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California Highways

Routes 25 through 32

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

25 · 26 · 27 · 28 · 29 · 30 · 31 · 32


State Shield

State Route 25



Routing

(a) From Route 198 to Route 101 near Gilroy.

(b) (1) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Hollister the portion of Route 25 that is located within the city’s jurisdiction between Sunnyslope Road and San Felipe Road prior to the relocation of that portion of Route 25 through adoption of the proposed new easterly bypass alignment of Route 25, if the department and the city enter into an agreement providing for that relinquishment.

(2) The terms and conditions imposed pursuant to paragraph (1) shall include a requirement for the City of Hollister to maintain within its jurisdiction signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 25 until such time as the new easterly bypass alignment is adopted and opens to traffic.

(3) A relinquishment under this subdivision shall become effective immediately following the recording by the county recorder of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission’s approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment.

(4) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, both of the following shall apply:

(A) The relinquished former portion of Route 25 shall cease to be a state highway.

(B) The relinquished former portion of Route 25 may not be considered for future adoption under Section 81.

(5) Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission shall, upon terms and conditions approved by it, adopt into the state highway system the proposed easterly bypass alignment for Route 25 that is located between Sunnyslope Road and San Felipe Road in the City of Hollister. The adoption may occur at any time after the effective date of the relinquishment pursuant to paragraph (3).

In January 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Hollister on Route 25 (Tres Pinos Road, Nash Road, San Benito Street, and San Felipe Road) between Sunnyslope Road and Bolsa Road, under terms and conditions stated in the letter dated December 18, 2013, determined to be in the best interests of the State. Authorized by Chapter 523, Statutes of 2013, which amended Section 325 of the Streets and Highways Code.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined to run "from Route 198 to Route 180 near Paicines."

In 1984, the route was divided into two segments, "(a) Route 198 to Route 156 in Hollister. (b) Route 156 in Hollister to Route 101 near Gilroy." The portion from Route 25 in Paicines to Route 101 near Gilroy was transferred from Route 180. Originally, Route 180 was to have been much longer, and would have continued from its present terminus to Route 5, and had a segment from Route 5 to Route 25, and the Route 180 would have continued on into Gilroy. This routing for Route 180 was deleted in 1984.

In 2001, the discontinuity in Hollister was removed by SB 290, Chapter 825, 10/12/2001.

In 2013, SB 788 (Chapter 525, 10/9/13) added the language permitting relinquishment to the City of Hollister of the portion of Route 25 that is located within the city’s jurisdiction between Sunnyslope Road and San Felipe Road prior to the relocation of that portion of Route 25 through adoption of the proposed new easterly bypass alignment of Route 25.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This segment was originally LRN 119, and had the same routing. It was defined in 1933. In 1934, Route 25 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 198 near Priest Valley to Jct. US 101 near Gilroy, via Hollister.

 

Status

[Hollister Bypass]This project constructed a 2.7 mil urban arterial with 6 lanes from Sunnyslope Road to East Park Street, and a 4 lanes from East Park Street to Bolsa Road. It included grading, paving, traffic signals, bike lanes, signing, striping, and sound walls. The total cost was $43.3 million. Environmental work started in December 2004, and the project was opened in November 2008.

There have been a number of changes made to this route to improve safety. In 2000, a dozen people were killed on the flat, two-lane 11-mile stretch between Gilroy and Hollister. By 2003, Caltrans had installed a four-foot median rumble strip flanked by double yellow stripes; widened the shoulders with more rumble strips placed there; banned passing; and set the speed limit at 55 mph. This has made it safer: 97 people on the stretch from 2000 to 2002, 56 have been injured from 2003 to 2006. Crashes have fallen 39%.

In 2010, work continued on making Route 25 safer. The first phase of construction included work on the western side of Route 25 and the project area. The primary work that was completed includes paving the western roadway shoulders and construction of private driveway access roads. The second phase of construction included work on the eastern side of Route 25. Phase II work included excavation, grading, and shoulder widening. The net goal is driveway consolidation.

In March 2014, the CTC considered a route adoption in the city of Hollister. The purpose of the route adoption was to restore the connectivity of Route 25 by establishing a new alignment for a portion of Route 25 east of downtown city of Hollister. A portion of Route 25 through the City was relinquished by the California Transportation Commission (Commission) on January 29, 2014. Senate Bill 788, approved by the Governor on October 3, 2013, allowed the relinquishment to precede the bypass route adoption by amending Section 325 of the Streets and Highways Code. Route 25 traverses the entire north-south length of San Benito County. From the southern county boundary at the junction of Route 198 near King City, Route 25 extends north through the unincorporated communities of Paicines and Tres Pinos, and through the City to the northern county boundary near Gilroy where it connects to US 101. This route is classified as a minor arterial, and it is primarily a rural facility. Within the City, the relinquished portion of Route 25 is a two-lane facility with no shoulders except for a section through downtown Hollister. The one-mile long section along San Benito Street and San Felipe Road between 7th Street and Bolsa Road is four lanes wide and the shoulders are used for parking. Speed limits range from 25 mph to 40 mph and increases to 55 mph when Route 25 connects to Bolsa Road north of downtown. The City, through the Council of San Benito County Governments (SBtCOG), initiated and built a bypass and requested that the Department adopt the bypass as the new location of Route 25. Additionally, the City desired to control the existing Route 25 within the city limits and accept relinquishment of the route through downtown Hollister (per City Council of City of Hollister Resolution No. 2013-180). In 2006, the Department and SBtCOG entered into a cooperative agreement for the construction of the Route 25 City of Hollister bypass with the intention of transferring it to the Department through a future Transfer of Highway Location Commission action item. The agreement indicated that SBtCOG would design and construct the bypass in accordance with state highway standards, policies and practices. The route transfer would consist of two actions: 1) the adoption of the newly constructed bypass facility as the new Route 25 and 2) the relinquishment of the existing Route 25 within the city of Hollister to the City. The bypass project construction was completed, and the roadway opened to travel in February 2009. The bypass was constructed as an urban arterial 2.63 miles long with five at-grade intersections. It begins at the intersection of Sunnyslope/Tres Pinos Roads and Airline Highway (Route 25) and extends north as a six-lane facility with signalized intersections at Sunnyslope/Tres Pinos Roads and East Park Street. North of East Park Street, the bypass continues as a four-lane facility with signalized intersections at Hillcrest Road, Meridian Street, and Santa Ana Road. North of Santa Ana Road, the four-lane facility turns westward to intersect with San Felipe Road and connect to the two-lane Bolsa Road (Route 25). The bypass provides an improved level of service and better serves regional traffic than the existing Route 25, which is located in a congested downtown and commercial area. However, this facility presents a number of deficiencies that do not comply with Department standards. The Route Transfer Report (RTR) approved on April 2, 2012, identified these deficiencies and did not recommend the route transfer until corrective action was taken. The bypass non-standard features included deficiencies with the hydraulic-drainage systems (improper construction of drainage inlets, type of dike used, etc.), roadway geometrics (super-elevation rate is insufficient for the posted speed), storm water management (the project did not comply with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit), roadway pavement (longitudinal cracks in the shoulder section and concrete dikes), soundwall (separation along the expansion joints), and signal loops (advance loops at the signals are at the wrong locations). With the proposal from the Department to program a SHOPP project to address the deficiencies, the City agreed to accept relinquishment of the existing Route 25 within the city limits at no cost to the Department. The City pursued enabling legislation to allow the Commission to approve the relinquishment of Route 25 to the City. In June 2013, the Project Study Report (PSR) was approved to allow the Department to program the SHOPP project and address the deficiencies identified in the RTR. The estimated cost of the project is approximately $ 9,235,000, which includes construction and Right of Way costs escalated to the year of construction. The project is scheduled to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2017-18. On October 3, 2013, the Governor approved Senate Bill 788, allowing the relinquishment to precede the bypass route adoption by amending Section 325 of the Streets and Highways Code. On January 29, 2014, the Commission approved relinquishment of a portion of Route 25 to the City. The relinquished alignment through downtown Hollister runs along Tres Pinos Road and San Benito Street, to the intersection of San Felipe Road and Bolsa Road (Route 25). The bypass benefits to the state include: a new facility with access control between intersections, no parking allowed, and a striped bike lane within the eight-foot wide shoulder. All bypass intersections are projected to be at Level of Service (LOS) C or better in 2025, with the exception of the intersection at San Felipe Road. It will be at LOS D, but improved from the existing condition of LOS F. In comparison, the relinquished Route 25 route serves local traffic at lower levels of service, allows parking, functions as a minor arterial with multiple access points between intersections, and does not provide for a bike lane. The expected ten-year bypass maintenance cost is comparable to the maintenance cost for the relinquished Route 25. The route adoption has the support of all local agencies. Resolutions requesting the Department to transfer Route 25 to the bypass have been passed by the City, the County of San Benito, and SBtCOG.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #2227: Widening to four lanes and other safety improvements on Route 25 from Hollister to Gilroy. $2,928,000.

In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval of funding a project in San Benito County that will realign and straighten a portion of Route 25 near the town of Paicines. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $4,205,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Naming

"Bolsa Road"

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.3] Entire portion.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.3] From Route 180 near Paicines to Route 156 in Hollister, and from Route 156 in Hollister to US 101. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Business Routes

Portions of the route through Hollister are signed as Business Route 25.

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

 


Overall statistics for Route 25:

  • Total Length (1995): 74 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 260 to 19,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 70; Sm. Urban 4.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 74 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 15 mi; Minor Arterial: 42 mi; Collector: 19 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Monterey, San Benito, Santa Clara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 25 was first defined in the 1909 First Bond Act as running from Nevada City to Downieville. In 1933, it received two extensions: [LRN 37] near Colfax to [LRN 17] near Grass Valley, and [LRN 25] at Downieville to Blairsden-Truckee Road near Sattley. In 1935, it was codified into the state highway code as:

  1. [LRN 37] near Colfax to [LRN 17] near Grass Valley
  2. Nevada City to [LRN 83] near Sattley via Downieville.

The portion from Nevada City to Downieville was considered a primary route. This definition remained unchanged until the great renumbering in 1963.

Signage on the route was as follows:

  1. From LRN 37 near Colfax to LRN 17 near Grass Valley.

    This signage of this segment pre-1964 is unclear, but it is currently signed as Route 174.

  2. From Nevada City to LRN 83 (Route 89) near Sattley via Downieville.

    This is currently signed as Route 49, and runs between Route 20 (LRN 15) and Route 89 (LRN 83).


State Shield

State Route 26



Routing
  1. From Route 99 in Stockton to Route 12 at Valley Springs.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as two segments: “(a) Route 4 to Route 99 near Stockton” and “(b) Route 99 near Stockton to Route 12”. In 1994, Chapter 1220 deleted segment (a), and changed this segment to be “Route 99 in Stockton to Route 12 at Valley Springs."

    What happened in 1994 is that a portion of Charter Way west of Route 99 was designated as Route 26 (up to where Mariposa Road meets up with Charter Way). Charter Way west of that point is now signed as Business Route 99 and was US 99/Route 4, with Mariposa Road southwest to Farmington Road also a part of US 99/Route 4).

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was signed as Route 8 before the 1964 renumbering, and was LRN 5, defined in 1933. Information on the original routing signed as Route 26 may be found below.

     

    Status

    In June 2007, the CTC considered a project in San Joaquin and Calaveras Counties that would make roadway improvements near Linden from Wimer Road/Ospital Road to Savage Way. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $21,008,000. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2008-09. The project will involve construction activities in the environmentally sensitive habitat of the California tiger salamander and the Western spadefoot toad. Three archaeological sites that are eligible for the National Register of Historic Places are located within the project area. In addition, farmland and relocation issues resulted in a Mitigated Negative Declaration being completed for this project.

    Improvements near LindenIn April 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Joaquin County near the town of Linden that will realign two existing curves and replace the Sandstone Creek Bridge with a triple box culvert. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated project cost is $6,049,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 SHOPP.

    In September 2011 and October 2011, the CTC approved vacation of right of way in the county of San Joaquin along Route 26 at 0.4 mile north of North Escalon Bellota Road, consisting of superseded highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes. The County of San Joaquin was given a 90-day notice of intent to vacate, without protesting such action.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.3] Entire portion (Stockton to Valley Springs). Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1965.


  2. From Route 12 to Route 88 near Pioneer Station via Mokelumne Hill and West Point.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was first defined (by Chapter 385) as "Route 12 to Route 49 near Mokelumne Hill.". Before the year was out the routing was extended by Chapter 2155 to be "to West Point via Mokelumne Hill." In 1984, it was extended by Chapter 409 to terminate at "Route 88 near Pioneer Station via Mokelumne Hill and West Point" by a transfer of a segment from Route 104.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment from Route 12 to West Point was originally signed as Route 8, and was part of LRN 5. This portion of LRN 5 was defined in 1963.

    The remainder of this segment of Route 26 was originally Route 104. Route 104 was defined in 1970; the segment was transferred to Route 26 in 1986.

     

    Naming

    The segment between the community of Mokelumne Hill and West Point is named the "Stephen P. Teale" highway. Physician and California State Senator from 1953 to 1972, Stephen P. "Doc" Teale worked to establish the state legislature's first computer system. The Stephen P. Teale data center, a computer facility supporting California government, is also named for Doc Teale. Named by Senate Concurrant Resolution 43, Chapter 106, in 1997.

    Bridge 30-0052, crossing the Middle Fork of the Mokelumne River, near West Point, is named the "Tom Taylor Bridge". Tom Taylor, a lifetime resident of Calaveras County, served as a County Supervisor and was instrumental in securing funding for the construction of the bridge that bears his name. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 105, Chapter 107 in 1998.

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 26:

  • Total Length (1995): 62 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 750 to 18,300
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 61; Urbanized: 1.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 62 mi; FAU: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 1 mi; Minor Arterial: 61 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Joaquin, Calveras, Amador.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 26 was signed along the route from Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) near Seal Beach to US 101 near Santa Ana along Bolsa Avenue. This was LRN 183, defined in 1933, and deleted by 1951. The Route 26 signage appears to have been dropped by the late 1930s.

Between sometime in the 1938 timeframe and July 1, 1964, LRN 173 (defined in 1933), the route originally signed as Route 6 was resigned as Route 26. The original signed Route 6 ran from Santa Monica to Jct. Route 39 in Fullerton along roughly Olympic and Whittier. In Los Angeles, it ran between US101A (Lincoln Blvd) and US101 along 10th Street, later renamed Olympic Blvd (in 1939, the route ran along Pico between Lincoln and Robertson). Evidently, the original plan was to call this Route 6, but that went away when US 6 was assigned to a different route. It used the McClure Tunnel now used for I-10. Olympic Boulevard was built (widened and realigned) in two stages. By 1938, major improvements were completed. The jog at Figueroa Street was eliminated. Near Alvarado Street, Hoover Street and Arlington Avenue, Olympic Boulevard was realigned away from 10th Street to provide continuity. Westerly of Lucerne Boulevard, Country Club Drive was renamed Olympic Boulevard, widened throughout and extended through the 20th Century Fox movie studio property. Further improvements were disrupted by World War II. In 1948, the final links of Olympic Boulevard were constructed between Crenshaw Boulevard and Lucerne Boulevard and between Centinela Avenue and Lincoln Boulevard. The latter project was built as a landscaped divided parkway with no driveways through the City of Santa Monica. Before the construction of the freeway in downtown LA, the route continued along Olympic Blvd and 9th St. to Atlantic Blvd (Route 15; LRN 167). A 1942 map shows that Route 26 was cosigned with Bypass US 101 from approximately the Olympic/Telegraph junction to Route 19. A 1948 map shows the route running along Olympic, 9th St, Anaheim, Telegraph, Los Nietos, Whittier Road, La Mirada Road, and La Habra Road, terminating at the intersection of Manchester Blvd (then Bypass US 101) and La Habra Road in Buena Park. It was later replaced by I-10, the Santa Monica Freeway, but early plans show this as the Olympic Freeway. The signage for Route 26 may have been down by 1959.
[Some historical information on 10th St/Olympic Blvd was derived from "Transportation Topics and Tales: Milestones in Transportation History in Southern California" by John E. Fisher, P.E. PTOE, available at http://ladot.lacity.org/pdf/PDF100.pdf]

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

1944 MapThe route that was to become LRN 26 was first defined in the 1916 Second Bond Issue, together with LRN 27. The wording was "an extension of the San Bernardino county state highway lateral to the Arizona State Line near the town of Yuma, Arizona, via the cities of Brawley and El Centro in Imperial County by the most direct and practical route...". Given that the "San Bernardino county state highway lateral" was LRN 9 (from LRN 4 (US 99) in San Fernando to San Bernardino, this means that LRN 26 initially started near former US 66 in San Bernardino. The 1944 map to the right shows the spur of LRN 26 into San Bernardino along E Street. From there, the route continued to Colton, then to Indio, down along the south shore of the Salton Sea to Heber and Brawley, where it met LRN 27 in El Centro. LRN 27 (US 80, later I-8) then continued easterly from El Centro to Yuma Arizona.

It was extended again on both ends in 1931. On the northwestern end, there was a significant extension west of Colton, adding a segment that ran from [LRN 26] near Colton via Pomona to Los Angeles. Specifically, segment (i) of Chapter 82 defined it as “[LRN 26] near Colton via Pomona to Los Angeles”. The April 1931 also discussed the proposal for the route, which referred to it as "a highway from Los Angeles to a connection with [LRN 26] E of Colton". The confusing part here is that the extension did not start in Los Angeles; rather, it started from the eastern border of Los Angeles (roughly the LA River, just E of Eastern Avenue), near Ramona and Garvey. The routing utilized Garvey (much of which was later subsumed by I-10) and Holt Avenue. The rationale for the extension was to provide a mid-point route between LRN 9 (US 66) to the north, and the eventual US 60 routing to the south.

The 1931 act also extended the route on the southeastern end, extending it from El Centro and the junction with LRN 27 (US 80) to the border at Calexico. The extension's norther end was near the junction of LRN 12 (US 80 - El Centro to San Diego), LRN 27 (El Centro to Yuma), and LRN 26 (El Centro to Los Angeles) in the center of the intensely cultivated irrigation district of the Imperial Valley. The southern terminus was the only important entrance to California from Mexico E of the Pacific Coast.

In 1933, the route was extended from "Los Angeles (Aliso Street) to [LRN 26] near Monterey Park via Ramona Blvd", which completed LRN 26 into downtown Los Angeles. This was the eventual Ramona Expressway that became the San Bernardino Freeway (I-10).

By 1935, LRN 26 was codified into the highway code as:

  1. Los Angeles (Aliso Street) to Calexico via Ramona Boulevard, Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Brawley, and El Centro, together with a connection from near Colton to San Bernardino.
  2. A point on the highway specified in subdivision [1] of this section, approximately two miles west of Brawley, to a point on said highway approximately 2½ miles SW of Brawley.

It was primary state highway from San Bernardino to El Centro.

In 1959, Chapter 1841 deleted the connection from Colton to San Bernardino from the route (which ran along E street). Chapter 1062 earlier that year had added LRN 275, which was a routing from LRN 26 to LRN 190 (Route 30), so the connection was effectively transferred from LRN 26 to LRN 275.

In 1961, Chapter 1146 relaxed the description of segment (a) to eliminate a specific routing (and thus permitting the Interstate routing): "Los Angeles (Aliso Street) to Calexico via Ramona Boulevard, Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Brawley, and El Centro."

Signage along this route was as follows:

  1. From LRN 2 in Los Angeles to Calexico via the vicinity of Montery Park, Pomona, Colton, Brawley, and El Centro. This segment was the eventual route of the San Bernardino Freeway (and ran along Ramona Blvd and Garvey Blvd before freeway construction). It was cosigned as US 99/US 60/US 70 from its junction with US 101 (LRN 2) in downtown LA (the present I-5/I-10 east junction) to the junction with CA 71 (LRN 77) near Pomona.

    It then continued cosigned as US 99/US 70 through Colton and Redlands, rejoining with US 60 near Beaumont. LRN 26 continued E from Beaumont cosigned as US 60/US 70/US 99 until Indio.

    The connection into San Bernardino from Colton, which was part of this route until 1959, was signed as Route 18.

    From Indio, LRN 26 diverged from US 60/US 70, and continued S along the present-day Route 86 to Brawley, and then to El Centro. It continued through El Centro to cross US 80 (LRN 12) to Route 111 (LRN 201) near Heber. This was signed as US 99.

    From Route 86 E of Heber to the border, it was signed as US 99, and later as CA 111.

  2. From a point on the highway specified in segment (1) of this LRN's definition, approximately two mi W of Brawley, to a point on the same routing approximately two and one-half mi SW of Brawley. This corresponds to Route 228 in Brawley, and may have been an alternate routing of US 99.


State Shield

State Route 27



Routing

From Route 1 near Topanga Beach to Route 118.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 27 was defined as the route from “Route 1 near Topanga Beach north of the intersection of Sunset Boulevard and Route 1 to Route 118 at or near Chatsworth.”

In 1965, Chapter 2007 simplified the wording of the origin: "Route 1 near Topanga Beach north of the intersection of Sunset Boulevard and Route 1...". In 1981, Chapter 292 simplified the wording of the terminus: "Route 118 at or near Chatsworth".

Topanga Canyon originally terminated at Santa Susana Pass Road (in fact, it was known as Santa Susana Road N of Devonshire). The extension N of Devonshire St. from just S of the SP Railroad "S" curve to the new freeway was completed in 1966; this extension climbs an 8% grade to an elevation of 1,232'. Topanga Canyon Blvd was rerouted sometime in the 1960s between Plummer and Marilla Street. The original routing was along what is now Topanga Canyon Place, and went first W of the current route, crossed the current route, and then looped E and back to the current route shortly N of Marilla Street. This was to avoid a hill that was later taken down. However, the Plummer to Topanga intersection was constructed in the 1980s or 1990s.

There also appears to be rerouting between Roscoe and Nordhoff, as well as slightly around Oxnard. The original terminus was Devonshire Street, where it met Route 118 and continued N and then W as Santa Susana Ave.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 27 was signed from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) near Topanga Beach to Jct. Route 118 near Chatsworth. This routing was LRN 156, defined in 1933.

There is an "Old Topanga Canyon Road" that splits off Topanga Canyon Road in the community of Topanga, and continues on a more westerly and winding route, meeting Mullholland Drive near Valley Circle. It is unclear if this was an original routing of Route 27; if it was, it is unclear how the route continuted easterly to the present Route 27 once US 101 was reached.

 

Status

In April 2013, it was reported that the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has asked the state to designate the portion from Route 1 to the Ventura County line as a state scenic highway (essentially, the entire route).

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.3] From Route 1 to Mulholland Drive.

 

Naming

This route is Topanga Canyon Blvd.. Topanga is an Indian name referring to "above place" or even sky or heaven. It may refer to Indian village site located above Topanga Creek.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 27:

  • Total Length (1995): 20 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 13,400 to 43,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 4; Urbanized: 16.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 16 mi; FAS: 4 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 14 mi; Minor Arterial: 6 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that was to become LRN 27 was first defined in the 1916 Second Bond Issue as part of the "extension of the San Bernardino county state highway lateral to the Arizona State Line near the town of Yuma, Arizona, via the cities of Brawley and El Centro in Imperial County by the most direct and practical route...". LRN 26 took the portion from the San Bernardino County lateral (LRN 9) down through Brawley and El Centro. LRN 27 then continued E-ly from El Centro to Yuma Arizona. (LRN 26 continued S to Calexico as part of LRN 26's 1931 extension)

In 1935, LRN 27 was codified into the highway code as running from El Centro to Yuma, and was all primary state highway. The definition remained unchanged until 1963 and the great renumbing. This route was signed as US 80, and is present-day I-8.


State Shield

State Route 28



Routing

From Route 89 at Tahoe City along the northern boundary of Lake Tahoe to the Nevada state line at Crystal Bay.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

The current definition of Route 28 is unchanged from the 1963 definition.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield The present-day routing of Route 28 is not the original routing. In 1934, Route 28 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Albion to Jct. US 40 near Davis, vis Sage Canyon. This corresponded to the following routes:

  1. From Route 1, 8 mi S of Mendocino through Navarro, Boonville, Yorkville, and McDonald to Route 101 near Cloverdale. This was later signed as Route 128, and was LRN 48.
  2. From Route 101 near Geyserville to Calistoga. This was later signed as Route 128, and was LRN 103.
  3. Concurrant with Route 29 from Calistoga to 7 mi S of Napa. This was later resigned to be cosigned Route 128/Route 29, and was LRN 49. Between Rutherford and Napa, this is now signed as Route 121/Route 29.
  4. From 7 mi S of Napa to Cordelia Suisun. This was signed as Route 12, and was LRN 8.
  5. Concurrant with US 40 to Vacaville.
  6. N from Vacaville through Winters to US99 near Woodland. This is the route of the present-day I-505, and was LRN 90.

In 1952, the original routing for Route 28 was renumbered as Route 128.

State Shield The present routing was LRN 39 (defined in 1915), and has been signed as Route 28 since 1952. Prior to 1952, the route was unsigned. The Route 28 designation permitted the route along the north shore of Lake Tahoe between Tahoe City and the California-Nevada boundary to join Nevada Sign Route 28 at the state line.

 

Status

This route continues into Nevada as Nevada 28.

028 Kings CorridorIn 2007, the CTC did not recommend using the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account to fund the Kings Beach commercial core.

In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the Kings Beach Commercial Core Improvement Project (project) in Placer County, which will include roadway improvements to Route 28 to accommodate anticipated future transit and pedestrian needs which will include installing sidewalks; constructing curbs, gutters, storm drains, and water quality facilities at specific locations; streetscaping; designating specific road sites as on-street parking; and construction of new, off-street parking lots at specific locations within the action area in Placer County.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.11] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 28:

  • Total Length (1995): 11 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 9,200 to 17,100
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 11.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 11 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Minor Arterial: 11 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Placer.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 28 was first defined in the 1909 First Bond Act as running from Redding to Alturas. It was also part of the "Lassen State Highway" established in 1911 by Chapter 498 as follows:

"That certain highway known as the county road and beginning on the boundary line between Shasta and Lassen Counties in the NE corner of T37N R6E and running and extending through T38N R6E, T38N R7E, T38N R8E, to the Modoc County Line...shall be designated and known as the Lassen State Highway"

It was seemingly extended in 1915 when Chapter 765 authorized the survey, location, and construction of a route "from Surprise valley, in Modoc county, to the Nevada state line." However, this authorization was rescinded in the 1935 act that created the state highway code.

In 1921, it was more directly extended with Chapter 888, which provided an appropriation “...for the survey, plans and estimates and for the construction of the highway from the town of Alturas in Modoc county to the Nevada-California state line by the most direct and practical route via Cedarville in connecting with the proposed Nevada state highway...”

By 1935, the route had been codified into the highway code as running "from Redding to the Nevada line via Alturas and Cedarville". It was primary state highway from Redding to Alturus. The 1935 definition remained unchanged until the great renumbering in 1963. The entire route was signed as US 299 between Redding and the Nevada border.


State Shield

State Route 29



Routing

From Route 80 near Vallejo to Route 20 near Upper Lake via the vicinity of Napa, via Calistoga, via Lower Lake, passing south of Kelseyville and via Lakeport.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, Route 29 was defined as “from Route 80 near the Carquinez Bridge to Route 20 near Upper Lake via the vicinity of Napa, via Calistoga, via Lower Lake, passing south of Kelseyville and via Lakeport.” In 1965, Chapter 1371 reworded the origin of the route to be "near Vallejo" instead of the Carquinez Bridge.

A 1975 state highway map appears to show an adopted routing from just S of the Route 37/I-80 intersection to Route 29 near American Canyon Road.

In the 1980s, the Napa River Bridge and the new freeway bypassed the segment of Route 29 near Napa from Route 29 near Soscol Road to Route 121 at Imola Avenue. The bypassed segments were transferred to Route 121 and Route 221, changing their definitions (Chapter 409, 1984), but no change was necessary in Route 29's definition.

Route 29 between Lakeport and Kelseyville was given an adopted freeway routing, which is now an expressway. The old route is now Soda Bay Road (Route 281), Big Valley Road to Kelsey Creek, Finley Road south to the Kelseyville city limit, and Main Street back to Route 29.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield In 1909, the first bond act funded LRN 8, which included the portion of eventual Route 29 from 4 mi S of Napa (the present Route 12/Route 29 junction) to Napa (present-day Route 121). The future Route 29 was extended again in 1931, when the routing from LRN 8 (now Route 12) near Cordelia (which is 4 mi S of Napa) via American Canyon to LRN 14 (US 40, now I-80) was added to the state highway system. This later portion became part of LRN 74. The situation in 1931 was that traffic between the Sacramento Valley and the bay cities could not find the direct and most advantageous passage from LRN 8 to LRN 14 over connected state highways. LRN 7 (roughly today's I-580) was available via the Martinez Ferry, but a better road and bridge facility implied almost exclusive use of a county highway from the Napa Wye to the Carquinez Straits. It was felt that a state route should be established to service the through traffic which was forced onto county roads. The route proposed for LRN 74 was a favorable route from Cordelia south to LRN 14 by way of American Canyon. This route was 5 miles shorter than the route using the Napa Wye and 9 miles shorter than the routing through Martinez. The new route avoided the disadvantageous passage over steep intersecting streets in Vallejo. It was considered appropriate to add it to the state highway system as it would serve a very large volume of state traffic now carried over a county highway.

In 1931, the portion between Route 12 and I-80 was at one time signed as (temp) US 40. In 1934, Route 29 was signed along this route from Vallejo to Upper Lake, via Calistoga and Lakeport. The portion between I-80 near Vallejo to Curtola Parkway in Vallejo was defined in 1937, the remainder to 4 mi S of Napa in 1931.

From 4 mi S of Napa (present-day Route 12) to Napa (present-day Route 121), Route 29 was LRN 8. Portions of this were cosigned with Route 12; the cosigned portion is now present-day Route 221 (signed as Route 121). The small portion between Route 221 and Route 121 in Napa was not part of the highway system until 1984 when the Napa River Bridge and a freeway bypass were constructed.

Between Route 121 in Napa and Middletown, near Lower Lake, Route 29 was LRN 49. The portion between Napa and Calistoga was defined in 1993, from Calistoga to Middletown was defined in 1919. Before 1964, Route 29 ran from Middletown to Lower Lake through Whispering Pine and Cobb (present-day Route 175); this was LRN 89, defined in 1933. It rejoined the present-day Route 29 5 mi SE of Kelseyville.

The present-day Route 29 runs along what was Route 53 (LRN 49, defined in 1919) between Middletown and Lower Lake. The route continued as Route 29 (but was LRN 243, defined in 1959) between Lower Lake and the present-day Route 175 5 mi SE of Kelseyville. The Route 53 segment was renumbered as Route 29 in 1964.

It then ran, signed as Route 29 but LRN 89, along the lower edge of Clear Lake to 3 mi NW of Kelseyville, and then on to Route 20. This segment was defined in 1933.

 

Status

On the north end of Vallejo, Route 29 meets Route 37, which is a stub freeway from I-80 east to this intersection. Caltrans is building a freeway interchange here, where Route 37 will fly over Route 29.

In May 2011, the Napa County Board of Supervisors requested that Caltrans perform a corridor study on Route 29 between Route 37 in Vallejo and Napa Junction Road north of American Canyon. The study would look for both long- and short-term solutions to the traffic problems on Route 29, a main thoroughfare clogged with morning and evening rush-hour traffic.

In August 2011, it was reported that the CTC awarded $300,000 to the county’s transportation planners to study the Route 29, focussing on Route 29's southern segment from American Canyon to the city of Napa. In 2010, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) awarded the American Canyon $540,000 for planning development along the Route 29 corridor.

In March 2013, it was reported that the first results from the first “visioning” phase of a Caltrans-funded Highway 29 Gateway Corridor Improvement Plan study were released. The study focuses on a 13-mile stretch of the state-owned road from the Solano County line north to Trancas Street in Napa, an often congested thoroughfare during morning and evening rush hours. The report recommended a multi-faceted road into the renowned Napa Valley that encourages walking, bicycling and public transit while providing access for local residences and businesses and smooth, uncongested traffic-flow for commuters. The goal of the study is to come to a consensus on ways to improve mobility and decrease congestion, while remaining sensitive to adjacent land uses and following the state’s “complete streets” guidelines.

In February 2014,the Napa County Transportation and Planning Agency provided updated results from the study. The draft Route 29 Gateway Corridor Improvement Plan calls for expanding the highway from four to six lanes from American Canyon Road to Route 12/Jameson Canyon, as well as new interchanges at Route 12/Jameson Canyon and Route 221 and improvements to the juncture of Route 29 and Route 12/Carneros Highway. In American Canyon, the two new lanes would be built as frontage roads to siphon off local traffic from the highway. The plan also adds miles of bicycle paths and sidewalks, and a link to the future Vine Trail multi-use path that’s planned to run from Calistoga to the Vallejo Ferry. The character of the 17-mile stretch of roadway (from the Vallejo ferry to Trancas Street in Napa) would transition from landscaped freeway to “boulevard” in American Canyon to rural highway further north to align with the residential, commercial and undeveloped surroundings. The complete draft is online at nctpa.net/sr-29-corridor–study.
(Source: American Canyon Eagle)

In May 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of St. Helena along Route 29, between Charter Oak Avenue and 0.1 mile west of Pratt Avenue, consisting of non-motorized transportation facilities, namely sidewalks.

In September 2011, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Napa along Route 29 on Redwood Road, Trancas Street, California Boulevard, and Permanente Way, consisting of collateral facilities.

As of February 2000, the Route 20 corridor is a hot spot. Mendocino, Lake, and Colusa Counties have all agreed that they would like to see four lane road all along the corridor, which is considered a rural principal arterial. In Lake County, rather than upgrading Route 20 along the North shore of the lake, the principal arterials will be Route 29 and Route 53 along the South side of the lake. Project Study Reports in progress for the following:

  1. Extending the Route 20 expressway NE of Ukiah into Lake County.
  2. Extending the Route 29 freeway portion S from Lakeport to Kelseyville.
  3. Upgrading Route 29 from Kelseyville to Lower Lake to 4-lane expressway
  4. Building a bypass of Lower Lake starting on Route 29 and running NE to Route 53.
  5. Upgrading the Route 53 Clearlake Expressway to freeway.
  6. Construction of an interchange at Route 53 and Route 20.
  7. Upgrading Route 20 to 4 lanes between the beginning of the Coast Range mountains E to I-5 at Williams.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route: High Priority Project #3803: Expansion of Kelseyville/Lower Lake Expressway in Lake County. $5,000,000.

The upgrading of the route near Kelseyville was the subject of a draft EIR at the November 2007 CTC meeting. The basic issue is how to adjust the centerline of the widened route.

In September 2012, it was reported that plans to replace the decaying Garnett Creek Bridge on Route 29 are on hold in the face of budget constraints and opposition from Calistoga residents. The bridge, between Calistoga city limits and Tubbs Lane, was built in 1902 and is one of a dwindling number of examples of stone arch bridges built in Napa County in that period. It is a well-known landmark and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Caltrans caused a stir in late 2011 when it published a preliminary study that suggested that the bridge should be replaced. The agency said the bridge would either need to be demolished to make way for a new one or else preserved by rerouting the highway about 80 feet downstream to a new span. Either option would be controversial. Preservationists don’t want to see the historic structure demolished, but nearby landowners and agriculture groups don’t want to see the state converting any of Napa Valley’s iconic vineyards into new roadways. Caltrans noted that the bridge is close to the bottom of the scale in terms of safety and structural integrity. On the 9-point scale the agency uses, a new bridge in perfect condition would rate a 9, while a bridge that scored a 1 would be judged to be an immediate threat to public safety and would be closed. The Garnett Creek Bridge now rates a 3, largely because the stream has been steadily eroding the pillars and foundation, and heavy modern trucks are causing cracking. The bridge is also dangerously narrow by modern standards: just 19 feet wide, too narrow to safely accommodate two full-sized trucks at highway speeds. Trucks account for about 9 percent of the 4,000 vehicles that use the bridge daily, an unusually heavy concentration of big vehicles that is putting enormous strain on the structure. The option of rerouting Route 29 up Foothill Boulevard and across Tubbs Lane is not impossible, but would require expensive upgrades to Tubbs Lane before the state could accept it as a new highway route.
(Source: Weekly Calistogan, 9/29/2012)

According to Robert Cruickshank, above Calistoga, Route 29 becomes a very winding road. . The Calistoga Grade appears to have been cut quite a while ago, with a number of switchbacks up to the summit. This lasts for somewhere between 10 and 15 miles. Once you cross into Lake County the roadway straightens out as it descends into some of the area valleys.

In October 2013, the CTC considered for future consideration of funding a project in Napa County that will replace the existing Troutdale Creek Bridge on Route 29 near the city of Calistoga. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $21,475,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

In 2007, the CTC considered a request for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), which was not recommended for funding. This request was to construct an expressway from Diener Dr. to Route 175.

In June 2011, the CTC approved $6.1 million to repave stretches of Route 29 and Route 53 in Lake County. The Route 29 work will go from just south of the junction with Route 53 in Lower Lake to just north of it. For Route 53, the work will go from Route 29 to just north of 40th Avenue in Clearlake.

In October 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Lake on Route 29 in the unincorporated Town of Middletown at Wardlaw Street, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

 

Business Routes
  • Lakeport: Main Street, Lakeshore Drive.

 

Naming

Portions of this are "Lower Lake" Road.

The interchange of Route 29 and Trancas Road in Napa County is named the John Castro Memorial Interchange. It was named in memory of John Castro, a life-long resident of the City of Martinez. John Castro contributed to the City of Martinez in many ways, including raising cattle and goats, farming corn and hay, and by helping the less fortunate people. He served two duties in Vietnam, returning home to work serving the public by constructing bridges. In particular, he helped many individual's commute time by working on Route 4 improvements between the City of Martinez and the City of Hercules. He also worked on the Route 29/Trancas Road Project in Napa County in order to tunnel the highway under the wine train in order to avoid traffic delays. It was while completing the overcrossing and railroad transferring on July 3, 2003, that a fatal accident took the life of John Castro at the age of 54. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 68, July 16, 2004, Chapter 119.

The portion of this route in Lake County that is between the Napa county line and Route 175 is named the "Earle W. Wrieden Memorial Highway". Earle W. Wrieden was born in Middletown, California on February 8, 1910, and, except for one year in Berkeley, lived most of his life in Middletown. He was appointed to the Lake County Board of Supervisors in 1949, where he served for 24 years and where he was instrumental in many changes, advances, and improvements for the people of Middletown, Lake County, and northern California. He was heavily involved in water issues in Lake County, especially relating to Cache Creek and Putah Creek. However, his prime interest was in roads, including securing funds for the construction and maintenance of county roads and facilitating the adoption of highly traveled county roads into the state highway system. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 18; Resolution Chapter 80, 7/1/2001.

The portion of Route 29 from post mile 37.9 to post mile 39.5 in Napa County is named the "Robert Louis Stevenson's Historic Trail to Silverado. " This segment was named to commemorate the history of "Silverado". In the 1850s, volunteers built the Old Bull Trail from what is today the City of Calistoga over Mount St. Helena in Napa County to what is today Middletown in Lake County. Due to grades exceeding 35% along the Old Bull Trail, which prevented wagon travel, the Legislature, in 1866, authorized John Lawley to construct a private toll road to replace most of the Old Bull Trail starting approximately 1.5 miles north of the City of Calistoga. The toll road over Mount St. Helena was completed in 1868 with grades of just 12%. This toll road is still in use today as a public road and is known both as the "Old Toll Road" and as "Lawley Road". In 1872, John Lawley, along with William Montgomery and William Patterson, founded the Monitor Ledge Mine on Mount St. Helena just off the Old Toll Road and later renamed that mine and the surrounding community "Silverado". During one point in its short three-year life, the mining town of Silverado housed over 1,000 people. Many more people came and went during that time in search of fortunes, every one of whom traveled the toll road and the 1.5 mile remnant of the Old Bull Trail that connected that toll road to Calistoga and to the rest of the Napa Valley. In the summer of 1880, a young author, running low on cash, and his new bride left their honeymoon suite in the resort town of Calistoga to become squatters in the mining town of Silverado, which had been abandoned five years earlier. One hundred twenty-five years ago, Robert Louis Stevenson's The Silverado Squatters, a travelogue detailing the young author's trip to Napa Valley, was published for the first time. In The Silverado Squatters, the best-selling author of Treasure Island and Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde introduced the world to the beauty of the Napa Valley and the quality of its wine, famously describing it as "bottled poetry". In a chapter of The Silverado Squatters entitled "Starry Drive," Robert Louis Stevenson recounted the brilliant night sky above the 1.5 mile remnant of the Old Bull Trail as he rambled back to his honeymoon perch one summer evening. Few roads have ever been described so vividly. In 1921, a local farm bureau successfully petitioned the County of Napa to name a series of rough roads and trails running along the eastern spine of the Napa Valley, known collectively as the "Old Back Road," the Silverado Trail after the mining town Robert Louis Stevenson made famous. Although that collection of roads running along Napa Valley's eastern spine ended at Tubbs Lane just north of the Old Toll Road, the County of Napa ended the newly named Silverado Trail 1.5 miles short of the Old Toll Road because the county was making arrangements to turn that 1.5 mile stretch of road over to the state to incorporate it into a new modern highway to be built by Lake County. As a result of Napa County's decision to incorporate this stretch of historic road into a modern highway, the history of this pioneer pathway, Robert Louis Stevenson's "Starry Drive" and the last leg of the trail to Silverado, has been lost until now. That stretch of road predates John Lawley's Old Toll Road, was originally built by California pioneers in the 1850s, shortly after California's statehood, as part of the Old Bull Trail, and is now memorialized by a historical marker in Middletown, Lake County. That stretch of road also predates the City of Calistoga, which was formed in 1867, and Lake County, which was carved out of Napa County in 1861. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 37, Resolution Chapter 93, on 8/20/2010.

There is a movement afoot to name ports of Route 29 after Robert Mondavi. The Napa News reported in December 2004 that the plan is to put the legendary 91-year-old vintner's name on Highway 29 through Napa County. Sen. Wes Chesbro is sounding out local cities and wine industry groups to find out if they would support dedicating this wine highway to the Napa Valley's most famous winemaker. The Napa County Board of Supervisors has unanimously supported the idea, has have elected city leaders serving on the Napa County Transportation Planning Agency, as long as the wine industry goes along.

 

Named Structures

Bridge No. 21-0047 on Route 29 at the City of Yountville is officially designated the "Veterans' Home Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1959, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 30, Chapter 127, in 1994. It was named after the Veterans Home of California in Yountville CA, which is a community of and for veterans located in the heart of scenic Napa Valley. The home provides residential accommodations and a wealth of recreational, social and therapeutic activities for independent living; plus the added security of five levels of nursing and medical care. Some 1,200 Veterans (both men and women) live at the Home. Veterans desiring to be considered for membership must be residents of California, age 62 or older (or younger if disabled), and have served honorably.

Bridge 21-0049, at the Napa River in Napa county, is named the "George F. Butler Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1977, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 23, Chapter 48, in 1991. George F. Butler was a CHP officer who was killed in the line of duty at the age of 52. He was flying as an observer in a CHP helicopter that was taking aerial photographs of a double traffic fatality on Interstate 80 near Dixon. After finishing the photographs, the helicopter then set down a short distance from the accident scene in an open field adjacent to an irrigation canal. Butler exited the left side of the aircraft and proceeded to walk up the edge of the canal’s raised berm when he was struck by the helicopter's main rotor and hurled into the empty irrigation canal. The 21-year veteran of the CHP was killed instantly.

Bridge 14-0016, the St. Helena Bridge, is the "Robert H. "Bob" Weatherwax Memorial. Robert H. "Bob" Weatherwax (d. 1996), a lifelong supporter of the Middletown Unified School District in Lake County, donated land for the treatment plant now used by the Callayomi Water District. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 34, Chapter 71 in1997.

The bridge located on Route 29 six miles north of Middletown, is named the "Frank and Elly Hartmann Bridge". Named in honor of Frank and Elly Hartmann, who were pioneers in Middletown and the Coyote Valley area. They established and operated the Hartmann Ranch and many significant contributions to Middletown and the Coyote Valley area. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 45, Chapter 52, May 5, 2004.

 

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Other WWW Links

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.3] From Route 37 near Vallejo to Route 221 near Napa; and from the vicinity of Trancas Street in northwest Napa to Route 20 near Upper Lake.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Napa 29 10.09 12.49
Napa 29 12.49 13.20

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.3] From Route 80 near Vallejo to Oak Knoll Avenue north of the City of Napa; and from the Napa-Lake county line to Route 20. The portion from Route 121 to north of Napa and from Route 175 to north of Lakeport is constructed to freeway standards.

As for the timing of the additions to the F&E system, the 1959 statutes used the older route numbers, so it is harder to follow given a route as disjointed as this. It is clear that the 1959 Chapter 1062 defined the portion between Vallejo and Route 221 S of Napa, and the portion from Napa to Upper Lake as part of the F&E system. By 1963, all of the original definition of Route 29 was considered Freeway and Expressway. Chapter 998 in 1971 deleted the segment from Oak Knoll Avenue to the Napa-Lake County Line from the Freeway and Expressway system.

On 7/18/1974, the freeway routing between Yountville and Calistoga was rescinced, per CHC Resolution HRU 74.3:

WHEREAS, the California Highway Commission, by resolutions dated September 20, 1955, September 27, 1960 and July 22, 1953 established a freeway location on State Highway Route 29 in Napa County from 1 mile south of Yountville to Calistoga and;

WHEREAS, the Legislature at its 1971 Session deleted from the California Freeway and Expressway System the unconstructed portion of Route 29 from 1 mile north of' Yountville to 3 miles south of Calistoga; now, therefore

BE IT RESOLVED, that the California Highway Commission declares that the presently maintained location between 1 mile north of Yountville and 3 miles south of Calistoga shall be the only established location for Route 29; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Department of Transportation is directed and authorized to dispose of rights of way previously acquired for freeway purposes on said segment of Route 29 from 1 mile north of Yountville to 3 miles south of Calistoga.

In 1984, a new freeway bypass was created in Napa, and with the changes involved with the redefinition of Route 121 and Route 221, the portion from Route 221 S of Napa to Route 121 in Napa was added (Chapter 409).

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.11] Entire route.

 


Overall statistics for Route 29:

  • Total Length (1995): 106 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 3,700 to 59,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 87; Urbanized: 19.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 101 mi; FAU: 5 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 53 mi; Minor Arterial: 53 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Napa, Lake, Solano

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 29 was originally defined in the 1909 First Bond Act running from Red Bluff to Susanville. In 1919, the Third Bond Act extended the route from Susanville to the Nevada State Line. In 1933, it was extended further, from [LRN 35] to [LRN 3] near Red Bluff. It was codified in the 1935 state highway code as:

  1. Red Bluff to the Nevada State Line via Susanville
  2. [LRN 35] to [LRN 3] near Red Bluff

This was primary state highway from Red Bluff to Susanville.

This definition remained until the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment. Signage was as follows:

  1. From Red Bluff to the Nevada line via Susanville.

    This was signed as Route 36 between Red Bluff and Susanville.

    LRN 29 was signed as US 395 between Susanville and the Nevada border (it was briefly cosigned with Alt US 40 from 6 mi E of Chilcoot to the Nevada border).

  2. From LRN 35 to LRN 3 near Red Bluff.

    This was signed as Route 36, and ran from the present day Route 3/Route 36 junction (LRN 35) to US 99 (LRN 3).


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 30



Routing

No current routing. At one point, portions of the former routing were signed as Route 30, but upon the connection of Route 210 from San Dimas to Route 215, the Route 30 portion was finally renumbered as Route 210.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, this route was defined the route from "Route 210 near San Dimas via the vicinity of Highland northeasterly to Route 18."

In 1972, the portion from the junction with former Route 106 to Route 18 was renumbered as Route 330, and what remained of former Route 106, from the Route 106/Route 30 junction to I-10 became part of Route 30, changing the definition to "Route 210 near San Dimas via the vicinity of Highland to Route 10 near Redlands.".

In 1998, AB 2388 renumbered this route as Route 210. With the completion of the freeway segment, the signage was changed from Route 30 to Route 210, although it is still state shields. Interstate shielding requires AASHTO approval. Until connection of the original I-210 portion to I-215, there were places where the route still appears to be signed as Route 30 (as of December 2009, in Claremont and Upland along Baseline Ave and on 19th Street in Rancho Cucamonga), as well as the freeway portion in San Bernardino.

Note that a big numbering switch also occured in 1964. Prior to 1964, Route 18 ran N from San Bernardino. At Running Springs, it joined with Route 30 (now Route 330) up from Highland, and continued cosigned Route 18/Route 30 to the W end of Big Bear Lake. At this point, Route 30 ran along the S edge of the lake, and Route 18 ran along the N end. When the new definitions went into place, Route 18 was rerouted to the S side of Big Bear Lake (replacing what had been signed as Route 30). The cosigning that existed between the W end of Big Bear Lake and the Route 30 (now Route 330)/Route 18 junction was eliminated, and the route was just signed as Route 18. The old Route 18 routing on the N side of the lake was signed as Route 38.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 30 started life as LRN 190, defined in 1933. The initial set of state signed routes in 1934 did not include Route 30. Route 30 was first signed on the 1952 state highway map running between Los Angeles and the Big Bear resort. By 1953, Route 30 was being signed between San Dimas and Redlands, Route 30, located in San Bernardino County, followed Highland Avenue and City Creek Road, with a temporary western terminus as of 1953 in Upland at the junction of Euclid Avenue and Foothill Boulevard (US 66). The eastern end of Route 30 is at Running Springs on Route 18 west of Big Bear Lake. At the time, it was noted that eventually Route 30 would follow Highland Avenue all the way from its western terminus near Glendora, in Los Angeles County. That designation was pending until the portion of Highland Avenue between Glendora and Upland had been improved.

The former portion of Route 30 that was later re-numbered as Route 330 was signed as Route 30, and was LRN 207 (defined in 1937). CHPW noted that since the improvement of City Creek Road around 1950, more and more cars from the Los Angeles area were using the Route 30 (Route 330) route as an alternate way of getting to Lake Arrowhead and Big Bear Lake.

 

Interstate Submissions

The routing from I-210 near San Dimas to I-10 in Redlands was submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1968, but not accepted. See I-210 for a history of submissions of this segment as part of Route 210.

The designation I-30 was proposed in December 1957 for what is now I-40; this was rejected by AASHTO.

 

Business Routes

Cameron Kaiser reports that as of May 2009, most of the Business Route 30 signs on Highland in San Bernardino are still up, even amidst recent street work (including a set of new red light cameras at Waterman and Highland).

 

Status

Current planning maps show Route 30 continuing from the terminus of Route 210 and Route 30 to San Bernardino, using Highland Ave. Currently a section of freeway exists from Route 215 to approximately 5 miles east to Highland Ave, in San Bernardino. This will be renumbered as Route 210 once the currently existing Route 210 portion is completed to I-215.

In November 2000, the California Transportation Commission had two Route 30 projects on its agenda (yes, as Route 30, not Route 210!). One was a $17.5 million request from SANBAG (San Bernardino Associated Governments) for Route 30 from Cucamonga Canyon Wash to Hermosa Avenue for a 6-lane freeway and two HOV lanes (with $7.44 million to be requested later, and $21.007 million from other sources. The $17.5 million is $2.008M state, $15.492M Federal). The second proejct was segment 4 from Hermosa Ave to Milliken Avenue. This is also 6-lanes plus 2 HOV. The cost for this is $10.166M ($1.167M state, $8.999M Federal), with $10.7M from other sources.

A 5½-mile stretch of the new freeway, from Rancho Cucamonga to Fontana, opened in July 2001. The new stretch extends from Day Creek Boulevard in Rancho Cucamonga to Sierra Avenue in Fontana. The eight lane thoroughfare, including two carpool lanes, is expected to handle between 115,000 and 120,000 vehicles each day. According to Don Hagstrom in May 2002, Route 210 (former Route 30) is open from Day Creek Bl. to Sierra Ave. The portion from Foothill Bl. in La Verne (connecting to the current open portion once known as Route 30) to Sierra opened on November 24, 2002, and will be numbered as Route 210. The rest of the freeway into Rialto and San Bernardino, connecting with the stub portion west of I-215 will be complete by 2007.

In June 2002, the CTC had on its agenda the relinquishment of 08-Sbd-30-PM 9.6/9.9 and PM 94/9.9 in the City of Rancho Cucamonga. This is likely original routings bypassed by the new freeway. In November 2002, they considered relinquishing 08-SBD-30-PM 0.0/4.0 in the City of Upland,a portion bypassed by the new Route 210.

In April 2003, the CTC considered relinquishment of quite a few segments of what was presumably the old routing: 08-SBd-15, 30-PM 9.2/9.4 Routes 15, 30 in the City of Rancho Cucamonga; 08-SBd-30-PM 9.4/9.6 Route 30 in the City of Rancho Cucamonga; 08-SBd-30-PM 12.7/15.0 Route 30 in the City of Fontana; 08-SBd-30, 210-PM 4.0/9.4 Routes 30, 210 in the City of Rancho Cucamonga; and 08-SBd-30, 210-PM 9.2/12.6 Routes 30, 210 in the City of Fontana.

According to one correspondant, within the city of Upland, all Route 30 shields have come down. There remain, however, shields for Route 30 in Rancho Cucamonga, Fontana, and Claremont and La Verne (although recently the freeway entrance shields for the ramps at Lone Hill and San Dimas Avenues have been changed from Route 30 to Route 210).

The non-freeway routing is unsigned on 19th Street from Mountain Avenue to Haven Ave. in Upland and Rancho Cucamonga.

In August 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of the Route 30 right of way in the City of Upland, along the old alignment of State Route 30, from the westerly city limits to 0.25 mile east of the westerly city limits, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

As of December 2008, field reports confirmed that Route 30 is now completely resigned as Route 210 on all overhead signs and trailblazers, as well as on approaching routes. In some cases, a Route 210 shield was pasted over an Route 30 shield on the overhead signs, but in many cases, an entirely new sign panel was put up. About half of the postmila bridge ID signs at the overcrossings and undercrossings have been changed from SBD-30 to SBD-210. The postmile markers that showed the route as Route 30. There appears to be one exception, on the short Route 259 connector that links NB I-215 with eastbound Route 210. There is one interchange on that route at Highland Avenue. The shield on the freeway entrance sign at Highland for NB Route 259 (which defaults into EB Route 210) is still an Route 30 shield, rather than Route 210, and the sign designating it as the business route for Route 18 and Route 30 is still there approaching the Highland offramp.

In June 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the city of Highland along Route 30 on Victoria Street, consisting of collateral facilities.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Bernardino 30 R21.36 R29.98
San Bernardino 30 R30.09 R30.48
San Bernardino 30 R31.32 R33.18

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 30, before renumbering as Route 210:

  • Total Length (1995): 44 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 7,800 to 74,000
  • Previous Milage Classification: Urbanized: 44.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 44 mi.
  • Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 7 mi; FAU: 37 mi.

 

Naming

The segment of this route from Route 210 to Route 10 is named the "Foothill" Freeway (although it is not all constructed to freeway standards). It was officially named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 29, Chapter 128, in 1991.

This portion of this route from Route 66 to Route 210 is part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

 

Named Structures

Bridge 54-0592 on I-10, the I-10/Route 30 interchange in San Bernardino county, is designated the "Chresten Knudsen Interchange". It was built in 1962, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 21, Chapter 47, in 1991.

 

National Trails

Arrowhead Trail Sign The portion of this route from Route 66 to Route 210 is part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

National Old Trails Road Sign The portion above was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

New Santa Fe Trail Sign The portion above was part of the "New Santa Fe Trail".

National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign The portion above also appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

 

Commuter Lanes

HOV lanes are under construction or planned as follows:

  • From I-210 to Foothill Blvd. These are scheduled to open in February 1998.
  • From Foothill Blvd to the San Bernardino County line. Construction starts January 1998.
  • From the San Bernardino County line to Mountain Avenue. Construction starts in February 2000.
  • From Mountain Avenue to W of Cucamonga Canyon Wash. Construction starts December 1999.
  • From W of Cucamonga Canyon Wash to Hermosa Avenue. Construction starts in October 1999.
  • From Hermosa Avenue to 0.4 mi W of East Avenue. Construction starts in November 1998.
  • From E of Hemlock Avenue to 02 mi E of Sierra Avenue. Construction starts in December 1999.
  • From 0.2 mi S of Pipeline Avenue to 0.9 mi S of Central Avenue. Construction starts in December 2000.
  • From Linden Avenue to Riverside Avenue. Planning stages.
  • From Riverside Avenue to State Street. Construction starts in 2000.
  • From State Street to 0.4 mi E of I-215. Construction starts in 2000.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.3] From Route 330 near Highland to Route 10 near Redlands.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; the portions from Route 210 to Route 66 and from Route 215 to Route 10 are constructed to freeway standards. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959; references were corrected to Route 210 in 1999.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that was to be LRN 30 was defined in the 1909 First Bond Issue as running from Oroville to Quincy. This was likely the Oroville-Quincy Highway. In the 1919 Third Bond Issue, the route was abandoned as a state highway and LRN 21 extended to cover the mileage to Quincy.

In 1959, Chapter 2089 added a new definition for LRN 30, running from LRN 31 near Devore to LRN 26 near Millikan Avenue. This was a duplication with part of LRN 193. This is the routing of the present-day I-15, and for a time was signed as part of Route 31 (Temporary I-15).


Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic

Former State Route 31



Routing

No Current Routing.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic In 1963, this route was defined to run from Route 91 near Corona to Route 15 [now I-215] near Devore, passing near Milliken Avenue at its junction with Route 10.

In 1974, Chapter 537 transferred this segment to Route 15. At one point, this was signed TEMP I-15 until they completed construction of Route 15.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

State Shield The route of 1964-1974 Route 31 was LRN 193, defined in 1933.


Pre-1964 State Shield Route 31 was not defined as part of the original set of state signed routes. It is unclear what, if any, routing was signed as Route 31 before 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 31 was first defined in the 1916 Second Bond Act as "an extension of the San Bernardino county state highway lateral to Barstow in San Bernardino County by the most direct and practical route..." (i.e., US 66 to Barstow). In 1925, the route was extended to Nevada by Chapter 369, which authorized and directed "the California highway commission to acquire necessary rights of way, and to construct and maintain a highway, which is hereby declared to be a state highway, extending from Barstow...to a point...on the boundary line between the state of California and the state of Nevada...which said highway is commonly known and referred to as the Arrowhead trail.". In 1933, the route was extended again with a segment from "[LRN 26] near Colton to [LRN 9] near San Bernardino via Mt. Vernon Ave".

In 1935, LRN 31 was codified into the state highway code as:

  1. San Bernardino to the Nevada State Line near Calada, via Barstow
  2. [LRN 26] near Colton to [LRN 9] near San Bernardino via Mt. Vernon Avenue

This was primary state highway from San Bernardino to the Nevada State Line.

In 1957, Chapter 1911 removed the branch on Mt. Vernon Avenue, which appears to have been signed as US 395/US 91. That segment was subsequently rerouted onto a new alignment (presumably the eventual I-15 alignment).

Signage on the route was as follows:

  1. Between San Bernardino and Devore: Cosigned as US 91/US 66/US 395. This is currently I-215.

  2. Between Devore and 7 mi SW of Victorville: The route was cosigned as US 66/US 91/US 395. This is present-day I-15. US 395 (LRN 145) diverged and headed N at this point.

  3. Between 7 mi SW of Victorville and Barstow: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66. This is present-day I-15. At Barstow, US 66 (LRN 58) diverged and headed E.

  4. Between Barstow and the Nevada state line: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 466. This is present-day I-15.


State Shield

State Route 32



Routing
  1. From Route 5 near Orland to Route 99 near Chico.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined to run from "Route 5 near Orland to Chico". In 1972, Chapter 1216 changed the terminus to "Route 99 near Chico".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 32 was signed along the route from Orland at Jct. US 99 to Jct. Route 36 near Deer Creek Meadows, via Chico. It was LRN 47 between US 99W (LRN 7; present-day I-5) and US 99E (LRN 3; present-day Route 99). This portion of LRN 47 was defined in 1919.

     

    Status

    In July 2008, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Orland between the westerly right of way of the Southern Pacific Railroad and postmile L0.30 consisting of superseded highway right of way, and relocated and reconstructed city streets, sidewalks, and landscape areas.

    In March 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Orland along Route 32 at 8th Street, consisting of collateral facilities inadvertently omitted from a previous relinquishment.


  2. From Route 99 near Chico to Route 36.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined to run from "Route 99 near Chico to Route 36 near Deer Creek Meadows." In 1984, Chapter 409 simplified the definition to "Route 36".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 32 was signed along the route from Orland at Jct. US 99 to Jct. Route 36 near Deer Creek Meadows, via Chico. Before 1964, this segment of Route 32 was LRN 47 between US 99W (LRN 3) and Route 36 (LRN 29). This portion of LRN 47 was defined in 1933.

     

    Status

    In 2007, the CTC did not recommend using the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) to fund widening from Route 99 to Yosemite Dr. However, in May 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will widen and improve approximately 2.6 miles of Route 32, beginning at Route 99 and extending past Yosemite Drive. The project will widen Route 32 from two to three lanes in each direction from the east side of the Route 99 interchange to just east of Fir Street. The roadway will then be widened from two to four lanes (two in each direction) from east of Fir Street to Yosemite Drive, where the roadway width will transition down from four lanes to the existing two lanes. The project will also modify the ramp terminal intersections and the couplet at the Route 99/Route 32 Interchange. The Route 32 intersections with Forest Avenue, El Monte Avenue and Bruce Road will be widened and the existing signals will be modified. The Route 32 intersections with Fir Street and Yosemite Drive will be widened and new signals will be installed. The project scope also includes open graded asphalt, shoulder, median, guardrail (timber barrier), landscaping, signal and bridge improvements as well as sound barrier installation along select rear yards of residential properties that abut Route 32. The proposed project will relieve traffic congestion, increase capacity, improve signal operations and enhance safety.

    In May 2011, the CTC amended the CMIA baseline agreement for the Route 32 Widen Phase 1 project (PPNO 2107) in Butte County to remain within budget. This inlcuded revising the project limits from Post Mile 10.1 - 11.1 to Post Mile 10.3 - 11.3 to accommodate scope change. The purpose of this project is to add a lane in each direction on the section of Route 32 from the Route 32/ Route 99 intersection eastward approximately one mile to the Forest Avenue intersection, which will improve safety, relieve congestion and mitigate traffic queues at the Forest Avenue/Route 32 intersection. During the design phase, it was discovered that the limits of the project would need to be shifted to just east of the Forest Avenue intersection, in order to accommodate the roadway transition from four lanes back down to two lanes. Furthermore, it was discovered that the work to build these roadway design tapers for the transition from four to two lanes, impacts the nearby Dead Horse Slough Bridge, which will now need to be widened. The additional scope and costs related to the widening of Dead Horse Slough Bridge were not part of the original baseline agreement. In order to remain within budget, the project was changed to widen the Dead Horse Slough Bridge to accommodate roadway tapers at Forest Avenue, and to eliminate signal, roadway and widening work at the intersection of Route 32 and Route 99 as well as at Fir Street.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved an allocation of $3.425 million to a project to widen to four lanes a stretch of Route 32 in east Chico. The city of Chico will be kicking in $3 million to the Route 32 work, which will stretch east from the park and ride lot at Route 99, to just past the Dead Horse Slough bridge east of Forest Avenue. The work will also extend down Forest to Humboldt Road, and will improve northbound left turns from Forest onto Route 32 by adding a second dedicated left turn lane. The work will include widening the Dead Horse Slough bridge to four lanes. The ultimate plan is to widen the highway to four lanes as far east as Yosemite Drive.

    In April 2012, the CTC approved revising the project schedule. The Route 32 Widen Phase 1 project originally proposed to widen Route 32 from Route 99 (PM10.1) to east of Forest Avenue (PM11.1). The project is needed to improve traffic operations on a portion of Route 32 in an urbanized area of Chico feeding Route 99. The completed improvements will mitigate queues of traffic, relieve congestion, increase capacity, and improve safety. The project was programmed at the Commission’s May 2010 meeting to be funded with a combination of Corridor Mobility Improvement Account funding and local funding. A construction allocation was approved by the Commission at its August 2011 meeting; however a contract award has been delayed due to a recent court decision which affected the project funding. Specifically, the recent California Supreme Court decision that eliminated all re-development agencies and related funding impacted the City’s financial plan for the Route 32 Widen Phase 1 project. Additional time to award the contract wass needed for the City to revise its financial plan in which the City will re-allocate City development impact fees and gas tax revenues to the project. Once the revised financial plan has been approved by the City Council, the City Manager will be able to move forward with awarding the contract which was anticipated by June 30, 2012. Closeout is now estimated for May 2014.

Naming

There is an historical plaque in Butte County commemorating the 14 Mile House. In June 1864, the Chico and Humboldt Wagon Road Company was incorporated, and John Bidwell and other Chicoans received the franchise to construct a road to connect the City of Chico with the Idaho Mines. Nick Spires built accommodations on that road at a site located on the rim of Little Chico Creek Canyon for travelers and their livestock. Paul Lucas bought the land from Nick Spires, and Paul Lucas' son, John Lucas, built a fine two-story hotel. The hotel, a slaughter house, and a hide house, which later served as a school for Chico Canyon children, were collectively referred to as 14 Mile House. Soon after the turn of the 19th century, the toll house that was adjacent to the road was moved four miles north, nearer to today's Forest Ranch, and the last remaining 14 Mile House building, the old barn, disappeared in the 1960's. In 2001, a historical plaque commemorating the 14 Mile House was authorized in the right-of-way of Route 32 in Butte County at a site that is located along Route 32, lying approximately 12.7 miles east of the junction of Route 32 and Route 99, at the site of the 14 Mile House. Authorized by Senate Concurrent Resolution 59, Chapter 101, 9/4/2001.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Status

In July 2002, the CTC considered for funding and future adoption a realignment of Route 32 in the City of Orland. This new route adoption runs from 0.06 mi W of Eighth St to Sixth St.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 32:

  • Total Length (1995): 74 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 1,050 to 23,800
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 64; Sm. Urban 3; Urbanized: 7.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 74 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 18 mi; Minor Arterial: 56 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Glenn, Butte, Tehama

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 32 was originally defined in the 1915 Second Bond Act as "an extension connecting the San Joaquin valley trunk line at a point between the city of Merced in Merced County and the city of Madera in Madera County with the coast trunk line at or near the city of Gilroy in Santa Clara County, through Pacheco Pass, by the most direct and practical route." In 1933, it was extended from "Coast Road near Watsonville to [LRN 2] in Santa Clara Valley via Hecker Pass". Thus, by 1935, it was codified as:

  1. A point on [LRN 4] between Merced and Madera to [LRN 2] near Gilroy, via Pacheco Pass.
  2. [LRN 56] near Watsonville to [LRN 2] in Santa Clara Valley via Hecker Pass.

In 1959, Chapter 1062 combined the segments and extended the routing to LRN 249, which was the proposed "Easterly" freeway, Route 65. This made the definition "LRN 56 near Watsonville to LRN 249 near Sharon via Hecker Pass and Pacheco Pass."

This is currently signed as Route 152. As with present-day Route 152, the portion of the routing E of US 99 (LRN 4; present-day Route 99) due E to the Fresno River, where it intersects unconstructed Route 65 (LRN 249) is unconstructed.



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