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California Highways

Routes 33 through 40

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

33 · 34 · 35 · 36 · 37 · 38 · 39 · 40


State Shield

State Route 33



Routing
  1. From Route 101 near Ventura to Route 150.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

    A 1965 planning map shows this as freeway all the way to Castaic. Never upgraded, although a portion from Route 101 N is freeway.

    Near Route 145, it appears that Coalinga-Mendota Road and Derrick Blvd is an old routing of Route 33 (US 399).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was signed as US 399 starting around 1935, and remained signed as US 399 until the 1964 route renumbering. It was was LRN 138. This portion of LRN 138 was defined in 1933. It was resigned as part of Route 33 in 1964.

    This segment was adopted into the California Highway System in 1915. Within the county, this highway crosses terrain that transitions from mountainous in the southern portion to flat and rolling terrain in the northern portion. Route 33 has been designated as a State Highway Terminal Access Route for larger trucks under the Federal Surface Transportation Act of 1982. Route 33, from its junction with Route 101 to its junction with I-5, is a State Highway Extra Legal Load Route and is included in the National Highway System. Route 33 is also a High Emphasis Interregional Route. The route is designated for explosives, hazardous materials (including rocket fuel), and trucks up to 105 feet in length. On a year-around basis, Route 33 is a significant interregional route for agricultural products, and truck traffic accounts for 40 percent of the Average Annual Daily Traffic.

     

    Status

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $313,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs on Route 33 near Oak View, at San Antonio Creek, that will rebuild the slope, roadway and drainage system to correct pre-existing condition as required mitigation at one location.

     

    Naming

    Route 33 from Route 101 to Foster Park in Ventura County is named the "Ojai" Freeway. It was named by its location. The first segment opened in 1956. It was named after the community of Ojai, which was a spelling for the rancheria Aujai is mentioned in mission records. A'hwai is Chumash for "moon."

    This segment is also named the "Bakersfield, Maricopa and Ventura Highway". It was named by Resolution Chapter 610 in 1913.

     

    Named Structures

    Tunnels 52-068, 52-070, and 52-072 in Ventura county, built in 1931, are unofficially named the "Matilija Tunnels".

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] Entire portion.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Ventura 33 0.00 0.47

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] Entire portion; the portion from Route 101 to N of Ventura is constructed to freeway standards. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. There were once plans to have a freeway through Ojai.


  2. From Route 150 to Route 5 near Oilfields via the vicinity of Cuyama Valley and Maricopa, and via Coalinga.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 33 was signed along the route from Maricopa to Jct. US 50 near Tracy, via Coalinga. In 1935, the portion between Route 150 and Taft was resigned as US 399. This particular segment was signed as follows:

    1. US Highway Shield As US 399 between Route 150 (LRN 151) and Route 166 (LRN 57), from the initial state signage of US highways in the early 1930s to the 1964 route renumbering. This segment was part of the 1933 portion of LRN 138.

    2. US Highway Shield Cosigned as US 399/Route 166 (present-day Route 33/Route 166) between 7 mi N of Ventucopa and Maricopa. This was LRN 57, defined in 1919.

    3. US Highway Shield Cosigned as US 399/Route 33 between Maricopa and Taft. This was part of the portion of LRN 138 defined in 1933. Note that the signed Route 33 began at Route 99 6 mi N of Wheeler Ridge (near the current I-5/Route 99 junction) and was cosigned as Route 33/Route 166 to Maricopa, but has since been resigned as Route 166. That latter routing was LRN 57 (also defined in 1919). The signage of Route 33 N from Maricopa dates to the initial state signage of routes in 1934.

    4. US Highway Shield As Route 33/US 399 between Taft and Route 198 in Coalinga. This was LRN 138, and was part of the portion defined in 1933. At Taft, US 399 continued E, and is present-day Route 119 (LRN 140).

    5. As Route 33 between Coalinga and Oilfields. This was part of LRN 10, defined in 1915.

     

    Status

    In early 2006, Caltrans made a routing change in Coalinga. Coming into Coalinga, Route 33 becomes Polk Street. Pre-2006, Route 33 used to continue on Polk Street, and joined Route 198 (Elm Street). In 2006, Caltrans changed the signage to have 5th Street signed for Route 33.

    In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval of funding a project in Fresno County that will replace the existing Jacalitos Creek Bridge on Route 33 near the city of Coalinga. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $10,739,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

    [Rte 46 Interchange Realignment]In April 2007, the CTC considered a routing change for this route where it intersects Route 46. The proposed route adoption for this segment of Route 33 would improve the safety and the operations at the Route 46 junction. Under the change, Route 33 will be realigned to provide a 90-degree approach to Route 46. The junction will be constructed with exclusive right and left turn lanes, and storage for left turn movements. In addition, Route 46 will be rehabilitated to meet current design standards from the San Luis Obispo County line to 0.8 mile west of Lost Hills Road. The current alignments intersects Route 46 at an angle.

    In March 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishement of right of way in the county of Kern on Route 33 from Route 46 to 0.4 mile southeasterly thereof, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities. They also authorized vacation of right of way in the county of Kern along Route 33 between 0.5 mile southeasterly and 0.5 mile northwesterly of Route 46, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this segment between Route 150 and Route 119 is named the "Bakersfield, Maricopa and Ventura Highway". It was named by Chapter 610 in 1913.

    The portion of Route 33 in Kern County between Route 46 and Route 166 is named the Petroleum Highway. It was named in recognition of the petroleum industry, which has made an important economic contribution to Kern County and other parts of the state. The heart of oil country in Kern County is in the western part of the county adjacent to Route 33, where oil has been produced for more than 100 years. In fact, this region of Kern County produces 50 percent of California's oil production; and the largest gas field in the west, Elk Hills, is within sight of Route 33. Travelers on Route 33 can visit the only oil boomtowns in California and the West Kern Oil Museum in Taft. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 185, July 16, 2004, Chapter 128.

    The portion of this route N of Route 166 has historically been called El Camino Viejo.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 150 to Route 166 in Cuyama Valley; and from Route 198 near Coalinga to Route 198 near Oilfields.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] From Route 150 to Route 166 near Maricopa; not constructed to freeway standards. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. From Route 5 to Route 152 via the vicinity of Mendota.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    The portion between Route 5 near Oilfields to 12 mi N (i.e., the break between segments) is cosigned I-5/Route 33.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 33 was signed along the route from Maricopa to Jct. US 50 near Tracy, via Coalinga. This particular segment was signed as follows:

    1. Present-day Route 33 is signed along I-5 between Oilfields and the Route 33 exit. This is post-1964 legislative Route 5, but was LRN 238, defined in 1959. Pre-1964 Route 33 used a similar routing, but was part of the 1955 LRN 138 extension.

    2. Between Oilfields and Route 180 in Mendota, the route was signed as Route 33, but was also part of the LRN 138 1955 extension.

    3. Between Mendota and Route 152, the route was signed as Route 33, but was LRN 41 (defined in 1933).

     

    Naming

    This segment has historically been called El Camino Viejo.

    The portion of Route 33 between Bullard Avenue and Douglas Avenue in the City of Firebaugh in Fresno County is named the “Officer Sixto Maldonado, Jr., Memorial Highway”. Named in memory of Sixto Maldonado, Jr., born on April 9, 1952, in Fresno. He attended Arthur E. Mills Elementary School and Riverview Junior High School in Firebaugh, followed by Dos Palos High School. Mr. Maldonado was a member of the newly-formed Firebaugh Youth Group, served as its president for a number of years while in high school, and was a role model student who was highly respected in his community. He worked in the fields as a farm laborer at a very young age to help his parents provide for their family. Mr. Maldonado worked in a variety of different jobs to help offset costs of his extended education, and in 1972, enrolled and attended 4 C's Business College with a major in business administration. He started his law enforcement career as a Firebaugh Police Department Reserve/Dispatcher in 1973, and was also an emergency medical technician for the City of Firebaugh where he drove and assisted on ambulance runs. Officer Maldonado was tragically slain in the line of duty as a Firebaugh police officer on August 19, 1975, at the tender age of 23, leaving behind his wife and son; and a legacy of his distinguished service to law enforcement, with three brothers and a nephew following in his footsteps by becoming peace officers for the County of Fresno. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 128, Resolution Chapter 75, on 7/3/2008.


  4. From Route 152 west of Los Banos to Route 5 near Santa Nella.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, Route 33 included a segment running from "Route 152 to Route 140." The starting point on Route 152, however, was 10 mi west of where the original Route 33 branched off of Route 152 (Ingomar Grade and Henry Miller Road). That original routing became Route 207 in the 1963 renumbering.

    In 1970, the segment was shortened to "Route 5 near Santa Nella to Route 140", deleting the post-1963 routing of Route 33 between Route 152 and I-5 from the highway system.

    In 1972, the former routing of Route 207 was transferred back to Route 33, creating this segment.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 33 was signed along the route from Maricopa to Jct. US 50 near Tracy, via Coalinga. The 1963 routing was signed as Route 33 (but was LRN 121) from approximately 10 mi W of Los Banos to the junction with LRN 41, approximetly where I-5 is today. The original routing, which was LRN 41, ran from Los Banos for 6 mi NW to Volta, and then 5 mi W to the junction with LRN 121, near the present I-5 (which was LRN 238). According to someone familiar with the area, this routing approximates with Henry Miller Avenue (the EW portion between Santa Nella and Volta) and the Ingomar Grade to Los Banos. That routing became Route 207, which later went back to being Route 33.

     

    Naming

    This segment has historically been called El Camino Viejo.

     

    Status

    Note: The break between segments is cosigned Route 152/Route 33.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] Portion (4); not constructed to freeway standards. This was added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1965.


  5. From Route 5 near Santa Nella to Route 140.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, Route 33 included a segment (Henry Miller Road from Route 152 to Route 33) running from "Route 152 to Route 140." The starting point on Route 152, however, was 10 mi west of where the original Route 33 branched off of Route 152 (Ingomar Grade and Henry Miller Road). That original routing became Route 207 in the 1963 renumbering.

    In 1970, the segment was shortened to "Route 5 near Santa Nella to Route 140", deleting the post-1963 routing of Route 33 between Route 152 and I-5 from the highway system. That is the source of the current segment (e).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 33 was signed along the route from Maricopa to Jct. US 50 near Tracy, via Coalinga. This segment was signed as Route 33 between LRN 121 (near the present-day I-5) and Route 140, but was LRN 41, defined in 1933.

     

    Status

    Although technically the route between (5) and (6) is legislatively Route 140, it is signed and named as Route 33. This segment is LRN 122, and was defined in 1959.

     

    Naming

    This segment has historically been called El Camino Viejo.


  6. From Route 140 to Route 5 near Vernalis.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was defined in 1963 as "(e) Route 140 to Route 205 near Tracy." In 1970, it was split into two segments: "(e) Route 140 to Route 5 near Vernalis. (f) Route 5 near Vernalis to Route 205 near Tracy." The act also stated that "the portion of this route described in subdivision (f) shall cease to be a state highway when Route 5 Freeway is constructed from Route 33 near Vernalis to Route 205."

    In 1976, segment (f) was deleted by Chapter 1354.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 33 was signed along the route from Maricopa to Jct. US 50 near Tracy, via Coalinga. This segment was also part of LRN 41, defined in 1933.

     

    Naming

    This segment has historically been called El Camino Viejo.

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1976, an additional segment that ran from Route 5 to Route 205 near Tracy was deleted [see above] (that deleted segment was also part of "El Camino Viejo". This segment was the remainder of 1933 LRN 41, and had been signed as Route 33. It appears to have been Ahern Road and Bird Road.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 33 was signed along the route from Maricopa to Jct. US 50 near Tracy, via Coalinga.

 


Overall statistics for Route 33:

  • Total Length (1995): 290 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 300 to 37,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 259; Sm. Urban 23; Urbanized: 8.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 194 mi; FAS: 96 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 25 mi; Minor Arterial: 222 mi; Collector: 43 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Pine Mountain Summit (5084 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Kern, Kings, Fresno, Merced, Stanislaus, San Joaquin.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that become LRN 33 was first defined in the 1916 Second Bond Issue as "an extension connecting the San Joaquin valley trunk line at or near Bakersfield with the coast trunk line in San Luis Obispo county, through Cholame pass, by the most direct and practical route;". In 1933, the routing was extended "[LRN 56] near Cambria to [LRN 2] near Paso Robles" (i.e., to the coast route). It was codified in the highway code in 1935 as:

  1. [LRN 4] near Bakersfield to [LRN 2] near San Luis Obispo County via Cholame Pass
  2. [LRN 56] near Cambria to [LRN 2] near Paso Robles

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as follows:

  1. LRN 4 (US 99; now Route 99) near Bakersfield to LRN 2 (US 101) in San Luis Obispo County via Cholame Pass. This was signed as US 466; it is present-day Route 46 between Paso Robles and Shandon; signed Route 41 (but post-1964 legislative Route 46) between Shandon and Cholame; and Route 46 between Cholame and Route 99.

  2. LRN 56 (Route 1) near Cambria to LRN 2 (US 101) near Paso Robles. This was signed as Route 41, but is present-day Route 46. Present-day Route 41 is what was US 466 between US 101 and Morro Bay.


State Shield

State Route 34



Routing

From Route 1 between Point Mugu and the City of Oxnard to Route 118 near Somis.

The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 34 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Oxnard Boulevard and Rice Avenue, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (1) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 34 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (3) For portions of Route 34 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Oxnard shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 34.

Note: In March 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Oxnard on Route 34 from Oxnard Boulevard (Route 1) to Rice Avenue, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 717, Statutes of 2008, which amended Section 334 of the Streets and Highways Code.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 34 was defined as the route "from Port Hueneme to Route 118 near Somis.". In 1965, the portion from Port Hueneme to Route 1 was deleted.

In 2008, SB 1366, Chapter 717, September 30, 2008, authorized the relinquishment of the portion of the route within the city limits of Oxnard:

The commission may relinquish to the City of Oxnard the portion of Route 34 that is located within the city limits of that city and is between Oxnard Boulevard and Rice Avenue, upon terms and conditions the commission finds to be in the best interests of the state, if the commission and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. (1) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately after the county recorder records the relinquishment resolution that contains the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, that portion of Route 34 relinquished shall cease to be a state highway and may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81. (3) For portions of Route 34 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Oxnard shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 34.

A 1965 planning map show this as freeway; never upgraded.

For some reason, the 1979 planning map shows this as running S from 5th Street, although the current routing is along 5th St.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route was LRN 153, defined in 1933. Route 34 was not including in the original set of signed state routes in 1934. It is unclear when this routing was first signed as Route 34.

 

Status

There are plans to widen this route in the city of Camarillo (August 2002 CTC Agenda).

[118/34 Jct]In February 2009, the CTC received notice of preparation of an EIR for reconstruction of the Route 118/Route 34 interchange in Somis. The proposed project would construct roadway improvements that include relocating and realigning Route 118 at Donlan Road, and adding a westbound left-turn lane in the westbound direction of Route 118, an eastbound auxillary lane, and interchange ramp improvements along portions of Route 118 and Route 34 intersection in the community of Somis in Ventura County. The project is included in the State Highway Operation and Protection Program Long Lead Project List. Future funding for project design, right of way, and construction will be programmed later pending completion of the environmental clearance. The alternatives being considered are:

  • No Build Alternative: The No-Build Alternative proposes to maintain the existing conditions without any alterations.
  • Intersection Improvement Alternative: This alternative closes the existing Donlon Road from Route 118 to La Cumbre Road. The new alignment of Donlon Road would begin at the Route 118/34 intersection and run north along the west side of Coyote Canyon Creek up to the spillway of the Ventura County Watershed Control District debris basin. At this point, Donlon Road would cross over the spillway in a northeasterly direction with a bridge structure. The southbound lane for Donlon Road would have a mixed thru/left-turn/right-turn lane at the intersection with Route 118. The realigned northbound lane of Donlon Road would not change. It would also add an additional left-turn lane in the westbound direction of Route 118 (east leg), an auxiliary lane in the eastbound direction of Route 118 (east leg), and a right-turn only lane in the eastbound direction of Route 118 (west leg). An auxiliary lane would be added on the southbound direction of Route 34 and a left-turn through-lane only on the northbound direction of Route 34. The existing drainage culvert and large catch basin (north side) for Coyote Canyon would be modified to accommodate the extra left-turn lane and auxiliary lane on Route 118 (east leg).
  • Bridge Alternative: This alternative proposes the same intersection improvements as the Intersection Improvement Alternative with the exception of the realignment of Donlon Road. The new Donlon Road would be a straight alignment due north of the Route 118/Route 34 intersection and would cross Coyote Canyon via a bridge structure. The Department of Transportation Division of Structures has estimated that a bridge structure of 156 feet by 55.5 feet would be required.
  • Roundabout Alternative: This alternative consists of a one-way, one-lane circulatory roadway in a counter-clockwise direction with a width of 24 feet. An additional structural pavement, 8 feet in width, would abut the inner radius of the roadway, which would function as a truck apron. A raised curb would border the inner radius of the truck apron and delineate the central island. The roundabout would replace the existing signalized intersection. The east leg approach of Route 118 would consist of a four-lane roadway (two lanes for ingress and two lanes for egress). The west leg approach of Route 118 would consist of a three lane roadway (two lanes for ingress and one lane for egress). The south leg approach of Route 34 would consist of a three-lane roadway similar to the west leg approach of Route 118. The realigned Donlon Road would travel north over the outlet of the debris basin with a two-lane roadway (one lane for ingress and one lane for egress).
  • Somis Bypass Alternative: This alternative was presented by local residents of the Somis community. This alternative would attempt to alleviate truck and commuter traffic going through this community by constructing a new two-lane highway. The proposed roadway would start at the present Union Pacific railroad crossing with Route 118 on the east side of Somis, continue south parallel to the railroad alignment, and connecting to Route 34 at a point south of the community of Somis.
  • Save Our Somis (SOS) Alternative: JR Consulting Engineers, LLC, was retained by the Save Our Somis (SOS) community organization and proposed a smaller intersection design for the project. This design would be similar to the lntersection Improvement Alternative with the following exceptions: only one left-turn lane for the westbound direction of Route 118, lengthened to almost 350 feet; the east leg of Route 118 would not have an eastbound auxiliary lane; and no auxiliary lane for the southbound direction of Route 34.

Moorpark officials reviewed the draft EIR, and believe that it fails to take into account a plan by Ventura County to realign Donlon Road so that it joins to make a four-way intersection where the two state highways meet. They also believe that it does not provide mitigation of an expected increase in truck traffic and related air quality, noise and safety impacts on Route 118 as a result of projects planned by Caltrans.

In October 2012, it was reported that Caltrans has dropped plans to revamp the Somis interchange. Caltrans will include its decision in the project's environmental impact report that will be issued by the end of November 2012. The county now wants to realign Donlon to make a four-way intersection at Route 118 and Somis Road. According to the county, Caltrans can make "easy, quick and cheap fixes" in conjunction with the county project, such as lengthening a left-turn lane from westbound Route 118 to Somis Road.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #2639: Port of Hueneme Intermodal Access Improvement Project, including grade separation at Rice Avenue and Route 34; widen Hueneme Road. $3,760,000.

  • Transportation Improvement #19: Port of Hueneme Intermodal Access Improvement Project, including grade separation at Rice Avenue and Route 34; widen Hueneme Road. $1,000,000.

 

 

Naming

Evidentally, Route 34 (while still just LRN 153) was planned to be the "Calleguas Freeway", according to a 1962 California F&E map for Ventura County.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route (never upgraded). This was added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 34:

  • Total Length (1995): 13 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 7,700 to 16,500.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 5; Urbanized: 8.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 13 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 8 mi; Minor Arterial: 5 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Ventura.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that was to become LRN 34 was first defined in the 1909 First Bond Issue as running from [LRN 4] near Arno to Jackson. In 1911, the definition of the Alpine State Highway extended LRN 34 with the segments from Route 99 to Route 88 SE of Ione and from Route 104 to Route 89:

"The certain road commencing at the Calaveras big tree grove located in Calaveras County thence running to Dorrington in said county, thence E-ly following what is known as the Big Tree and Carson Valley Turnpike to Mt. Bullion in Alpine Cty, thence along county road to Markleeville in Alpine Cty, thence along that certain road via Kirkwood, Silver Lake, Pine Grove and Irishtown to Jackson in Amador Cty, including therewith the road from Picketts in Hope Valley connecting with the Lake Tahoe Wagon Road, a state highway, at Osgood's Place in El Dorado Cty, and the road from Mt Bullion via Loupe in Alpine Cty to Junction in Mono County connecting with the Sonora and Mono State Highway is hereby declared and established a state highway and shall be designated and known as "Alpine State Highway""

This led to its 1935 definition as:

[LRN 4] near Arno to [LRN 23] near Pickett's in Hope Valley via Jackson, Irishtown, Pine Grove, Silver Lake, and Kirkwood.

This was primary state highway from Arno to Jackson.

This definition remained intact until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as Route 104 between cosigned US 50/US 99 (present-day Route 99) to 2 mi SE of Ione, and as Route 88 (originally Route 8) between 2 mi SE of Ione and Route 89 (LRN 23) near Pickett's.


State Shield

State Route 35



Routing
  1. From Route 17 at Summit Road to Route 92 via Skyline Boulevard.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment of Route 35 was defined as "Route 17 to Route 92 via Skyline Boulevard". In 1990, Chapter 1187 changed the origin to "Route 17 at Summit Road".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 55. It was originally signed as Route 5. It was defined in 1919. See below for the original routing of signed Route 35.

     

    Naming

    Portions of this route were named "Skyline Blvd" by Resolution Chapter 46 in 1919.

     

    Status

    According to Scott Rux in 2004, between Route 17 to Route 9, there are regular reassurance markers and postmiles. There are several Caltrans callboxes, all of which list the name of the highway in their identification. At the intersection of Bear Creek Rd and Skyline Blvd, there are directional signs indicating the continuation of Route 35, with the usual green miner's spade designations. At Summit Rd south and Mountain Charlie Rd (about 0.1 mile north of Route 17), the highway is only signed as "To Route 17".

    Supposedly, some sections are one-lane wide, and appear to have been paved some time ago. A portion of Route 35 south of Route 9 is called the Goat Trail by CalTrans workers. Some portions of this route are maintained by the owners of the property near the road, and some portions are maintained by the County of Santa Clara or Santa Cruz County.

    In fact, Route 35 (Skyline Blvd.) follows the north boundary of Santa Cruz county (with both San Mateo and Santa Clara counties) for 20-30 miles, except that the boundary (defined by a mountain ridge) is so irregular that the road can't exactly follow it. The road wanders in and out of each county so frequently that most of the crossings are unmarked, and even Caltrans' county based "postmiles" aren't very accurate. At one point you're told that you're entering Santa Cruz county, and then about 0.4 mile later, you're told you're entering the city limits of Palo Alto. (Palo Alto is in Santa Clara county, and cities can't extend across county lines in California.) The southern portion of Route 35 between Route 9 and Route 17 is also almost totally unmarked, apparently because local residents tear down the signs.
    [Based on a posting by John David Galt]

     

    Freeway

    This segment was added to the freeway and expressway system in 1959, but was deleted in 1965.


  2. From Route 92 to Route 280 at Bunker Hill Drive.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    Part (2) was added in 1984 by Chapter 409.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Before 1964, Route 35 was originally signed as Route 5. Before Route 280 was constructed, Route 5 began at the intersection of Route 9 (LRN 42) and Skyline, proceeded up to the junction of Route 92 (LRN 105), and then went over Crystal Springs Reservoir, and then turned north following the existing portion of Route 280 from the Route 92/I-280 interchange north to until where Skyline Blvd exits to the left. It was LRN 55. Route 5 was signed as part of the 1934 initial signage of routes. This was superseded in 1959 by LRN 237.

    According to Chris Sampang, after I-280 was built through the area in the 1970s, the Skyline Boulevard state highway (Route 35) was rerouted to I-280 between Route 92 and the current Route 35 semi-directional Y in San Bruno. However, a few portions of the old Skyline Boulevard still remain:

    1. In Millbrae, Skyline Boulevard between Larkspur Drive and Millbrae Avenue; the ramps leading into Skyline Boulevard from I-280/Route 35 may also be part of this.

    2. In Burlingame and Hillsborough, Skyline Boulevard from Trousdale Drive to Golf Course Drive

    3. In Hillsborough and San Mateo, including part of Golf Course Drive (which was named Skyline Boulevard as late as 1998, according to a CSAA Daly City/South San Francisco map) and Skyline Boulevard from Golf Course Drive south to Bunker Hill Drive. The portion of Skyline Boulevard from Bunker Hill Drive south to Route 92 was added back to the route in 1984 as the current Segment Two of the route—but is only signed as Route 35 going southbound; Route 35 northbound follows Route 92 east of the Skyline/Route 92 split and then I-280 north from Route 92 to past the Bunker Hill Drive interchange. North of Bunker Hill Drive, Route 35 is part of I-280 both northbound and southbound until the current Route 35/I-280 split.

    Also, according to Chris, around when I-280 was built, a couple of portions of Skyline Boulevard were bypassed in the San Bruno area. One starts at the junction of Glenview Drive and Ridgeway Avenue and goes south for about 600 feet and is essentially a cul-de-sac. Some old dirt right-of-way is visible south of the cul-de-sac itself between the end of the segment and Cambridge Lane. At Cambridge Lane, another segment of Skyline Boulevard begins. This lasts for about 900 feet southbound and then feeds into a short residential street; some more dirt right-of-way is visible through what are some residential backyards and into the current Route 35/I-280 merge. In Daly City, there is a "Skyline Drive" which begins at Westline Drive (possible former Route 1) in Pacifica and continues north to near Thornton State Beach. Although the part that parallels the Route 1 freeway routing to Westline Drive is most likely a newer construction, the rest of Skyline Drive parallels the current Skyline Boulevard completely. The north dead end seems to be pointing in a straight line to the old Route 1 stub in Thornton State Beach; thus Skyline and Route 1 may have merged here previous to the construction of the current 4 lane expressway and John Daly/Skyline junction. For more information, see Route 1. As of October 2006, the old intersection with Route 1 is no longer fenced off. In 2005, Daly City reopened this portion as Thornton Beach Vista. It's a small parking lot with a short trail leading to the bluff, with a few informational signs along the trail. One sign shows the alignment of old Route 1 pre-1957, and the old pavement can clearly be seen across a small gully that was formed by the storms of 1982 (that part is fenced off). There is no access to the actual State Park; for that you still need to take the freeway portion of Route 1 to the Manor Drive exit and go north on the frontage road.

     

    Naming

    Portions of this route were named "Skyline Blvd" by Resolution Chapter 46 in 1919.


  3. From Route 280 via Skyline Boulevard to Route 1 in San Francisco.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "Route 280 via Skyline Boulevard to Route 280 in San Francisco." In 1968, as part of the freeway reworking in San Francisco, the terminus was changed to "Route 1 in San Francisco", although this had no effect on the actual route, other than dropping a cosigning.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was signed as Route 5 between the initial signage of routes in 1934 and 1964. It was LRN 55, and was defined in 1919. See below for the original routing of signed Route 35.

    The portion between the Route 1 Freeway and John Daly Drive was cosigned with Route 1 between 1957 and 1967.

     

    Naming

    Portions of this route were named "Skyline Blvd" by Resolution Chapter 46 in 1919.

     

    Status

    Freeway currently exists from 1 mile south of jct with Route 1, to 1 mile north of jct of Route 1.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] From Route 280 to Route 1 near Daly City. Added to the Freeway and Expressway systems in 1965.

     

    Other WWW Links
    • Freeways of San Francisco. Chris Sampang's site gives a lot of information about proposals for this route in the San Francisco area, including exit lists with hypothetical connections. This includes subpages on the Great Highway freeway.

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 35:

  • Total Length (1995): 53 miles.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 210 to 29,500.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 36; Urbanized: 17.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 17 mi; FAS: 22 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 12 mi; Minor Arterial: 5 mi; Collector: 21 mi; Rural Minor Collector/Local Road: 15 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Cruz, Santa Clara, San Mateo, and San Francisco.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 35 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 22 near Seal Beach to Jct. US 99 near West Covina via Santa Fe Springs. It ran from US60/US70/US99 (LRN 26; now I-10) along Puente Ave, Workman Mill Blvd, Norwalk Blvd, Pioneer Blvd, Norwalk Rd, and Los Alamitos Road to Route 22 (LRN 179) near Westminster. It was LRN 170, present-day I-605, defined in 1933, extended in 1957 and 1959.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 35 was initially defined in 1907 by Chapter 117, by an act that authorized "...locating, surveying, and constructing a state highway connecting the present county road systems of any one or all of the counties of Trinity, Tehama, and Shasta with the road system of Humboldt County..." This provided the segment of the route between Peanut and Kuntz. In 1933, it was extended on both ends: "[LRN 1] near Alton to [LRN 35] near Kuntz" and "[LRN 35] near Peanut to [LRN 20] near Douglas City". Thus, by 1935, it was codified into the highway code as:

"[LRN 1] near Alton to [LRN 20] near Douglas City, passing near Kuntz and Peanut"

In 1957, a paragraph was added that gave priority to the funding of improving this route for any funding received. This language was adjusted further in 1959.

This routing was signed as Route 36 between Alton (US 101; LRN 1) and 4 mi SW of Peanut, where it met signed Route 3. At that point, it continued along the present-day Route 3 to Douglas City, where it terminated at US 299 (LRN 20).


State Shield

State Route 36



Routing

Route 101 near Alton to Route 395 near Johnsonville passing near Forest Glen via Red Bluff and Mineral, via the vicinity of Morgan Summit, and via Susanville.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 36 was defined as "(a) Route 101 near Alton to Route 5 near Red Bluff passing near Kuntz and Peanut. (b) Route 5 at Red Bluff to Route 395 via Mineral, via the vicinity of Morgan, and via Susanville. (c) Route 139 north of Susanville to Route 395 near Ravendale." Later that year, Chapter 1698 changed Kuntz to Mad River and Ravendale to Termo. In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the wording again, this time adjusting "Mad River" to "Forest Glen". Then, in 1984, Chapter 409 changed "Morgan" to "Morgan Summit".

In 1988, the first two segments were combined into a new segment (a): "Route 101 near Alton to Route 395 near Johnsonville passing near Forest Glen and Peanut via Red Bluff and Mineral, via the vicinity of Morgan Summit, and via Susanville." In 1990, the reference to "Peanut" was deleted.

Lastly, in 1998, the remaining segment (b) "from Route 139 north of Susanville to Route 395 near Termo" was deleted by AB 2132, Chapter 877, signed September 26, 1998. That segment was LRN 20 to US 395 (LRN 73), and was defined in 1959. That section was never constructed; the traversable local roads included S. Grasshopper Road, Westside Road, and Fillman Road. Those roads were not on a proper alignment for construction as a state highways, and there were no plans for a freeway or expressway.

The route between Route 36 near Deer Creek Pass and Route 36 near Morgan Summit is cosigned as Route 36/Route 89, although it is legislatively Route 36.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 36 was signed along the route from Jct. US 101 near Scotia to Jct. Route 7 (later US 395) E of Susanville, via Red Bluff. The route had the following legislative routes:

  1. Between Alton (US 101; LRN 1) and Mad River, this route was LRN 35, defined in 1933.
  2. Between Mad River and Peanut (Route 3), this was LRN 35 (defined in 1909).
  3. Between Route 3 and I-5 in Red Bluff, this was LRN 35 (1907).
  4. Between I-5 and Route 99, near Red Bluff, this was LRN 3 (1909).
  5. Between Route 99 and Route 172 near Mineral, this was LRN 29 (1909).
  6. Between Route 172 near Mineral and Route 89 near Morgan Summit, this was cosigned as Route 86 (1933).
  7. Between Route 89 and Route 172 near Morgan Summit, this was cosigned as Route 83 (1933)
  8. Between Route 172 near Morgan Summit and Susanville, this was cosigned as Route 29 (1909)
  9. Between Susanville and US 395, this was cosigned as Route 29 (1919)
  10. Between Route 139 N of Susanville to Route 395 near Termo, this was LRN 20 (1959).

 

Status

In February 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the County of Tehama, at Kinney Avenue, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads.

In September 2006, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way at PM 25.1 in the City of Susanville, at Foss Street, consisting of a road connection.

In August 2008, the CTC vacated right of way along Route 36 in the county of Tehama, between 0.1 and 0.3 miles northwest of the intersection with Route 32, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

In December 2008, the CTC vacated right of way in the county of Tehama along Route 36 east of Cannon Road near Red Bluff, and west of Kinney Avenue near Red Bluff, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

In September 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Humboldt along Route 36 near Bridgeville at Kneeland Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $9.5 million in SHOPP funding for repairs near Carlotta, from 1.7 miles east of Route 36/US 101 Junction to Van Duzen River Bridge; also near Bridgeville, from Van Duzen River Bridge to 1.7 miles east of Little Larabee Creek Bridge. This project will rehabilitate 37.2 lane miles of roadway to improve the ride quality, prevent further deterioration of the traveling surface, minimize costly roadway repairs and extend the pavement service life. They also approved $1,365,000 for a project that will repair slipouts and slope failures at four locations damaged by heavy rainfall on Route 36 near Bridgeville. The project limits are from 0.7 mile west of Bridgeville Post Office to 0.3 mile east of Little Larabe Creek Bridge.

In January 2013, the CTC approved SHOPP funding for reports on the Mill Creek Bridge in Tehama County near Mineral. Work there will replace rock slope protection at the abutment and pier to prevent further scouring and maintain structural integrity.

 

Naming

A small portion of this segment in Red Bluff is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

 

Named Structures

The bridge over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county is named the "Bernard A. Hemenway Bridge". It was constructed in 1984, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 102, Chapter 53, in 1986. Bernard A. "Bernie" Hemenway (b. 1907) was a 40 year Caltrans employee and founder of the original CSEA Crabfeed.

Bridge 04-089 over Yager Creek in Humboldt county is named the "Robert F. Fisher Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1968, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 151, Chapter 282, in 1969. Robert F. Fisher, elected to the California Assembly by the people of Humboldt County in 1926, 1928 and 1930, was the last remaining Spanish-American War veteran in Humboldt County.

Bridge 04-093 over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county is named the "Dwight O'Dell Bridge". It was built in 1965, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 16, Chapter 49, in 1981. Dwight O’Dell was the publisher and editor of the Humboldt Beacon & Fortuna Advance. He was instrumental in the formation of the Highway 36 Association in 1951.

Bridge 04-129, over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county, is named the "William J. C. Dinsmore Bridge". It was built in 1981, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 10, Chapter 49, in 1987. William J.C. "Will" Dinsmore, (1933-1994), a lifetime resident and rancher in Sonoma county, worked as a foreman on the construction of Route 36 from Dinsmore to Forest Glen.

Bridge 04-294, over the Van Duzen River in Humboldt county, is named the "Silvio 'Botchie' Santi Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1985, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 103, Chapter 54 in 1986. Silvio "Botchie" Santi, who immigrated to the United States at the age of 19, started "Botchie's Crab Stand" in Field's Landing, Humboldt County, in 1928.

Bridge 08-021, at the south fork of the Cottonwood Creek in Tehama county, is named the "John R. Trainer Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1969, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 80, Chapter 355, the same year. John R. Trainor served as the Mayor of the City of Red Bluff and Chairman of the Highway 36 Association until his death in 1968.

This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

  • Lake Almanor, in Plumas County, 4.3 mi E of Chester.

 

National Trails

[Volcanic Byways]This route is part of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway All American Road.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.3] From Route 101 near Alton to Route 3 near Peanut; and from Route 89 near Morgan Summit to Route 89 near Deer Creek Pass.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.3] Route 36 from Route 5 at Red Bluff to Route 395. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959. Note that this includes the portion that ran from Route 139 north of Susanville to Route 395 near Termo that was deleted by AB 2132, Chapter 877, signed September 26, 1998.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 36:

  • Total Length (1998): 250 miles.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 180 to 26,500.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 242; Sm. Urban 8.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 250 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 16 mi; Minor Arterial: 234 mi.
  • Significant Summits: Morgan Summit (5750 ft); Fredoyner Pass (5748 ft); Deer Creek Pass (4939 ft).
  • Counties Traversed: Humboldt, Trinity, Shasta, Tehama, Plumas, Lassen.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 36, Ch. 104 in 1983.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that became LRN 36 was first defined in 1907 by Chapter 116, which authorized ""...location, survey, and construction of a state highway from a point known as the Mt. Pleasant Ranch on the road between Quincy and Marysville thence in a SE-ly direction by a place called Eureka to Downieville, Sierra Cty..." This is roughly a routing from Oroville to Downieville, which appears to go near Collins Lake. This was codified in the 1935 highway code as the following:

From Mount Pleasant Ranch on the road between Quincy and Marysville, in a southeasterly direction via Eureka to Downieville, Sierra County.

In 1963, this was changed to read "From [LRN 25] near Downieville to Eureka Mine Road near Saddleback Mountain", however this definition was repealed when Chapter 385 became operative that year. However, that definition was used for Route 194.


State Shield

State Route 37



Routing
  1. From Route 251 near Nicasio to Route 101 near Novato.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined to run from "Route 17 near Nicasio to Route 101 near Novato." In 1984, Chapter 409 changed "Route 17" to "Route 251".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This portion of the routing was not part of the original definition of Route 37 in 1934. It was LRN 252 (defined in 1959) in 1963, but the routing was shown as "proposed, routing not determined".

     

    Status

    Unconstructed This segment is unconstructed. The traversable local routing is Point Reyes-Petaluma Road and Novato Blvd. The existing road is in the vicinity of Stafford Lake, and is (a) inadequate and (b) unstable. There are no plans for improvement.

     

    Naming

    This was to have been part of the "Point Reyes Freeway". The Pt. Reyes Freeway was one of many new routes created in the State Freeway and Expressway System, which was approved by the Legislature in 1959. This route has all but been killed by environmental concerns and costs. It would have connected with Route 251.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] Entire portion.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Solano 37 R8.00 R8.45
    Solano 37 9.24 9.62
    Solano 37 9.95 10.38
    Solano 37 10.38 R11.92


  2. From Route 101 near Novato to Route 80 near Lake Chabot via the vicinity of Sears Point and via the former Sears Point Toll Road.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is unchanged from its 1963 definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 37 was signed along the route from Jct. US 101 near Ignacio to Jct Route 28 near Monticello, via Napa. The portion of this route between US 101 (LRN 1) and 7 mi NE of Ignacio (i.e., the current junction with Route 121) was LRN 8 defined in 1909.

    Route 37 then continued along the current Route 121 routing to Route 128 (originally Route 28) as LRN 8 (to Route 29 in Napa) and LRN 6 (Napa to Route 128). This segment was the original definition of Route 37 (i.e., between US 101 near Ignacio to Route 28 near Monticello, via Napa).

    The portion of this route from 7 mi NE of Ignacio (present-day Route 121 junction) and I-80 (former US-40; LRN 7) was signed as (state) Route 48. It was resigned as part of Route 37 in 1964. This was LRN 208, defined in 1939.

     

    Status

    Current, there is a gap in the Route 37 freeway between the Napa River bridge and Marine World. The current proposed alignment for the replacement freeway is:

    • Between Wilson Ave and Enterprise St, the freeway will be on the same alignment as current Route 37. Rodgers St and Selfridge St will dead end at Route 37, and Sacramento St will fly over Route 37 to meet an extended Wilson Ave.

    • East of Enterprise St, the freeway will swing north of the current Route 37 and intersect Route 29 with a 6-ramp partial cloverleaf, with loop ramps from Route 29 South to Route 37 West to Route 29 North to Route 37 East.

    • From there, the freeway will run parallel to the current Route 37 and join where the current freeway ends near Diablo Rd.

    The current Route 37 between Route 29 and Diablo Rd will become a local street. Diablo Rd will be rejoined to the old Route 37. In June 2002, the CTC had on its agenda an item for $50,600,000 for Route 37 in Vallejo between Enterprise Street and Diablo Street to construct new Route 29 interchange and four lane freeway. This is also in the MTC 2001 Regional Transportation Plan.

    According to Chris Sampang, as of June 2004, between Sears Point and Mare Island, all two-lane sections are now seperated with a Jersey Barrier. East of Mare Island, the highway uses a temporary four-lane segment between Sonoma Boulevard (Route 29) and the east end of the Mare Island bridge. A semi-elevated freeway is under construction north of this temporary four lane segment to bypass the businesses west of Marine World and the crowded intersection of Route 29 and Route 37. An older two lane (plus center turning lane) section of Route 37 (Marine World Parkway) to the south of the temporary four-lane alignment has been cut off and is now a cul-de-sac, with at least one business (a former USA/Beacon gas station) succumbing to the lack of traffic. It appears the temporary four-lane segment that currently carries Route 37 at grade across Route 29 will become the future eastbound exit (exit numbers and such are already present even though the elevated bypass is not complete). It isn't clear if the old alignment east of Route 29 or the temporary alignment west of Route 29 will become part of eastbound ramps, but that appears to be the arrangement being proposed.

    In May 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Vallejo along Route 37 from Sacramento Street to Antioch Drive, consisting of superseded highway right of way, relocated or reconstructed city streets and a bike path.

    As of 2006, the freeway between Mare Island and I-80 was completed.

    In February 2011, it was reported that a study was in progress exploring a capacity increase in the 2-lane segment between Sears Pt. Rd and Route 29. The road is built on a berm, and travels through multiple protected species habitats, migration passages, wetlands, tidal marshes, farmland being converted back to wetlands, rivers, creeks, and bay shore lands. The Study will look at different ways to both mitigate and avoid mitigation measures in this sensitive area before the project is initiated. Caltrans and UC Davis will, at the end of this and probably following studies, will respond to the ecology of the area in its design, hopefully both increasing road capacity, adding class I bike/ped access to connect the Class I SMART train trail (70+ miles from Larkspur to Cloverdale) and the N/S bike network being designed to connect the Vallejo Ferry terminal in the south with the town of Calistoga in the north (www.vinetrail.org), and increase the tidal action, deal with sea-level rise and restore the saltmarshes damaged by the berm. This will not only help restore the largest remaining SF Bay wetland area, but also deal with multi-modal transport. This study is funded by 1 of only 4 TRB grants given out nationally for this purpose. The grant application was submitted by Caltrans in partnership with the UC Davis Road Ecology Center.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route from Route 121 at Sears Point to Vallejo is named the "Sears Point Toll Road". It was named by Chapter 393 in 1933.

    The portion of this route running through Sonoma County is called the "Valley of the Moon Scenic Route". "Valley of the Moon" was the name Jack London, resident of Glen Ellen, coined for this area.

    In Vallejo, Route 37 is "Marine World" Parkway. Marine World is located in Vallejo.

    The eastbound I-80/Route 37 interchange is named the "Gary L. Hughes Memorial Interchange". Officer Gary L. Hughes and his partner Officer Lancer R. Thelen stopped and arrested a suspected drunk driver along Interstate 80 in Vallejo. Hughes was sitting in the rear of the patrol car with the suspect when a pick-up truck camper plowed into the patrol car pinning Hughes against the front seat and causing massive head injuries. The 38-year-old Patrol officer died enroute to the hospital and the prisoner received minor injuries. Thelen was near the front of the patrol car with a tow truck operator completing paperwork for impounding the suspect's vehicle when they were struck by the patrol car as it was rammed by the truck camper. Thelen suffered a severe leg injury and the tow truck operator had a compound leg fracture. The driver of the truck camper was taken into custody on charges of felony drunk driving and manslaughter. Hughes was an 11-year veteran of the Patrol. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Chapter 124, in 1998.

    The portion of this route between I-80 and Route 29 is named the Vallejo Police Officer James Capoot Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of James Lowell Capoot. He was born in 1966, in Little Rock, Arkansas, attended local schools, and graduated from John L. McClellan High School in 1985, where he excelled on the cross country and track teams. After graduation, Jim enlisted in the United States Marine Corps, and was stationed at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard in Vallejo. Jim completed active duty with the United States Marine Corps in 1989, but remained on active reserve until 1993, and he began his law enforcement career with the Department of the California Highway Patrol in 1990. In 1993, Jim joined the Vallejo Police Department, where he served for over 18 years as a motorcycle officer, motorcycle instructor, driving instructor, and SWAT officer. During his service with the Vallejo Police Department, Jim received two Medals of Courage, one Life-Saving Medal, and many other department commendations, as well as the Officer of the Year Award. Jim was killed in the line of duty on November 17, 2011.
    Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 6, August 29, 2013. Resolution Chapter 85.

    The portion of this route from Route 29 to Skaggs Road is named the "Randy Bolt Memorial Highway". Special Agent William Randall "Randy" Bolt was killed on May 9, 1995 in a traffic accident while on duty as a special agent with the Department of Justice, Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement. He was driving eastbound Route 37, east of Skaggs Island Road, Solano County, California, when at approximately 7:25 a.m., a party driving a vehicle westbound crossed the painted double yellow lines directly into the path of Randy Bolt's unmarked Department of Justice vehicle. The two vehicles collided head-on and both Randy Bolt and the party driving the other vehicle died instantly. He was only 48 years old at the time of his death. Agent Bolt began his tenure as a law enforcement officer for the State of California in the year 1968 with the Fremont Police Department and subsequent to that employment, he was employed by the Placer County Sheriff's Department and the San Rafael Police Department. In 1988, he was appointed to the Department of Justice and assigned to the Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement, Riverside regional office. In 1990, he was transferred to the Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement, San Francisco regional office where he worked until his untimely death. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 95, Chapter 128, September 24, 2001.

    Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

     

    Named Structures

    The Sonoma Creek Bridge is officially named the "Richard "Fresh Air" Janson Bridge". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 68 in 1996. Richard Ludwig "Fresh Air Dick" Janson (d. 1951), a native of Estonia who made his home in Sonoma County, is recognized as the premier waterfowl decoy carver in the western United States. Known as "Fresh Air" for his reverence for wildlife, Janson lived for most of his life on an ark moored half a mile from the bridge—formerly known as the Sonoma Creek Bridge; he died in 1951.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1945 and 1956; not accepted both times. Freeway currently exists from jct with US101 to approximately 4 miles east of US101 to Atherton Ave. Also another freeway section begins at 1 mile before Mare Island, over the Napa River Bridge, and ends 1/2 mile east of the bridge. Freeway then begins 1/2 mile east of Route 29 to junction with I-80.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 101 near Ignacio to Route 29 near Vallejo.

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between Route 121 and the intersection with Route 29. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

exitinfo.gif

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 37:

  • Total Length (1995): 21 miles constructed; 11 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 25,000 to 62,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 21; Urbanized: 11.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 21 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 21 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Marin, Sonoma, Solano.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.12] Between the east urban limits of San Francisco-Oakland near Novato and the west urban limits of San Francisco-Oakland near Vallejo.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that was to become LRN 37 was originally defined in the 1909 statutes (not the bond act) via Chapter 224, which authorized the ...location, survey, and construction of a state highway from Emigrant Gap, Placer County in an E-ly direction through what is known as the Truckee Pass to the W end of Donner Lake in Nevada County... and it shall be the duty of the department to locate, survey, and construct said road along the line of the wagon road known as the Dutch Flat and Donner Lake wagon road..." Its route was changed in 1916 by Chapter 619 (later repealed) which was "for making a change in the location of the Emigrant Gap state road so as to eliminate the grade crossing of said road over the railroad track near Summit Station provided that the Southern Pacific company shall contribute not less than $3,500 for the same purpose." In 1915, Chapter 203 extended the route as part of "...the wagon road extending along the W side of Lake Tahoe, from McKinney's in El Dorado Cty to Tahoe City, thence along the Truckee River to Truckee, and thence in a W-ly direction to Donner Lake in Nevada Cty, connecting with the present state highway from Emigrant Gap" It was also extended by Chapter 678 that same year (1915), which called for "...the county road extending from Auburn in an E-ly direction and connecting with the Emigrant Gap state road at a point near Emigrant Gap." It was extended from Emigrant Gap to Verdi in the 1919 Third Bond Act.

By 1935, it had been codified into the highway code as:

"Auburn to Truckee via Emigrant Gap, the Truckee Pass, and the west end of Donner Lake"

This was primary state highway from Auburn to Truckee.

In 1957, Chapter 1911, relaxed the definition to be "Auburn to [LRN 38] via Emigrant Gap." Chapter 1698 would have changed this to "[LRN 17] near Auburn", but that was overridden by the 1963 renumbering.

This route was signed as US 40, and is present-day I-80.


State Shield

State Route 38



Routing
  1. From Route 10 near Redlands to Route 18 near Baldwin Lake via Barton Flats.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Route 38 was not included in the set of state signed routes initially defined in 1934. It was signed as Route 38 sometime after 1934, and was LRN 190, defined in 1933.

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 38 between post mile 24.00 to post mile 29.00, inclusive, in San Bernardino County is officially named the "Detective Jeremiah MacKay Memorial Highway." It was named on 09/27/13 by ACR 68, Res. Chapter 142, Statutes of 2013. It was named in memory of Detective Jeremiah MacKay. MacKay was born in June 1977 in San Bernardino. Mr. MacKay grew up with his younger sister in Lake Arrowhead, where he developed a passion for mountain recreation. At the age of four he climbed the highest peak in southern California, 11,503-foot Mount San Gorgonio. Mr. MacKay attended Calvary Chapel Christian School in Twin Peaks, and Mary P. Jenck Intermediate School and Rim of the World High School, both in Lake Arrowhead. Throughout his adolescence, Mr. MacKay enjoyed being part of a youth group at Church of the Woods in Lake Arrowhead, and loved participating in sports, including football, tennis, and skiing. Mr. MacKay continued to spend time in the mountains as a young man, working as a ski and snowboard instructor at the Snow Valley Ski Resort in Running Springs, and as lake patrol for the Arrowhead Lake Association in Lake Arrowhead. Mr. MacKay began his career in public service when he joined the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department as a member of Academy Class 131. He graduated from the program and became a Deputy Sheriff on June 4, 1998, his 21st birthday. As a deputy, Mr. MacKay was assigned to the Central Detention Center, Central Station, and Sheriff Training Facility, all in San Bernardino, and Twin Peaks station, in Twin Peaks. He was promoted to the rank of detective and served in that capacity at stations in Twin Peaks, Big Bear, and Yucaipa, with the radio call sign of 14.D.2. As part of the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, Detective MacKay earned five California Highway Patrol 10851 Awards and three Commander’s Awards. Detective MacKay was chosen to be a member of the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department Honor Guard, and lived by the three cardinal principles of the Sheriff’s Department: honor, pride, and tradition. Detective MacKay married in November 2011. Detective MacKay took pride in his Scottish heritage and enjoyed playing the bagpipes. He was a member of the Inland Empire Emerald Society for six years, and ultimately became the organization’s sergeant at arms. On February 12, 2013, at the age of 35, Detective MacKay was shot and killed by Christopher Dorner during the manhunt for the rogue ex-Los Angeles Police Department officer. To honor Detective MacKay’s memory, the 14.D.2 Prayer Project has been established to encourage prayer for the safety of first responders.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 18 near Baldwin Lake along the north side of Big Bear Lake to Route 18 near the west end of Big Bear Lake.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    Note that a big numbering switch also occured in 1964. Prior to 1964, Route 18 ran N from San Bernardino. At Running Springs, it joined with Route 30 (now Route 330) up from Highland, and continued cosigned Route 18/Route 30 to the W end of Big Bear Lake. At this point, Route 30 ran along the S edge of the lake, and Route 18 ran along the N end. When the new definitions went into place, Route 18 was rerouted to the S side of Big Bear Lake (replacing what had been signed as Route 30). The cosigning that existed between the W end of Big Bear Lake and the Route 30 (now Route 330)/Route 18 junction was eliminated, and the route was just signed as Route 18. The old Route 18 routing on the N side of the lake was signed as Route 38.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was originally part of Route 18 (from the west end of Big Bear Lake to Big Bear City), and was LRN 43. It was resigned as Route 38 in 1964.

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 38 between mile markers 49.530 and 59.396 in San Bernardino County is named the "Lieutenant Jared M. Landaker Memorial Highway" This segment was named in memory of USMC Lieutenant Jared M. Landaker, who made the ultimate sacrifice for his country when, on February 7, 2007, he gave his life while serving in Iraq in the United States Marine Corps. Lieutenant Landaker was born in Madera, California, on May 3, 1981. Due to a possible complication at Lieutenant Landaker's birth, doctors warned his parents that their child might be mentally challenged. The doctors encouraged surgery, an option that Joe and Laura Landaker refused. Although smaller in size than most boys his age, Lieutenant Landaker proved the doctors wrong by excelling in both academics and sports. As a young man, Lieutenant Landaker enjoyed skiing, snowboarding, and playing baseball and football. While attending Big Bear High School, Lieutenant Landaker played varsity baseball, served as the quarterback on the varsity football team, was an all-CIF defensive back, and was inducted into the player hall of fame. The head football coach at Big Bear High School, Dave Griffith, considered Lieutenant Landaker not only a standout football player but also a standout person and a role model to kids. Joe Bradley, a physics teacher and baseball coach at Big Bear High School, also held Lieutenant Landaker in high regard, stating that he had never coached a kid with more heart or courage. In homage to Lieutenant Landaker's athletic legacy at Big Bear High School, his jersey, number 15, was recently retired and an award is to be made in his honor. After graduating from high school, Lieutenant Landaker studied physics at the University of La Verne. Following the events of September 11, 2001, Lieutenant Landaker felt the need to do his part and decided to join the United States Marine Corps. He proceeded to attend Officer Candidate School, The Basic School, and flight school. Ranking in the top 5% during flight training, he was awarded the privilege of selecting an aircraft. Desiring to be a part of the community, he chose the CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter, an aircraft involving some of the most noble assignments in the military. Within just seven months, Lieutenant Landaker achieved the status of Helicopter Aircraft Commander, a status that typically takes at least one year to achieve. Lieutenant Landaker received a commission as second lieutenant on September 7, 2003, followed by a commission of first lieutenant on September 7, 2005. He served as a first lieutenant with the Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 364, nicknamed "the Purple Foxes." As a medevac pilot, he airlifted wounded marines and citizens out of dangerous combat zones in Anbar province in Iraq. On February 7, 2007, just one week before his scheduled return home, Lieutenant Landaker gave his life while flying a CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter that was shot down over Anbar province. In recognition of his service in the military, Lieutenant Landaker received a purple heart, a National Defense Service Medal, an Iraqi Campaign Medal, a Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, a Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, and a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 59, Resolution Chapter 115, on 9/10/2007.

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.12] Between the east urban limits of San Bernardino-Riverside and Route 18 west of Big Bear Lake.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 38:

  • Total Length (1995): 59 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,850 to 17,800.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 48; Sm. Urban 3; Urbanized: 8.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 59.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 20 mi; Minor Arterial: 39 mi.
  • Summits: Onxy Summit (8,443 ft)
  • Counties Traversed: San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 38 was first defined in 1911 by Chapter 158 which called for "...a state highway from a point on the Lake Tahoe state wagon road, at or near Myers Station... thence past Tallac, Emerald Bay, to McKinney's in Placer County....".

In 1915, Chapter 203 effectively extended the route by calling for a state highway along "...the wagon road extending along the W side of Lake Tahoe, from McKinney's in El Dorado Cty to Tahoe City, thence along the Truckee River to Truckee, and thence in a W-ly direction to Donner Lake in Nevada Cty, connecting with the present state highway from Emigrant Gap".

In 1919, Chapter 66 called for the state highway system to include “A certain highway in Nevada and Sierra counties, running as follows: From a point in the town of Truckee where the present state highway branches at the subway under the Southern Pacific tracks going toward Lake Tahoe, continuing through the town of Truckee, crossing Prosser Creek and over what is known as the "Dog Valley Grade" as far as the state line about 1 mi NW of Verdi, Nevada...”

The 1919 Third Highway Bonds also provided funding for the extension from Tahoe City to Truckee.

In 1923, Chapter 100 amended the 1919 definition as follows: “A certain highway in Nevada and Sierra counties, running substantially describedas follows: From a point in the town of Truckee where the present state highway branches at the subway under the Southern Pacific tracks going toward Lake Tahoe, continuing through the town of Truckee, crossing Prosser Creek and over what is known as the "Dog Valley Grade" as far as the state line about 1 mi NW of Verdi, Nevada..." and by the most practicable route to the Nevada State Line at or near Verdi, Nevada

By 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as:

[LRN 11] near Meyer's Station to the Nevada State Line near Verdi, Nevada, via Tallac, Emerald Bay, McKinney's, Tahoe City, the Truckee River, Truckee, and Truckee River Canyon.

This was primary state highway from Truckee to the Nevada State Line.

In 1939, Chapter 473 changed "Meyer's Station" to "May's Junction". No further changes in the route were made until the 1963 renumbering.

This route was signed as follows:

  1. Route 89 between Tahoe Valley (junction with US 50, LRN 11) and Truckee (junction with US 40, LRN 37 to the W, now I-80).

  2. US 40 (present-day I-80) between Truckee and the Nevada state line.


State Shield

State Route 39



Routing
  1. (a) Route 1 near Huntington Beach to the southern city limit of Buena Park.

    The relinquished former portions of Route 39 within the city limits of Azusa, Buena Park, Covina, and West Covina are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portions of Route 39, the Cities of Azusa, Buena Park, Covina, and West Covina shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 39.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, Route 39 had a single segment: "Route 1 near Huntington Beach to Route 2 passing through or near Buena Park and via San Gabriel Canyon."

    In 1958, route location studies were begun for a Route 39 freeway between Pacific Coast Highway and the Foothill Freeway in the general vicinity of existing Beach Blvd. There were public hearings in 1964 on the portion between Route 1 and Route 22. Studies on the northern portion were "later".

    In 1978, Chapter 1043 divided the route into the current three segments: "(a) Route 1 near Huntington Beach to Route 72 in La Habra via Beach Boulevard. (b) Beach Boulevard to Harbor Boulevard in La Habra via Route 72. (c) Route 72 in La Habra to Route 2 via Harbor Boulevard to the vicinity of Fullerton Road, then to Azusa Avenue, Azusa Avenue to San Gabriel Canyon Road, San Gabriel Avenue southbound between Azusa Avenue and San Gabriel Canyon Road, and San Gabriel Canyon Road. "

    In 2011, Chapter 536 (AB 957, 10/7/2011) permitted the relinquishment of the portion within the city limits of Buena Park from the Anaheim/Buena Park city limits to the junction with Route 5 (post mile 12.9 to post mile 15.1), on terms and conditions that the commission finds to be within the best interests of the state, effective upon the recordation of a certified copy hereof with the Recorder of Orange County. This segment was approved for relinquishment by the CTC in March 2012, and the resolution was recorded on April 9, 2012.

    In 2013, SB 788 (Chapter 525, 10/9/13) split this into two segments and consolidated the relinquishment language:

    (a) From Route 1 near Huntington Beach to the southern city limit of Buena Park.

    (b) Route 5 in Buena Park to Route 72 in La Habra via Beach Boulevard.

    The CTC is permitted to relinquish to the City of Buena Park the portion of Route 39 within the city limits of Buena Park from the Anaheim/Buena Park city limits to the junction with Route 5 (post mile 12.9 to post mile 15.1), on terms and conditions that the commission finds to be within the best interests of the state, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the portion of Route 39 relinquished under this subdivision shall cease to be a state highway and shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81. (3) For the portion of Route 39 relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Buena Park shall maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 39.

    The relinquished former portions of Route 39 within the city limits of Azusa, Buena Park, Covina, and West Covina are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portions of Route 39, the Cities of Azusa, Buena Park, Covina, and West Covina shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 39.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 39 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) near Huntington Beach to Jct. Route 2 near Valyermo, via Covina. This segment had two LRNs:

    1. LRN 171 between Route 1 and US 101 (once US 101 was rerouted to its freeway route). This ran N along Huntington Beach Blvd, then N on Stanton. Between Lincoln Avenue and (freeway) US 101 (along Grand Avenue). This was defined in 1933.

    2. LRN 62 between (freeway) US 101 and present-day Route 72 (former surface US 101; Whittier Blvd.; LRN 2). This route ran along Grand Avenue, La Habra Road, and La Mirada Avenue. This was defined in 1933.

    This segment from pre-1964 Route 26 south to the Pacific Coast Highway went under several different names in 1961 (all of these are now part of an extended Beach Boulevard): Huntington Beach Boulevard, Stanton Avenue (through the town of Stanton near Ball Road), Grand Avenue through Buena Park, and then Beach Boulevard in Mirada Hills. Near Westminster, this may have run along Coast.

     

    Status

    In February 2010, the CTC approved relinquishement of right of way in the city of La Habra along Route 39 on Imperial Highway between Brass Lantern Drive and Route 39, consisting of a collateral facility.

    The City of Buena Park has a number of plans for its portion of Route 39 after relinquishment to the city. These plans include landscaping and water fountains in the highway's median, and pedestrian walkways and bridges crisscrossing the roadway. It will also give businesses and the city more control of signage and rights-of-way.

    In March 2012, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Buena Park on Route 39 from the south city limits to Route 5, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated February 27, 2012, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 536, Statutes of 2011, which amended Section 339 of the Streets and Highways Code.

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 39 (Beach Boulevard) between I-405 and Route 22 within the boundaries of the City of Westminster is named the "Westminster Police Officer Steven L. Phillips Memorial Highway" This segment was named in memory of Westminster Police Officer Steven L. Phillips, who died in an on-duty traffic accident on January 29, 2004, at the intersection of Trask Avenue and Jackson Street in the City of Westminster. Officer Phillips was the first officer in the Westminster Police Department's 46-year history to die in the line of duty. He was born on June 5, 1957, in Los Angeles, California. Officer Phillips graduated from Edgewood High School in the City of West Covina and joined the United States Air Force in 1976. He completed four years of service as a military police officer, and continued his service with the Air Force as a reserve military police officer assigned to the 30th Security Forces Squadron at Vandenberg Air Force Base in Lompoc, California. He was called back to active duty for a year after the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001, and served his time at Vandenberg AFB. In 1986, Officer Phillips entered the Rio Hondo Police Academy. The City of Westminster then hired Officer Phillips as a police officer. Officer Phillips served in the Westminster Police Department for 18 years and he was a motor officer since 1991. He was an experienced motor officer and he was responsible for training new motor officers. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 70, Resolution Chapter 132, on 9/19/2005.

    The portion of Route 39 (Beach Blvd.) in the City of Buena Park from Hillsborough Drive to Stage Road is named the Gerald “Blackie” Sawyer Memorial Highway. It was named after Detective Gerald “Blackie” Wayne Sawyer. Sawyer was born in1941. In 1958, Detective Sawyer graduated from Excelsior High School in the City of Norwalk, California, where he was a very active student and played football. In 1963 Detective Sawyer began attending the Los Angeles Police Academy, where he attained his ultimate desire by becoming a proud member of the Los Angeles Police Department where he served for 10 years. In 1971, Detective Sawyer relocated to the City of La Mirada. On Tuesday, November 6, 1973, Detective Gerald Sawyer was shot and killed while working in a joint undercover investigation with the United States Drug Enforcement Administration. Detective Sawyer was shot by a cocaine trafficker during an attempted robbery of a $144,000 flashroll. The trafficker and an accomplice were arrested at the scene by other narcotics detectives and charged with first degree murder. In 1974, Detective Sawyer was awarded the Medal of Valor, the highest award given an officer, for his ultimate sacrifice. In the years following Detective Sawyer’s tragic death, countless police officers and detectives nationwide have been made safer because of the training film outlining his death. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 16, Resolution Chapter 68, August 8, 2013.


  2. (b) Route 5 in Buena Park to Route 72 in La Habra via Beach Boulevard.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    See segment (a).


  3. (c) From Beach Boulevard to Harbor Boulevard in La Habra via Whittier Boulevard.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was created by the original division of the route into segments in 1978 as "Beach Boulevard to Harbor Boulevard in La Habra via Route 72.". In 1981, the reference to Route 72 was changed to "Whittier", as the Route 72 segment was formally transfered to Route 39. This segment exists to connect the original Route 39 to the S with a planned freeway (never built) Route 39 betewen La Habra and West Covina.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segement was not part of the original Route 39; it was part of Route 72. Route 72 originally continued E from Beach Blvd and went S on Harbor. See Route 72 and Route 5 for additional details. This was part of LRN 2.

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 39 on Beach Boulevard in the City of La Habra from the south city limits to Whittier Boulevard is named the "La Habra Police Officer Michael Anthony Osornio Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Michael Anthony Osornio, who was born in 1968, in the City of Fayetteville, North Carolina, the youngest of four children, to Rafael and Guadalupe Osornio. In 1976, his family moved to the City of La Puente, California, and in 1979, moved to the City of Walnut where Officer Osornio attended Suzanne Middle School and Walnut High School, where he was a very active student and played football. Officer Osornio relocated to the City of Montclair, where he resided with his family. Officer Osornio attended law enforcement classes at Golden West College, where he received his Police Officer Standards and Training Certificate in November 1991. In September 1993, Officer Osornio obtained his ultimate desire by becoming a proud member of the La Habra Police Department, where he served for 13 months. On October 31, 1994, Officer Osornio was patrolling the southwest portion of the city during the graveyard shift and was stopped at a red traffic signal at westbound La Habra Boulevard at Beach Boulevard. He began to accelerate when the westbound traffic signal changed to green, when his patrol car was hit by a vehicle as Officer Osornio crossed through the intersection, and he died in the line of duty from injuries sustained in the collision. The driver of that vehicle was driving at approximately 60 miles per hour and was subsequently convicted of a felony for driving under the influence of alcohol. In 2000, the La Habra Police Department created the Michael Osornio Drunk Driving Apprehension Award in honor of Officer Osornio, and that award is given to the police officer who makes the most arrests for driving under the influence. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 78, Resolution Chapter 88, on August 24, 2012.


  4. (d) Whittier Boulevard in La Habra to Route 2 via Harbor Boulevard to the vicinity of Fullerton Road, then to Azusa Avenue, Azusa Avenue to San Gabriel Canyon Road, San Gabriel Avenue southbound between Azusa Avenue and San Gabriel Canyon Road, and San Gabriel Canyon Road, other than the portion of the segment described by this subdivision that is within the city limits of Azusa, Covina, and West Covina.

    The relinquished former portions of Route 39 within the city limits of Azusa, Buena Park, Covina, and West Covina are not state highways and are not eligible for adoption under Section 81. For the relinquished former portions of Route 39, the Cities of Azusa, Buena Park, Covina, and West Covina shall maintain within their respective jurisdictions signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 39.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment was created by the original division of the route into segments in 1978 as "Route 72 in La Habra to Route 2 via Harbor Boulevard to the vicinity of Fullerton Road, then to Azusa Avenue, Azusa Avenue to San Gabriel Canyon Road, San Gabriel Avenue southbound between Azusa Avenue and San Gabriel Canyon Road, and San Gabriel Canyon Road."

    In 2000, the portion within the City of Azusa S of Post Mile 17 was reliquished to the containing city [SHC 339(c)]. Additionally, the portion of Route 39 that is within the City of Covina was been relinquished to that city when appropriate terms have been accepted by that city. (SHC 339(d), added by Assembly Bill 2909, Enrolled August 28, 2000. In 2003, Assembly Bill 1717 (Chaptered 9/25/2003, Resolution Chapter 525) changed the legislative definition to exclude the relinquished portions in Azusa and Covina.

    In 2004, SB 1578 authorized the relinquishment of the portion in West Covina as well.

    In December 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Azusa on Route 39 from Arrow Highway to 330 feet north thereof, under terms and conditions as stated in the relinquishment agreement dated November 7, 2011, determined to be in the best interest of the State. Authorized by Chapter 264, Statutes of 1996, which amended Section 339 of the Streets and Highways Code.

    SB 1578, chaptered September 9, 2004, authorizes the California Transportation Commission to relinquish to the City of West Covina any portion of Route 39 that is located within the city limits of West Covina, pursuant to the terms of a cooperative agreement between the city and the department, upon a determination by the commission that the relinquishment is in the best interests of the state. Said relinquishment becomes effective immediately following the recordation by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. At that point, the portion of Route 39 relinquished ceases to be a state highway, and cannot be considered for future readoption. Furthermore, the City of West Covina is required to maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 39. In September 2005, the CTC considered this relinquishement.

    In 2010, SB 1318 (9/29/10, Chapter 421) made the following change: "...within the city limits of Azusa, and Covina, and West Covina."

    In 2013, SB 788 (Chapter 525, 10/9/13) added back the language regarding West Covina.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 39 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) near Huntington Beach to Jct. Route 2 near Valyermo, via Covina. This route consisted of the following:

    1. A routing N along Hacienda Blvd and Glendora Avenue to West Covina and the intersection with I-10 (formerly cosigned US 60/US 70/US 99). The official routing was later realigned to the E, but never finalized. This is signed as Route 39, and was LRN 62, defined in 1933. It was signed as late as 1988.

    2. N along Azusa Ave to San Gabriel Avenue and a logical connection with Route 2. This was LRN 62. Due to landslide, Route 39 does not connect with Route 2 anymore; supposedly, they are doing construction to reopen the part between Crystal Lake and Route 2 (which now Caltrans admits will never happen). The portion between Azusa and Route 2 was defined in 1919; the remainder was defined in 1933.

    San Gabriel Canyon Road opened in 1961, was closed regularly due to landslides on the west face of Mount Islip, and closed permanently in 1978, with Mother Nature declared the victor. However.... according to a planning report on a CalTrans site, this might actually be reopened:

    "LA-39-40.0/44.4 19920K Reopen Highway (PC/AG) This project is currently in PSR review stage with changes still being made by Project Studies. This Office submitted amendments to the PEAR on September 7, 2000 for Alternative 5 and the cost estimate for biological mitigation (including Alternative 5). According to the 2nd draft of the PSR the recommended environmental document likely is an EIR/EIS for Alternative 5 (the preferred alternative)."

    The City of Industry has a document that describes the origins of FAS Rte 1274, which appears to be today's Route 39 and County Route N8. This was to be a route from Huntington Beach and north across the San Gabriel Mountains to the Antelope Valley. The project involved the extension of Azusa Avenue through West Covina to link with Pass and Covina Road just S of Amar Road in La Puente. Part of this effort involved remaking Grazide Road into a four-lane divided highway from Hacienda Bl east for ½ mi.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed Between La Habra and Route 10 in Azusa, this was a planned freeway routing that was never built. It is unclear if Route 39 is signed between Whitter Blvd / Harbor Blvd and I-10; if it is, the signed Route 39 between those points is the pre-1964 routing. According to the Traversable Routing report, between the Orange County line (Whittier Blvd) and Route 10, the traversable local roads are Harbor Blvd, Fullerton Road, Colima Road, and Azuza Ave. Right of way engineering was recommending deletion of this portion from the state system.

    Currently, the routing is as follows: When entering the southern city-limits, it follows Beach Blvd. Afterwards, it shortly jogs east on Whittier Blvd. State maintenance ends at Harbor Blvd.. Note that, historically, Route 39 continued north of La Habra city-limits, via Hacienda Blvd.

    In Decmeber 2011, the CTC approved $900K to construct three maintenance vehicle pullouts, one retaining wall, 20 freeway access gates, in Monrovia, Duarte, and Azusa, at various locations from Huntington Drive to Azusa Avenue (Route 39).

    [Pier Repair]In February 2010, the CTC approved a project in Los Angeles County to rehabilitate an existing pier on the North Fork San Gabriel Bridge on Route 39 in the Angeles National Forest. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated project cost is $3,874,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. A Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed.

    In September 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding this project, which was described as a project in Los Angeles County that will rehabilitate, re-open, and construct roadway improvements on Route 39 within the Angeles National Forest north of the city of Duarte. It was noted that the project is fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program for $47,592,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12.

    The portion between Crystal Lake Road and Route 2 is currently closed. However, according to a report on 12/15/02 in the Whittier Daily News, it may be reopened in the future. According to the article, by January 2003, Caltrans officials expect to have a plan in place to repair Route 39 where it meets Angeles Crest Highway. This 6.2 mile stretch was closed after a major storm in 1978, and provides a recreational loop from Azusa to La Canada Flintridge, with an option to veer toward Wrightwood. However, it may take until 2007 to open the road. Without the route, residents must drive an extra 45 miles through the forest to get to Route 2 in La Canada Flintridge, or to Interstate 15 in Rancho Cucamonga to reach higher-elevation campgrounds, ski areas and restaurants in Wrightwood. There are two phases:

    • Phase I includes repaving work, drainage work, retaining-wall construction and partial reconstruction of the road. It covers the northern and southern sections (PM 40/41.6 and 43.00/44.44) with an estimated completion of summer 2004. Specific actions include cleaning 23 culvert inlets, building 4 new retaining walls and installing metal beam guardrails. The Initial Study/Environmental Assessment (IS/EA) for Phase I was released in January 2003 and found no significant impacts. The tentative work schedule for Phase I is as follows: finalize IS/EA early spring 2003 and begin construction Summer 2003 with an estimated completion of winter 2003.

    • Phase II requires re-engineering a part of the road where a landslide swept away a 500-foot portion about five miles north of Crystal Lake. It has an estimated completion date of at least summer 2008. Phase II currently has 5 alternatives. Alternatives for Phase II are currently under evaluation. The preferred alternative would include realigning the roadway at Snow Spring Slide and installing retaining walls and metal beam guardrails. The cost of this project is estimated at over $20,000,000, and there is no forseeable source of funding.

    [Thanks to Greg Saia for providing this information, including forwarding information he obtained from Caltrans.]

    [Route 39]According to the Caltrans EIR (PDF) dated January 2009, the project (which appears to be Phase II above) would rehabilitate and reopen a 4.4-mile segment of Route 39 from post miles 40.0 to 44.4, in the Angeles National Forest, in Los Angeles County. The restored connection would be accessible to public highway traffic throughout the year, with seasonal closures during times of inclement weather. These closures would likely occur during Winter and early spring. Phase I, mentioned above, rebuilt the roadway at Snow Spring, making it traversable throughout the length of the project area. Maintenance activities included the cleaning of drainage culverts and the erection of a dirt berm. With these past improvements, the roadway is passable, but only open to emergency service vehicles, and it is constricted as it approaches its northerly terminus at post mile 40.00.

    The proposed project would consist of the following actions; the reconstruction of culverts and construction of new retaining walls, installation of new metal-beam guard rails and widening of the shoulder at the Route 39/Route 2 intersection, maintenance of drainage inlets at each end of the closed segment and at Snow Spring, and repaving of the roadway within project limits. The design alternatives being considered are:

    • Alternative 1, or the “No-Build Alternative” proposes to maintain the existing conditions of the roadway without any improvements. This alternative is not recommended since it does not reopen the closed section of Route 39 or address persisting safety issues that the proposed project intends to resolve.

    • Alternative 2 proposes to rehabilitate roadway/roadside facilities, and install geosynthetic reinforcement at Snow Spring. Alternative 2 also proposes to reconstruct the washed out and damaged Route 39 roadway section for approximately 2,000 linear feet. At the location of the most significant damage, the Snow Spring Slide area (post miles 42.20 to 42.37), this alternative would install geosynthetic reinforcement to a depth of 29.5 feet below the roadway level. At post miles 40.96 to 40.97, a mechanically stabilized earth wall would be constructed to replace the existing, damaged crib wall.

    • Alternative 3 proposes to rehabilitate roadway/roadside facilities, and construct a concrete-boxgirder bridge at Snow Spring. Alternative 3 also proposes to reconstruct the washed out and damaged Route 39 roadway section for approximately 1,300 linear feet, plus provide a new bridge at Snow Spring Slide. At this location, where the most significant damage has occurred, a concrete box girder bridge would be constructed to allow slide debris and heavy runoff to pass underneath the roadway. At post miles 40.96 to 40.97, a reinforced concrete slab bridge with spread footing on bedrock would be constructed to replace the existing, damaged crib wall.

    • Alternative 4 also proposes to reconstruct the washed out and damaged Route 39 roadway section for approximately 2,000 linear feet, including a realignment of the road at the Snow Spring Slide. At this location, where the most significant damage has occurred, the existing roadway would be realigned 16 feet toward the down slope by building a 890-foot mechanically stabilized earth wall along the roadway on the down slope side to support the realignment. A 20-foot rock catchment area would be constructed, along with a rock-fall fence. A 6.6-foot-deep subdrain would be installed at the bottom of the upslope.

    In April 2009, it was noted that the project is fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program for $43,360,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11.

    In April 2011, it was reported that Caltrans opened Route 39 to allow motorists access to Crystal Lake Road on Tuesday, March 22 at 6:30 a.m. There is no access to Route 39 beyond Crystal Lake Road. The highway may be closed occasionally due to inclement weather. The project to repair storm damaged sections of Route 39 in the Angeles National Forest began May 2010. Two retaining walls were built to help support the highway. This $400,000 contract was awarded to Chumo Construction, Inc. of Baldwin Park, California.

    In October 2011, it was reported that despite earlier promises, Caltrans is abandoning plans to reopen a 4.4-mile section of Route 39 in the Angeles National Forest between Crystal Lake and Wrightwood, citing rising costs, engineering challenges and a mandate to protect bighorn sheep offspring. Caltrans had agreed to repair the long-closed gap in Route 39 in May 2009. After stakeholders attended several scoping meetings in Azusa, the state agency said it would spend $32 million on new drainage, an 890-foot mechanical wall and a redirected portion of the highway at Snowy Springs, about 23 miles north of Azusa and less than a mile north of Crystal Lake. The last portion of Route 39 connecting it to Highway 2 was built in 1957 by order of President Dwight Eisenhower. It washed away in heavy rains in 1978, a result of what some call shoddy engineering. It has never re-opened. In a Caltrans letter dated Sept. 26, 2011, the agency said engineering and environmental mitigations would most likely increase the project's cost, making it no longer feasible. They wrote it was likely to be washed out again, making the repair project "less than a prudent investment." They also also wrote that the California Department of Fish and Game notified Caltrans of the protected status of the big horn sheep in the area, making the reopening of the road within their habitat "problematic." Caltrans cited the recent death of a neonatal bighorn lamb on the closed portion of the highway as evidence that a working road would increase the likelihood of lambs being run over. To prevent lamb deaths, the road would therefore have to be closed or restricted during the sheep's birthing season from January to June.

    In January 2012, it was reported that Caltrans now wants to relinquish the portion of Route 39 in the San Gabriel Mountains betwween Azuza and Route 2 to either the U.S. Forest Service or Los Angeles County. L.A. County needs the highway to access three dams critical to flood control. The Forest Service's interest is access to Angeles National Forest by the public and, at times, by firefighters. The agency spent $6 million improving a spacious campground at Crystal Lake, where the highway now ends after winding along the San Gabriel River past the Morris and San Gabriel reservoirs. The problem is… neither agency wants the road. Caltrans spends $1.5 million a year maintaining the two-lane paved roadway, which is damaged regularly by landslides, flooding, falling rocks and forest fires. Further, if Caltrans abandons the road (as opposed to relinquishment), the Forest Service interpretation is that "…if Caltrans abandons the highway, they have to remove their improvements — meaning the road — and return the area to the natural landscape." A landslide swept away the highest part of the road in 1978, cutting it off from Angeles Crest Highway (Route 2). Since then, that last stretch of asphalt has been roamed by Nelson's bighorn sheep, creatures fully protected under state law. Caltrans concluded that it would be cost-prohibitive to re-engineer that 4.4-mile gap and legally risky to try because it cannot guarantee that the sheep would not be killed in the process. As a result, the highway has become what Caltrans spokesman Patrick Chandler described as "essentially a 27-mile-long cul-de-sac."
    (Source: Los Angeles Times, 1/29/2012)

    In February 2012, the San Gabriel Valley Council of Governments voted unanimously to oppose Caltrans' abandonment of 27 miles of Route 39 from Azusa to Crystal Lake. The agency also voted to write a letter requesting the state transportation agency continue the project it started in 2009 to repair a 4.4-mile gap in the the highway between Islip Saddle and Wrightwood at Angeles Crest Highway. That upper portion of Route 39 has been closed to the public since 1978 due to a mud slide that damaged the roadway.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1904: Reconstruct Azusa Ave and San Gabriel Ave for two-way traffic in Azusa. $2,000,000.

     

     

    Naming

    The proposed name for the freeway segment was the "Huntington Beach" Freeway. It was named for its terminus in Huntington Beach. Huntington Beach was named for Henry E. Huntington, nephew of Collis P. Huntington and a Southern California Utility magnate and promoter.

Post 1964 Signage History

Pre-1978, this was a continuous route from Route 1 to Route 2. A 1965 planning map shows this as freeway from Route 1 to Route 210; never constructed/upgraded. Route/location studies were conducted in 1958, with public hearings in 1964.

If one hikes over the planned route, one will discover two "tunnels to nowhere" and one "bridge to nowhere". These are along the E fork of the San Gabriel River. One tunnel was built in 1961; the other was built in 1964. They were to be a part of Route 39 up the East Fork of the San Gabriel River to Vincent Gap (at Route 2). The road is called present-day Shoemaker Canyon Road and is only partially paved. The Bridge to Nowhere was part of a road up the East Fork of the San Gabriel River built in 1929 to 1938, when most of the road was destroyed by a rainstorm, leaving the bridge stranded. The Road to Nowhere was another attempt made from 1954 to 1969, stopped this time by budget-cutters and environmentalists

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 39 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) near Huntington Beach to Jct. Route 2 near Valyermo, via Covina.

 

Status

Unsigned Unsigned from Whittier Blvd to Route 10. Additionally, in 1996, a section (d) was added that allows the portion of Route 39 that is within the city limits of the City of Azusa, except that portion that is north of post mile 17, to cease to be a state highway when the highway department and the City of Azusa reach agreement on terms of relinquishment. The agreement will require that any lump-sum payment from the department to the City of Azusa be deposited by that city in a special account and used solely for improvements on Azusa Avenue and San Gabriel Avenue in the City of Azusa.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 39:

  • Total Length (1995): 56 miles traversable; 12 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 150 to 61,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 27; Urbanized: 41.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 30 mi; FAU: 26 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 28 mi; Minor Arterial: 28 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Orange, Los Angeles.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.3] From Route 5 to Route 210. Not upgraded. The portion between Route 1 and Route 210 was added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959; in 1988, the Freeway and Expressway designation was redefined to Route 5 to Route 210.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.4] From Route 210 near Azusa to Route 2.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 39 was first defined by Chapter 680 in 1915, which called for "a state highway from Tahoe City, Placer County, along the N boundary of Lake Tahoe to the W boundary of Nevada at Crystal Bay". This was captured substantially intact in the 1935 highway code as:

"Tahoe City along the northern boundary of Lake Tahoe to the Nevada State Line at Crystal Bay"

This definition remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as Route 28, and started at Route 89.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 40



Routing

From Route 15 at Barstow to the Arizona state line near Topock, Arizona via Needles.

 

Business Routes
  • Needles: Old US 66-95 (National Trails Highway); River Road, N Street, Broadway, Acoma, and Front Street.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

1964 route adoptionIn 1963, this routing was defined as "Route 15 at Barstow to the Arizona state line near Topock, Arizona via Needles, together with an extension from a point on such Route 40 near Needles easterly by the most direct and practicable route to the Arizona-California line at the Colorado River, including a bridge over and across said river, to be constructed, owned, operated, and maintained jointly with the State of Arizona."

In 1981, Chapter 292 shortened the definition to eliminate the mention of the extension and the bridge.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield Interstate Shield US Highway Shield The specific routing corresponding to this did not exist before 1964 (i.e., the interstate routing). In fact, the Interstate routing was adopted in January and February 1963. An approximate routing is that of the old US 66 (now the National Trails Highway) between Barstow and Needles. That routing was signed as US 66, and was LRN 58, defined in 1919. See below for pre-1964 Route 40.

66 Colorado BridgeIn 1947, the Department of Highways moved Route 66 to a new alignment and a new bridge across the Colorado River. The movement to the Red Rock Bridge permitted elimination of one of the narrowest and crookedest portions of US 66. The cost to move to the Red Rock Bridge was only $147K, of which $71.5K was spent replacing the rail deck of the bridge, $70.5K was spent widening the old railroad approach, and $5K was spent to connect it to the existing US 66. The opportunity to replace the bridge arose when ATSF obtained approval to build a new RR bridge 500' upstream in 1942. The Red Rock bridge was set to be scrapped for its steel, but the Army was interested in the bridge and analysis showed that the need for steel would be over before the scrapping could occur. Negotiations were reopened, and the bridge was finally donated to the states in 1944. The history of the bridge going back to Civil War days may be found in the July/August 1947 issue of CHPW. Note that an act of Congress in December 1944 was required to confirm that ATSF could transfer the bridge. The old bridge was completed in 1916, and had a load limit of 11 tons. The construction of Parker Dam also served to submerge the steel supports of the old bridge. The new bridge was designed to support 94 ton trains. Note that it appears that the both the old bridge and the Red Rock bridge (or at least their locations) are still in use as of 2013 -- the Red Rock Bridge still appears to be supporting the traffic of I-40 (although it may have been rebuilt -- it still is in the correct location with respect to the RR bridge), and the original 1916 bridge appears to now be supporting a pipeline.

 

Status

There is a sign at the western end of the route that indicates the distance to Wilmington NC. The sign was once stolen, but has since been replaced.

In September 2011, it was reported that San Bernardino County received $35,912,000 to rehabilitate 93 roadway lane miles and extend pavement service life and improve ride quality near Newberry Springs on I-40. The scope of work is between the Desert Oasis Safety Roadside Rest Area and Crucero Road. The project will grind and overlay mainline, shoulders and ramps. It will also upgrade metal beam guardrail and minor drainage.

In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will replace Van Winkle Wash Bridge Left and Right (Bridge Numbers 54-0903L and 54-0903R) on I-40 near Essex to correct extensive deck and girder cracking. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $21,697,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2010 SHOPP.

In August 2012, the CTC approved SHOPP funding of $11,615,000 on I-40 PM R85.2 near Essex, at Van Winkle Wash Bridges (Bridge # 54-0903L/R). Outcome/Output: Replace both eastbound and westbound bridges to address extensive cracking and ensure long-term operational capability.

 

Naming

This route is named the "Needles" Freeway. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 1 in 1968. It was named because it traverses the City of Needles. Needles was named after a railroad station, established in February 1883, on the Arizona side of the Colorado River and named after the near-by pinnacles. The name was transferred to the California side in October 1883.

The portion of I-40 between West Park Road (milepost marker 139.18) and the Needles Overcrossing (milepost marker 142) in the County of San Bernardino is named the "CHP Officer John “Jack” Armatoski Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer John “Jack” Walter Armatoski, who was born on May 1, 1917, to August and Sophie, in Ironwood, Michigan. Upon graduation from the CHP Academy in 1948, Officer Armatoski was assigned to the Needles area. Officer Armatoski was killed in the line of duty on May 1, 1953, during a routine traffic stop. After he completed the traffic citation, Officer Armatoski was approaching the violator’s car on the left side when an intoxicated motorist, driving a stolen station wagon, sideswiped the parked vehicle and struck Officer Armatoski, killing him instantly. Officer Armatoski was a devoted officer, a loyal husband, and an amazing father. He was known for his integrity and his adoration of his wife and children.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

This route is part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

 

Named Structures

This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

  • Desert Oasis, in San Bernardino County 9 mi E of Newberry.
  • Fenner, in San Bernardino County, 45 mi W of Needles.

 

Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947. In August 1957, this was tentatively approved as I-40; however, in November 1957 the California Department of Highways suggested that it be designated as I-30 to eliminate confusion with the existing US 40 in California. This was rejected by AASHTO, as was probably one of the factors leading to the "great renumbering".

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Bernardino 40 0.56 0.90
San Bernardino 40 R141.09 R142.21
San Bernardino 40 R142.28 R142.53
San Bernardino 40 R143.48 R143.76

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.4] From Barstow to Needles.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route (I-40) was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 112, Ch. 143 in 1984.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.12] Entire route

 

National Trails

Interstate Shield National Old Trails Road Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-40 (i.e., old US 66) was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

Interstate Shield The original surface routing replaced by I-40 (i.e., old US 66) was part of the "Santa Fe Trail".

Interstate Shield National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-40 (i.e., old US 66) appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for I-40:

  • Total Length (1995): 155 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 8,000 to 17,800.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 145; Sm. Urban 10.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 155 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 155 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Bernardino.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield US Highway Shield In 1926, US 40 was designated as the "Victory Highway", entering California through the Truckee Rive canyon, thence through Auburn, Sacramento, Davis, Fairfield, Benecia, Martinez, Richmond, and thence to Oakland. In 1928, the routing was formalized as the route beginning at San Francisco, crossing the bay to Oakland, Martinez, Davis, Sacramento, Auburn, Truckee, via the Nevada-California state line west of Verdi. This is a routing roughly parallel to the existing I-80. It had the following LRNs:

  1. LRN 68 between San Francisco (US 101) and Oakland (junction Route 17, now I-880). This was defined in 1923.

  2. Between Oakland and Richmond/Albany, there were two routings:

    1. The first was LRN 14, defined in 1909. This is present-day Route 123. (San Pablo Avenue)

    2. The second was LRN 69, which was a bypass of LRN 14. This was the original portion of LRN 69, defined in 1923, the same year as LRN 68.

  3. LRN 7 from near El Cerrito and 2 mi SW of Davis (junction Alt US 40/US 99W; now Route 113). This was signed as US 40; it is present-day I-80. It was defined in 1909. It appears that US 40 used W and N Texas Streets in Fairfield, and Merchant St. and Monte Vista Avenue in Vacaville. The portion between LRN 14 near Crockett (which is the S side of the Carquinez Straights, just S of Vallejo) to the American Canyon Route near Vallejo was added to LRN 7 in 1931, and ran along what is today Route 12 and Route 29 (between Cordelia Jct and Vallejo).

  4. LRN 6 between Davis and Sacramento, cosigned as US 40/US 99W. This was defined in 1909. Portions of this used Old Davis Road and Olive Drive. Portions of the old frontage road to the N of I-80 (Road 32) E of Davis was also old US 40. US 40 used W Capitol Avenue to enter Sacramento via the Tower Bridge.

    US 40 appears to have followed the following roads up to Davis: (1) Texas Street from Fairfield to the I-80 corridor (2) Lyon Road and Cherry Glen Road between Fairfield and Vacaville. (3) Merchant Street, Dobbins Avenue, and East Monte Vista Avenue in Vacaville to the Nut Tree Airport. (4) Midway Road, Porter Road, Porter Street, Old State Highway, A Street, and current Route 113 through Dixon, and Vaughn Road from current Route 113 east to Sacramento. (5) Pedrick Road (Yolo County Road 98) north to Russell Boulevard (Route 128 corridor) (6) Russell Boulevard east to Davis. Segments (5) and (6) were later part of Alternate US 40. Davis now has a few Historic US 40 signs up on Richards Boulevard and First Street.

    The US 40 bypass of Davis (now I-80; presumably the stretch between Olive Drive and Pedrick Road) was constructed in 1940.

  5. LRN 3 between Sacramento and Roseville, cosigned as US 40/US 99E. This was defined in 1909.

    The US 40/99W bypass of West Sacramento and Broderick (later I-80, now US 50/Business I-80/I-305 and Route 275) was first proposed in 1950; however, local business opposition developed in these early stages as well. Thus, when the freeway was completed in 1954, the Yolo County Hotel-Motel Association was formed (as many of the businesses on bypassed West Capitol Avenue were and are lodging establishments).

  6. LRN 17 between Sacramento and Auburn. This was defined in 1909.

  7. LRN 37 between Auburn and Truckee. This was defined in 1919.

  8. LRN 38 between Truckee and the Nevada state line. This was defined in 1923.

According to "California Highways" by Ben Blow (1920), the Auburn-Emigrant Gap State Road and the Emigrant Gap-Donner Lake State Road were both taken into the State Highway System under the first highway Bond Act of 1909. The section from Truckee to Verdi, the road was added under the third Bond Act of 1919. There is some additional information in the following articles:

Interstate Shield The designation was changed on July 1, 1964, when the current I-80 took over the old US-40 route (and Route 113 and Route 70 took over the old Alternate US-40 route, although Route 24 was also a previous US 40A), and the new route (I-40) was defined.

In Fairfield, the stretch of former US 40 back to 1915, when only a few thousand people lived in Fairfield and Suisun City. According to an article in the Fairfield Daily Republic, one local contractor working on the original road drove his mule so hard that he ran afoul of the local humane society. The original highway route used old Cordelia Road and went through Suisun City to the courthouse. It later bypassed Suisun City and went down West Texas Street and through downtown Fairfield. The highway department straightened out turns in Cherry Glen in 1936, and built the Vacaville bypass in 1937. About 14,600 cars a day passed through Fairfield on US 40 in 1948. In the mid-1960s, workers enlarged the four-lane US 40 to the eight-lane I-80.

In Sacramento, some of the original street portion has been signed as Historic US 40. The first sign went up in 2001 on West Capitol Avenue in West Sacramento.

In Citrus Heights, the routing ran along Auburn Boulevard. Auburn Road (as it was called then) cut through Sacramento County‟s Central Township (what is present day Citrus Heights) to connect the City of Auburn to Sacramento. In the 1860s, Sylvan School and Sylvan Corners (both of which exist today) became the educational, civic, social and religious center of this early settlement. Until the 1950s, Auburn Boulevard consisted of auto-oriented retail that catered to travelers‟ needs of that bygone era. But with the opening of I-80 in the late 1950s, Auburn Boulevard changed to a commercial corridor serving the local community‟s needs.

Note that, in the vicinity of Donner Lake, Caltrans is required to remove snow. Specifically, the law requires that from and after November 8, 1967, the department shall remove snow from that portion of former US Route 40 that has been superseded by the relocation and construction of I-80, commencing at its intersection with I-80 near Donner Memorial Park westerly approximately four miles to the vicinity of Donner Lake.

So, why did US 40 get the interstate nod over US 50? James Lin reported, on misc.transport.road, "a Caltrans employee told me that back in the late 1950s, there was fierce competition between the US 40 and US 50 corridors over which alignment would become Interstate. What eventually tipped the battle in favor of the US 40 corridor was Squaw Valley hosting the 1960 Winter Olympics."

A listing of all the former routings of US 40 may be found at http://www.route40.net/page.asp?n=1058.

For those trying to follow old US 40, John David Galt noted (in a misc.transport.road posting) that near Suisun the old route jogged north on Suisun Valley Rd. to Rockville Rd., back to the present freeway route in Suisun, where Rockville Rd. becomes Air Base Pkwy. Between there and West Sacramento, there's very little of the old route left other than the freeway. There are bits of frontage road near the Nut Tree and the Hick'ry Pit that may have been part of US 40, but they don't go through. In West Sacramento, the old route leaves the freeway as West Capitol Ave., which is signed only as the "Downtown Sacramento" exit. From there, US 40 followed the Capitol Mall across to 16th St., then picked up the present Route 160 freeway route, ending up on what is now Auburn Blvd. Auburn is now signed as "Historic US 40" for most of its length, all the way into Roseville. At one point, Route 160 and US 40 were cosigned.

Hampshire Rocks Rd.In October 2012, it was reported that two 1926 bridges along old US 40 were scheduled for replacement: the Hampshire Rocks Road bridge over the South Yuba River near Big Bend, and the Donner Pass Road bridge over the S. Yuba River . The latter project is between exits 165 and 171 off I-80 (and is a bit E of the first project).

 

Alternate Routes

US Highway Shield There was also an Alternate US 40, also signed (apparently) in the mid-1930s. This ran N from 2 mi SW of Davis beginning at the current interchange of I-80 and Pedrick Road (Yolo County Road 98). It then followed Pedrick Road north past the UC Davis airport to Russell Boulevard, then followed Russell east to Route 113, where it met up with US 99W northbound and continued to Woodland (LRN 7 between US 40 and Route 16; LRN 87 between Route 16 and Tudor); then along present-day Route 70 between Marysville and US 395 (LRN 87 between Marysville and Oroville; LRN 21 between Oroville and US 395). It was cosigned with US 395 into Reno, NV.

In the late 1930s, there was a temporary routing of Alternate US 40 that took a more southern alignment than the current Route 70 routing, running through Berry Creek and Bucks Lake to Quincy along Orville-Quincy Highway, Spanish Ranch, and Bucks Lake Road. Much of that route is no longer part of the state highway system, although the portion from Oroville to Brush Creek is part of Route 162.

Note that the routings in Davis had been changed to the Route 113 routing by 1953.

 

Historical Route

Assembly Concurrent Resolution 180, 1998, designated those portions of US 40 that are still publically maintained and not already designated as part of Historic US 40 as "Historic US 40".

Senate Concurrent Resolution 66, Chaptered May 18, 2006 (Resolution Chapter 51), designated, upon application by an appropriate local governmental agency, any section of former Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 that is still a publicly maintained highway and that is of interest to the applicant, as Historic Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40. This recognizes the role that Former Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 played in the development of the transportation routes into California over what is now known as the Davis "Y". Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40 is currently Route 113 from Davis to Woodland and Yuba City, and Route 70 through Marysville, Oroville, and the Feather River Canyon to Hallelujah Junction on Route 395, a route that today serves 27 towns and the six counties of Yolo, Sutter, Yuba, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen. The Feather River Scenic Byway is a 130 mile segment of Route 70, which was part of Alternate U.S. Highway Route 40.

 

National Trails

US Highway Shield Lincoln Highway Sign As US 40, the portion of this route between the Nevada border and Sacramento was part of the "Lincoln Highway (Alternate)" (which started in Reno).

US Highway Shield Lincoln Highway Sign Additionally, the segment of US 40 between San Francisco and Oakland was part of the "Lincoln Highway", which originally terminated in Lincoln Park, six miles west of the ferry landing at the foot of Market Street. The Lincoln Highway ended opposite the Palace of the Legion of Honor at a small monument marking the spot. The last few miles (of the highway) were California Street.

Victory Highway Sign Portions of US 40 were part of the "Victory Highway".

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 40 was first defined in 1899 by Chapter 26, which called for "...locating and constructing a free wagon road from the Mono Lake Basin to and connecting with a wagon road called the "Tioga Road" and near the "Tioga Mine"..."

In 1915, Chapter 306 and Chapter 396 extended the route further. Chapter 306 added "that portion of the Great Sierra Wagon Road, better known as the Tioga Road, lying without the boundary of Yosemite National Park, providing that the portion within the park is taken over by the federal government." Chapter 396 added "that certain toll road in Tuolumne and Mariposa counties known as the Big Oak Flat and Yosemite Toll Road beginning at a point near the former location of Jack Bell Sawmill in Tuolumne Cty and extending thence in an E-ly direction through a portion of Mariposa Cty at Hamilton Station, thence again into Tuolumne Cty, past the Hearden Ranch, Crocker Station, Crane Flat, and Gin Flat to the boundary line of the original Yosemite Grant near Cascade Creek"

In 1917, Chapter 704 extended the route through an act "...to extend the Mono Lake Basin state road E-ly to a junction with the county road from Mono Lake Post Office to Mono Mills"

In 1933, it was extended further, from [LRN 23] near Mono Lake to [LRN 76] near Benton Station. This led to the following 1935 codification:

  1. [LRN 13] to [LRN 23] near Mono Lake via Big Oak Flat, Buck Meadows, and Tioga Mine. That portion of [LRN 40] lying within the boundaries of Yosemite National Park is not a state highway.
  2. [LRN 23] near Mono Lake to [LRN 76] near Benton Station

In 1937, Chapter 841 removed the reference to "Tioga Mine".

In 1953, Chapter 1786 added a third segment, "LRN 23 N of Mono Lake to the Nevada line, in the vicinity of the Pole Line Road."

Signage on LRN 40 was as follows:

  1. From LRN 13 to LRN 23 near Mono Lake via Big Oak Flat and Buck Meadows.

    This segment was/is signed as Route 120, and runs from cosigned Route 108/Route 120 4 mi W of Chinese Camp to US 395 near Lee Vining.

  2. From LRN 23 near Mono Lake to LRN 76 near Benton Station.

    This is signed as Route 120.

  3. From LRN 23 N of Mono Lake to the Nevada line, in the vicinity of the Pole Line Road.

    This segment was unsigned before 1963. It is presently signed as Route 167.



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