Between Shandon and Cholame, the route was cosigned as Route 41/US 466, and was LRN 33. This was part of the original signage of US 466.

     

    Status

    Route 41 Shandon MapIn October 2011, Caltrans and the County of San Luis Obispo have exchanged responsibilities for routes in and near the community of Shandon. At the county's request, the state has transferred to the county a portion of West and East Centre Street that passes through the center of town. In exchange, the state now has responsibility for the portion of West Centre Street to the intersection of Route 46 and McMillan-Canyon Road. This will allow the county to implement improvements planned for the Shandon area. In the September 2011 CTC meeting records, the following was noted: The County of San Luis Obispo on May 17, 2011 adopted a resolution requesting a transfer of Route 41 location from its existing easterly alignment along West Centre Street and through the Shandon Community to an intersection with Route 46 to the proposed new shorter westerly alignment along West Centre Street. A Route Transfer Report was approved on July 1, 2011. The Department completed a preliminary environmental review and determined that this project would not have a significant adverse impact on the environment. A Categorical Exemption (CE) was signed on September 27, 2010. The background noted:

    The purpose of this route adoption is to establish a new alignment for the portion of Route 41 that passes through the community of Shandon. The County of San Luis Obispo (County) requested a transfer of highway location to allow the County to better implement the Shandon Community Plan and achieve the plans’ goals to reduce interregional traffic through Shandon and to make roadway improvements that do not meet the Department’s State highway design standards. This transfer of alignment will allow existing Route 41 from Post Mile (PM) 41.2 to 43.8 to be relinquished to the County while maintaining the route concept and connectivity of Route 41 to Route 46. On February 27, 1960, the California Highway Commission adopted this portion of Route 41 as a State Highway. Route 41 traverses the counties of San Luis Obispo, Kings, Fresno, Madera and Mariposa beginning in the city of Morro Bay and terminating in Yosemite National Park. The limits of the proposed route transfer are entirely within the county of San Luis Obispo. The route is classified as a primary route, included in the Interregional Road System and has a Truck Advisory Designation. Route 41 within the project limits is a two-lane undivided conventional highway, functionally classified as rural major collector, with 10-foot lanes and a one-foot shoulder in the westbound direction and no shoulders in the eastbound direction. The current easterly alignment of Route 41, from the intersection at West Centre Street to Route 46, runs through the unincorporated community of Shandon. West Centre Street acts as the main street for Shandon and has posted speeds ranging from 55 miles per hour (mph) to 25 mph. There are no designated bike lanes or paths along the existing Route 41 roadway and the lack of paved shoulders requires bike traffic to ride with the flow of traffic on the roadway. Route 41 serves primarily through trips from the west starting at US 101, City of Atascadero, to points east including I-5, Bakersfield, Visalia and Fresno. Local traffic from farms and housing along the route also use this highway to travel to and from the community of Shandon to the city of Atascadero. The proposed new alignment (Route Adoption) begins at the intersection of Route 41 and West Centre Street (PM R41.2) and runs westerly along West Centre Street (formerly known as McMillian Canyon Road) terminating at its junction with Route 46 (PM R42.2). This route is a rural two-lane undivided conventional highway with 11-foot-wide lanes and one-foot-wide shoulders. Posted speeds range from 55 mph to 45 mph prior to horizontal curves. Both the existing and proposed alignments are comparable in geometric cross section and pavement condition. The new westerly alignment of Route 41 provides a more direct connection to Route 46 and is about a mile in length. The existing easterly alignment of Route 41, from the intersection with West Centre Street (PM 41.2) through the Shandon community to just west of the intersection of Route 41 with Route 46 (PM 43.8), would be transferred to the County and is 2.65 miles in length.

    In May 2003, the CTC considered relinquishment of the segment from PM 16.7 to PM 16.9 in the City of Atascadero. This is likely an original or bypass segment.

    A portion of this route in the city of Atascadero once ran along Business Route 101. Until 2003, eastbound Route 41 crossed US 101 and then turned left on El Camino Real/Business Route 101, then turned right on West Mall Road, and continued onto Capistrano Avenue. It then crossed under the railroad, turned right on Sycamore Road, turned left onto the stub of Curbaril Avenue, continued across a bridge which no longer exists, turned left on Rocky Canyon Road, and then turned right on the short portion of Creston Eureka Road and continued east on the existing main portion of Creston Eureka Road. The westbound routing was identical, in reverse. Since then, a new routing has been constructed. This routing includes a bridge across the Salinas River, the connecting road south of that bridge to the intersection of Route 41 and El Camino Real, and the connecting road north of that bridge to the intersection of the short portion of Creston Eureka Road and its main portion. This new section is two miles long, as compared with the old, circuitous, 3.5-mile routing.

     

    Naming

    This segment is officially designated the "E.G. Lewis Highway". Edward Gardner Lewis was born in Connecticut in 1869. He purchased the Atascadero Rancho and moved west in 1912. In this role, he became solely responsible for the planning, design, and construction of much of the 40 square mile Atascadero Colony, now known as the City of Atascadero. Mr. Lewis built a printing plant, an all-under-one roof shopping center, schools, a hospital providing full medical coverage for all his employees, paved the state highway, El Camino Real, on its 10 mile stretch through the City of Atascadero, and planted thousands of acres of orchards. He also purchased a three mile strip of land along the Pacific Coast 17 miles west of Atascadero and saw the need for a road from Atascadero to the beach so that the residents of Atascadero would have a direct route to the coast for recreation. This road, Morro Road, is now Route 41. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 76, Chapter 47, in 1994.

    The Route 41/Route 46 junction near Cholame is named the "James Dean Memorial Junction". James Byron Dean wasone of the most admired movie stars of all time and an icon of American culture. He was born on February 8, 1931, in Marion, Indiana; and later moved to California and attended Santa Monica City College and the University of California at Los Angeles. He is best known for his roles in "East of Eden," "Rebel Without a Cause," and "Giant," and also appeared on television shows and in a Broadway play. As a successful actor, he attained cult status in little more than a year's time, personifying the restless American youth of the mid-1950s. He was tragically killed on September 30, 1955, in an automobile crash on Route 46 in San Luis Obispo County while traveling in his automobile on the way to a racing event. Just two hours before the fatal crash, Dean was pulled over for speeding on Route 99 outside of Bakersfield. Retired officer Otie Hunter clocked Dean's car at 70 miles an hour. Dean told the officer he had bought the car just a few days before and was headed to the Monterey area to compete in a car race. He was given a warning. Around 9:00 PM, it was reported that James Dean had been killed in a car wreck. This interchange, which is near where he was killed, is still regularly visited by his fans. Dean's family, friends, and lawmakers lobbied for the designation, and on September 30, 2005 (50 years to the day he died), the state of California posted signs renaming the intersection where he crashed his silver Porsche, the James Dean Memorial Junction. Dean's close cousin, Marcus Winslow, accepted an official resolution and placed a rose at the accident scene. "On September 30,1955, at approximately 5:45 p.m. only a few feet from where we're standing here, Jimmy's life came to an abrupt and sorrowful end," said Winslow. Private donations paid for the two $400 signs, with the hope that the signs will serve as a safety reminder to drivers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Chapter 107, on August 15, 2002.

    Historically, this segment is supposedly part of the "Sierra to the Sea" Highway, although other records indicate that name belongs to Route 198.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 1 near Morro Bay to Route 101 near Atascadero.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] From Morro Bay to Route 101 near Atascadero. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 46 to Route 99 in Fresno.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "Route 46 to Route 99 near Fresno." In 1992, Chapter 1243 changed this to "in Fresno".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 41 was signed along the route from Cambria to Yosemite Park, via Paso Robles and Fresno. Between the US 466 (now Route 46) divergence near Cholame to US 99 (LRN 4), the route was part of LRN 125, defined in 1933.

     

    Naming

    Historically, this segment is supposedly part of the "Sierra to the Sea" Highway, although other records indicate that name belongs to Route 198.

    The portion of Route 41 between Creston Road and El Camino Real (map) in San Luis Obispo County is named the "Robert and Pat Nimmo Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of Robert and Pat Nimmo. Robert Nimmo was born in Balboa, California in 1922 to a pioneer ranching family. He married Patricia Anne Stone in 1950, and together they had three children, Mary, Augusta, and Kathleen. Robert Nimmo enrolled at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo in 1940 and later joined the Cal Poly Rodeo Team. He served from 1943 through 1946 as a pilot in the United States Army Air Corps, and from 1950 through 1952 as Company Commander, 161st Ordnance Company. His crew was later assigned to the 448th Bombardment Group, 8th United States Air Force, flying missions over France and Germany during the landing at Normandy on June 6, 1944. He also worked with the California State Military Department in various military assignments from 1955 through 1970. He became a member the California National Guard at Camp San Luis Obispo, later earned the position of commanding officer of San Luis Obispo's 161 Ordnance Depot Company, and later became installation commander at Camp San Luis. He retired with the rank of colonel and in 1964 graduated from the United States Army Command and General Staff College. He was appointed in 1970 by Governor Ronald Reagan to serve as United States property and fiscal officer for the State of California from 1970 through 1972. He served as a California State Assembly Member from 1972 through 1976, representing the counties of Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara, and as a California State Senator from 1976 through 1980, representing the counties of Monterey, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Santa Cruz. Legislation authored by Robert Nimmo included the development of facilities at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, improvements to schools in the Atascadero Unified School District, conservation efforts devoted to Morro Bay State Park, and the protection of Moonstone Beach. He served on the Assembly Agriculture, Energy and Diminishing Materials, Resources and Land Use, Elections and Reapportionment, Employment and Public Employees, Natural Resources and Conservation, Water, and Retirement Committees, as well as the Senate Rules Finance, Agriculture, Local Government, Water Resources, and Revenue and Taxation Committees. He was appointed by President Ronald Reagan as the Adminstrator of Veteran's Affairs; and served on the Atascadero city council from 1990 to 1994 and as Mayor of Atascadero from 1992 through 1994. Robert Nimmo died on November 7, 2005. As for Patricia Nimmo, she established Nimmo Realty Corp. in Atascadero and worked as a real estate broker for more than 40 years. Patricia Nimmo was a wonderfully energetic participant in the Republican Women's Federation, the Atascadero Chamber of Commerce, and St. William's Church in Atascadero. Patricia Nimmo was the victim of a tragic car accident while walking with her husband near Route 41. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 122, Resolution Chapter 94, on 7/23/2008.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 46 near Cholame to Route 33.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. Constructed to freeway standards from 3 mi S of Route 99 to Route 99.


  3. From Route 99 in Fresno to Yosemite National Park.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(c) Route 99 near Fresno to Route 180. (d) Route 180 to Yosemite National Park.". In 1986, Chapter 928 combined these segments into "(c) Route 99 in Fresno to Yosemite National Park."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 41 was signed along the route from Cambria to Yosemite Park, via Paso Robles and Fresno.This segment was was LRN 125, defined in 1933.

    Before the current routing was established, Route 41 entered via Elm Avenue, then followed C Street to Fresno Street, where it ran with Route 180 multiplexed northeast to Broadway (US 99), then Route 41 continued north with US 99 to Stanislaus Street, and then north on Stanislaus to Blackstone Avenue.

     

    Status

    CalTrans is in the midst of a number of projects to upgrade Route 41 in Fresno and the Fresno vicinity. Fresno has long had a deficit of freeways. This changed in 1986 when the electorate in Fresno County voted to raise their sales tax by .5% for twenty years to fund road improvements. At the time of the measure, Freeway Route 41 went only as far north as Bullard Avenue. The first project was to build the freeway to Woodward Park, just shy of the San Joaquin River (and the county line). In 1997, the Route 41 freeway was extended as far south as North Avenue. The plans are to have it expressway grade from there to Conejo or Mendocino Avenues (near Caruthers).

    According to Joe Rouse in May 2001:

    I traveled the 41 freeway from Jensen Ave. north into Madera County. The new freeway extends quite a ways south of Jensen but I didn't have time to travel it. There are still Route 41 shields on Route 99 between Jensen and the interchange with the Route 41 freeway. Prior to the completion of the Route 41 freeway south of Route 99, Jensen Ave. was designated as Route 41 between Route 99 and Elm Ave.

    The extension north into Madera County starts on the west side of the old highway. Parts of the old road remain there, including the San Joaquin River bridge. The new freeway is 4 lanes but the new bridges across the river look like they are built to accommodate 3 lanes in each direction. The old road continues north, parallel to the new freeway, up to a large interchange that looks out of place since it is in an area with very little development..only the Valley Children's Hospital, is out there. However, this interchange has signals and ramp metering. Future development is apparently being planned. Just north of there the freeway becomes a super-2 and runs east of the old alignment, which has been renamed and signed as Business Route 41. The super-2 rejoins the old alignment at Avenue 12.

    According to Gary Araki, as of September 2004, this project has been completed. The section from Mt View Ave to Elkhorn has now been coverted to a 4 lane.

    [TCRP 95]Improvement of the Friant Road Interchange in Fresno, including addition of an auxiliar lane and operational improvements, is TCRP Project #95. The project is to improve the operation of northbound Route 41 from Herndon Avenue to Friant Road. The project is to construct a median lane from El Paso Avenue to Friant Road, construct an auxiliary lane from Herndon Avenue to Friant Road, construct a second auxiliary lane from El Paso Avenue to Friant Road, and widen Friant Road to accommodate the two auxiliary lanes. Due to a reduction in cost for Right-of-Way, in February 2006 the CTC considered redistribution of $424,000 in TCRP funds to ongoing work in Plans, Specifications, and Estimates (PS&E). PS&E was completed in August 2006, and expenditures were lower than originally estimated. The $230,000 surplus is needed for Construction due to increased cost in asphalt concrete and structural concrete. The project is being constructed in two segments. The first segment, funded with $9,376,000 from the State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP), will be completed in December 2006. Construction of the second segment will be funded with $8,300,000 in TCRP funds. Estimated completion is in FY 2010/2011. The mitigated negative environmental impact declaration was recieved in July 2007.

    In September 2007, the CTC approved a project near Coarsegold for future consideration of funding. This project in Merced County will make improvements to a 198 acre parcel to be used for current and future mitigation near Coarsegold. The project is fully funded in the District 6 Minor Program.

    In July 2010, the California Transportation Commission approved the last bit of funding for the Route 41/Route 168/Route 180 interchange project, which will build a system of new ramps with overpasses to separate streams of traffic that now merge and diverge in an often chaotic scene. Two other project on Route 41 also are getting under way. One adds a new lane to the outside between Herndon and Bullard avenues to better accommodate entering and exiting traffic. The other involves installing ramp meters at four sites between Ashlan and Bullard avenues.

    In August 2011, it was reported that Caltrans completed installation of three ramp-metering systems: one at McKinley Avenue, and the other two at Shields Avenue. The average daily traffic volume on Route 41 at each of these locations is about 125,000 vehicles. The $2.5 million project was financed entirely by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act).

    In November 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Fresno County that will construct new braided ramps between Route 41 and Route 168 in the city of Fresno. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $55,000,000 for capital and support. The project will mitigate potential impacts to noise to a less than significant level by building soundwalls at four locations.

    2007 CMIA. Two projects on Route 41 in Madera and Fresno Counties were were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects were widening Route 41 between Ave 11 and Ave 12 (including an Ave 12 interchange) ($44.8M requested) and expansion of the route to eight lanes from Divisadero to Shields ($95M). Neither was recommended for funding.

    In November 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Kings County that will construct left turn lanes in both the northbound and southbound directions on Route 41 near the city of Lemoore. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $2,753,000 for capital and support. The project will require construction activities in the habitat of the Tipton kangaroo rat and the San Joaquin kit fox, both of which are state and federally listed threatened and endangered species. The project contains mitigation measures to reduce impacts to these species to a less than significant level.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved $10.1 million for a project on Route 41 near Lemoore that will raise the roadway profile, widen shoulders and repave the 5.2 lane-miles worth of the roadway between Hanford-Armona Road and Grangeville Boulevard. The project will improve ride quality and reduce the potential for flooding.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #287: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. See also HPP #3798. $2,800,000.

    • High Priority Project #3798: Rehabilitation, repair, and/or reconstruction of deficient two-lane roads that connect to I-5, Route 180, Route 41 and Route 99 throughout Fresno County. This seems to be supplemental funding for HPP #287. $1,500,000.

    In September 2005, the CTC considered a proposal to relinquish the segement of former Route 41 (bypassed by the freeway construction) from 0.1 mile south of the Perrin Road Undercrossing to the San Joaquin River Bridge, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

     

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 41 from Herndon Avenue in the City of Fresno to Avenue 10 in Madera County is named the "Deputy David G. Graves Memorial Freeway". It was named in memory of Deputy David G. Graves of the Fresno County Sheriff's Office, who was killed on November 5, 1982, while in performance of his duties to the citizens he was sworn to protect. Deputy Graves was a native of Fresno, and a graduate of Hoover High School and Fresno City College. Before entering law enforcement, Deputy Graves worked as a general contractor and operated his own construction business. Deputy Graves joined the Fresno County Sheriff's Office in 1979, having served as a volunteer in the Sheriff's Search and Rescue Unit for two years prior to becoming a deputy, and was assigned to the patrol division. Deputy Graves was a dedicated officer who served his community and loved his profession. On November 5, 1982, Deputy Graves was on routine patrol on Shaw Avenue in Fresno west of Route 99 in a marked patrol vehicle when his vehicle was struck by a pickup truck driven by an intoxicated 28-year-old Clovis man that had run a stop sign, with the collision resulting in severe head injuries to Deputy Graves that led to his death prior to arrival at the Valley Medical Center. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 61, Resolution Chapter 90, on 9/1/2009.

    The portion of Route 41 between Jensen and Elkhorn Avenues located in the City of Fresno is officially named the "Donald E. DeMers Highway". This segment was named in honor of Donald E. DeMers, who served as the first and only Executive Director of the Fresno County Transportation Authority. Mr. Donald E. DeMers graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of North Dakota in 1966, with a bachelor's degree in Political Science; he earned a master's degree in Political Science and Public Administration from the University of North Dakota in 1971. During his tenure at the Fresno County Transportation Authority, Donald E. DeMers led the effort to construct freeways on Route 41, Route 180, and Route 168. Fresno County was one of the first counties statewide to become a self-help county, taxing itself to augment road construction throughout the county; Mr. DeMers led the county's representation on a committee that was formed of fellow self-help counties called the Self-Help Counties coalition throughout his time with the Fresno County Transportation Authority. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 37, Resolution Chapter 138, on 9/8/2006.

    The portion of Route 41 from the intersection with Elkhorn Avenue to the intersection with Ventura Avenue and from the intersection with Herndon Avenue to the Medera County Line is named the "Yosemite" Freeway. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, 1997.

    The segment of Route 41 from Ventura Avenue to Herndon Avenue is officially named the "Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Freeway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 42, Chapter 141, in 1971. Dwight Eisenhower was the 34th President of the United States, and is believed to be the driving force behind the interstate system. He died in 1969. For more information, see President Eisenhower's official biography or visit the Eisenhower Library.

    The portion of this route from the Fresno county line to Yosemite National Park is named the "Southern Yosemite Highway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 27, Chapter 69, in 1989. It was named by location.

    In local usage, this segment is called "Wawona Road".

    Historically, this segment is supposedly part of the "Sierra to the Sea" Highway, although other records indicate that name belongs to Route 198.

     

    Named Structures

    The Route 41/Route 180 interchange is named the "Rose Ann Vuich" Interchange. Rose Ann Vuich was the state senator that secured the funding for completion of Route 41 and Route 180. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Chapter 85, in 1997.

    The Route 41/Route 99 interchange in downtown Fresno is named the "Rosa Parks Interchange". Rosa Parks (born February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama) is considered the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement". This fame started when she was arrested on December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Her arrest was the impetus for a boycott of Montgomery buses, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and joined by approximately 42,000 African Americans for 381 days. On November 13, 1956, the United States Supreme Court ruled that Montgomery's segregation law was unconstitutional, and on December 20, 1956, Montgomery officials were ordered to desegregate buses. Rosa Parks refusal to surrender her seat in compliance with Montgomery's segregation law inspired the civil rights movement, which has resulted in the breakdown of numerous legal barriers and the lessening of profound discrimination against African Americans in this country. Her courage and conviction laid the foundation for equal rights for all Americans and for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Rosa Parks was the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was an active volunteer for the Montgomery Voters League. She cofounded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 1987 with Elaine Easton Steele to motivate and direct youth to achieve their highest potential through the "Pathways to Freedom" program. She is the recipient of many awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian, and the first International Freedom Conductor Award from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 3, Chaptered 7/16/2003, Chapter 98.

    The Route 41 Lincoln Avenue overcrossing (Bridge 42-0144) is called the "Richard Allen Flores Memorial Bridge". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 102, Chapter 170 in 1998. Richard Allen Flores lost his life in a construction accident on January 13, 1998, while working on the Lincoln Avenue overcrossing bridge, which bears his memorial.

    The Route 41 Fresno River overcrossing (Bridge 42-4122) is called Kristopher's Crossing. It was named in memory of 9 year old Kristopher Charles Turner, a third grader at Oakhurst Elementary School. Kristopher was reported missing on May 23, 2004, and his murdered body was discovered later that day inside a concrete culvert under a bridge that crosses the Fresno River, Department of Transportation Bridge 4122. Renaming the bridge under which Kristopher's body was found Kristopher's Crossing "reflects the boy's crossing over to a better place". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 65, Resolution Chapter 82, on 7/11/2006.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 49 near Oakhurst to Yosemite National Park.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] From Route 99 near Fresno to Route 180; and from Route 180 to Yosemite National Park. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Fresno 41 R19.91 R21.11
Fresno 41 R22.50 R23.08
Fresno 41 R23.25 R30.70
Fresno 41 R30.70 R31.68

 

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Other WWW Links

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.12] Between Route 1 and Yosemite National Park.

 


Overall statistics for Route 41:

  • Total Length (1995): 187 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 460 to 112,000.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 166; Sm. Urban 9; Urbanized: 13.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 160 mi; FAU: 1 mi; FAS: 26 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 149 mi; Minor Arterial: 10 mi; Collector: 28 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Cottonwood Pass (2000 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: San Luis Obispo, Kings, Fresno, Madera, Mariposa.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that become LRN 41 was first defined in 1905 by Chapter 598, which authorized "...locating, surveying, and constructing a public highway from the General Grant National Park in Fresno County, thence E-ly into Kings Canyon..."

In 1909, Chapter 223 stated "The highway now completely located and surveyed, and partially completed ... from the General Grant National Park to the floor of the Kings River Canyon is hereby made a state highway..."

In 1919, the Third Bond Issue provided funding for the Kings River Canyon State Road. In 1933, the route was extended from [LRN 4] near Fresno to General Grant National Park, and from [LRN 4] near Fresno to [LRN 5] near Tracy. By 1935, when the route was codified, the definition was:

  1. [LRN 5] near Tracy to [LRN 4] near Fresno
  2. [LRN 4] near Fresno to General Grant National Park
  3. General Grant National Park to Kings River Canyon

Legislation approved in 1963 would have changed "General Grant National Park" to the "General Grant Grove Section", but that change was overtaken by the 1963 renumbering by Chapter 385.

Signage along this route was as follows:

  1. From LRN 5 near Tracy to LRN 4 near Fresno.

    This was signed as Route 33 between Tracy and Los Banos and between the vicinity of Santa Rita Park and 2 mi NE of Mendota. It was signed as Route 180 from 2 mi NE of Mendota into Fresno. The Route 33 portion was defined in 1933; the Route 180 portion was defined in 1919.

    Since 1964, some portions of this segment were deleted. The portion between Route 152 and I-5 (originally part of CA 33) was deleted in 1970, when former Route 207 (LRN 121) was resigned as Route 33 from Route 152 to I-5. The deleted portion was Ingomar Grade and Henry Miller Road. Additionally, the portion between I-205 in Tracy and I-5 was deleted from the state highway system in 1976.

  2. From LRN 4 near Fresno to General Grant National Park.

    This was signed as Route 180. "General Grant National Park" is General Grant Grove in Sequoia National Park. This was defined in 1933.

  3. From General Grant National Park to Kings River Canyon.

    This was signed as Route 180. This was defined in 1905.


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 42



Routing

No current routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, this route was defined as "Route 1 west of Inglewood to Route 91 in Santa Ana Canyon via the vicinity of Norwalk."

On June 5,1963, a public hearing was held regarding the Century Freeway (then Route 42) from the Pacific Coast Freeway (Route 1) to the Santa Ana Freeway (I-5).

In 1965, the portion of former Route 42 from Route 605 to Route 39 was transferred to Route 90, and the routing was redefined as (1) from Route 1 west of Inglewood to Route 605 and (2) Route 39 near La Habra to Route 91 in Santa Ana Canyon. A 1965 planning map shows this as freeway from Route 405 to Route 605, and then continuing as freeway from Route 605 to Route 91 along what is now Route 90.

In 1968, part (1) was transferred to Route 105, and part (2) was transferred to Route 90. Part (1) became the "Century Freeway", and part (2) became the "Yorba Linda Freeway". This resulted in the route's deletion.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield Before this route was designated as Route 42, it was signed as Route 10. Sometime between 1960 and 1963, the route was resigned as Route 42. The pre-1964 routing ran only between US 101A (now Route 1) and US 101 (now Route 5). It appears that Route 42 was originally LRN 174 (defined in 1933) between Route 1 and Route 19. LRN 176, defined in 1933 between Route 39 and Route 91, and extended to Route 19 in 1959. As part of Route 10, portions were signed as Bypass US 101.

Pre-1964 State Shield Route 42 was not assigned as part of the 1934 signage of state routes. It is unclear if any route was signed as Route 42 between 1934 and the resignage of Route 10 as Route 42.

US Highway Shield US 42 was the original number proposed in 1926 for what was later US 48, which was later renumbered as part of US 50. This is now part of Route 37.

 

Status

The CalTrans bridge log indicates that Route 105 is signed in its entirety as Route 42. What this means is that the currently signed Route 42 is really the old traversable routing of Route 105. In mid-2000, CalTrans finally relinquished all portions of Route 42, although it still has some of the old signs in some places. The CalTrans photolog still shows some portions of Route 42 as unrelinquished in 2001.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #479: Widen Firestone Blvd (former Route 42) between Ryerson Blvd and Stewart and Gray Road in Downey. $1,600,000.

  • High Priority Project #1633: Conduct project report study on Old River School Rd — Firestone Blvd intersection reconfiguration in Downey. $400,000.

 

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that became LRN 42 was first defined in 1913 by Chapter 398, which called for "the survey and construction of a state highway from the point known as Saratoga Gap on the line between the counties of Santa Clara and Santa Cruz, extending thence by the practicable route in a generally SW-ly direction along the ridge between the San Lorenzo and Pescadero creeks to the present boundary of the California State Redwoods Park, thence into the California State Redwoods Park in Santa Cruz County to Governor's Camp, and thence through said park to the boundary thereof at Bloom's Mill."

In 1933, the route was extended from [LRN 55] near Saratoga Gap to [LRN 5] near Los Gatos. It was codified into the highway code in 1935 as follows:

[LRN 5] near Los Gatos to Governor's Camp in California Redwood Park via Saratoga Gap and along the ridge between San Lorenzo and Pescadero Creeks.

This definition remained until the 1963 renumbering. The route is the present-day Route 236 between Governor's Camp near Big Basin and the Route 9/Route 269 junction, and then Route 9 to Route 17 (former LRN 5). The California Redwood State Park Road ("from Saratoga Gap, on the line between the counties of Santa Clara and Santa Cruz, to, into and within California Redwood Park...") was defined in 1913. The remainder of the route (to Route 17 near Los Gatos) was defined in 1933. The Route 9 signage dates back to 1934.


State Shield

State Route 43



Routing
  1. Route 119 to Route 46 in Wasco.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this route was defined to run "Route 119 to Route 99 near Selma via the vicinity of Wasco." In 1986, Chapter 928 introduced a discontinuity in Wasco, dividing the route into two segments.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was signed as Route 43 before 1964, but was not part of the initial 1934 signage of routes. It was LRN 139 (defined in 1939) between US 399 (LRN 140; present-day Route 119) and US 466 (LRN 33; present-day Route 46).

     

    Status

    In August 2011, the CTC approved a locally-administered STIP project for $42,000 in Wasco, from Filburn Avenue to Poso Drive, that will construct 3,357 linear feet of median curbs, 2,114 linear feet of curb and gutter, 12,890 square feet of sidewalk, 2,367 linear feet of 6-foot tall block walls, and one mile of bike lanes.

     

    Naming

    This is currently called "Enos" Lane.

    The portion of this route from Selma to Route 46 in Wasco was historically called the "Central Valley Highway".


  2. Route 46 in Wasco to Route 99 near Selma.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this route was defined to run "Route 119 to Route 99 near Selma via the vicinity of Wasco." In 1986, Chapter 928 introduced a discontinuity in Wasco, dividing the route into two segments.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was signed as Route 43 before 1964, but was not part of the initial 1934 signage of routes. It was LRN 135 (originally defined in 1933, extended and rerouted in 1953, 1959, and 1961) between US 99 (LRN 4) and US 466 (LRN 33; present-day Route 46).

     

    Status

    There are plans to widen this to a four lane expresway from the Kings County line to Route 99 in Selma in Fresno County. This is TCRP Project #94. However, due to budgetary problems, work on this has been suspended. Funding was deallocated due to inactivity in September 2005.

    Caltrans is exploring creating a roundabout on this route at the intersection of Route 43/Route 137 in Corcoran. Other potential/planned roundabout locations in the San Joaquin Valley include Route 145/Jensen near Kerman, Route 168/Auberry Road in Prather, Route 155/Browning Road in Delano, Route 216/Route 245 in Woodlake, Route 190/Road 284 east of Porterville, and Route 190/Road 152 east of Tipton. A 2007 study of 55 roundabouts in the U.S. found a 35% reduction in accidents and a 90% reduction in fatal accidents when intersections with stop signs or signals were converted to roundabouts. It costs about the same to build a roundabout as to put up traffic signals, and they need significantly less maintenance than traffic signal intersections -- about 60% to 90% less, depending on how much landscaping work is required.

    In October 2006, the CTC had a resolution to relinquish right of way in the city of Hanford, at 0.5 mile north westerly of Fargo Avenue, consisting of frontage road.

    In May 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Fresno along Route 43 on Conejo Avenue, consisting of a reconstructed county road.

     

    Naming

    This segment was historically called the "Central Valley Highway".

Freeway

[SHC 253.3] From Route 5 to Route 99 near Selma. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 43:

  • Total Length (1995): 98 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,350 to 9,400.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 89; Sm. Urban 8; Urbanized: 0.4.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 98 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 10 mi; Minor Arterial: 88 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Cottonwood Pass (2000 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Kern, Tulare, Kings, Fresno.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

1944 MapThe route that would become LRN 43 was first defined in 1917 by Chapter 697, which called for inclusion in the state highway system of the route "...beginning at a point in Waterman Cyn at the termination of the pavement of the San Bernardino County highway system, thence following the meanderings of the road known as the "Crest Drive" into Bear Valley, ending at a point directly opposite the most easterly point of Bear Lake." The 1919 Third Bond Issue extended the route from Deep Creek to Metcalf Creek, specifically "Deep Creek easterly via Bear Valley Dam to the county road at Metcalf Creek in the Angeles National Forest (Arrowbear to the Eastern End of Big Bear Lake)." This ran along the S side of Big Bear Lake.

In 1931, it was extended further, from [LRN 43], Waterman Canyon via Santa Ana Canyon to Newport Beach. This was a routing from San Bernardino to the coast through the cities lying northeast and southwest of the Santa Ana Rivers. It represented the most direct line to the coast through an area that includes Colton, Riverside, Corona, Santa Ana, and Orange. The route was well-fed by local inter-community and inter-county traffic. There was also a large amount of recreational traffic seeking the mountain through San Bernardino, Redlands, and Riverside. As there was rapid development in the area, the state wanted to adopt the route while they could.

It is unclear, for a time, whether there was a distinct routing between LRN 9 and LRN 26. This is illustrated in the 1944 map to the right.

In 1933, the route was extended further, from [LRN 31] from Victorville to [LRN 43] near Big Bear Lake via Baldwin Lake. It was also extended to complete the circle around Big Bear Lake. Thus, the route was codified in the 1935 highway code as:

Newport Beach to [LRN 31] near Victorville, via Santa Ana Canyon, San Bernardino, Waterman Canyon, "Crest Drive" into Bear Valley, Big Bear Lake and Baldwin Lake. [LRN 43] includes a highway around Big Bear Lake.

In 1961, Chapter 1146 amended the definition to delete the reference to “"Crest Drive" into Bear Valley”.

Signage on the route was as follows: LRN 43 was signed as Route 55 until the Route 55/US 91 junction (present-day Route 55/Route 91 junction), and then as US 91 into San Bernardino (now Route 91 to Riverside, and I-215 to San Bernardino). Between present-day I-10 and Route 30 in San Bernardino, the original surface routing of LRN 43 is now I-215 and Route 259.

From Route 30 in San Bernardino N, LRN 43 was signed as Route 18 (and encompassed all of the present day Route 18 between San Bernardino and Victorville, except for the portion around Big Bear Lake). The northern route around the lake was also LRN 43, and was originally Route 18 but is now Route 38.


State Shield

State Route 44



Routing

From Route 299 at Redding to Route 36 west of Susanville, via the vicinity of Lassen Volcanic National Park.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 44 was defined as "(a) Route 5 at Redding to Lassen Volcanic National Park. (b) Lassen Volcanic National Park to Route 36 west of Susanville."

In 1988, Chapter 106 combined these into a single segment ("Route 5 at Redding to Route 36 west of Susanville, via the vicinity of Lassen Volcanic National Park.")

In 1999, the routing was changed from starting at Route 5 near Redding to starting at Route 299 at Redding (AB 1650, Ch. 724, 10/10/99).

In 2002, a highway location routing for Route 299 was adopted along Lake Boulevard from Route 273 to I-5. Concurrent with this action, the segment of Route 273 from Route 299 at Market Street to Route 273 at Lake Boulevard will be cosigned Route 273/Route 299. The former Route 299 segment from Route 299 at Market Street to I-5 will be designated as Route 44.

Chris Sampang noted that before the extension of Route 44 into downtown Redding (and the removal of the Route 299/I-5 multiplex from Route 44 north to Lake Boulevard), Route 44 east began at the cloverleaf ramp where Route 299 east merged onto I-5 north; Route 44 west ended when the ramps from I-5 merged onto the Route 299 freeway. Now that Route 44 has been extended on the former Route 299 freeway, the legislative definition (of Route 44 beginning at Route 299) has not changed, but the streets leading from the former Route 299 freeway onto Route 273 do not directly connect to the current Route 299/Route 273 multiplex. It is unknown whether Route 44 is co-signed on the former Route 299/Route 273 portion of Market Street from Eureka Way south to Shasta and Tehama Streets (the ramps leading to the freeway) or whether Route 44 actually ends at Route 273 (with the definition not having been updated yet.)

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield US Highway Shield In 1934, Route 44 was signed along the route from US 101 near Arcata to Alturas, via Redding. In 1935, that routing was resigned as US 299.

When US 299 was signed, Route 44 was resigned to this routing. It dates to 1935. There are three distinct segments to this route:

  1. Between US 99 (LRN 3) in Redding and Manzanita Lake. By 1956, this was signed as Route 44. In the initial 1934 signage of state routes, this segment was signed as Route 440. It was LRN 20, defined in 1933.

  2. Between Manzanita Lake and 1 mi NE of Old Station (junction Route 89; LRN 83). This was either unsigned, or signed as Route 44. It was LRN 83. This was defined in 1933.

  3. Between 1 mi NE of Old Station and 5 mi W of Susanville (junction Route 36; LRN 29). This was signed as Route 44, and was an extension of LRN 20 defined in 1959.

From the Old Oregon Trail exit in east Redding through Palo Cedro and Millville, there is an "Old 44 Drive" that apparantly was bypassed when the Route 44 freeway and expressway were built. The newer portion of Route 44 includes a Super-Two type interchange at Deschutes Road south of Palo Cedro.

 

Status

Currently Route 44 begins a freeway at Route 299, traveling east until reaching Old Oregon Trail. Freeway status ends at that intersection.

In August 2005, the CTC considered improvements to Route 44 in Shasta County to increase capacity and improve operations and safety in Redding.

In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed improvements to the Route 299/Route 44/Route 36 area. These would complete "Buckhorn" to allow STAA trucks to travel direct from I-5 at Redding to US 101 near Eureka and into the Port of Humboldt, now prohibited due to the existing curvilinear alignment that causes truck off tracking. This is the only viable alternative to get STAA trucks into the north coast. STAA trucks cannot access the Port on US 101 north due to environmental restrictions at Richardson's Grove that pre-empt major improvements to the route. Route 44 widening reduces congestion in the Redding urbanized area and also improves inter-regional through movement for people and goods.

In December 2006, the CTC considered a resolution to vacate right of way in the county of Shasta, about 4.3 miles northeasterly of the junction of Route 44 and Route 89, consisting of right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

In 2007, the CTC considered a number of requests for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA). None were recommended for funding. These requests were: widening the route to 6 lanes from Dana to Downtown, and extending the four lane freeway to Palo Cedro (Stillwater).

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #2158: Construct interchange at intersection of Route 44 and Stillwater Road. $4,000,000.

 

 

Named Structures

The Bear Creek Bridge in Shasta County, located on the portion of Route 44 between post mile R14.445 (facing westbound) and post mile R14.489 (facing eastbound), as the "Deputy Dennis "Skip" Sullivan Memorial Bridge". It was named in memory of Deputy Sheriff Dennis "Skip" Sullivan, of the Shasta County Sheriff's Office, who was killed in a traffic collision on Route 44, on October 10, 1987, while on his way to negotiate with a reportedly armed woman barricaded in a Mountain Gate home. Deputy Sullivan had been performing duties as a dedicated member of the Sheriff's Office Hostage Negotiation Team for four years. Deputy Sullivan served 11 years with the South San Francisco Police Department, where as a sergeant he supervised the operations division and the community relations and crime prevention programs. Deputy Sullivan continued to exemplify professional commitment and leadership during his assignment by designing and implementing the South San Francisco Police Department's field training program. Continuing his tradition of honorable and faithful service in law enforcement, in 1981, Deputy Sullivan joined the Shasta County Sheriff's Office. He served first as a resident deputy sheriff in the Shingletown area of Shasta County and then as a patrol deputy sheriff at the Palo Cedro substation. Deputy Sullivan, who was 41 years of age when he died, was survived by a son and two daughters. Deputy Sullivan was an avid fisherman and hunter who loved the Shasta County area and the people. Deputy Sullivan was killed when his vehicle collided with a semitruck on Route 44 east of Shingletown. As Deputy Sullivan was responding to the report of shots fired, heading west near Inwood Road, the trailer of an eastbound truck tipped over onto his small pickup. Witnesses report that Deputy Sullivan tried to avoid the trailer by moving to the extreme right of the road. The impact of the collision sheared off the top of the pickup and forced the pickup off the highway onto the north side of Route 44. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 39, Resolution Chapter 40, on June 27, 2011.

This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

  • Shingletown, in Shasta County, 3.1 mi E of Shingletown.
  • Bogard, in Lassen County, 28 mi. NW of Susanville.

 

Naming

Portions are the "Feather Lake" Highway. This is named by location.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.4] From Route 5 near Redding to Route 89 near Old Station.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
SHA 44 L0.37 L1.00
SHA 44 L1.61 L1.81
SHA 44 R0.00 R1.56

 

National Trails

[Volcanic Byways]This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road, between Route 36 and Route 89, and between Route 44 and Route 89.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route (not completly constructed). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 41:

  • Total Length (1995): 105 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,400 to 27,500.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 101; Urbanized: 4.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 105 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 105 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Eskimo Hill (5933 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Shasta, Lassen.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.12] Between the east urban limits of Redding and Route 36.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that was to become LRN 44 was first defined in 1917 by Chapter 703, which added to the state highway system "...that certain road situated in Boulder Creek township, county of Santa Cruz... Beginning at the intersection of Main and Lorenzo Streets in the town of Boulder Creek, thence running in a NW-ly direction over the present traveled road to the Sequoia schoolhouse, thence running over the road known as the Boulder Creek and state park road to the E-ly boundary of the California Redwood Park..." This was captured in the 1935 state highway codes as:

From the intersection of Main and Lorenzo Streets in Boulder Creek to [LRN 42] at Governor's Camp in the California Redwood Park, via the Sequoia Schoolhouse and Bloom's Mill.

In 1937, Chapter 841 simplified the definition to "[LRN 116] near Boulder Creek to [LRN 42] at Governor's Camp in the California Redwood Park".

This route was signed as Route 9, but is present-day Route 236 between Boulder Creek and 8 mi N of Boulder Creek.


State Shield

State Route 45



Routing
  1. From Route 113 near Knights Landing to Route 20 near Sycamore.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The definition of this segment is unchanged from 1963

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 35 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 24 (now Route 113) at Knights Landing to Jct. Route 32 Hamilton City, via Colusa. This segment was LRN 88 defined in 1933.


  2. From Route 20 near Colusa to Route 32 near Hamilton City.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The definition of this segment is unchanged from 1963

    The route between Colusa and Route 45 near Sycamore is signed as Route 45, although it is legislatively Route 20.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 35 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 24 (now Route 113) at Knights Landing to Jct. Route 32 Hamilton City, via Colusa. This segment was LRN 88. The portion between Route 20 and Route 162 was defined in 1959, and from Route 162 to Route 32 in 1933. It appears that the portion connecting the two segments of present day Route 162 were part of LRN 45.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this segment connecting the two segments of Route 162 is part of the "Biggs-Willows Road", named by Resolution Chapter 542 in 1919.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 11-038, the "Stoney Creek Bridge" in Glenn county, is called the "Chet Walker Bridge". It was built in 1974. It was named after Chester W. Walker, who was known as "the mayor of Hamilton City". He served as chair of the North Sacramento Valley Highway Committee of the California Chamber of Commerce. He was a leader in an effort to replace the original narrow, dangerous bridge at this location.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 45:

  • Total Length (1995): 70 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 360 to 7,700.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 70 mi.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 37 mi; FAU: 1 mi; FAS: 33 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 37 mi; Collector: 33 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Yolo, Colusa, Glenn.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 45 was first defined in 1919 by Chapter 54, which stated "That certain highway beginning at a point on the present state highway in Butte county about 3 mi N-ly of the town of Biggs, thence extending W-ly and crossing Cherokee Canal and Butte Creek and extending through Butte City and across the Sacramento River, thence N-ly to Glenn Post Office, thence W-ly to the town of Willows in Glenn County ... is hereby constituted a state highway..." This was codified into the 1935 state highway code as:

[LRN 3] near Biggs to [LRN 7] at Willows via Butte City and Glenn

In 1957, Chapter 1911 simplifed the definition to terminate at "[LRN 7] near Willows." This is present-day Route 162 between Route 5 and Route 99. This route is the "Biggs-Willows Road".


State Shield

State Route 46



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Cambria to Route 101 near Paso Robles.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Between the initial state signage of routes in 1934 and the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, this segment was signed as Route 41, and was a 1933 extension of LRN 33.

     

    Naming

    This segment is officially named the "Eric Seastrand Memorial Highway". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 22, Chapter 75, in 1993. Eric Seastrand served in the California State Assembly from 1983 to 1985, serving San Luis Obispo County, representing California's 22nd District, home to Vandenberg Air Force Base. He was very active in the establishment of the California Spaceport Authority.

    The interchange at Route 101 and Route 46 East, and any subsequent interchange constructed to replace that interchange, in the City of Paso Robles is named the "California Highway Patrol Officer Brett J. Oswald Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Officer Brett James Oswald, who was born in 1962, to his parents Richard and Linda Oswald, in San Rafael, California. Officer Oswald graduated from Sam Barlow High School in Gresham, Oregon in 1980, received his associates degree from Central Texas College in Killeen, Texas in 1991, and furthered his education by completing courses at Rio Hondo Community College in Whittier, California, and Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, California. Prior to joining the California Highway Patrol, Officer Oswald held several jobs, including film development, fabricating counter tops, custodial work for a local junior high school, military, and even assisting with his family's business. Officer Oswald, badge number 13164, graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1990 as a flight officer, and was assigned to the Santa Fe Springs Area Office. Officer Oswald subsequently served as a traffic officer in the King City Area Office, a flight officer in the Paso Robles Coastal Division Air Operations Office, and a traffic officer in the Templeton Area Office. Officer Oswald proudly served a total of 20 years and one month as a California Highway Patrol Officer. Officer Oswald was killed in the line of duty on June 27, 2010, in Paso Robles, California, when he was struck by a vehicle while waiting for a tow truck on the side of the road. He responded to a report that a vehicle had hit a tree on South River Road in Paso Robles. After investigating, Officer Oswald determined that no accident had occurred and that the vehicle was abandoned. He called for a tow truck and was waiting next to his patrol car, when a passing vehicle crossed the double yellow lines and struck the patrol car. The force of the impact pushed the patrol car into him. Officer Oswald was transported to a local hospital where he later died from his injuries. In his spare time, Officer Oswald enjoyed reading, photography, making people laugh, working on his property, and a good cigar from time to time. Above all else, Officer Oswald enjoyed spending time with his family. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 117, Resolution Chapter 63, June 29, 2012.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] Entire portion.


  2. From Route 101 in Paso Robles to Route 99 near Famoso via Cholame Pass.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment ran from "Route 101 in San Luis Obispo County to Route 99 near Bakersfield via Cholame Pass." In 1965, Chapter 1371 changed the terminus to "Route 99 near Famoso via Cholame Pass." In 1992, Chapter 1243 made the origin more specific: "Route 101 in Paso Robles"

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Between the mid-1930s and 1964, this route was signed as US 466. It was LRN 33, and was defined in 1915. It was cosigned with Route 41 between Shandon and Cholame. The portion between Route 101 and Shandon was unconstructed in 1935. Circa 1935, the routing for US 466 continued S from Route 99 in Bakersfield to the Nevada State Line, along the routing of what is now Route 58 (LRN 58) to Barstow, and then N on US 91 (now I-15; LRN 31)

    The Route 46 signage was not defined in 1934. It is likely that Route 46 was first signed in 1964 with the decomissioning of US 466. The route that became Route 46 was adopted into the California Highway System in 1915 and was made part of the California Freeway and Expressway System in 1971 as a Controlled Access Highway. Within the county, this highway crosses terrain that transitions from gently rolling rangeland to level agricultural land and small urban areas. Route 46 has been designated as a State Highway Terminal Access Route for larger trucks under the Federal Surface Transportation Act of 1982. Route 46, from its junction with Route 101 to its junction with I-5, is a State Highway Extra Legal Load (SHELL) Route and is included in the National Highway System. Route 46 is also a High Emphasis Interregional Route. The route is designated for explosives, hazardous materials (including rocket fuel), and trucks up to 105 feet in length. On a year-around basis, Route 46 is a significant interregional route for agricultural products, and truck traffic accounts for 40% of the Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT).

     

    Status

    In December 2012, the CTC approved $4,300,000 to replace the Estrella River Bridge near Paso Robles as it was structurally deficient.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1043: Widen Route 46 between Airport Road and the Shandon Rest Stop in San Luis Obispo County. $33,461,000.
    • High Priority Project #3637: Planning design and construction to widen Route 46 in Kern County between SLO county line and I-5. According to the Antelope Valley Press, this project would widen Route 46 from two lanes, creating a four-lane expressway from I-5 near Lost Hills to the Kern-San Luis Obispo county line. $92,000,000.

    With respect to HPP #3637, the CTC had on its October agenda a resolution that proposed to approve the project for future consideration of funding. This project in Kern and San Luis Obispo Counties is to construct a 4-lane expressway. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for $72,500,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2007-2008. A negative EIR was completed in October 2006.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening important east west inter-regional routes in San Luis Obispo County for people and goods movement.

    [TCRP 113]There is currently a push to make a segment of the route a four-lane expressway. Initial plans are for the expressway portion to run from US 101 to I-5, but the expressway may be extended as far as Route 99. TCRP Project #113 will widen this to four lanes for 33 miles from I-5 to the San Luis Obispo Conty line in Kern County. The overall project is to convert the existing Route 46 from a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane expressway from Route 5 to the San Luis Obispo County line. The project also includes pavement rehabilitation and improves traffic operations and traffic safety. For delivery and implementation purposes, the project is separated into four segments. The environmental document for the entire corridor was completed in June 2005. The environmental document was delayed due to receiving the Biological Opinion from United States Fish and Wildlife Services in April 2005. Two of the segments are ready to begin right-of-way acquisition. In October 2006, funds were requested from the CTC for this purpose. The project is projected to be completed in FY 2016/2017. In 2007, funding was requested from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account. The construction of a four-lane expway from Geneseo to Almond (Whitley 1) [$105,000K total cost; $67,742K requested and recommended] was approved, but other corridor improvements (Whitley 2) [$94,000K requested] were not recommended. The CMIA was also recommended to fund widening of Route 46 to four-lanes between Kecks Rd and Route 33 ($49.9 milllion requested, $45 million approved, total cost $94.195 million). The first request for bids (for the segment from Airport Road To Geneseo Road was put out for bid in November 2007, with an estimate of $39M. In July 2010, the second segment (from 0.5 Mile West Of Geneseo Road To 0.6 Mile East Of Almond Drive) was put out for bid with an estimate of $51M. In Spring 2012, the segment from 0.1 Mile east of Almond Drive to 0.8 mile east of Mcmillan Canyon Road was put out for bid. In August 2012, the CTC reduced the original CMIA allocation for construction by $1,912,000, from $40,000,000 to $38,088,000, for the Route 46 Corridor Improvements (Whitley 2A) project (PPNO 0226G) in San Luis Obispo County, reflecting award savings.

    Lost Hills MapIn January 2007, the CTC considered a route adoption of 29.9 miles of Route 46 near the City of Lost Hills in the County of Kern as a Controlled Access Highway. This route adoption extends the limits of the 1971 adoption from PM 28.5 to PM29.9. The purpose of this project is to improve traffic operations, improve traffic safety, and correct any deficiencies in the existing roadway in order to meet all current design standards for a four-lane expressway with a standard 62-feet median in most places. The project improvements extend beyond the limits of the route adoption to 0.9 miles east of I-5. The proposed improvements include new lanes that will shift north and south from the existing alignment in order to avoid a natural creek, a canal, orchards and development along Route 46. The design speed within the expressway limits would be upgraded to 80 miles per hour and the existing roadbed would be rehabilitated to meet all current design standards. Within the community of Lost Hills (PM 29.9 to 30.8), a four-lane conventional highway is proposed with an 18-foot median. The median will act as a two way left turn lane. At I-5 and the business district, the 30-foot median will consist of a left turn lane in each direction separated by a curbed island. Several local roads and Route 33 will be realigned to provide a 90-degree approach to Route 46. This will improve the safety and the operations of these intersections. Route 33 will be constructed with exclusive right and left turn lanes, and storage for left turning movements. In addition, existing intersections within the project limits will be upgraded to accommodate Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 1982 trucks, which are roughly 69 feet long. Within the limits of the route adoption, one bridge will be replaced-the Bitter Water Creek Bridge (#50-437). Beyond the area of the route adoption, new structures include the California Aqueduct Bridge (#50-197), the Route 46/5 separation Bridge (#50-316), the Main Flood Canal Bridge (#50- 30), and the West Side Canal Bridge (#50-29).

    The CTC considered a funding adjustment to the Route 46 Expressway — Segment 3 Project (PPNO 3386A) in June 2008. This project converts the existing two-lane highway on Route 46 to a four-lane expressway from post mile (PM) 6.8 to PM 19.8. This project will also correct any deficiencies in the existing roadway in order to meet current design standards. This project is a vital segment in converting the Route 46 corridor to four lanes between I-5 in Kern County and Route 101 in San Luis Obispo County.

    In March 2009, the CTC was noticed that in April there would be a STIP amendment regarding the expressway. The overall project is to convert Route 46 from a two-lane conventional highway to a four-lane expressway from the San Luis Obispo/Kern County line to Route 5. The Route 46 corridor in Kern County comprises the following four segments, which together compose Traffic Congestion Relief Program (TCRP) Project 113:

    1. Segment 1 (PPNO 3386), from Route 33 to east of Brown Material Road. Design (PS&E) of this segment is complete. Construction is programmed with regional shares (RIP), interregional shares (IIP), federal demonstration (Demo) and proposed TCRP funding.

    2. Segment 2 (PPNO 3380A), from the San Luis Obispo County line to Kecks Road. PS&E of this segment is complete. Construction is programmed with RIP, IIP, Demo and proposed TCRP funding.

    3. Segment 3 (PPNO 3386A), from Kecks Road to Route 33. PS&E is ongoing, but due to be finished March 2010. Construction is programmed with Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), RIP, Demo and proposed TCRP funding, all in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009-10. This is a Tier 1 TCRP project.

    4. Segment 4 (PPNO 3386B), from east of Brown Material Road to Route 5. PS&E is programmed with RIP and Demo funding. Right of Way (R/W) and construction are not programmed. The future need is $110,160,000.

    The proposed STIP amendment will fully fund construction of Segments 1 and 2 without the use of TCRP funding, which will allow the remaining TCRP funding ($22,430,000) to be programmed to Segment 4 in the future. It will also account for cost estimate changes on several Segment 1 and 2 components, as well as for the difference between the federal apportionment and the obligation authority for Demo funding on Segments 1 and 2.

    In September 2010, the CTC received notice of a proposal to amend the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) to revise the funding plan for the Route 46 Expressway — Segment 4 project (PPNO 3386B) [in Wasco, from E of Browns Materials Road to I-5, conversion to a 4-lane expressway], reduce the programming for KCOG’s Planning, Programming and Monitoring (PPNO 6L03), and program two new projects, the 7th Standard Road 8-Lane project (PPNO 6267) [in Bakersfield, from Route 204 to 0.6 mi N of 7th Standard Road, which would widen the freeway from 6 to 8 lanes] and the Taft Highway 8-Lane project (PPNO 6268) [in Bakersfield from Route 119 to Wilson Road, widening the freeway from 6 to 8 lanes].

    In September 2012, Caltrans held a groundbreaking ceremony today for the third phase of the $45 million Route 46 widening project, which will widen five miles of the highway from one to two lanes in each direction. Proposition 1B, the transportation bond approved by voters in 2006, is fully-funding this project. Phase one between Airport Road and Geneseo Road was completed in 2011 while work is currently underway on phase two of widening Route 46 from Geneseo Road to east of Almond Drive. Construction is expected to be completed in early 2013. Phase three will widen the highway from Almond Drive to McMillan Canyon Road.

    In January 2013, the Kern County COG reported that two of three segments along Route 46 from the Kern County line to just west of I-5 that began widening construction in 2009-10 were complete and open to the public. The two-lane highway west of I-5 in Kern County will be a four-lane divided highway once Segment 3 is completed. Segment 1 (7.7 miles in length) and segment 2 (7.3 miles) were opened in late 2011. Segment 3 is 12 miles long and scheduled for completion by September 2014 but could be delivered up to one year early, which would allow the traveling public to traverse the new 27-mile 4-lane highway as soon as the summer of 2013. Construction bids for all segments have totaled nearly $100 million in federal, state and local funds.
    (Source: Kern COG Winter 2012 Newsletter)

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between Route 101 and Route 41. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

     

    Naming

    The segment from US 101 to I-5 is named the "Paso Robles" Highway. It was named by location.

    The portion of Route 46 from US 101 to Route 41 near Cholame is named the "Jack O'Connell" Highway. Jack O'Connell was a state senator authored the resolution that made that segment of Route 46 a double-fine zone as part of an overall safety enforcement effort on the route. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 78, Chapter 135, in 1997.

    The Route 41/Route 46 junction near Cholame is named the "James Dean Memorial Junction". James Byron Dean wasone of the most admired movie stars of all time and an icon of American culture. He was born on February 8, 1931, in Marion, Indiana; and later moved to California and attended Santa Monica City College and the University of California at Los Angeles. He is best known for his roles in "East of Eden," "Rebel Without a Cause," and "Giant," and also appeared on television shows and in a Broadway play. As a successful actor, he attained cult status in little more than a year's time, personifying the restless American youth of the mid-1950s. He was tragically killed on September 30, 1955, in an automobile crash on Route 46 in San Luis Obispo County while traveling in his automobile on the way to a racing event. Just two hours before the fatal crash, Dean was pulled over for speeding on Route 99 outside of Bakersfield. Retired officer Otie Hunter clocked Dean's car at 70 miles an hour. Dean told the officer he had bought the car just a few days before and was headed to the Monterey area to compete in a car race. He was given a warning. Around 9:00 PM, it was reported that James Dean had been killed in a car wreck. This interchange, which is near where he was killed, is still regularly visited by his fans. Dean's family, friends, and lawmakers lobbied for the designation, and on September 30, 2005 (50 years to the day he died), the state of California posted signs renaming the intersection where he crashed his silver Porsche, the James Dean Memorial Junction. Dean's close cousin, Marcus Winslow, accepted an official resolution and placed a rose at the accident scene. "On September 30,1955, at approximately 5:45 p.m. only a few feet from where we're standing here, Jimmy's life came to an abrupt and sorrowful end," said Winslow. Private donations paid for the two $400 signs, with the hope that the signs will serve as a safety reminder to drivers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 52, Chapter 107, on August 15, 2002.

    The portion of Route 46 within the city limits of the City of Wasco is named the "Medal of Honor Recipient Larry Stanley Pierce Memorial Highway". It is named in memory of Larry Stanley Pierce, born on July 6, 1941, in Wewoka, Oklahoma. In 1958, Larry Stanley Pierce enlisted in the United States Army, where he rose to the rank of Staff Sergeant and served in the 1st Battalion of the 173rd Airborne Brigade. Larry Stanley Pierce served his country in the Republic of Vietnam during the Vietnam War and was assigned as a squad leader in charge of a reconnaissance platoon. On September 20, 1965, Larry Stanley Pierce and his platoon were ambushed by hostile forces with machine gun fire. Pierce and his platoon routed the ambushing force and gave chase in order to further suppress the attacking enemy. Pierce discovered an antipersonnel mine that could have destroyed his entire squad. He used his own body to absorb the blast from the mine, saving the lives of 29 of his soldiers. Larry Stanley Pierce was laid to rest at the Wasco Memorial Park in the City of Wasco, California, and President Lyndon B. Johnson posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor to Larry Stanley Pierce's wife, Verlin, his daughter, Teresa, and his sons, Kelley and Gregory, on February 14, 1966. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 60, Resolution Chapter 68, on 7/16/2009.

    The segment from I-5 to Route 99 is named the "Famosa" Highway. It was named by location.

     

    Named Structures

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Shandon, in San Luis Obispo County, 0.9 mi E of Route 41.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 101 near Paso Robles to Route 41 near Cholame.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.12] Between Route 1 and Route 5.

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 46:

  • Total Length (1995): 111 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 2,200 to 17,600.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 103; Sm. Urban: 8; Urbanized: 0.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 111 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 89 mi; Minor Arterial: 22 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Luis Obispo, Kern.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 45 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Issue as running from Klamath River Bridge [LRN 3] to [LRN 1] near Klamath River. This was captured in the 1935 highway code as:

The Klamath River Bridge on [LRN 3] to [LRN 1]

In 1949, Chapter 909 change the origin to be "a point on [LRN 3] near the Klamath River Bridge". In 1959, Chapter 435 added the following words permitting the route to be non-continuous:

Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 81 of this code, the department may maintain a traversable highway located in portions of this area between the termini of and approximately on this route even though the highway is not continuous.

This is present-day (partially unconstructed, route not determined) Route 169 between US 101 (LRN 1) near Klamath and Weitchpec. It is Route 96 between Weitchpec and the vicinty of Hawkinsville. Present-day I-5 bypasses the old US 99 route (LRN 3), which is now signed as Route 263.


State Shield

State Route 47



Routing

From Route 110 in San Pedro to Route 10 via the Vincent Thomas Bridge. Route 47 also includes that portion of Henry Ford Avenue from Route 47 to Alameda Street and that portion of Alameda Street from Henry Ford Avenue to Route 91, but not that portion of the adopted route from Route 1 to Willow Street and that portion of the adopted alignment from Willow Street to Route 405.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, Route 47 ran from "Route 7 (now I-710) at Terminal Island to Route 10." at this time, Route 7 (I-710) curved W along Seaside Parkway. A proposed alignment of Route 47 was supposed to split off just north of the drawbridge from Terminal Island.

In 1965, Chapter 1372 added the portion from Route 11 (present-day I-110) to Route 7 (present-day I-710), making the route "Route 11 in San Pedro to Route 10 via the Vincent Thomas Bridge." A 1965 planning map shows this as freeway its entire length. There were later proposals that extended the Terminal Island Freeway as Route 47 north from its end at Willow Street rather than north of the drawbridge.

In 1975, the California Highway Commission rescinded the freeway adoption between Route 405 and Route 91. Note that this did not necessarily rescind any surfaces street adopted as the routing; it only rescinded the future freeway routing. The freeway routing was approved on January 22, 1969.

In 1981, Chapter 292 changed Route 11 to refer to Route 110.

In 1982, the language was added to note that Route 47 shall also include that portion of Henry Ford Avenue from Route 47 to Alameda Street and that portion of Alameda Street from Henry Ford Avenue to Route 91, but note that portion of the adopted route from Route 1 to Willow Street and that portion of the adopted alignment from Willow Street to Route 405.

In other words, Route 47 was then switched back to Henry Ford Avenue and Alameda Street, and the remainder became Route 103. This appears to be what the legislative definition refers to when it mentions the adopted alignment ("but not that portion of the adopted route from Route 1 to Willow Street and that portion of the adopted alignment from Willow Street to Route 405"). The mention of the segment from Willow Street to Route 405 makes one believe that Route 103 originally ran to Route 405. The portion of freeway (now Route 103) from Route 1 to Willow Street is not state highway anymore.

The portion from Route 1 to Route 10 was the heart of the proposed "Industrial Freeway", and may have been intended to connect up with LRN 222, which would have run from I-5 (US 99) to I-110 (US 66). There would have then been a continuation (not known to be in the state highway system) that ran N to the I-5/Route 2 junction. Although the Terminal Island Freeway was on the drawing board since 1949 (ACSC proposal), the Industrial Freeway didn't show up until the mid-1950s. It appears to have been proposed to run roughly from Santa Fe, angling W to Wilmington, ending up near Central and present-day I-10. In 1963, it was reported that route location studies were initiated at the beginning of the year for the Industrial Freeway. After Route 103 was defined, the routing changed slightly to go from Alameda instead of Santa Fe, still ending up near Central and I-10. Note that a 1957 map shows a connection between Route 47 and Route 7 (I-710). Other maps show a connection to Route 91 near Wilmington.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This routing was unconstructed before 1964, but its routing was determined by 1963. It was LRN 167 for the portion between Gaffey Avenue and Alameda (current Route 47/Route 103 junction), and LRN 270 between Seaside Blvd (Route 47/Route 103 junction) and the future I-10 (LRN 173). The LRN 167 portion also appears to have been LRN 231. The LRN 167 portion was apparently defined in 1933; the LRN 270 portion was defined in 1959. Route 47 was realigned in 1983 to create Route 103; the new alignment did not exist in the highway system before 1983.

Note that the Terminal Island Freeway was not part of the state highway system before 1964. The segment from Seaside Blvd to Willow St. (3.1 mi) was designed by the State Division of Highways and constructed under State and US Navy contracts, and financed by the US Navy and Federal Aid Funds for $12 million. The State Division of Highways was reimbursed in full for its services. At one point, this was called the "Route 167 - Seaside Freeway".

This route was not allocated as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear if any route was signed as Route 47 before 1964.

 

Status

Unconstructed The portion between Route 110 to Route 103 and from Route 103 to Route 10 is unconstructed as freeway. Sections from Route 103 to Route 91 are part of the Los Angeles demonstration project. The state will assume maintenance when the route is brought up to standards, which includes adequate widening.

Under Traffic Congestion Relief Program Project #44, there are plans to construct a grade-separated interchange at Ocean Boulevard and the Terminal Island Freeway, and at Ocean Boulevard and Henry Ford Avenue, including the preparation of plans and specifications, estimates, and related support activities for design and construction. (January 2001 CTC Agenda, Agenda Item 2.1c.(1), project 44; Negative Impact EIR Report, March 2001 CTC Agenda Item 2.2c.(2)). This is currently scheduled for completion in February 2007.

In August 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen the Route 47/I-110 connector from one to two lanes, extend the additional through lane on the northbound I-110 past the John S. Gibson Boulevard off-ramp, modify the northbound ramps at the I-110/John S. Gibson Boulevard interchange, and improve the intersection of John S. Gibson Boulevard and the northbound I-110 ramps. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund. The total estimated cost is $39,068,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund.

According to Daniel Thomas in May 2004, there are trailblazer signs posted at least three times on Alameda Street North at Carson Street, Del Amo Boulevard and Santa Fe Avenue. There were some southbound as well. This is the section that was reconstructed. There were not any signs posted south of I-405, nor along Henry Ford Avenue, although there is a lot of construction happening on that section.

The Commodore Schuyler F. Heim Bridge (Schuyler Heim Bridge) crosses the Cerritos Channel in the Port of Long Beach, was commissioned by the United States Navy between 1946 and 1948, and is one of three bridges that connect Terminal Island to the mainland. The bridge was named for Commodore Schuyler F. Heim, commanding officer of the Terminal Island Naval Base throughout World War II. The United States Navy completed construction of the bridge in 1948 and then turned it over to the City of Long Beach, which operated the bridge until 1974. The bridge is a vertical lift structure with a 73-meter (m) (240-foot [ft]) span. It has an 820-ton movable (lift) span that is supported by two crossbraced steel towers suspended by cables, and a pair of 400+-ton counterweights. Historic records indicate that, by 1951, the Schuyler Heim Bridge showed significant settlement caused by oil extraction in Long Beach Harbor. In 1951, the towers were leaning approximately 3.8 centimeters (cm) (1.5 inches [in]) to the east, and the approach structures had settled as much as 10.2 cm (4.0 in). The combined effects of settlement and leaning created the potential to bind the moveable parts and cause the lift span to fail. Subsequently, the towers were straightened, and additional work was conducted on the approaches, truss bearings, guard rails, pier footings, and lift span guide rollers. During the 1950s, the City of Long Beach pumped groundwater into depleted oil fields beneath the harbor, which mitigated the bridge’s rate of subsidence. However, the harbor continued to sink, requiring bridge repairs. By the end of the decade, the shifting terrain beneath the bridge foundations had caused cracks in the reinforced concrete pillars beneath the bridge, requiring additional repairs. Throughout the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, bridge repairs continued for routine maintenance, as well as for damage caused by trucks and marine vessels. In 1987, the Whittier Narrows earthquake (Richter magnitude [M] 5.9) twisted a heavy girder in one of the towers. In 1988, Caltrans initiated a $2 million project to refurbish the bridge to accommodate increased vehicular and marine traffic in response to expansion of the ports. After the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the Schuyler Heim Bridge was determined to be in need of seismic retrofit improvements. A Project Scope Summary Report (PSSR) was completed in 1998 to program the retrofit project and included the plans, specifications, and engineering estimate (PS&E) for the retrofit. During the PS&E phase, it was determined that replacement of the bridge would be more cost-effective and practical than retrofitting the existing bridge to meet seismic requirements for a major earthquake. Therefore, the retrofit design was halted. Subsequently, in consultation with the U.S. Coast Guard, Caltrans developed several fixedspan bridge alternatives. These alternatives met the project purpose of complying with the 1994 state mandate for Caltrans to strengthen its bridges, and met the need to comply with seismic requirements, reduce potential safety hazards to vehicular and marine traffic, and provide a cost-effective solution to the ongoing deterioration of the bridge.
(source)

[Map]Additionally, Caltrans has historically wanted an expressway in this area, as part of a series of regional transportation improvements at the southern end of the Alameda Corridor. The Route 47 Expressway is cited in the Southern California Association of Governments Regional Transportation Plan. It would build upon a network of local streets by constructing a high-capacity expressway connecting the Ocean Boulevard/Route 47 Interchange with Alameda Street at Pacific Coast Highway, thereby providing a missing link in the local transportation system. The existing Route 47 extends east from the southern terminus of the Harbor Freeway (I-110) in San Pedro, over the Vincent Thomas Bridge, along Seaside Avenue and Ocean Boulevard, then north across the Cerritos Channel on the Schuyler Heim Bridge, continuing north on Henry Ford Avenue, then onto Alameda Street until its terminus at I-10 in downtown Los Angeles. The Route 103 Expressway is an alternative to the Route 47 Expressway. It also would build upon a network of local streets by constructing a high-capacity expressway that connects existing Route 103, beginning about 0.8 kilometer (km) (0.5 mile [mi]) north of Pacific Coast Highway, to Alameda Street at a point about 0.8 km (0.5 mi) south of the San Diego Freeway (I-405). Currently, to connect from Terminal Island to Alameda Street, vehicles must travel 1.5 km (0.9 mi) north from Ocean Boulevard, then exit at the Henry Ford Avenue off-ramp and travel north through local streets, signalized intersections, and railroad crossings for about 2.0 km (1.2 mi) before joining Alameda Street just south of Pacific Coast Highway. Alameda Street continues north of Pacific Coast Highway for 4.0 km (2.5 mi) and connects to the I-405. About 5.5 km (3.4 mi) north of I-405, Alameda Street connects to the Artesia Freeway (Route 91). The existing Route 103 begins north of the Schuyler Heim Bridge at the Terminal Island Freeway, where Route 47 exits at Henry Ford Avenue. Route 103 continues north to Pacific Coast Highway, where it ends. The Terminal Island Freeway continues past the terminus of Route 103 and ends at Willow Street/Sepulveda Boulevard.
(source)

As a result, Caltrans initiated a $351 million project to start in 2009 with the following goals:

  • Provide a structurally and seismically safe vehicular connection along the critical northsouth corridor between Terminal Island and the mainland that can remain in service following a major earthquake to ensure that ground and vessel transportation are maintained.
  • Improve operational and safety design features of the crossing to facilitate the movement of people, freight, and goods, while meeting current design standards to the maximum extent feasible.
  • Provide a high-capacity alternative route for traffic between Terminal Island and I-405 that reduces traffic congestion and improves safety.

There are a number of alternatives under consideration:

  • Alternative 1. This alternative involves replacement of the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge, construction of a new Route 47 Expressway to provide a high-capacity alternative route along the Alameda Corridor for traffic between Terminal Island and Alameda Street at Pacific Coast Highway, and construction of a flyover that would divert eastbound Ocean Boulevard traffic directly onto northbound Route 47 and across the new bridge. Construction activities for the replacement bridge and Route 47 Expressway are planned to begin in 2009 and be completed in 2011. Construction of the flyover is planned to begin in 2015 and be completed in 2017. With this alternative, a new fixed-span bridge would be constructed, primarily within the existing bridge right-of-way (ROW), but toward the east to avoid impacts to the railroad on the Badger Bridge, immediately to the west; the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge (lift bridge) would be demolished. The replacement bridge would be 13 m (43 ft) wider than the existing bridge due to the addition of standard shoulders, which are not present on the existing bridge. The replacement bridge would include three 3.6-m (12-ft) lanes (two through-lanes and one auxiliary lane), with 3-m (10-ft) shoulders in the northbound direction, and four 3.6-m (12-ft) lanes (three through-lanes and one auxiliary lane), with 3-m (10-ft) shoulders in the southbound direction. Bridge construction would include a southbound off-ramp and northbound on-ramp at New Dock Street on Terminal Island, as well as a northbound off-ramp and southbound on-ramp at Henry Ford Avenue on the mainland side of the bridge. With this alternative, the new bridge would be supported by four piers in the channel, with a minimum vertical clearance of 14.3 m (47 ft) over the mean high water level (MHWL). This clearance would be maintained for the width of the navigable channel, which would be 54.9 m (180 ft), the same as under existing conditions. The new Route 47 Expressway would begin on Terminal Island, at the intersection of Route 47 and Ocean Boulevard, extending north over New Dock Street and onto the new fixed-span bridge. The expressway would extend northward to Alameda Street, south of the intersection with Pacific Coast Highway, a distance of approximately 2.7 km (1.5 mi). The Ocean Boulevard/Route 47 Flyover (flyover) would begin on Terminal Island, about 1,200 m (3,900 ft) west of the Ocean Boulevard/Route 47 intersection, extend eastward along the south side of Ocean Boulevard, and then turn north, cross over Ocean Boulevard and onto the new bridge. The west end of the flyover would be at grade, then rise to a maximum elevation of 21 m (69 ft) to join the new bridge. The elevated portions of the flyover would be supported by fourteen single-column bents, one 2-column outrigger bent, with a total of 15 spans. The flyover would have an overall length of 830 m (2,723 ft), ending at the northerly end point (gore point) of the northbound New Dock Street on-ramp onto the bridge. The left lane of the flyover would converge with the Route 47 through lane to the left; the right lane of the flyover would continue as a northbound Route 47 through lane and would have the option to continue to Route 47 or SR-103. The flyover would be located entirely within the City and Port of Long Beach.

  • Alternative 1A. Alternative 1A is a structural variation of Alternative 1. The main purpose of this alternative is to improve the aesthetics of the replacement bridge over the Cerritos Channel and span a greater horizontal distance across the channel between columns. Other aspects of this alternative, the Route 47 Expressway and Ocean Boulevard/Route 47 Flyover, would be the same as described for Alternative 1.

  • Alternative 2. With this alternative, the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge would be replaced by a fixed-span bridge, and the flyover described under Alternative 1 would be constructed. This alternative also would extend Route 103 to the northwest on a four-lane viaduct to join Alameda Street between Sepulveda Boulevard and I-405. Improvements to Route 103 would begin approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) north of the Schuyler Heim Bridge and extend a distance of approximately 2.6 km (1.6 mi). The viaduct would cross over the Union Pacific Railroad manual yard and San Pedro Branch, through the Southern California Edison (SCE) utility corridor, across the Los Angeles Harbor Department Warehouse 16/17 area, over Sepulveda Boulevard, then parallel the western boundary of the Intermodal Container Transfer Facility (ICTF) to the centerline of Alameda Street. The viaduct would slope to grade south of the Wardlow Road ramps to I-405. Improvements would be made to the existing Route 103 to accommodate the southerly and northerly end connections of the viaduct.

  • Alternative 3. This alternative would preserve the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge and construct a new fixed-span bridge on an alignment east of the existing bridge. Under this alternative, the new bridge would have the same lane configuration as the replacement bridge for Alternative 1. Additionally, the Route 47 Expressway and Ocean Boulevard/Route 47 Flyover described under Alternative 1 would be constructed, and connectivity with SR-103 would be maintained.

  • Alternative 4. This alternative is provided as a means of constructing a new bridge over the Cerritos Channel and, at the same time, preserving the existing bridge. The Schuyler Heim Bridge has been determined to be a historic property and is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. With Alternative 3, the existing bridge would be retrofitted and left in place, but would not be used. However, according to the U.S. Coast Guard, when a bridge is no longer used for its permitted purpose of providing land transportation, the bridge shall be removed from the waterway. Therefore, removal of the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge would be included as a condition of the federal permit for the replacement bridge. This alternative would replace the existing Schuyler Heim Bridge (lift bridge) with a fixedspan bridge, largely along the existing bridge alignment, generally as described under Alternative 1. Also with this alternative, connectivity with the Route 103 would be maintained. The existing Schuyler Heim Bridge would be demolished, as would occur under Alternative 1. With this alternative, however, no roadway improvements would occur, and the flyover would not be constructed. Additionally, the Route 47 Expressway described in Alternative 1 would not be constructed, and the Route 103 Extension to Alameda Street described in Alternative 2 would not be constructed.

  • Alternative 5. This alternative is designed to identify low-cost, easily implementable improvements to the local roadway system as an alternative to constructing more expensive improvements. This Transportation System Management (TSM) alternative focuses on improvements to routes that parallel the proposed Route 47 Expressway, and that serve the same trips.

  • Alternative 6. No Build.

Alternatives that were eliminated included extending Route 103 to I-405 or I-710, with freeway-to-freeway connections. These were just too expensive.

Final RoutingAs of April 2008, Caltrans approved replacement of the Schuyler Heim and Gerald Desmond bridges. In March 2009, the CTC received notice of the draft EIR. In October 2009, the CTC approved the project for future consideration of finding, based on the final EIR.

In July 2010, the CTC approved amending the Proposition 1B Project Baseline Amendment for TCIF Project 16, Route 47 Port Access Expressway and Schuyler Heim Bridge Replacement to split the project into two segments. Segment 1 is for the replacement of the Schuyler Heim Bridge and Segment 2 is for the Route 47 Expressway. The split will allow Segment 1, the Schuyler Heim Bridge replacement, to begin construction in June 2011, while the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Segment 2 are litigated. In Segment 1, the existing lift bridge will be replaced by a fixed span structure, either cast in place or precast concrete. In Segment 2, an expressway (Route 47) will be constructed as an elevated viaduct between Route 103 over Henry Ford Avenue and Alameda Street, where it transitions down to the existing grade south of Route 1.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #297: A study of the Vincent Thomas Bridge to meet future cargo and passenger traffic needs of the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. $1,600,000.

  • High Priority Project #712: The Alameda Corridor/Route 47 Port Access Expressway design. Additional funding seems to be provided by HPP #3797.$8,000,000.

  • High Priority Project #2885: I-110/Route 47/Harbor Blvd. Interchange Improvements, San Pedro. $4,000,000.

  • High Priority Project #3797: The Alameda Corridor/Route 47 Port Access Expressway design. This seems to be additional funding for HPP #712. $2,000,000.

In March 2012, it was reported that the Long Beach City Council voted to seek a grant that would study a proposal to remove the Terminal Island Freeway. The plans are still very preliminary. The goal of local advocates is to turn the freeway into a local street and a large park. The council vote means the city will officially pursue a $300,000 Caltrans grant under the Transportation Planning Grant Program. The section of freeway targeted for removal is on city-owned land, so if the freeway is removed, according to the Long Beach Post, "the surplus land size falls in the arena of some 25-acres that could be used to create a mile-long greenbelt, similar to the Wilmington Park Yards proposal."

In November 2013, it was reported Long Beach city officials were considering a radical makeover of west Long Beach that would involve ripping out a one-mile section of one of the Southland's first freeways, now mostly used by truckers, and replacing it with a long ribbon of green space. Built by the Navy in the 1940s to connect the mainland to its base, the Terminal Island Freeway became a vital postwar link to the burgeoning ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. Regional planners had hoped to connect the Terminal Island route to the region's expanding highway network by extending it to what is Route 91. Completion of the Alameda Corridor freight rail line and expansion of I-710 made the link a less pressing priority. The freeway starts near the waterfront and ends abruptly at Willow Street in Long Beach, spilling cars and trucks onto a city boulevard. The portion being studied for removal, north of Pacific Coast Highway, has vehicle counts comparable to some surface streets near downtown Long Beach and one-tenth those on I-710. Long Beach owns the section of freeway being studied. Beginning in 2014, the city will use a $225,000 state grant to examine various options, including replacing the roadway with an 88-acre greenbelt.

 


Overall statistics for Route 47:

  • Total Length (1995): 3 miles traversable; 18 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 14,400 to 33,000.
  • Milage Classification: Urbanized: 21.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 3 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 21 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles.

 

Naming

The portion of this route from Seaside Blvd in San Pedro to Sepulveda Blvd. in Long Beach is the "Seaside Freeway". It was named by House Resolution 144 in 1959.

Some Caltrans District VII information shows this as the "Terminal Island" Freeway. The first segment opened in 1948. Terminal Island was originally named "Isla Raza de Buena Gente" (Island of the Race of Good People). Early in the American era, the island became known as Rattlesnake Island. In 1911, after the Los Angeles Terminal Railway had built a line from the city to the island, it assumed its present name.

The proposed name for the planned freeway segment between Route 1 and I-10 was the "Industrial" Freeway.

 

Named Structures

Bridge 53-1471 in San Pedro was originally called the "San Pedro-Terminal Island Bridge". It was built in 1961. It was renamed the "Vincent Thomas Memorial Bridge" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 131, Chapter 226, in 1961. It honors Assemblyman Vincent Thomas from San Pedro's, an orphan from the streets and wharves who went on to become a State Assemblyman for the 52nd District in San Pedro. Vincent Thomas moved to San Pedro from Oakland in 1919. In 1928, he graduated from San Pedro High School. He received a Bachelor Degree from the University of Santa Clara in 1932 and attended the University of Santa Clara and Loyola Law Schools from 1932 to 1936. He worked as a minor sports coach and PE instructor while in college. He also played football for Santa Clara. He was married and had a daughter and son. He was elected to the California Assembly in 1940. In 1962, he was elevated to Dean of the Assembly. He also served as Chairman of the Committee on Intergovernmental Relations. He was still in the Assembly when his namesake bridge opened in 1963. He was the individual most responsible for its realization. He served in the Assembly at least through 1975. As for the bridge itself, it was completed in 1963, and was the first bridge of its kind to be constructed on pilings. Construction required 92,000 tons of Portland cement, 13,000 tons of lightweight concrete, 14,100 tons of steel and 1,270 tons of suspension cable. It is designed to withstand winds of 90 miles per hour, double that required by code. The overall length of the bridge is 6,060 feet (4th longest in California, 76th longest in the world), with a main suspension span of 1,500 feet and 500-foot spans on either side. The bridge carried an average of 48,000 cars and trucks per day in 2005. Its roadway is 52 feet wide between the curbs and stands 185 feet above the harbor. Its towers are 335 feet tall. The bridge is painted annually by nine Caltrans workers, who cover all 1.6 million square feet of steel siding and cables with three to four coats of oil-based paint, totaling 54,800 gallons. They start with a terra cotta-colored primer, followed by two to three finish coats in the bridge's distinctive green. The final coat used on visible surfaces is flecked with silver, lending the structure its iridescent glow. Much of the paint is sprayed on, and crews must drape sheets of vinyl below them to catch any paint that might fall into and pollute the water. The bridge's heavy cables require particular care: Workers don large mitts that they douse in paint and then clasp the cables to coat them. A separate crew is responsible for checking and replacing the bridge's 278 light bulbs, from the tower-top beacons to navigation lights below the roadbed. Other crews inspect the bridge to assure that its cables and welds have not been weakened by weather or age. The bridge was dedicated on Saturday, September 28, 1963. Doing the honors in 100-degree heat were L.A. Mayor Sam Yorty, State Controller Alan Cranston, L.A. Supervisor Burton Chace, L.A. City Councilman John S. Gibson, Sen. Thomas Kuchel and former governor Goodwin J. Knight. Organizers had hoped to get Governor Pat Brown and President John F. Kennedy to attend, but they were up in Northern California dedicating the Whiskeytown Dam and Reservoir and couldn't make it. The bridge officially opened to traffic on Friday, November 15, 1963 at 12:01 a.m. Vincent Thomas paid the first toll, which was 25¢.
[Information adapted from the San Pedro Chamber of Commerce's page on the Vincent Thomas Bridge, the Los Angeles Almanac page on Vincent Thomas, and a 2006-01-10 Los Angeles Times article on the bridge]

Bridge 53-2618, over the Cerritos Flood Control Channel in Los Angeles County, is named the "Commodore Schuyler F. Heim Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1946. The name is not official. Commador Schuyler Franklin Heim was born in Plymouth IN in 1884. He advanced from ensign to commadore, and saw duty in battleships, cruisers, repair ships, and destroyers. He served at the Naval Operating Base on Terminal Island between 1940 and 1945, and was commandant of Naval Activities in the Los Angeles/Long Beach area. He was awarded the Legion of Merit Award. He was also well known for his Judo skills.
[Thanks to the research librarian at the Naval Academy in Annopolis MD for providing this information.]

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 47 R0.00 0.74

 

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Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route (not completely constructed). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that became LRN 47 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Issue as running from Orland to Chico. It was extended in 1933 from [LRN 3] near Chico to [LRN 29] near Deer Creek Meadows. It was captured in the 1935 highway code as:

  1. [LRN 7] at Orland to Chico
  2. [LRN 3] near Chico to [LRN 29] near Deer Creek Meadows.

In 1959, Chapter 1841 simplifed "[LRN 7] at Orland" to "[LRN 7] near Orland". Signage was as follows:

  1. From LRN 7 near Orland to Chico.

    This is signed as Route 32.

  2. From LRN 3 near Chico to LRN 29 near Deer Creek Meadows.

    This is signed as Route 32, and runs from US 99E (LRN 3) to Route 36 (LRN 29).


State Shield

State Route 48



Routing

From Route 14 near Lancaster to Route 122 near the San Bernardino county line.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, Route 48 was the route from Route 138 near Gorman to Route 122 near the San Bernardino county line.In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the origin of the route to be "Route 138 east of Gorman".

In 1996, Chapter 10 truncated the origin even further, beginning the route at "Route 14 near Lancaster". The portion from Route 138 to Route 14 was transferred to Route 138.

A 1965 planning map shows that this was to have been freeway; never upgraded.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield This segment was LRN 267 (defined in 1959), and was unconstructed before 1964. Prior to 1964, this segment was signed as part of Route 138, and constituted the constructed portion fo LRN 59, established in the 1919 Third Bond Act (Lancaster to Baileys). In 1959, LRN 59 was rerouted to the new Metropolitan Bypass routing through Lake Hughes, and the older routing was renumbered as LRN 267.

For information on pre-1964 Route 48, see below.

 

Status

Unconstructed This route is unconstructed from Route 14 to future Route 122. There is no paved traversable local highway. For information on the High Desert Corridor, see Route 138.

Not a Route 48 PostmileNote: There is seemingly a Route 48 route marker postmile at the Calaveras-Tuolomne county line on O’Byrne’s Ferry Road between Route 108 and Route 4 near Copperopolis. It is just past the bridge that carries the road over the Stanislaus River. Currently this road is signed as Calaveras County Route E15. The key word is "seemingly", because investigation determined that this is a Calaveras county road marker: The CAL in this case represents the first 3 letters of the County, Calaveras. The 48 is the county road number. Each County-maintained road is assigned a number; they have other similar markers on roads in the County-maintained system. The problem is that this is almost identical to a post mile for Route 48 if Route 48 was in Calaveras County.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 48:

  • Total Length (1995): 16 miles traversable; 8 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,000 to 3,600.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 24.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 16 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 16 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield US 48 was on the original map of US routes in 1926, running from Stockland to Oakland and San Jose, along what is nowadays I-580. In 1928, US 48 was signed in California. It ran from French Camp to San Jose via Tracy and Hayward. By 1935, this had been renumbered as part of US-50 (LRN 5) using a routing that is now I-580 and I-205 (from Oakland along I-580 until the I-205/I-580 junction, and then along I-205 to Tracy; however, there are some reports that include I-238 in Oakland as part of the original US 48, and that indicate it was numbered as US 101E. There are also some maps that show Route 237 as part of US 48 (nee US 42).

Pre-1964 State Shield State Shield By 1935, Route 48 had been resigned to run from Vallejo to near Novato along the top of the San Francisco Bay. That latter routing (LRN 208) is now Route 37.

Note that US 48 was originally proposed as US 42, but the number was changed to US 48 in 1926.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 48 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from McDonalds to the mouth of the Navarro River. This was captured in the 1935 highway code as:

[LRN 1] at McDonald's to the mouth of the Navarro River

It was amended later that year by Chapter 274 to begin at "[LRN 1] near Cloverdale via McDonald's"

In 1963, Chapter 1698 would have removed the "via McDonald's", but that was overtaken by the 1963 renumbering.

This route was signed as Route 128.



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