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California Highways

Routes 9 through 16

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


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State Shield

State Route 9



Routing

From Route 1 near Santa Cruz to Route 17 near Los Gatos via Waterman Gap and Saratoga Gap and along the ridge between the San Lorenzo and Pescadero Creeks.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this was defined to run "from Route 17 near Santa Cruz to Route 17 near Los Gatos via Waterman Gap and Saratoga Gap and along the ridge between the San Lorenzo and Pescadero Creeks." In 1981, Chapter 292 changed the western origin to Route 1 near Santa Cruz.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This route consisted of two segments:

  1. The first segment ran between Santa Cruz and the present northern Route 9/Route 236 junction near Waterman Gap. This segment was LRN 116, and was added to the state highway system in 1933.
  2. The second segment ran between Route 236 and Route 17 in Los Gatos (through Saratoga). This segment was LRN 42. The portion between Route 236 and Saratoga Gap was added to the state highway system in 1913; the remainder of the segment from Saratoga Gap to Los Gatos was added in 1933.

In 1934, Route 9 was signed along the route from Santa Cruz to Milpitas via Redwood Park.

Pre-1964 State Shield In Saratoga, the original signage of Route 9 diverged from the present signage. The signed Route 9, as LRN 114, proceeded North on Saratoga-Sunnyvale Road into Sunnyvale via Mathilda Ave, thence to a jct with Alviso-Milpitas Road (currently signed as Route 237), and a junction with Bypass US-101 (LRN 68). It appears this segment was defined in 1933. On October 18, 1956, the Highway Commission adopted the routing for a future freeway location for Route 9 from Bayshore Freeway north of Moffett Field, generally following Stevens Creek to an existing Route 9 location north of Azule near Saratoga. For a while, this was signed as part of Route 85.

Pre-1964 State Shield The route signed as Route 9 then proceeded on the current Route 237 alignment into Milpitas. This was LRN 113. It ran east as Route 237 to Route 17 (LRN 69; now I-880). Before the current bridge over the Guadalupe River was constructed, it took a route into Alviso via Gold Street north and 1st Street southwest back to current Route 237.

Between Milpitas and Warm Springs, Route 9 ran N along a LRN 69 (Route 17, now I-880) to present-day Route 262 near Warm Springs. This segment, as LRN 69, was added to the state highway system in 1933.

Near Warm Springs, Route 9 ran along the present-day Route 262 routing between Route 17 (present-day I-880) and Route 21 (present-day Route 680). This was part of LRN 5, defined in 1909.

Between the present-day Route 262/I-680 junction near Warm Springs and Irvington, Route 9 ran cosigned with Route 21 to Irvington, near Mission San Jose. This segment was LRN 5, and was added to the state highway system in 1909.

Near the mission (at Mission Blvd), Route 9 diverged, continuing signed as Route 9 (but still LRN 5) along what is now Route 238, ending at US 50 (present-day I-580). This was also added in 1909.

 

Status

In July 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of Saratoga, between Saratoga-Los Gatos Road and 0.13 kilometer west of Sixth Street, consisting of nonmotorized transportation facilities, namely sidewalks.

In June 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will make safety upgrades on Route 9 from 2.5 miles north of Route 35 to 6th Street, near Saratoga. The project is not fully funded. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $13,427,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program.

In August 2011, the CTC approved $479,000 in SHOPP funding to stabilize and repair slope at four locations in Saratoga, from Skyline Boulevard to Toll Gate Road, damaged by heavy rainfall.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.3] From Route 1 near Santa Cruz to Route 236 near Boulder Creek; and from Route 236 near Boulder Creek to Route 236 near Waterman Gap; and from Route 236 near Waterman Gap to Route 35; and from Saratoga to Route 17 near Los Gatos; and from Blaney Plaza in Saratoga to Route 35.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.10] Between the north urban limits of Santa Cruz and the south urban limits of San Jose.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Interstate Submissions

In November 1957, the California Department of Highways proposed the designation I-9 for what is now I-405.

 


Overall statistics for Route 9:

  • Total Length (1995): 39 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 3,200 to 34,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 18; Urbanized: 21.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 20 mi; FAS: 9 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 4 mi; Minor Arterial: 16 mi; Collector: 19 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Cruz and Santa Clara.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 9 was defined in the first set of highway bonds in 1909, with a rough routing of "San Fernando to San Bernardino". It was extended in 1933 to run to [LRN 2] (US 101) near Montalvo. By 1935, it was codified in the highway code as:

  1. [LRN 2] near Montalvo to [LRN 4] near San Fernando
  2. San Fernando to San Bernardino

Only the first segment was a primary route.

In 1957, Chapter 1911 changed the west end of the first segment from [LRN 2] (US 101) near Montalvo to [LRN 79] (Route 126) near Saticoy, and replaced San Fernando with "near San Fernando" in the second segment.

The signage for LRN 9 was as follows:

  1. From LRN 79 near Saticoy to LRN 4 near San Fernando.

    This segment was signed as Route 118.

  2. From near San Fernando to San Bernardino.

    This routing was signed as Route 118. At some point, the signage as Route 118 terminated, and the remainder of the route between Pasadena and San Bernardino was signed as US 66. The routing of LRN 9 (US 66) through Pasadena was: right on Shamrock Ave. in Monrovia, left on Foothill Blvd. through Arcadia into Pasadena, left on Santa Anita Ave. right on Colorado Street and left on Fair Oaks Ave.

    LRN 9 later applied to the routing of what is now I-210 between Pasadena (the Route 134/I-210 junction) to Route 30.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 10



Routing
  1. From Route 1 in Santa Monica to Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    (105-110)In 1963, this segment was defined as "Route 1 in Santa Monica to Route 105 near Soto Street."

    In 1968, Chapter 385 changed the definitions of Route 105 ("from Route 5 to the junction of Route 110 (now part of Route 10) and US-101") and Route 110 ("from Route 105 to the junction of Routes 5 and 10") from their former stub routes in downtown, creating the present day I-105 routing. At this point, the definition of Route 10 was changed to "Route 1 in Santa Monica to Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles", and US 101 was changed to start at "Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield Interstate Shield The segment was LRN 173, and was defined as part of the state highway system since 1933; however, it was signed as Route 26 prior to the freeway designation. Route 26 ran along Olympic Blvd. For information on the route that was signed as Route 10, see below.

    The McClure Tunnel opened on February 1, 1936, and originally connected the Roosevelt Highway (later, Pacific Coast Highway) with Lincoln Boulevard as part of US 101A. At one point, this was part of signed Route 6. Note that technically the McClure tunnel (actually, the portion to the west of Lincoln Blvd) is part of Route 1, not Route 10.

    The various state highway routes around this time (signed Route 2 along Santa Monica, signed Route 26 along Olympic, signed Route 42 along Manchester) demonstrate that state was unsure what was the best route for the freeway. In a 1953 article on the Los Angeles freeway system, CHPW addressed this:

    "One of the glaring defects indicated by the construction progress map is that it shows no activity upon a freeway extending westerly from the central business area of Los Angeles. We have long recognized the need for such freeway, but the overloaded condition of the Hollywood Freeway during its brief life of service has made it necessary that we reappraise the situation to determine whether a Santa Monica Freeway extending to the west, or a Venice-Olympic Freeway farther to the south, should be given priority, or whether it would be possible to determine upon some compromise route giving equal or better service. We have recently completed the initial phases of a traffic study for the entire western area, and are at the present time supplementing this by a vehicle use survey which will give us origin and destination data having a direct bearing upon the problem. Additional finances, if provided by the Legislature, should permit us to crystallize our thinking into action in providing the best facility possible for this very important area in this metropolitan district."

    As history bore out, the choice was closer to the Venice-Olympic routing (but even a little S of that).

    The first portion of I-10 (signed pre-1964 Route 26, LRN 175) to be adopted as freeway was a 9.6 mi segment between US 101 (Santa Ana Freeway) and La Cienega Blvd. This occured on 5/21/1954. The remainder of the route, from LaCienega to Lincoln Blvd (Route 1, LRN 60), was adopted as a freeway on November 15, 1956. The route recognized that one east-west freeway would have to serve West Los Angeles for many years, and the route chosen was one that provided the maximum traffic service. Work on the route was expected to start in 1957.

    I-10 Under ConstructionThe KCET website has a nice article on the construction of I-10, with lots of nice pictures (including a larger version of the one to the right, which shows the I-10 under construction in West Los Angeles. The article notes how the original routes were planned along Santa Monica Blvd or Olympic (and later Venice, with a onetime proposal for a raised freeway along the median of Venice). It noted the current route was developed to avoid protesting neighborhoods. The articles notes that construction crews broke ground on the first segment of the newly renamed Santa Monica Freeway over the Los Angeles River on June 17, 1957. Land acquisition for the freeway's right-of-way began in 1958, and by 1961 families -- living in houses the state had purchased and then rented back to their occupants -- received orders to move. On December 4, 1961, Governor Edmund "Pat" Brown dedicated the first, easternmost segment of the freeway as crews began work on the route's West Los Angeles and Santa Monica portions. At its western extreme, the freeway required a 7,000-foot-long, 20-foot-deep cut before reaching the Pacific Coast Highway's McClure Tunnel. By October 1964,it had been extended west to La Cienega Boulevard, and on January 29, 1965--several years after residents in the freeway's path were displaced--the 4.5-mile segment between La Cienega and Bundy Drive opened. The final segment through Santa Monica opened on January 5, 1965. The article does not, alas, explain the design decision to build the freeway as a raised structure as opposed to a depressed freeway (which might have been less expensive).

    [Reece at 405-10]The I-405/I-10 interchange was designed by Marilyn Jorgenson Reece, who was the first woman in California to be registered as a civil engineer, and the first woman to serve as an associate highway engineer for the state. She died in May 2004. A South Dakota native who earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1948, Reece moved to Los Angeles with her parents shortly after graduation. The same year, she went to work for the State Division of Highways, which later became Caltrans, as a junior civil engineer in Los Angeles. In 1954, after six years of required experience to sit for the Professional Engineer's Exam, Reece became the state's first fully licensed female civil engineer. In 1962, she received the Governor's Design Excellence Award from Gov. Pat Brown for the San Diego-Santa Monica freeway interchange. Shortly after, Reece became the Division of Highway's first woman resident engineer for construction projects. The three-level San Diego-Santa Monica freeway interchange, which opened in 1964, was the first interchange designed in California by a woman engineer. With the aid of an early computer program, Reece plotted the curves of its ramps and soaring, 75-foot-tall bridges to allow automobiles to transition between freeways at 55 miles per hour -- a significant speed increase over the tolerance of earlier interchanges, like downtown's Four Level, which required cars to slow to 35 miles per hour. Reece told The Los Angeles Times in 1995 that she put her "heart and soul into it" and that she designed the interchange with aesthetics in mind. "It is very airy. It isn't a cluttered, loopy thing," she said, adding that specifications to keep traffic moving at high speeds necessitated the long, sweeping curves. The image to the right, excerpted from One Hundred Years of Progress, shows Reece and Thomas McKinley. However, the book referred to Reece as an Associate Engineer, with McKinley as a Resident Engineer, but did indicate that Reece supervised the I-405/I-10 interchange project. The view in the photo is looking N from what is roughly the National offramp on the I-405; you can see a sign for the Route 26 Olympic Blvd NB offramp that was removed as part of the project (likewise, the SB National offramp was removed)

    Some nice pictures of the construction of this route may be found on the KCET website. Additional pictures may be found in the USC Digital Archives.

    Construction on the Santa Monica Freeway portion of I-10 was completed in January 1966.

     

    Status

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #3805: Planning, design, and preliminary engineering of on/off ramp system at intersection of I-10 and Roberston/National Blvds. in Culver City. $2,000,000.

     

     

    Naming

    This portion is named the "Santa Monica Freeway"; the first segment opened in 1961 and the freeway was completed in 1966. It was named by the State Highway Commission on April 25, 1957. The name derives from the western terminus of the segment in the City of Santa Monica. The name Santa Monica may have been applied by the second Portolá expedition on May 4, 1770, the day of holy Monica, mother of Saint Augustine. It appears in 1839 in the land grant San Vicente y Santa Monica, on which the modern city was founded in the early 1870s. Sierra de Santa Monica was recorded in 1822.

    The route was originally to have been named the "Olympic Freeway"; that name was changed during planning in 1958. That probably came from the original Route 26 routing along Olympic Blvd, which itself was renamed from 10th Street in honor of the 1932 Olympics.

    The portion of I-10 within the city limits of Santa Monica is named the "Ricardo A. Crocker Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Santa Monica Police Officer Ricardo A. Crocker, a Major in the United States Marine Corps, who was killed by a rocket propelled grenade explosion on May 26, 2005 while conducting combat operations against enemy forces in Iraq. Ricardo A. Crocker was assigned to Detachment D, Third Civil Affairs Group, attached to the Fifth Provisional Civil Affairs Group II MEF and had previously served in Operation Iraqi Freedom II with the Third Civil Affairs Group from February through September 2004, and was redeployed to Iraq with the Fifth Provisional Civil Affairs Group in February 2005. At the time of his death, Ricardo A. Crocker, known as "Rick," was 39 years of age and a 10-year veteran of the Santa Monica Police Department. Ricardo A. Crocker held the rank of Captain in the United States Marine Corps when he was hired by the Santa Monica Police Department on July 21, 1995, subsequently being promoted to the rank of Major in the Marine Corps. As an Officer for the Santa Monica Police Department, Ricardo A. Crocker served in uniform patrol and was a member of the Crime Impact Team and Special Entry Team, serving as the primary emergency medical technician for the Special Entry Team, and was a rifle team member and rifle instructor. While in his final assignment to the Police Activities League, Officer Crocker made an indelible impression on the youth of Santa Monica by teaching preparatory courses for the Scholastic Aptitude Test, leading the book club, and implementing hiking and camping programs that exposed these youth to his two passions: education and nature. Ricardo A. Crocker was an excellent officer and ambassador for the Santa Monica Police Department as well as an excellent protector of the community; was a consummate caring professional who represented the highest standards and traditions of law enforcement and the Santa Monica Police Department. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 20, Resolution Chapter 94, on 7/12/2007.

    The segment between I-405 and Route 110 is named the "Rosa Parks Freeway". Rosa Parks (born February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama) is considered the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement". This fame started when she was arrested on December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Her arrest was the impetus for a boycott of Montgomery buses, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and joined by approximately 42,000 African Americans for 381 days. On November 13, 1956, the United States Supreme Court ruled that Montgomery's segregation law was unconstitutional, and on December 20, 1956, Montgomery officials were ordered to desegregate buses. Rosa Parks refusal to surrender her seat in compliance with Montgomery's segregation law inspired the civil rights movement, which has resulted in the breakdown of numerous legal barriers and the lessening of profound discrimination against African Americans in this country. Her courage and conviction laid the foundation for equal rights for all Americans and for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Rosa Parks was the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was an active volunteer for the Montgomery Voters League. She cofounded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 1987 with Elaine Easton Steele to motivate and direct youth to achieve their highest potential through the "Pathways to Freedom" program. She is the recipient of many awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian, and the first International Freedom Conductor Award from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. The naming was on the occation of Rosa Park's 89th birthday. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 134, Chapter 2, 28 January 2002.

    In additional to the other designations noted, Route 10 (in its entirety) has been officially designated the "Christopher Columbus Transcontinental Highway", although on the east coast, the corresponding sign is not on I-10 (it is on I-40). It acquired this name in Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 106, Chapter 71, in 1976. According to reports in 2003, the sign on I-10 has disappeared.

     

    Named Structures

    The I-405/I-10 Interchange is named the "Marilyn Jorgenson Reece Memorial Interchange". It was named in honor of Marilyn Jorgenson Reece, who was born and raised in North Dakota and earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1948. Ms. Reece moved to Los Angeles with her parents shortly after graduation in 1948, and went to work for the State Division of Highways, which later became the Department of Transportation, as a junior civil engineer in Los Angeles. After six years of experience required to sit for the Professional Engineers Exam, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece became the state's first fully licensed female civil engineer in 1954. In 1962, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece received the Governor's Design Excellence Award from Governor Pat Brown for designing the I-10/I-405 interchange. Ms. Reece became the Division of Highway's first woman resident engineer for construction projects shortly after receiving that award. The three-level I-10/I-405 interchange designed by Marilyn Jorgenson Reece opened in 1964 and was the first interchange designed in California by a woman engineer. Urban critic Reyner Banham, author of Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies, admired the wide-swinging curved ramps connecting the two freeways, and wrote that the I-10/I-405 interchange "is a work of art, both as a pattern on the map, as a monument against the sky, and as a kinetic experience as one sweeps through it". During her 35-year career, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece's projects included serving as senior engineer for the completion of Route 210 through Sunland in 1975—at the time, the largest construction project the Department of Transportation had ever awarded—at $40 million. After retiring in 1983, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece taught engineering classes at Cal State Long Beach; and during Women's History Month in 1983, the Los Angeles City Council honored Marilyn Jorgenson Reece for making significant contributions to the city. In 1991, Marilyn Jorgenson Reece received life membership in the American Society of Civil Engineers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 72, Resolution Chapter 96, on 8/15/2006.

    The eastbound portion of the National Boulevard overpass is named the "Culver City Police Lieutenant Curtis Massey Memorial Overpass". This segment was named in honor of Lieutenant Curtis Massey of the Culver City Police Department, who died on January 28, 2009 when his unmarked vehicle was struck head-on by a vehicle driven the wrong way on I-10 near National Boulevard in the City of Los Angeles. Massey was born on June 1, 1967, the son of Stephen Massey and Padric Davis of Pacific Palisades. Massey attended Saint Matthews School and Palisades High School, graduating as part of the class of 1985. In those early years, Massey was a role model to many and was instrumental in the lives of young children through his job as a summer camp counselor at St. Matthews Day Camp. Massey furthered his education at Northern Arizona University where he received his bachelor's degree. In addition to his collegiate work, Massey devoted himself, again, to helping others as part of the Flagstaff EMT unit. That devotion to helping others led Massey to a career in law enforcement. Accordingly, Massey graduated from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Academy in 1992. Massey devoted his life to his family and the public, particularly at-risk youths. Beginning as a patrol officer, Lieutenant Massey served with distinction during his 17-year career in a variety of assignments within the Culver City Police Department; most notably with the juvenile section of the detective bureau, specifically the juvenile diversion program. During that time, Massey's admirable drive to protect and serve the public, and his dedication to duty, led Massey to be honored as "Officer of the Year" three times within the Culver City Police Department. Massey was also a recipient of the "Medal of Valor," the department's highest honor. Lieutenant Massey had recently been assigned as the supervisor of the juvenile detective section, and spent a lot of his own free time working with at-risk children. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 124, 8/30/2010, Resolution Chapter 109.

    The Western Avenue overcrossing at I-10, in the City of Los Angeles, is officially named the Reverend Cecil "Chip" Murray Overcrossing. It was named in honor of the Reverend Cecil "Chip" Murray, who has generously and successfully served the community and congregation of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles since 1977, when the congregation counted 300 active members and those members received his vision to ignite a fire in their hearts to be a church that extends beyond its walls. As of 2004, the congregation numbered over 17,300 members, and works through more than 40 task forces, including task forces related to health, substance abuse, homelessness, emergency food and clothing, general and specialized housing, tutoring, entrepreneurial training, and employment services. These task forces and programs provide notable assistance and services that include assistance and services for the physically handicapped, dwelling assistance for low-income individuals and those with HIV/AIDS, transportation for the elderly and handicapped, education, health care and AIDS/tobacco ministries, tutoring, legal aid, computer training, job training and placement, economic development and loan programs, a business incubator for multimedia production, a prison ministry, environmental programs, food programs, youth programs, choir and music programs, and other activities. Reverend Murray served 10 years on active duty in the United States Air Force as a jet radar intercept officer in the Air Defense Command and as a navigator in the Air Transport Command, was decorated in 1958 with the Soldier's Medal of Valor following an explosion in his two-seated fighter, and retired as a reserve major in the United States Air Force. He is a native of Florida and has received an undergraduate degree from Florida A&M University, has received a doctorate in religion from the School of Theology at Claremont, and has lectured and been an adjunct professor at Iliff University, Seattle University, the School of Theology at Claremont, Fuller Seminary, and Northwest Theological Seminary. Reverend Murray retired as Senior Pastor of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church on September 25, 2004. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 152, chaptered September 1, 2004. Resolution Chapter 175.

    The I-10/I-110 interchange is officially named the "Dosan Ahn Chang Ho Memorial Interchange". Dosan Ahn Chang Ho was born in a small village in Korea in 1878. He arrived in America in 1902 with his newlywed wife, Lee Hae Ryon (Helen Ahn). As the steamship approached Hawaii, Ahn Chang Ho resolved to stand tall above the sea of turmoil existing at that time in Korea, and resolved to call himself "Dosan," which means Island Mountain. While living in San Francisco, Dosan organized the San Francisco Social Meeting on September 23, 1903, and initiated a social reform movement that was in desperate need in the Korean American society. As an accomplished orator and leader at the age of 24, Dosan guided his countrymen to form a respectable community for Koreans in the United States. He and his family settled in Riverside, California, in March 1904 and worked tirelessly to unite Korean Americans and to revive the patriotic spirit of the Korean people. He moved to Los Angeles in 1913, where the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion now stands, and played a significant role in the growth of the Korean American community in the City of Los Angeles. Together with his friends, he formed the Gonglip-Hyuphoe, or Cooperative Association, which would become the basis for the Korean National Association, which Dosan later led as president. This association maintained structure within the Korean American community, both to build character of individuals and to enhance the image of Koreans within the mainstream community. Dosan also established one of the first English schools for Koreans so that his fellow Korean Americans could learn English and the Bible. He helped to relieve blighted living conditions for his fellow Korean Americans in the Greater Los Angeles area, and became the spiritual leader of the Korean Independence Movement. Following Japan's annexation of Korea in 1910, Dosan formulated the basis for the Provisional Government of Korea, and conceived Hung Sa Dahn (Young Korean Academy), an organization to develop leaders for the independence movement, in 1913. In 1915, Dosan promoted the development of the Korean language program for second generation Korean Americans as an opportunity to pass on Korean traditions, values, and identity to younger generations. Through his work, Dosan Ahn Chang Ho had an enormously beneficial impact and significance on the history of modern Korea and Korean Americans. Dosan's philosophy and teachings serve as a model for Korean American youths. The interchange was named in honor of the 100th Year Centennial Immigration for Korean Americans to the United States. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 104, Chapter 160, September 11, 2002.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    Approved as chargeable Interstate on 9/15/1955. At one time, Caltrans proposed this as I-12, with I-10 being assigned to what is currently I-8.


  2. From Route 101 near Mission Road in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River via the vicinity of Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Indio, and Chiriaco Summit, and via Blythe.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    (105-110)In 1963, this routing was defined as "Route 110 in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River via the vicinity of Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Indio, and Shaver's Summit, and via Blythe, and includes that portion of the Colorado River highway bridge (near Ehrenburg, Arizona) which is within the State of California. The department may contract with the State of Arizona, for and on behalf of the State of California, for the maintenance of such bridge." Route 110 referred to a stub route downtown (in particular, the portion between the two segments of Route 10).

    In 1968, the stub Route 105 and Route 110 were elimated, and the portion from Route 101 to Route 5 was transferred from former Route 110. This changed the routing to "(b) Route 101 near Mission Road in Los Angeles to Route 5. (c) Route 5 in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River...", reflecting the slight discontinuity at Route 5.

    In 1984, the two segments were comined, and the text about Arizona was removed, giving the definition of "(b) Route 101 near Mission Road in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River via the vicinity of Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Indio, and Chiriaco Summit and via Blythe."

    Near the intersection of I-10 and former Route 31, Ontario had a racetrack. Between 1971 and 1980, this track hosted Indycar/CART, NHRA, and NASCAR events; this racetrack was designed in a similar shape to the more famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway and was intended to bring a second venue of major auto racing into the Los Angeles area (the first was the now-defunct Riverside International Raceway, which is located at the I-215/Route 60 junction). This track also hosted the "Questor Grand Prix", an allstar event attempting to prove whether American formula racers were superior to those from Europe. After Ontario Motor Speedway went bankrupt in 1980, the track was demolished and the land is now owned by ChevronTexaco. It was near where Ontario Mills now stands, and might explain the car-named streets between Haven Avenue and old Route 31: Dusenberg Drive, Ferrari, Mercedes Lane, Porsche Way, and Concours, and the car named streets west of Haven Avenue: Triumph Lane, Shelby Street, Shelby Lane, Lotus Avenue, Jaguar Way.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield Interstate Shield This segment was made up of four distinct parts:

    1. Between Route 5 and San Bernardino, this was LRN 26. The initial portion of the route, from Colton to Route 86 near Indio, was added in the Second Bond Act of 1916. The route was extended between the eastern border of Los Angeles and Colton (utilizing Garvey and Holt Ave) in 1931. In 1933, LRN 26 was formally extended into Los Angeles to meet US 101; this extension was likely along Ramona Blvd (see below). This portion was signed as US 60/US 70/US 99. In 1935, a routing was added that ran along Valley Blvd between the eastern city limits of Los Angeles and El Monte; this was later added to LRN 77. It appears that the Valley Blvd routing was used for US 70, and the Ramona Blvd routing was used for US 60, although they may have been co-signed... and either might have been cosigned with US 99. This segment starts at the San Bernardino Split, which was the end of US 60 and US 70, and junction with US 99 and US 101. The grade separated interchange was originally completed in 1943; it was later modified by the addition of the flyover in 1954. In 1996, the flyover was removed due to earthquake safety. Note: By 1953, it was noted that the Ramona Freeway name was used in Los Angeles County; in San Bernardino County, it was the "US 70-99 Freeway".

    2. Between San Bernardino and Indio, this was also part of LRN 26. This portion of LRN 26 was defined in 1916, and was signed as US 60/US 70/US 99.

    3. Between Indio and Mecca, this was part of LRN 64. This segment of LRN 64 was defined in 1931. This portion was signed as US 60/US 70.

    4. Between Mecca and the Arizona state line, this was LRN 64. The portion between Mecca and Blythe was defined in 1919, and the extension to the Arizona State Line in 1931. It was also signed as US 60/US 70. Originally, the routing ran through Box Canyon between Mecca and Shavers Summer (Chiriaco Summit). In 1935, the Indio Cutoff opened running directly from Shaver Summit (Chiriaco Summit) to Indio (eliminating the canyon route and saving almost 10 miles). This was a rerouting of LRN 64.

      In Blythe, this was Hobsonway, and used a different bridge to cross the Colorado. The current bridge was built in 1960, with improvements in 1974. No remnants of the original bridge remain.

    The Ramona Expressway portion of I-10 started its development shortly after the US Highway system was adopted in 1926. At this time, California began development of US 99. In Monterey Park, Garvey Avenue was designated as part of the link of US 99. However, westerly of Atlantic Boulevard, the roadway ended. The six-mile gap would be filled by a new roadway that would connect Garvey Avenue near Atlantic Boulevard with Aliso Street at Mission Road to be named Ramona Boulevard. Ramona Boulevard was along terrain that was suitable for grade separations, with the Pacific Electric Railroad tracks to the north and a hillside to the south. In order to accommodate the new highway, six bridges that already spanned the tracks were extended or reconstructed and two new grade separations were constructed near Monterey Pass Road. Near the west end of the project, the Macy Street (now Cesar E. Chavez Avenue) bridge, which had been built in 1910, provided another grade separation over the tracks and could accommodate a roadway without reconstruction. Thus, there were nine bridges in all with no at-grade crossings and virtually no local property access. It was opened to traffic on April 20, 1935 and was called an “airline” route by the State because motorists could “fly” without intersectional conflict at 50 miles per hour. In 1944, Aliso Street, the westerly extension of Ramona Boulevard was widened and reconstructed. This project, which was undertaken by the City, included a grade separation at Mission Road. In coordination with this project, the State widened Ramona Boulevard easterly to the East City Limit and constructed a four-foot wide median. Upon the completion of these projects, Ramona Boulevard was renamed Ramona Parkway. In 1954, shortly after Ramona Parkway was extended easterly of the City, it was renamed the San Bernardino Freeway. In 1970, most of the 1935 and 1944 improvements were demolished to make way for the San Bernardino Freeway and Express Busway.
    [The historical information above on the Ramona Expressway was derived from "Transportation Topics and Tales: Milestones in Transportation History in Southern California" by John E. Fisher, P.E. PTOE, available at http://ladot.lacity.org/pdf/PDF100.pdf]

    On July 15, 1952, the California Highway Commission adopted I-10 as a freeway. I-10 became part of the Freeway & Expressway System in 1959 and is also part of the Interstate Highway System. I-10 is included in the State Interregional Road Systems and is further classified as a “High Emphasis” and “Gateway” route. The entire length of I-10 is included in the National Highway System, the Department of Defense Priority Network, and the Strategic Highway Corridor Network. The 1990 Federal Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) identifies I-10 as a “National Network” route for STAA trucks. The Federal Functional Classifications for I-10 are Rural Principal Arterial and extension of a Rural Principal Arterial into an urban area.

    According to the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, the first segment of the "Ramona Freeway" opened on Nov. 16, 1954, with a segment running 13.4 miles from Kellogg Hill in Pomona to Archibald Avenue in Ontario. The freeway to the west between El Monte and Covina was still being built, and work hadn't even started east of Ontario. The routing was contentious. Pomona fought the route for five years, wanting it to go north around the San Jose Hills in the vicinity of Arrow Highway. Ontario and Upland also battled over their part of the highway, finally agreeing on a route that tight-roped their joint boundary. Farther west, El Monte was involved in a bitter dispute over the route that cut the city in half. As for the naming, "San Bernardino Freeway" was bestowed on November 24, 1954, just eight days after the opening ceremonies. Originally called the Ramona Freeway, Pomona interests had pushed for the route to be named for their city, which it bisected. Instead, the State Highway Commission announced the route would be known as the San Bernardino Freeway, even though the completed freeway wouldn't even go to downtown San Bernardino, unless you made a left turn on US 395 (now Route 15) just east of Colton. They suggested that the future "foothills" route (I-210 Freeway) would be better named for San Bernardino.

    In Blythe, the first bridge to cross the Colorado replaced an existing cable ferry, established in 1870 between Ehrenberg AZ and Blythe CA. The new bridge, opened in 1928, was a toll bridge constructed by Riverside County, and was not part of the state highway system (although it was an extension of LRN 64). It had five steel truss spans each 190' long, for a total length of 950'. The roadbed was 20' wide, and it was 30' above the water. In 1931, the state purchased the toll bridge.

     

    Status

    According to an article in the San Gabriel Tribune, the I-10/I-605 interchange was designed in 1964 and was supposed to accommodate traffic until 1984. No major changes have been undertaken there since it was built. An average of 438,000 cars use the interchange each day, making the intersection the 19th busiest in the state. According to a 1999 study by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the area directly around the interchange has one of the highest air-pollution- related cancer risk factors in the San Gabriel Valley. One of the main problems with the intersection is what engineers call "the weave,", where vehicles transferring from the I-10 west to the I-605 south have to weave across cars getting on the I-605 south from the I-10 east. Cars from both directions have only about 150 feet to change places with each other. Additionally, drivers who want to transfer from the southbound I-605 to the eastbound I-10 east have to take a left turn when leaving the I-605. According to Caltrans, the prospects for improvements are bleak. Caltrans is considering building a flyover from the I-605 south to the I-10 east, which would eliminate the weaving-in section. The current budget crisis rules out state funding for the immediate future, and it was not appoved for funding in the 2007 CMIA allocations.

    In October 2013, the CTC considered for future approval of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will widen and improve the existing Cedar Avenue interchange on I-10 at Cedar Avenue in the community of Bloomington. The project is fully funded with federal and local dollars. The total estimated cost is $62,730,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2014-15.

    I-10 HOV San Berdoo to RedlandsIn March 2013, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR for a project that would improve and widen a 24-mile segment of I-10 from two miles west of the Los Angeles/San Bernardino County Line in the city of Pomona to Ford Street in the city of Redlands. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated cost is $539,817,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2019-20. Three alternatives are being considered: (1) No-build; (2) One High Occupancy Vehicle Lane in each direction; (3) Two Express Lanes in each direction.

    Live Oak Canyon ProjectA project has been approved for future consideration of funding to construct the Live Oak Canyon Interchange in the City of Yucaipa (TCRP #59). [April 2002 Agenda Item 2.2c.(3)]. The overall project is to reconstruct the Live Oak Canyon Road Interchange on Route 10 and construct the 14th Street Bridge over Wilson Creek. Construction of the 14th Street Bridge was completed in December 2003. In 2007, the CTC considered a request for modification of funding on this project, which would place the completion date in FY 2008/09

    In 2007, the CTC recommended using the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) to fund widening of the ramps and addition of aux. lanes at Cherry, Citrus & Cedar ($30,325K requested, $19,233 recommended) and a WB mixed flow lane from Live Oak Cyn to Ford St ($38,186K requested; $26,500K recommended).

    In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County is to reconstruct the Cherry Avenue Interchange, widen the overcrossing, and construct roadway improvements in the city of Fontana. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. Total estimated cost is $76,900,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12.

    In March 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County is to reconstruct the Citrus Avenue Interchange, widen the overcrossing, and construct roadway improvements in the city of Fontana. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local funds. Total estimated cost is $54,458,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11.

    [Tippicanoe Interchange]In May 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the I-10/Tippecanoe Avenue Interchange, construct auxiliary lanes on Route 10, and improve local traffic operations. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes federal demonstration and local funds. The total estimated cost is $80,021,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to paleontological resources and community character and cohesion to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to paleontological resources in the project area will be mitigated by preparing and implementing a Paleontological Mitigation Plan.

    In April 2012, the CTC amended the CMIA funding: On I-10, $10,000,000 to the San Bernardino Association of Governments for 08-SBd-10 25.3/26.3 I-10/Tippecanoe Interchange Improvements-Phase 1. In the cities of Loma Linda and San Bernardino, from 1 mile west of Tippecanoe Avenue to Tippecanoe Avenue. Construct eastbound auxiliary lane, eastbound off ramp, retaining walls, reinforced concrete box culvert, and widen San Timoteo Bridge.

    In December 2012, the CTC amended the CMIA baseline agreement for the I-10 Tippecanoe Avenue Interchange Improvements (Phase 1) project (PPNO 0154F) to update the project funding plan to include additional local funds. The construction contract was advertised in June 2012. When bids were opened, the lowest bid came slightly over the Engineer’s Estimate. The contract was awarded in July 2012 with a total project allotment of $13,787,000, an increase of $787,000 over the approved budget. This shortfall was covered with a combination of local and federal funds. The revised funding plan reflects the addition of these funds.

    In October 2010, it was reported that Caltrans is repaving about 9 miles of I-10 between Route 60 freeway and Thedore Street.

    Riverside Ave InterchangeIn April 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to reconstruct the existing Riverside Avenue interchange at Route 10 to improve interchange and mainline operation and safety. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) and the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes federal and local funds. Total estimated project cost is $34,000,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved project baseline agreement.

    In March 2011, it was reported that crews are scheduled to demolish the Riverside Avenue bridge in early May 2011. Once the five-lane bridge comes down, the contractor has a deadline to replace it with a nine-lane overpass, part of a plan to increase traffic flow in the area. The construction agreement includes a requirement that the contractor reopen the new bridge seven months after it closes the old one. A penalty will be assessed for opening late, and a bonus will be paid if the overpass opens earlier than expected. The larger bridge will give drivers two turn lanes in each direction from which to turn onto I-10. There will be three northbound lanes and two southbound lanes for through traffic. Entrance and exit ramps at Riverside Avenue and I-10 are also being widened, to accommodate more vehicles. Most of the money for the $32 million project is coming from the city's redevelopment agency and California's Prop. 1B transportation bond program.
    (Source: Press Enterprise, 3/20/11)

    [010 TCRP 58]There are plans to widen this route from Route 210 to Ford Street in Redlands (TCRP #58) [September 2002 Agenda Item 2.1c.(2)]. The overall project will add one mixed flow lane in the median in each direction on I-10 from Orange Street to Ford Street in the City of Redlands. The proposed widening will upgrade I-10 within the limits of the project from three lanes to four lanes in each direction. This is now scheduled for completion in August 2007. However, as of June 2008, PS&E for the project had been completed with $277,000 TCRP savings. SANBAG then requested to redistribute these funds to Construction in order to cover material and labor cost increases. Differing site conditions also contributed to an increase in construction costs. The project schedule and funding plan were updated.

    In December 2010, it was reported that there are plans to add an additional lane between Yucaipa and Redlands. San Bernardino Associated Governments officials approved an $18.7 million contract with Beador Construction Co. for the new eastbound lane, stretching from Live Oak Canyon Road in Yucaipa to Ford Street in Redlands. When completed in 2013, I-10 in the county will have at least four lanes in both directions. The contract means construction of the new lane could start sometime in early 2011 and take about two years to finish. Engineers predicted the construction would cost around $33.5 million, but costs have dropped in recent years because of the economic recession, and like others, the I-10 project's bids came in lower than expected.

    In April 2012, the CTC authorized $1,000,000 for the locally administered State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) I-10 HOV Lane Extension (PPNO 0134K) project, plus $10,560,000 from other sources. The funding is to complete planning and engineering activities. The project will add an HOV lane from Haven Avenue to Ford Street in Ontario and Redlands.

    In April 2012, it was reported that construction is planned for I-10 at Tippecanoe Avenue and Anderson Street to improve traffic flow to Loma Linda. Specifically, the interchange is being reworked to improve access to key destinations, including Loma Linda University Medical Center, the San Bernardino International Airport and the Jerry Pettis Memorial Veterans Hospital. The Loma Linda Academy and retail centers on Harriman Place and Hospitality Lane would also be easier to reach. The actual construction would entail (a) widening the freeway eastbound off-ramp to a two-lane exit, expanding to four lanes at the intersection; (b) bBuilding new westbound ramps that enter and exit at Harriman Place; (c) eliminating the current traffic signal at the Tippecanoe westbound ramps; (d) widening the Anderson/Redlands Boulevard intersection to include two through-lanes, two left-turn lanes and one right-turn lane in each direction; and (e) creating an auxiliary lane on eastbound I-10 between Waterman and Tippecanoe to improve merging traffic. The environmental studies have been completed and the project is currently (as of April 2012) in the right-of-way acquisition phase. The work be completed by Spring 2014 and will mean traffic detours, closures and slowdowns. Funding for the work will come from federal, state and local governments, including Loma Linda. There will be $47.8 million in federal funds; $2.5 million in state funds and $26 million in local funds.
    (Source: Redlands Patch, April 1, 2012)

    TCRP Project #61 will reconstruct the Apache Trail Interchange E of Banning in Riverside County. As of September 2005, this project is inactive.

    In May 2011, Caltrans replaced standard median near Cabazon with removable K-rails. The new barriers were installed 1.2 miles east of Main Street in Cabazon and 1.7 miles west of Haugen-Lehmann Way, in Whitewater. The new medians allow CHP officers to redirect traffic to opposite lanes or onto side streets where they can re-enter the freeway at a point past a crash. Riverside County and state officials are also planning two bypass roads through Cabazon and Banning that could serve as alternate routes. Caltrans is also planning addition median breaks in 2012 with more K-rail barriers.

    Additional information was provided in October 2012. The plan is for a series of street improvements and additions would form the backbone of an I-10 bypass system in the San Gorgonio Pass that could ease crippling traffic jams when the freeway has to be shut down. Caltrans will install gates in the freeway medians in case crews need to shift east- and westbound traffic to one side of the freeway. Also, Caltrans and CHP will partner with the county on message signs and other improvements that will help police redirect traffic and give drivers accurate knowledge of traffic jams when they happen. The County agreed to work on four separate road connections in the Pass and contribute other resources during traffic jams. South of I-10, the county would oversee the most critical link — connecting Hathaway Street in Banning to Apache Trail near Cabazon via a two-lane road. The project, commonly called the Westward Avenue extension because one option would bring Westward eastward to Apache, will cost about $20 million because of the terrain. South of the freeway, the county will work to find the money to extend Garnet Road to Whitewater Cutoff Road. North of the freeway, the county will look for the money to extend Tamarack Road from Mesquite Road to Whitewater Cutoff Road northeast of Route 111. Lastly, it will partner with Morongo tribe officials to extend Seminole Road eastward to Rushmore Avenue. Combined, the road extensions, freeway median improvements and adding changeable message signs, video cameras and other systems to the freeway are estimated to cost $40 million.
    (Source: Press-Enterprise, 10/15/12)

    In January 2013, it was reported that Caltrans completed installation of Changable Message Signs over I-10 just east of Blythe and just east of Desert Center. Crews have also installed 61 vehicle detection systems covering the entire roughly 133-mile stretch of freeway between Banning and Blythe. The detection systems monitor speed and traffic volume, processing the data and posting it on the the freeway message signs to give motorists' real- time estimates on how long it will take to travel a route. The total cost of the systems and signs was just over $2.1 million. The freeway additions were made as part of the state's obligations under the "Interstate 10 Lifeline Emergency Action Plan," which Riverside County is directing. The Board of Supervisors unanimously agreed in October to partner with the state and tribal governments on implementing the plan, inspired by a series of massive traffic jams on I-10 that left motorists' stranded in the last several years, most recently on Feb. 12, 2012.
    (Source: Palm Desert Patch, 1/25/13)

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $1,826,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs near Cabazon at East Channel Stubby Wash Bridge (#56- 0168L) that will widen and rehabilitate two bridges to extend the service life of the structures.

    In April 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Riverside County will reconstruct the Indian Avenue/I-10 interchange and construct roadway improvements, including a sidewalk on the west side, a bike lane in each direction, realignment of the eastbound and westbound direct on- and off-ramps, and widening of 20th Avenue and Garnet Avenue. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program, and includes local and federal funds. Total estimated cost is $35,098,000, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

    In April 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Riverside County will reconstruct the Palm Drive/Gene Autry Trail interchange and construct roadway improvements, including a sidewalk and bike lane in each direction. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local and federal funds. Total estimated cost is $38,603,000 capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. In July 2009, the CTC approved an amendment regarding reconstruction of the interchange. The project will modify the existing Route 10/Palm Drive Interchange from diamond configuration to a partial cloverleaf configuration with east and westbound loop entrance ramps and will construct a bridge structure over Route 10 to accommodate additional lanes. This is TCRP Project #146.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to reconstruct an existing interchange at I-10 and Date Palm Drive in Cathedral City. Additional improvements will include widening the existing overcrossing from two to six lanes and the addition of bike lanes and sidewalks. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project cost is $31,721,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. A Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed; the project will involve construction activities resulting in visual effects that will be addressed by aesthetic treatments. Construction activities will also occur in an area containing the Coachella Valley milk-vetch, a federally listed plant species of concern.

    [Bob Hope Interchange]In November 2006, the CTC considered a route adoption to construct a roadway extension and a new eight lane overcrossing over I-10, near Bob Hope Drive. In the vicinity of the proposed Bob Hope Drive interchange, I-10 is an eight-lane divided freeway. The existing Ramon Road interchange was constructed in 1961. The proposed project will construct a new spread diamond interchange with Bob Hope Drive. The interchange will be located approximately 0.4 miles west of the existing Ramon Road interchange and will be a new six-lane overhead structure over the Union Pacific Railroad and an eight-lane overcrossing structure over I-10. The existing Ramon Road eastbound on-ramp will remain operational while the other four ramps at Ramon Road will be removed. Keeping the eastbound on-ramp at Ramon Road will improve the operating conditions at the local street intersections. The proposed improvements will increase the capacity of the existing interchange and improve interchange operations. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project cost is $53,700,000. This project requires full oversight by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) since it is a federally-funded project on the interstate system that involves the reconstruction of an interchange and is greater than $1.0 million. A FHWA field operations engineer reviewed the project on April 12, 2006. A Modified Access Report was approved by FHWA on February 15, 2002. This project is consistent with the Regional Transportation Plan and the Riverside County General Western Coachella Circulation Plan. As a “Gateway Interchange” to Rancho Mirage, all improvements, including aesthetic treatment, landscaping, and restoration of natural areas will be based on the conceptual plans provided by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians. A public information meeting was held in November 2001 to solicit public input. It is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2007-2008.

    In March 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the westbound ramps at the I-10/Monterey Avenue Interchange in the community of Thousand Palms. The project is programmed in the Proposition 1B State-Local Partnership Program. The total estimated cost is $12,699,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. In May 2013, the CTC allocated $2,800,000 for this project.

    2007 CMIA. A number of projects on I-10 in Los Angeles County were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding. These projects included HOV lanes, Puente Ave. to Citrus St. ($173 million); HOV lanes, Citrus St. to Route 57 ($191.5 million); and the I-10/I-605 transition connector ($70.5 million). In San Bernadino County, a request for bridge widenings in preparation for HOV lanes ($107,931K) was also non-recommended. None were recommended for funding. This has been a point of contention in the inland empire as there is significant congestion on the I-10

    In November 2010, the CTC approved transfer of CMIA funds allocated to the I-405 HOV project that were replaced with ARRA funds to be used for the Citrus St. to Route 57 HOV lanes.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #391: Interchange improvements at the I-10 and Indian Ave Interchange in Palm Springs. This was noted in the Desert Sun. $2,200,000.

    • High Priority Project #881: Pedestrian Bridge for North Atlantic Blvd., Monterey Park. $480,000.

    • High Priority Project #1369: Interchange improvements at Palm Drive and I-10. $2,200,000.

    • High Priority Project #1387: Reconstruct interchange at I-10 and Riverside Avenue to improve traffic in Rialto. $1,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #1680: Implement Grove Avenue Corridor/I-10 interchange improvements in Ontario. $2,400,000.

    • High Priority Project #2051: Improve interstates and roads part of the Inland Empire Goods Movement Gateway project in and around the former Norton Air Force Base. $20,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #3098: Construct Cypress Avenue over-pass to separate I-10 and Union Pacific Railroad tracks in Fontana. $2,400,000.

     

     

    Business Routes
    • Montclair and Ontario: Holt Blvd (former business route)
    • E of I-15 along Valley Blvd through Colton (marked at least once).
    • Indio: Indio Blvd. This doesn't dump you easily back onto I-10 on the E side; you end up on Route 111 and then take the Route 86S expressway. This routing is old US 99.
    • Blythe: Hobsonway. This ends on the AZ side with an odd loop under I-10 at the AZ border for E bound traffic.

     

    Naming

    The portion of I-10 located in California is designated the "Pearl Harbor Memorial Highway". This segment was named in remembrance of approximately 2000 brave and patriotic survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor. On December 7, 1941, just before 8 a.m. on a Sunday morning, the first wave of bombers began the attack on Pearl Harbor that led the United States into World War II. It was an unforgettable day for those who lived through it and one that called America forth to defend itself. In so doing, it inspired a generation of Americans to rise and lead the defense of freedom around the world. Overall, on December 7th, 1941, 2,335 people were killed in action and 1,178 were wounded; the majority of the Pacific Fleet that was damaged and sunk in the attack was at one time home ported in California. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 8, Resolution Chapter 72, on 7/12/2005.

    The portion of this freeway from US 101 to Route 215 is named the "San Bernardino Freeway"; the first segment opened in 1943 and the last segment in 1957. It was named by the State Highway Commission, based on its primary destination of San Bernardino. San Bernardino was first recorded as a place name in 1810, and derives from the name of the Italian saint of the 15th century. In 1842 it was applied to a land grant, on a part of which Mormons in 1851 started a settlement, the nucleus for the present city. The mountains are mentioned before 1850, the county was named in 1853, and the national forest in 1893.

    The portion of I-10 from eastbound milepost marker 10 LA 22.31 to westbound milepost marker 10 LA 22.33 in the City of Alhambra is officially named the "the CHP Officer Johnny R. Martinez Memorial Highway". This segment was named in honor of Officer Johnny Ramirez Martinez, who was born June 14, 1948, to Bill and Vera Martinez, in Fayette, North Carolina. Officer Martinez graduated from Chaffey High School in 1966, and joined the United States Marine Corps shortly after graduation. He proudly served the Marine Corps for four years and achieved the rank of sergeant as a Vietnam veteran. Prior to becoming a patrol officer for the Department of the California Highway Patrol (CHP), Officer Martinez was employed by Alcoa Aluminum of Corona as an X-ray technician. Officer Martinez graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy on December 1, 1977, and upon graduation, was assigned to the East Los Angeles area, where he proudly served for four years. Officer Martinez, badge number 8813, was killed in the line of duty on October 2, 1981. While clearing debris from the San Bernardino Freeway, he and his partner were gunned down by two paranoid robbery suspects. Although he was rushed to the hospital, Officer Martinez succumbed to his injuries and died at Alhambra Community Hospital. Officer Martinez was known for being a man of principle and integrity. He was a loyal family man, a wonderful father and husband , and a dedicated officer. His greatest joys were his wife, his children, and riding motorcycles. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 159, 8/23/2010, Resolution Chapter 104.

    The portion of I-10 between South Marguerita Avenue (milepost marker 23.12) and South Almansor Street (milepost marker 24.31), in the City of Alhambra, is named the "Officer Ryan Stringer Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Ryan Stringer, who was born in the City of Los Angeles and grew up in the City of Whittier, graduating from Whittier Christian High School. Officer Stringer attended Fullerton College and Rio Hondo Community College after working for his father's construction business for several years. Officer Stringer entered the Police Academy at Rio Hondo and graduated in February of 2009 and was sworn in as an Alhambra Police Officer on February 26, 2009. During his two-year tenure with the Alhambra Police Department, Officer Stringer worked in the Field Services Division, Patrol Section. Officer Stringer showed his friendship, camaraderie, teamwork, and competitive drive as a member of the Alhambra Police Department's Baker-to-Vegas Challenge Cup Relay Team. Officer Stringer displayed his determination and will to succeed during his recovery from a life-threatening motorcycle accident that occurred in July 2010. After spending several weeks in a coma and being temporarily disabled, Officer Stringer made a full recovery within six months and returned to active duty as a police officer in January 2011. Unfortunately, on July 10, 2011, at approximately 2:30 a.m., Officer Ryan Stringer was killed in a tragic accident at the age of 26 while responding to a possible robbery in the rear parking lot of 100 North First Street in the City of Alhambra. Coworkers, friends, and family recall Officer Stringer's good-natured disposition, healthy sense of humor, strong sense of adventure, and desire to excel at whatever he set out to do. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    The portion of this freeway between the intersection with Route 19 in the City of Rosemead and the intersection with I-605 in the City of Baldwin Park is officially named the "El Monte Police Officer Donald Ralph Johnston Memorial Highway". It was named in honor of El Monte Police Officer Donald Ralph Johnston. Officer Donald Ralph Johnston was born in Wichita, Kansas, on November 11, 1954. When he was four, his parents moved the family to La Puente, California where his father Corky joined ranks of the El Monte Police Department. Officer Johnston graduated from La Puente High School in 1972, and became the proud father of a son Eric who later continued the Johnston legacy with the El Monte Police Department (3rd generation). In 1985, Officer Johnston became a reserve officer for the City of El Monte until he became a full-time officer in 1988. Officer Johnston volunteered in the Adopt-a-Cop program at Wilkerson School. On January 9, 1990, Officer Johnston responded to a call of a person trying to pass a bad check at a bank, and was shot and paralyzed by the suspect after selflessly pushing a bystander out of harm's way. He was awarded the City of El Monte Medals of Valor, Distinguished Service, and Purple Heart, received commendations and awards from the United States Congress, Governor Deukmejian, Governor Wilson, the California State Legislature, the Office of Attorney General, the County of Los Angeles, the American Police Hall of Fame, and numerous other local and national organizations. On January 29, 1991, Officer Johnston returned to work at the El Monte Police Department in a wheelchair, and was assigned to the Community Relations Unit as a detective handling missing persons investigations, all the while continuing his community involvement by mentoring disabled students. In 1993, Officer Johnston secured a position as the first regular police helicopter observer, and was able to experience the excitement of street patrol once again. Officer Johnston's work was so exceptional that he received many accolades for his service; and in 1997, Officer Johnston developed the S.T.R.I.V.E (Success Through Recognizing Individual Volition and Excellence) program, and visited schools to tell his story and inspire students to overcome their own obstacles. After retiring from active duty on September 1, 2001, Officer Johnston refused to quit, and with his letter of retirement, submitted a request to stay with the El Monte Police Department as a reserve officer, despite his declining health and chronic pain. Officer Johnston passed away on November 22, 2002. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 71, Resolution Chapter 115, 8/25/2003.

    The portion of I-10 from the Baldwin Park Overcrossing to the Sunset Avenue Undercrossing in the County of Los Angeles is officially named the CHP Officers Harold E. Horine and Bill Leiphardt Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol Officers Harold Horine and Bill Leiphardt, who made the ultimate sacrifice while performing their sworn duty. Specifically, on May 13, 1978, California Highway Patrol Officers Harold Horine and Bill Leiphardt were struck by a drunk driver while investigating a roadside crash involving an abandoned vehicle. Officer Harold Eugene Horine was born in 1939 in El Monte, California. Officer Horine, badge number 6686, graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in 1968 and, upon graduation, was assigned to the Baldwin Park Area Office, where he proudly served for approximately 10 years. Officer William Ferris Leiphardt, Jr. was born in 1939 in La Junta, Colorado. Officer Leiphardt served in the United States Air Force from 1958 to 1964 before deciding to join the Department of the California Highway Patrol. Officer Leiphardt, badge number 4911, was assigned to the Baldwin Park Area Office, where he proudly served for approximately 12 years. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 57, Resolution Chapter 5, 2/3/2014.

    Originally, the segment that opened in 1943 (from US 101 to Route 215) was named the "Ramona Expressway". Ramona was the central character in the Helen Hunt Jackson novel Ramona, which was a seminal novel in the early 20th century in creating the romance of California.

    The portion of I-10 between Vincent Avenue and Grand Avenue in the City of West Covina is officially named the "West Covina Police Officer Kenneth Wrede Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Kenneth Wrede of the City of West Covina Police Department, who was killed in the line of duty on August 31, 1983, in the City of West Covina while responding to a call regarding a suspicious person. Officer Wrede was a longtime resident of Southern California and a 1975 graduate of Katella High School in Anaheim. He received his associates degree in criminal justice from Fullerton College and was pursuing a bachelor's degree at the time of his death. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 104, Resolution Chapter 102, on 8/16/2006.

    The portion of Route 10 from Post-mile 12.25 to Post mile 15.25 in the City of Fontana is named the “Deputy Frank M. Pribble Memorial Highway”. This segment was named in memory of San Bernardino County Sheriff Deputy Frank Marion Pribble. Deputy Pribble joined the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department in March 1965 and was assigned to the Fontana Station. Deputy Pribble was very well respected and well known throughout the department in this large county, particularly in Fontana where he worked for 10 years and served as a deputy sheriff. Deputy Pribble was a mentor to the new deputies assigned to the Fontana Station and many deputies would wait after their shifts for a chance to ride with Pribble, who would take the new officers around the perimeter of the Fontana beat and carefully instruct them on the hazards of the area. On July 6, 1975, Deputy Pribble was on patrol in a rest area on Route 10 for a suspect wanted in a drive-by shooting when he was fatally shot in the line of duty. Even during the last moments of his life, Deputy Pribble exhibited selfless regard for life when he told a woman who was trying to assist the wounded officer to "Get out of the way; I don't want you people to get hurt." Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 96, Resolution Chapter 72, on 7/3/2008.

    The portion of I-10 in the City of Ontario between the 6th Street overcrossing and the intersection of Euclid Avenue as the "Officer Richard Hyche Memorial Freeway". It was named in honor of Officer Richard Hyche, a four-year veteran of the Ontario Police Department. Officer Hyche was fatally wounded on October 15, 1975, and at the time was the first Ontario police officer killed in the line of duty since 1957. Officer Hyche was born on April 27, 1944, in Long Beach; served in the United States Marine Corps; attended the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Academy; worked at the Glenn Helen Maximum and Minimum County Jail Facility for two years; and was hired as a police officer by the Ontario Police Department on July 23, 1971. Officer Hyche was killed by a single gunshot by a suspect being sought in connection with a murder that had occurred the previous day at the Pepper Tree Motel. The suspect was later convicted and sentenced to life in state prison, and subsequently escaped from prison, fled to Montana, and was eventually killed after a deadly crime spree. Officer Hyche is still remembered today by former supervisors and colleagues as an excellent officer who was always outgoing and friendly, who enjoyed his work as a police officer, and who had a strong commitment to his fellow officers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 95, Resolution Chapter 93, on 8/11/2006.

    The portion of Route 10 in the vicinity of Texas Street, milepost marker 30.377, to South Wabash Avenue, milepost marker 34.288, in the County of San Bernardino, is named the "CHP Officer Thomas P. Coleman Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of CHP Officer Thomas Philip Coleman, who was born October 6, 1976, in West Covina, California, to Robert and Janice Coleman. He was one of five children that included two boys, Thomas and Joseph, and three girls, Jennifer, Kathleen and Mary. He graduated from Damien High School in 1994 and joined the United States Marine Corps in September of 1996. Prior to joining the California Highway Patrol (CHP), Thomas P. Coleman served as a Marine Security Guard for the United States Marine Corps. In 2003, CHP Officer Thomas P. Coleman, badge number 17338, graduated from the CHP Academy and was assigned to the Altadena Area Office. After 60 months of service in the Altadena area, Officer Thomas P. Coleman was transferred to the San Bernardino area and was assigned to motorcycle duty on June 12, 2008. On June 11, 2010, Officer Thomas P. Coleman was in pursuit of a traffic violator when his motorcycle collided with a semitrailer truck. Shortly after the accident, Officer Thomas P. Coleman succumbed to his injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene. Officer Coleman was a hard-working, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people he worked with. He was known for being a loyal family man and a wonderful father and husband. His greatest joys were playing with his children, riding his motorcycle, hiking, and watching football and movies. Officer Thomas P. Coleman was admired for his passion for his career, his "smirk," his sense of humor, and his hugs. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 25, Resolution Chapter 89, on September 15, 2011.

    The portion of I-10 between Pepper Avenue and Cedar Avenue in the City of Rialto is named the "Sergeant Darrell Keith Lee, Sergeant Gary Wayne Wolfley, and Officer Sergio Carrera Jr. Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Sergeant Darrell Keith Lee, Sergeant Gary Wayne Wolfley, and Officer Sergio Carrera Jr., the only three officers lost in the line of duty between the founding of the Rialto Police Department in 1911 and 2012. All three police officers died from injuries sustained during violent confrontations while performing their respective duties as California police officers. Sergeant Darrell Keith Lee, of the City of Rialto, passed away on July 24, 1970, when he suffered a heart attack as a result of an injury sustained in the line of duty. Sergeant Lee was born to Minnie Price (Lee) of Texas and Glenn Lee of Oklahoma on February 7, 1932, in Southard, Oklahoma. Sergeant Lee attended Rialto Junior High and San Bernardino High School in the cities of Rialto and San Bernardino, respectively. Sergeant Lee served in the United States Marine Corps in Japan and Korea. He joined the Rialto Police Department in 1958, and was promoted to sergeant in 1963. Sergeant Lee was a lifelong resident of Rialto, California, and was a great public speaker who enjoyed speaking with all the local groups. Sergeant Gary Wayne Wolfley, of the City of Rialto, passed away on March 3, 1986, when he was shot while handling a call for service in the City of Rialto. Sergeant Wolfley was born to William and Patricia Wolfley on September 22, 1955, in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Sergeant Wolfley attended Eisenhower High School in the City of Rialto. During his teenage years, he was a Rialto Police Cadet and a member of the Civil Air Patrol. Sergeant Wolfley worked for the City of Rialto as a police dispatcher until he realized his dream of becoming a police officer in 1977. In March 1985, he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant. Sergeant Wolfley was well-known in the community and was always there to help his friends and family. Sergio Carrera Jr., of the City of Rialto, passed away on October 18, 2007, when he was shot and killed during a raid for illegal drugs. Officer Carrera was born to Sergio Carrera Sr. and Aurora Lopez on March 5, 1978, in Lynwood, California. Officer Carrera attended Valley View High School in Moreno Valley, California, and San Bernardino Valley College, where he completed his police academy training in 2003. Officer Carrera was a four-year veteran of the Rialto Police Department and a member of the SWAT team. Officer Carrera was a loving husband and wonderful father, was well-known for his contagious sense of humor and laughter, and was uncomplicated and straightforward in his relationships, which allowed him to accept people for who they were. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    The portion of this freeway from the Beaumont Avenue/Avenue/Route 79 exit to the Sunset Avenue Exit, in the County of Riverside is named the "CDF Firefighter Chris Kanton Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) Firefighter Chris Kanton, at 23 years of age, who died in the line of duty on Saturday, August 6, 2005, in the County of Riverside. While responding to storm-related accidents, CDF Firefighter Chris Kanton was traveling in a CDF fire engine on I-10 east of Route 60 when the engine left the highway and traveled down a steep embankment, struck several trees, and came to rest on the roadway below. CDF Firefighter Chris Kanton, graduated from high school in 2000 in Paso Robles, California; attended and graduated from the Allan Hancock Fire Academy in Santa Maria, California; and subsequently completed HAZMAT training and served on the HAZMAT team at Station 81 in Bermuda Dunes and other locations as a full-time firefighter. He later transferred to Station 58 in Moreno Valley, where he served as a Firefighter II. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 10, Resolution Chapter 64, on 7/3/2007.

    The portion of this freeway in San Bernardino and Riverside counties is named the "Redlands Freeway". This is because the route traverses the City of Redlands.

    The portion of I-10 between Main Street and Verbenia Avenue in Cabazon, in the unincorporated area of the County of Riverside as the "CHP Officer Ambers O. “Sonny” Shewmaker Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Ambers O’Neal “Sonny” Shewmaker, who was born October 10, 1941, to Earl and Eva Shewmaker in Santa Maria, California. California Highway Patrol Cadet A.O. “Sonny” Shewmaker entered the Department of the California Highway Patrol Academy on March 3, 1969, and upon graduation was assigned to the Riverside area office and was later transferred to the Banning area office where he spent the remainder of his career. On November 23, 1969, Officer “Sonny” Shewmaker, stopped a vehicle for speeding. Unbeknownst to him, the car was stolen and the driver was wanted for an earlier robbery in Riverside, California. As Officer Shewmaker was using his radio, the suspect shot him point blank in the head. Officer Shewmaker was taken to a hospital, but succumbed to his injuries on the morning of November 24, 1969. In 1970, the Yucaipa Valley Little League created the “Sonny Shewmaker Award for Best Sportsmanship” in honor of Officer Shewmaker’s dedication to helping the youth of Yucaipa Valley. Oddly enough, in 1973, the recipient of this award was a 12-year-old Brian Rezendes, who many years later married Officer Shewmaker’s sister-in-law, Kim. It was named in recognition of Officer Shewmaker’s contributions and sacrifice in serving and protecting the citizens of California. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    The portion of I-10 in San Bernardino County between mile markers 25.26 and 29.82 is named the "Officer James M. Goodman Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer James M. Goodman, who was killed in the line of duty on June 3, 2004. He was traveling west on his department motorcycle in the City of Redlands, attempting to overtake a vehicle he believed to be involved in a hit and run accident, when a van, traveling north on Nevada Street, entered the intersection from the south directly in the path of Officer Goodman. Officer Goodman was unable to avoid a collision and broadsided the van, and thereafter succumbed to the injuries he received from the traffic collision. He was born on September 11, 1955, in Martinez, California, was raised in the Bay Area, and graduated in 1973 from Pinole High School. He honorably served in the United States Army for nearly eight years and dedicated four years to reserve duty, ultimately achieving the rank of sergeant. Officer Goodman joined the California Highway Patrol on January 9, 1984. After successfully completing his training at the California Highway Patrol Academy, he reported to the Redwood City area on May 24, 1984. On August 20, 1985, Officer Goodman was awarded a California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training Basic Certificate; and on April 1, 1987, Officer Goodman transferred to the San Jose area. On May 2, 1989, he was assigned to the Oakland area; on October 1, 1993, he was assigned to the Golden Gate Division; on June 26, 2000, he was assigned to the Oakland area; and on March 1, 2001, he was assigned to the San Bernardino area. Over the years, Officer Goodman earned numerous certificates of achievement in the field of law enforcement. While stationed in the Oakland area, Officer Goodman was the first officer to arrive on scene after the Loma Prieta Earthquake occurred on October 17, 1989; and on the day of the earthquake, Officer Goodman helped to release a driver trapped under a collapsed portion of I-880 by crawling through a small space only accessible by removing several pieces of his safety equipment. For three hours, while the highway continued to settle from aftershocks, he and his colleagues worked to free the driver. In honor of this heroic act, he and two other officers were awarded the Medal of Valor by Former Governor Pete Wilson. Additionally, on November 25, 1989, Officer Goodman received a Meritorious Award from the office of the Mayor of the City of Oakland for his valor, gallantry, and courage during the 1989 earthquake. Officer Goodman made significant contributions to traffic safety and to the motoring public while serving at each assigned area and served for 20 years as a sworn peace officer for the California Highway Patrol. He was known by his fellow officers for his outstanding dedication to the department and to the protection of the citizens of our state. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 41, Resolution Chapter 72, on 7/3/2007.

    The portion of this freeway from a point just west of the Route 111 cutoff in the Palm Springs area to a point at the bottom of the grade east of the City of Coachella is named the "Sonny Bono Memorial Freeway". As if you didn't know the story, Sonny Bono left his boyhood home in Detroit, Michigan for Hollywood, California at a young age to become a star in show business. His quest led him to a laborer's job as a meat truck driver and deliveryman and then in promotions for a record company. Sonny Bono parlayed those jobs into an opportunity to showcase his ability as a showman and entertainer. Those talents eventually led to a career of fame as a recording and television star as part of the duo Sonny and Cher. Later, Sonny Bono pursued another dream as a restaurant owner in Palm Springs. His concern on behalf of his community as a businessman led him to public service eventually leading to his election as Mayor of Palm Springs in 1988. Sonny Bono's public service career eventually led him to the halls of the Congress of the United States in 1994 as the Representative from the Coachella Valley and Western Riverside County areas of southern California. Sonny Bono's achievements as a Congressman brought needed national attention to the environmental needs of the Salton Sea; he also worked on behalf of bringing the needed federal funding for transportation and infrastructure projects for the Coachella Valley, leading to funding for significant highway improvements throughout the Coachella Valley and Riverside County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 25, Resolution Chapter 58, June 4, 2001.

    The portion of this freeway near Indio in Riverside County between the Jefferson Street and Indio Boulevard interchange and the junction with Route 86 is officially named the "Doctor June McCarroll Memorial Freeway." Doctor June McCarroll arrived in California in 1904, when she moved to Indio in order to place her ailing husband in a health camp for persons infected with tuberculosis. In Indio, she traveled, at first by horse and buggy and later by horseback, to practice medicine on five Indian reservations. She later became the doctor retained by the Southern Pacific Railroad to treat its employees in the Coachella Valley. In later life, she expressed regrets that younger doctors were seemingly unable to function without modern hospitals and other conveniences when she had sometimes operated on kitchen tables, explaining "I would clear off the table, tie the patient down, and administer the anesthetic". She is also credited with starting the first library in the Coachella Valley. She is also known for her role in initiating the painting of centerlines upon streets and highways. The Riverside County physician, who was known as Dr. June, was driving home one day in 1917 when a truck forced her car off the road. Convinced that lines would help drivers stay safely on the correct sides of the road, McCarroll took her idea to Riverside County's Board of Supervisors and Chamber of Commerce. When they didn't do anything, she set an example by painting a mile-long, 4-inch-wide white stripe down the center of Indio Boulevard, near her home. In 1924, after she and the Indio Women's Club and the California Federation of Women's Clubs proposed it, the idea of painting a centerline on state highways was adopted by the California Highway Commission. The credit for painting white traffic arrows on pavement, incidentally, apparently belongs to George S. Hinckley, a traffic engineer who first used them in the plaza in front of Redlands City Hall in 1910. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 58, Chapter 105, August 17, 2000.

    The portion of this freeway extending five miles to the east and five miles to the west of mile marker number 84 in Riverside County, located east of the Chiriaco Summit, is officially designated the "Veterans' Memorial Freeway". This is in honor of the veterans that have served the United States from the state of California. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 137, Chapter 104, in 1994.

    This portion of this freeway from Route 86 near Indio to I-5 in Los Angeles is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

    The I-10 and Date Palm Drive Memorial Overcrossing in the County of Riverside is named the "CHP Officer Mark Thomas Taylor Memorial Overcrossing." It was named in memory of Officer Mark Thomas Taylor. who was born on May 17, 1959, to Thomas Claude and Lola Dee, in Benton Harbor, Michigan. Officer Taylor graduated from Benton Harbor High School in 1977 and joined the United States Marine Corps shortly thereafter. Officer Taylor served in the United States Marine Corps from 1977 to 1984 and achieved the rank of sergeant (E-5). After an honorable discharge, he applied to the CHP. On March 18, 1985, Officer Taylor graduated from the CHP Academy and was assigned to the Indio area. Officer Taylor married in 1977, and had a daughter in 1978. Officer Taylor was killed in the line of duty on November 26, 1987, during a routine traffic stop. While issuing a citation, the offender’s car was struck by another vehicle. The impact propelled Officer Taylor onto the highway, where he was struck by the same vehicle that had originally collided with the offender’s car. Officer Taylor was a dedicated officer, family man, and a best friend to many. He was known for his sense of humor and for making people smile. In his spare time, he enjoyed spending time with family and friends, being outdoors, running, traveling, and playing ping pong. Officer Taylor was admired for his honesty, loyalty, and determination. He always accomplished what he set out to do and never gave up. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    In additional to the other designations noted, Route 10 (in its entirety) has been officially designated the "Christopher Columbus Transcontinental Highway", although on the east coast, the corresponding sign is not on I-10 (it is on I-40). It acquired this name in Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 106, Chapter 71, in 1976. According to reports in 2003, the sign on I-10 has disappeared.

     

    Named Structures

    The I-5/I-10/Route 60/US 101 interchange, commonly referred to as the East Los Angeles Interchange, is named the “Medal of Honor Recipient , Eugene A. Obregon, USMC, Memorial Interchange” (it was originally named the “Marine Private First Class Eugene A. Obregon Interchange”). This interchange was named in memory of Medal of Honor Recipient Eugene A. Obregon, USMC. While serving as an ammunition carrier with Golf Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during the Korean War, PFC Obregon was killed in action on September 26, 1950. The machine-gun squad of Private Obregon was temporarily pinned down by hostile fire; and during this time, he observed a fellow marine fall wounded in the line of fire. Armed only with a pistol, Private Obregon unhesitantly dashed from his cover position to the side of the fallen marine. Firing his pistol with one hand as he ran, Private Obregon grasped his comrade by the arm, and despite the great peril to himself, dragged the marine to the side of the road. Still under enemy fire, Private Obregon was bandaging the marine's wounds when hostile troops began approaching their position. Quickly seizing the wounded marine's rifle, Private Obregon placed his own body as a shield in front of the wounded marine and lay there firing accurately and effectively into the approaching enemy troops until he, himself, was fatally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. By his courageous fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty, Private Obregon enabled his fellow marines to rescue the wounded marine. By fate and courage, Private Obregon is one of the valiant Mexican Americans to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor for bravery. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 109, Resolution Chapter 66, on 6/26/2008.

    Bridge 53-1367, the I-10/I-215 separation in Los Angeles county, is named the "James A. Guthrie Memorial Interchange". It was built in 1960, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 57, Chapter 193, in 1970. James A. Guthrie was a presidential elector from California in 1956. He served from 1943 to 1967 as a member of the California Highway Commission.

    Bridge 54-592, the I-10/Route 210 interchange in San Bernardino county, is designated the "Chresten Knudsen Interchange". It was built in 1962, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 21, Chapter 47, in 1991. Chresten Knudsen served as a member of the Redlands City Council and in the 1960's was appointed by Governor Ronald Reagan to the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board.

    Bridge 54-909 on I-15, the I-15/I-10 separation in San Bernadino county near Ontario, is named the "Daniel D. Mikesell Interchange". It was built in 1975, and was named in Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, Chapter 84, in 1980. San Bernardino County Supervisor Daniel D. Mikesell exerted exceptional effort beginning in 1955 to have the Devore Cutoff included in the California Freeway and Expressway System.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Wildwood, in San Bernardino County 1 mi W of Calimesa.

    • Brookside, in Riverside County, 3 mi. W of Beaumont.

    • Whitewater, in Riverside County 1 mi W of Whitewater.

    • Cactus City, in Riverside County 15 mi E of Indio.

    • Wiley's Well, in Riverside County 15 mi W of Blythe.

     

    National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

    Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign Holt Boulevard in Ontario was part of the Pikes Peak Ocean-to-Ocean Highway, which stretched between New York and Los Angeles, running along Holt Blvd in Ontario. In 1920, Holt Blvd was the main route linking Los Angeles to Palm Springs, according to the city of Ontario. At that time Holt Blvd was a 4-lane highway, and it was long before the 10 or 60 freeways were built. Also during the time of the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway, (about 1912) paved roads were rare and driving in a car for more than 10 miles was considered to be a great adventure .

    The portion of this segment between Indio (via Mecca) and Blythe was part of the "Hassayamph Trail". This portion is also named the "Sunkist Trail".

     

    Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes have been constructed from Hebert Street in downtown Los Angeles to I-710 in El Monte. This is called the "El Monte Busway". It opened in January 1973, requires three or more occupants, and is in operation 24 hours a day. In April 2008, the federal government offered Los Angeles County $213 million to convert these lanes to special, congestion-pricing toll lanes. In the proposed deal, the federal money would go toward the purchase of about 60 high-volume buses that would use the new toll lanes. That would free up MTA funds for creating the toll lanes. CTC approval would be required.

    In June 2009, it was reported that Los Angeles County transportation officials were considering charging solo motorists 25 cents to $1.40 a mile to use the high occupancy toll lanes proposed for the Harbor and San Bernardino freeways. Officials plan to use congestion-based pricing, which means that tolls will rise and fall in direct relation with the flow of traffic — a formula designed to keep individual motorists, carpools, van pools and buses in the high occupancy lanes at a minimum of 45 mph, even during rush hour. Under the proposed pricing schedule, 25 cents a mile would be charged when demand is lowest for the lanes, while the maximum, $1.40 a mile, would be the toll during the busiest part of the day. Before the toll schedule is finalized in late July 2009, the public will be allowed to comment on the prices at five community hearings this month in Los Angeles, Torrance, Carson, El Monte and West Covina. The yearlong demonstration project has received $210.6 million in federal funds to help reduce traffic and improve bus service along the two freeways -- the largest congestion-easing grant awarded to any city to date, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. Caltrans and the MTA will use the money to convert existing carpool lanes to high-occupancy toll lanes on 14 miles of the San Bernardino Freeway from Alameda Street to the 605 Freeway interchange and on 11 miles of the Harbor Freeway from Adams Boulevard to the Artesia Transit Center at 182nd Street. A second high-occupancy toll lane will be added in both directions to the San Bernardino Freeway. The project also calls for automated toll plazas, road improvements and additional transit services, including 57 clean-fuel buses for both freeway corridors. The entire project is expected to be completed by December 2010.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Los Angeles County will convert High Occupancy Vehicle lanes to High Occupancy Toll lanes. The project was covered environmentally with two separate environmental documents, one document for the Route 110 and Route 105 portion of the project and one document for the Route 10 and Route 10S portion of the project (note: it is unclear what Route 10S is). The project is programmed in the State-Local Partnership Program and includes federal and local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $69,300,000 for capital and support. The project will not involve a substantial amount of construction activities but due to public interest and controversy associated with toll lanes and the large amount of public outreach and education involved with the project it was decided to prepare a higher level of environmental document.

    The specific plan is to convert the HOV lanes on the 14-mile stretch of the I-10 between Alameda Street and the I-605 for a one-year pilot project. In March 2011, it was reported that the HOT lanes are expected to be complete in 2012. They will allow solitary drivers to enjoy the perks of car-pool lanes by paying a minimum of 25 cents per mile and a maximum $1.40 per mile. Tolls will be adjusted according to traffic conditions to maintain a free-flowing level of traffic. Buses, motorcycles, vanpools and carpools that currently use the car-pool lanes will not be charged a toll. General purpose lanes will continue to remain toll-free. Construction for the project, which is funded with a $210 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, will begin in summer 2011.

    In July 2011, ground was officially broken on the ExpressLanes project that will convert existing carpool (HOV) lanes along the Harbor Freeway (I-110) and the San Bernardino Freeway (I-10) to High-Occupancy Toll (HOT) lanes. The one-year demonstration program will covert 11 miles of existing carpool lanes on the I-110 (Harbor Freeway Transitway) between the Artesia Transit Center/182nd Street and Adams Boulevard near downtown Los Angeles and 14 miles on the I-10 (El Monte Busway) between Union Station/Alameda Street and the I-605 to toll lanes. During the construction phase of the program, workers will be installing a host of power and utility support units needed for the operation of 27 dynamic message signs (DMS) along the two freeway corridors as well as the installation of 22 toll transponder readers and approximately 145 signs to provide commuters information on the ExpressLanes and the tolls being charged to use the lanes. In addition, along the I-10 (San Bernardino Freeway) an additional toll lane will be constructed in each direction between the I-605 and the I-710 freeways to add capacity along that heavily traveled corridor. Currently, there is only one carpool lane operating in each direction along the El Monte Busway. None of the general purpose lanes will be taken away to covert the lanes and make the improvements. Construction crews also will widen Adams Boulevard off-ramp, add a right turn lane on Adams Boulevard, construct a pedestrian bridge, and re-stripe Figueroa Way in Los Angeles in support of the ExpressLanes project.

    Portions of I-10 are being converted to have HOT (High Occupancy/Toll) lanes--specifically, the I-10 El Monte Busway HOV lanes (I-605 to Alameda St). In June 2012, it was reported that drivers (even HOV drivers) will require a transponder for those routes. The so-called “suggestion pricing” ranges between a minimum toll per mile of $0.25 and a maximum of $1.40 and will debut first in on I-110 in November, followed by I-10 early in 2013. Caltrans said the toll prices will fluctuate according to traffic levels in the carpool lane. Information on the project and the transponders can be found at the Metro ExpressLanes website.

    The HOT lanes on I-10 opened for traffic on 2/23/13. Fastrak transponders are required. Fees for noncarpoolers will be assessed between 25 cents and $1.40 a mile, depending on the volume of traffic, according to Metro. The average toll is expected to be around $6, Metro said. Motorists riding the regular lanes are not charged.

    HOV lanes also exist from the San Bernardino County line to I-15. They require two or more people, and operate 24 hours a day.

    HOV lanes are planned as follows:

    1. from I-405 to I-110
    2. from Baldwin to I-605
    3. from I-605 to Puente Avenue
    4. from Puente Avenue to Citrus Avenue
    5. from Citrus Avenue to Route 57
    6. from Route 57 to the San Bernardino County line.

    [TCRP Project 40]Segments (3), (4), and (5) are the subject of District 7 TCRP Project #40, which plans to add HOV lanes to this segment, for a total cost of $210 million. The estimated completion date is 1Q2008 for the segment from I-605 to Puente Ave, 1Q2010 for the segment from Puente to Citrus, and 1Q2012 for the segment from Citrus to Route 57. A negative EIR (a good thing) came back in February 2004. However, due to funding, the schedule has been pushed back. In April 2006, the CTC considered requests approval of a TCRP project application amendment for $56,900,000 in new TCRP funding that would program $56,900,000 in TCRP funds to Construction; redistribute $4,194,000 from Plans, Specifications, and Estimates (PS&E) to Construction; redistribute $757,000 from Right of Way to Construction; and update the project funding plan. The project will provide for approximately 11.2 miles of HOV lanes that will effectively double the people carrying capacity of a mixed flow lane thus alleviating some of the congestion by encouraging and supporting the use of shared ride modes. The project will be delivered in three segments, with Segment 1 (Route 605 to Puente Avenue) fully funded with TCRP, STIP-RIP, and Proposition C funds. The current schedule is: Phase 1: FY 2002/2003; Phase 2: FY 2010/2011; Phase 3: FY 2010/2011; Phase 4: FY 2013/2014. Some of these were submitted for funding from the 2007 CMIA allocations, but none were recommended for approval. In April 2008, CalTrans and LACMTA requested amending TCRP Project #40 to designate LACMTA as a co-applicant agency, to update the project schedule and funding plan, as well as approval of an Assembly Bill (AB) 1335 LONP to use $61,851,000 in Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds in lieu of TCRP funds for the Construction phase of this project. The amended schedule shows completion of phases 3 and 4 in FY 2011/2012.

    In January 2011, it was reported that land was being acquired in West Covina for the widening of the route for these lanes. This included some property at the West Covina Mall.

    In August 2012, the CTC accepted the environmental document, and Findings of Fact, and approved for future consideration of funding, a project that will add one High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction on I-10 from Puente Avenue to Route 57 in Los Angeles County. The overall project is being constructed as two smaller projects on adjoining segments of I-10. The I-10 HOV Lanes from Puente Avenue to Citrus Street project (PPNO 0309N) will construct HOV lanes from Post Mile (PM) 33.2 to PM 37.2. The total estimated cost is $137,657,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13. The I-10 HOV Lanes from Citrus Street to SR-57 project (PPNO 0310B) will construct HOV lanes from PM 37.5 to PM 42.4. The total estimated cost is $234,861,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2013-14. Both projects are programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The scope of the overall I-10 HOV Lane Project, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2012 STIP. Note: This is roughly Segments 2 and 3 in the map above.

    In June 2011, it was reported that Caltrans completed the reconstruction of the Baldwin Park Boulevard Bridge in order to accommodate new carpool lanes that are being built on I-10. This is part of a project that is adding two miles of carpool lanes, east and west, on a portion of the I-10 freeway from the San Gabriel Valley Freeway (I-605) to Puente Avenue. Metro programmed $6.3 million to fund the reconstruction of the bridge, a component of the $169 million HOV lane project.

    In August 2012, the CTC approved $10.3 million to fund the ongoing extension of a carpool lane on I-10 from I-605 to Route 57 through Baldwin Park, West Covina and Pomona. The extra allocation will help pay for the project's second phase, a $184 million extension of the carpool lanes from Puente Avenue in Baldwin Park to Citrus Avenue in West Covina. Construction on the second phase of the project should begin in the spring of 2013. The first phase of the carpool lane project is being constructed from the El Monte busway to about Puente Avenue in Baldwin Park. A third phase will take the carpool lane over Kellogg Hill, from Citrus Avenue to Route 57. That will cost about $192 million.

    In December 2013, Caltrans officially dedicated 2.2 miles of HOV lanes in both directions on I-10 between I-605 and Puente Avenue in Baldwin Park.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing HOV lanes from Puente to Route 57 in LA County.

    As of late 2007, there were some proposals to convert some future lanes E of I-605 into High-Occupancy Toll (HOT) lanes.

    There are also some HOV lanes in the segment from I-15 to Route 57, but these do not extend for the entire portion.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 38 near Redlands to Route 62 near Whitewater. [Deleted by Senate Bill 169, August 26, 2013. Chapter 173.]

     

    Blue Star Memorial Highway

    The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.10] Between the east urban limits of San Bernardino-Riverside and the Arizona state line.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 10 R2.16 8.90
Los Angeles 10 8.96 9.32
Los Angeles 10 9.39 14.36
Los Angeles 10 14.57 14.94
Los Angeles 10 17.98 18.39
Los Angeles 10 S0.00 18.39
Los Angeles 10 18.39 19.71
Los Angeles 10 20.03 20.95
Los Angeles 10 21.01 21.68
Los Angeles 10 24.05 24.50
Los Angeles 10 24.80 25.90
Los Angeles 10 26.71 28.18
Los Angeles 10 28.25 30.74
Los Angeles 10 30.99 31.28
Los Angeles 10 31.28 31.65
Los Angeles 10 31.65 32.04
Los Angeles 10 32.04 32.08
Los Angeles 10 32.08 32.73
Los Angeles 10 32.73 32.77
Los Angeles 10 32.77 34.55
Los Angeles 10 35.04 38.15
Los Angeles 10 38.52 38.85
Los Angeles 10 41.58 42.34
Los Angeles 10 43.33 43.93
Los Angeles 10 43.97 45.74
Los Angeles 10 45.86 47.73
Los Angeles 10 47.92 48.27
San Bernardino 10 0.00 5.44
San Bernardino 10 5.63 6.30
San Bernardino 10 6.73 7.43
San Bernardino 10 11.74 19.73
San Bernardino 10 19.81 20.41
San Bernardino 10 20.48 R21.39
San Bernardino 10 R21.46 R22.40
San Bernardino 10 R22.44 R22.85
San Bernardino 10 R22.89 R23.56
San Bernardino 10 R23.97 30.06
San Bernardino 10 30.15 32.72
Riverside 10 6.98 8.21
Riverside 10 8.90 9.12
Riverside 10 9.60 9.83
Riverside 10 10.18 10.46
Riverside 10 10.75 12.98
Riverside 10 13.05 R14.81
Riverside 10 R151.88 R152.42
Riverside 10 R152.52 R153.50
Riverside 10 R153.93 R154.50
Riverside 10 R155.93 R156.35

 

Post 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield Prior to the designation of this routing as Interstate 10 on July 1, 1964, a routing similar to the current Route 10 routing had the designation of US 70. US 70 began in downtown Los Angeles, followed Valley Blvd, San Bernardino Road, Garvey-Holt Blvd, and Holt Street into Ontario, and thence to points east. Between Los Angeles and Palm Springs, the routing was cosigned with US 99. Portions were also cosigned with US 60.

For those looking for old US 60/US 70 off of I-10, look for several small exits on I-10 between Indio and Blythe. There is a portion of US 60 between Corn Springs Rd. and Ford Dry Lake Rd.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 10 was signed along the routing from Jct. Route 3 (US 101A, later Route 1) south of Venice to Jct. US 101 at Santa Ana, via Manchester Avenue and Santa Ana Blvd. This routing was LRN 174 from US 101A (Route 1, Lincoln Blvd) in Los Angeles along Manchester and Firestone Blvds to US 101 in Norwalk. Sometime between 1934 and 1963, the routing was resigned as Route 42. Specifics are not available, but the guess is that the resignage occurred in the late 1950s in preparation for the interstate. (1956 and 1960 maps shows it as Route 10; the 1963 state map (pre-renumbering) shows it as Route 42). Before signage as US-101, the routing (signed as Route 10, but LRN 174) continued on down to Orangethorpe, and then across Orangethorpe past Route 101 (Spadra Road, at that time) and E through Atwood, until joining the old surface route equivalent to US 101 (LRN 2). Some maps show Route 10 ending at the junction with Route 18 (later renumbered as Route 14, but cosigned with US 91; LRN 175 and LRN 178). It appears that, by 1942, Route 10 was also signed as Bypass US 101.

State Shield On July 1, 1964, LRN 174 (at one time signed as Route 10), between US 101A and US 101 in Norwalk, was officially designated Route 42, and has since been deleted from the state highway system.

 

Interstate Submissions

Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947; the portion from Route 101 to Route 5 was originally to have been designated as I-110, with I-10 sharing a route with Route 5 between the San Bernardino and Santa Monica portions of Route 10. The I-110 designation was deleted as chargeable interstate in August 1965 and a designation of I-10 was used to the Route 101 interchange. At one time, the California Department of Highways, in response to a proposal from Arizona, proposed that current I-10 be numbered as I-12, and that the I-10 designation be used for current I-8.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 10:

  • Total Length (1995): 243 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 6,700 to 363,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 134; Sm. Urban 14; Urbanized: 94.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 241 mi; FAU: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 243 mi.
  • Significant Summits: San Gorgonio Pass (2626 ft) and Chiriaco Summit (1710 ft)
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 10 was defined in the 1909 First Highway Bond act as running from Goshen to Hanford. In 1915, Chapter 404 extended it from Hanford to San Lucas ("an extension connecting the San Joaquin valley trunk line in Tulare County with the coast trunk line in Monterey County by the continuation of the lateral between the cities of Visalia and Hanford through Coalinga by the most direct and practical route..."). The 1919 Third Bond Issue further extended the route from Visalia (note that Goshen changed its name to Visalia) to Sequoia National Park. By 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as:

From [LRN 2] near San Lucas to the Sequoia National Park line via Coalinga, Hanford, and Visalia

The portion from Hanford to the Sequoia National Park was considered a primary highway.

The route wording remained unchanged until the 1964 alignment. This routing was (and is) mostly signed as Route 198. The portion from Coalinga to Oilfields is signed as Route 33.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 11



Routing

From the northerly border of the new Federal Port of Entry and east of the Otay Mesa Port of Entry to near the junction of Route 125 and Route 905.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

1964-1981 Routing

Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic Interstate Shield In 1963, Route 11 was defined to run from San Pedro to Route 248 (Colorado Blvd) in Pasadena.

In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed "Route 248" to "Colorado Blvd".

In 1978, the portion of Route 11 between Route 10 and San Pedro was approved as chargable interstate, and was assigned the number I-110, although the route was not signed as interstate at that time.

In 1981, Chapter 292 renumbered the entire routing as Route 110 for continuity of numbering purposes, with the portion S of Route 10 using an interstate shield, and the portion N of Route 10 using a state highway shield.

Route 11 was the first route to have "Call Boxes". The system included 80 boxes spaced at quarter-mile intervals. The telephones were connected to the police switchboard. They were first proposed in 1959 by Los Angeles County director of communications Maurice E. Kennedy. In 1962, the Federal Communications Commission approved the $92,000 cost. On July 10, 1965, highway officials inaugurated the emergency call box system on the Harbor Freeway between the interchange of the Santa Monica and Harbor freeways and El Segundo Boulevard.

1994-Present Routing

State Shield The current routing was defined in 1994 by Chapter 409. No specific routing was identified at that time. This will connect up with a new Mexican freeway called Tijuana 2000, which will be a bypass connecting the new port of entry with Rosarito. According to the Caltrans Photolog, Route 11 is not planned to begin at the 905/125 junction, but rather at Route 125 north of the current intersection of Lone Star and Harvest Roads east of Brown Field.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

In 1934, Route 11 was signed from San Pedro to Jct. Route 118 near La Cañada. This was a surface street routing along Gaffey, Figueroa St, Ave 22, and Linda Vista to Route 118. It appears to have had a connection with the pre-Foothill freeway freeway segment of Route 118.

The original routing was LRN 165, and was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933.

In 1935, a new route was defined for the planned Arroyo Seco Parkway. This route was LRN 205, and corresponds to the present routing. When LRN 205 was defined, the roughly parallel LRN 165 portion was signed as Route 11 and Alt US-66.

At one point after the completion of the Pasadena Freeway, US 66 was the freeway, whereas Route 11 ran along Figueroa from San Fernando Road N. This reflected Figueroa's status as Alternate US 66. Circa 1940, the route was co-signed with federal routes: Route 66 (US 66) between Pasadena and Downtown Los Angeles, and Route 6 (US 6) between downtown and San Pedro. On July 1, 1964, the routings for US 6 and US 66 were truncated, and the route was signed only as Route 11. Figueroa Street was named for Jose Figueroa, a governor of California under Mexico.

Around 1957, the freeway had been constructed only as far as Santa Barbara Ave. From this point S, Route 11/US 6 ran along Figueroa.

Prior to the completion of Figueroa street in Gardena, the route from Gardena to Wilmington involved 190th Street, Main Street, and Wilmington Boulevard, with Route 11 continuing south on Wilmington and B to reconnect with the Figueroa routing.

The Arroyo Seco Parkway was California's first freeway. The innermost part was originally called North Figueroa, as it was an extension of that street. The first "phase" involved the four tunnels, with their art deco facades and bracketed streetlight sconces. If you look at the bridges over the river you can see the earlier bridge style too. The Arroyo Seco parkway ended northeast of the four Figueroa tunnels across the Los Angeles river. Then both directions of travel fed into the tunnels which contained Figueroa St. From there the route followed Figueroa into downtown. On the first day, speeds reached an unprecedented 35 mph, without a single stop from Pasadena all the way into Los Angeles. When the Four Level interchange with US 101 was built, in the late 1940s, new lanes were built for southbound traffic, and the original became northbound only. Both sets of lanes then were connected to the Hollywood Fwy via the Four Level. The sharp jog in the southbound lanes of the freeway east of the Los Angeles river is where the new southbound lanes begin. [Historical Information on the Arroyo Seco routing is from postings on m.t.r by Tom Cockle, Harry Marnell and James Stewart]

In March 1954, a 1.1-mile section of the Harbor Freeway between 3rd Street and Olympic Boulevard opened to traffic. The Los Angeles Times described it as "a modern maze of 'on' and 'off' ramps for almost all of the east-west streets feeding into — or out of — the downtown district" and said it was "expected to do much to alleviate traffic congestion in the business district." The elaborate ribbon-cutting ceremony included an appearance by model Ann Bradford as Miss Freeway Link.

 

Status

Toll Road This is planned to connect with the Mexican Tijuana Loop Road at the East Otay Mesa border crossing. This will be a toll road.

According to Don Hagstrom in October 2002, the planned Route 11 Freeway, connecting the proposed Route 905 / Route 125 interchange with a planned new third San Diego / Tijuana Port of Entry (Otay Mesa II) could be completed by 2007. It would be 4.3 miles long.

[Project Map]In August 2007, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR for this route. The proposed project is to conduct a corridor study and construct a four-lane freeway and truck bypass road in San Diego County at the proposed Otay Mesa East Point of Entry (POE). The project is not fully funded. The project is fully funded for Project Approval/Environmental Document in the amount of $13 million in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program - Interregional Improvement Program funds. Total estimated project cost is $361.4 million. Construction is estimated to begin in FY 2012-13. In April 2008, the CTC received notice that the current environmental document is for Phase I and will identify the location of potential corridors. Phase II will be project level analysis and environmental approval for the Route 11 and the POE components. The overall project is not fully funded. The project is only funded for Project Approval/Environmental Document in the amount of $13,000,000 in the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program – Interregional Improvement Program funds. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $715,220,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13, depending on the availability of funds. The following alternatives are being considered, both of which would be entirely new facilities:

  • Alternative 1 - No Build.

  • Alternative 2 - Western Alternative Corridor – The Western Corridor Alternative includes the Route 11 and POE site. The 2.1 mile long corridor would extend eastward from Harvest Road at the future Route 125/Route 905 interchange, passing south of Otay Mesa Road and north of Airway Road, and curving southward to connect with the northern edge of the Western POE site.

  • Alternative 3 - Central Alternative Corridor – The Central Corridor Alternative includes the SR 11 and POE site. The 2.5 mile long corridor would extend east along the same alignment as the western alternative, but it would extend further to the east before curving southward to the northern edge of the Central POE site.

In October 2008, the CTC received notice of the mitigated negative declaration. There were issues with the construction permanently removing paleontological resources, sensitive upland vegetative communities, hazardous waste, growth inducement, as well as public controversy regarding the project. With the completion of the EIR, the impacts related to growth and cumulative biological resources such as impacts to native and non-native grasslands, disturbed mule fat scrub and non-wetland Waters of the United States (WUS) / streambed, sensitive plants, and sensitive animals including burrowing owl and the Quino Checkerspot Butterfly are anticipated to be significant and unmitigable for Phase II (project level). As a result, a Statement of Overriding Consideration was adopted.

[011 Tier II]In February 2009, the CTC received another notice of preparation for this route. The project would construct a new four-lane highway and port of entry (POE) at the United States-Mexico border from east of Route 905/Otay Mesa border crossing to the future Route 125/905 junction. Tier 1 (PPNO 1000) was programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program for approximately $6.0 million in interregional improvement program shares for environmental. The Tier 1 Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) [see the paragraph above] was prepared to inform the public and decision-makers about the potential environmental effects of the proposed program and the preferred corridor. The Tier 1 Final EIR/EIS was presented to the Commission at its October 2008 meeting. The new NOP is for the project level environmental document, Tier II (PPNO 0999). Tier II is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund program for approximately $709 million and includes interregional improvement program funds, federal demonstration funds, and local funds/public toll financing. The total estimated cost of both Tier I and Tier II is $715 million. Construction of the project is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13.

The Western Corridor alignment for the Route 11 and the Otay Mesa East POE was selected as the preferred alternative during the Tier I/Program level environmental analysis. The Tier II environmental analysis will consider the following preliminary alternatives/design variations:

  1. No Build/No Action Alternative.

  2. Transportation System/Demand Alternative: Implement pedestrian, cyclist, transit, and other transportation systems/demand management measures alone, without implementation of Route 11 and the new POE No Build/No Action Alternative.

  3. Toll Alternative: Construct Route 11 using toll implementation options.

  4. Two Interchange Option: Building two interchanges between Route 11 and local roadways, or one interchange only, with the exact locations of the interchanges to be determined after consideration of public input.

  5. Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility Alternative: Utilize the existing commercial vehicle enforcement facility (CVEF) at the existing Otay Mesa POE to also serve the proposed Otay Mesa East POE, versus accommodating the construction of a new CVEF adjacent to the new POE.

What's interesting about this is the CTC minutes, which put the entry for this as "construct a new segment of Route 905/Route 125, to be called Route 11", even though the routing doesn't fit the definition of either Route 905 or Route 125.

In December 2009, the CTC received notice of a proposed amendment to the project that would amend the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for the Route 11 and Otay Mesa Port of Entry (POE) project (PPNO 0999) in the city of San Diego, community of San Ysidro as follows:

  • Program $4,900,000 of Federal Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Border Infrastructure Program (BIP) funds to the Environmental phase of this project in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009-10.

  • Revise the project milestone schedule for Circulation of the Draft Environmental Document from September 2009 to March 2010.

  • Revise the project milestone schedule for End Environmental Phase (PA&ED Milestone) from March 2010 to December 2010.

  • Revise the project location and description as follows: In San Ysidro East Otay Mesa, at the border of Mexico from east of Route 905/Otay Mesa border crossing to and future Route 125/Route 905 junction to the U.S./Mexico border.

  • Construct new four lane highway and Port of Entry.

The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

  • High Priority Project #740: Design and environmental analysis for Route 11 connecting Route 905 to the new East Otay Mesa Port of Entry near San Diego. $800,000.

In December 2011, the CTC approved amending the TCIF baseline agreement for the TCIF Project 68-Route 11 and Otay Mesa Port of Entry (POE) (PPNO 0999) in San Diego, in the community of Otay Mesa East, to program $45,500,000 of Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Border Infrastructure Program (BIP) funds to Design (PS&E) and Right of Way (R/W) Support in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-13, and to split the project into three separate segments for staged construction. The original (parent) segment (PPNO 0999) was "In East Otay Mesa, from Route 905 and future Route 125/Route 905 junction to the U.S./Mexico Border. Construct new 4 lane highway and POE. Route 11 and Otay Mesa POE — Environmental Only." The three segments approved are:

  1. Segment 1 (PPNO 0999A): In San Diego County near San Diego on Route 905 from 0.1 mile west of the Britannia Boulevard overcrossing to 1.6 miles east of the La Media Road undercrossing. Construct Route 905/Route 11 freeway to freeway connectors.

  2. Segment 2 (PPNO 0999B): In San Diego County near San Diego on Route 11 from 0.1 mile east of the Sanyo Avenue undercrossing to 1.9 miles east of the Sanyo Avenue undercrossing. Construct a new 4 lane highway and commercial vehicle enforcement facility.

  3. Segment 3 (PPNO 0999C): In San Diego County near San Diego on Route 11 from 2.4 miles east of the Sanyo Avenue undercrossing to the Mexico border. Construct land port of entry.

Route 11 FEIRIn June 2012, the CTC approved the project for future consideration of funding, as the final EIR had been completed. This project will construct a new toll highway, Route 11, with connectors to Route 905 and associated modifications to Route 905; the new Otay Mesa East Port of Entry; and a Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridor Improvement Fund (TCIF). The total estimated project cost is $704,200,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The preferred alternative for the route is a refinement of the Two Interchange approach that also incorporates the Route 125 connector variation and a connection associated with the Siempre Viva Road Full Interchange Variation. Based on the FEIR, it looks like there will be a single interchage at Enrico Fermi.

Adopted Route 11In December 2012, the CTC approved a route adoption to establish a new four-lane toll freeway alignment for Route 11 that would extend from the future Route 905/Route 125 interchange approximately 2.8 miles east to the proposed Otay Mesa East Port of Entry. The adoption resolution notes that a number of alternatives were considered for this project. The rejected alternatives considered two alignments that extended further east than the proposed alternative and also considered variations on which and how many interchanges would be built. The Preferred Alternative includes two interchanges that would be constructed along Route 11 at Enrico Fermi Drive and Siempre Viva Road, as well as an undercrossing at Sanyo Avenue and an overcrossing at Alta Road. Overcrossings would also be constructed at the Enrico Fermi Drive and Siempre Viva Road interchanges. The proposed interchange at Enrico Fermi Drive, located approximately one mile east of the future Route 905/Route 125/Route 11 Interchange, would be a full interchange and have on and off ramps to and from both eastbound and westbound Route 11. The proposed interchanges at Enrico Fermi Drive and Siempre Viva Road would be located approximately one mile apart. The Siempre Viva Road interchange would be a half interchange providing eastbound off-ramp and westbound on-ramp access for both commercial and non-commercial vehicles. No access is provided between Siempre Viva Road and the POE for non-commercial vehicles, and only northbound commercial vehicles exiting the CVEF will have access to Siempre Viva Road.

In December 2012, the CTC updated the description of the Route 905/Route 11 connectors project to be: "In San Diego County near San Diego on Route 905 from 0.1 mile west of Britannia Boulevard overcrossing to 1.6 miles east of La Media Road undercrossing. Route 11 from Route 11/905 Separation to Enrico Fermi Drive and on Route 905 from 0.1 mile East of La Media Road Undercrossing to 0.2 mile West of Airway Road Undercrossing.

In May 2013, the CTC amended the TCIF Baseline Agreement for Segment 1 of Project 68 – Route 11/Route 905 Freeway to Freeway Connectors project (PPNO 0999A) in San Diego County to update the project funding plan. The CTC also approved $79,700,000 to fund construction.

In July 2013, Caltrans put out a bid for construction of a freeway connection to Route 905: In San Diego County In And Near San Diego On Route 11 From Route 11/Route 905 Separation To Enrico Fermi Drive And On Route 905 From 0.1 Mile East Of La Media Road Undercrossing To 0.2 Mile West Of Airway Road Undercrossing. Groundbreaking occured in December 2013.

 

National Trails

See Route 110 for pre-1994 trails information.

 

Interstate Submissions

The current routing of Route 11 is not in the Interstate system. The number I-11 was proposed in November 1957 for current I-5, but was rejected.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Defined in 1999 by Chapter 724.

 


Overall statistics for post-1994 Route 11:

  • Total Length (1995): 4 miles, unconstructed
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 4.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Status

The current routing is unconstructed.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

This is one of the oldest routes in the state highway system, having been first defined as a route in 1895 with a law that provided "[authorization to secure the title and right of way of] that certain wagon road situated and being in the county of El Dorado ... commencing at the junction of the Lake Tahoe Wagon Road with the wagon road leading from Placerville to the town of Newtown, a short distance E-ly from the village of Smith's Flat ... and running thence from the junction of said roads to Lake Tahoe." In 1897, Chapter 176 stated "A public highway or wagon road shall be built from a point on the E limits of the city of Sacramento, to Folsom in Sacramento Cty as near as practicable along the route of the present most direct line of county roads between these two points...". The 1909 First Bond Act included funding for a road from Sacramento to Placerville as part of this route. In the 1915 statutes, Chapter 32 adopted "the wagon road extending from the W end of the Lake Tahoe State Wagon Road to the E limits of the city of Placerville" as a state highway. The 1919 Third Bond Issue provided funding to extend the route from "Placerville to Sportsman's Hall". The 1933 statutes extended the route on the other end, adding milage from "Walnut Creek-Stockton Road near Antioch to Sacramento".

When the 1935 law codified the definition of the route in the highway code, the definition was:

From [LRN 75] near Antioch to the Nevada State Line near Lake Tahoe, via Sacramento, Folsom, Placerville, and Sportsman's Hall

The portion from Sacramento to Placerville was a primary route.

In 1947, Chapter 1233 relaxed the description of the route to be “from [LRN 75] near Antioch to the Nevada line near Lake Tahoe via Sacramento and Placerville.”

This routing started near Antioch at signed Route 4 (LRN 75), and ran to 16th in Sacramento signed as Route 24. This is present-day Route 160. The portion from Freeport Blvd to 16th St along Broadway, and along 15th/16th Street to N Street appears to also have been part of LRN 4.

In downtown Sacramento, LRN 11 diverged from signed Route 24 at 16th S, and ran N to Capitol Ave (signed as Route 16).

LRN 11 then ran along Capitol Ave to 30th Street, where it intersected signed US-50/US-99. This latter segment is present-day Business Loop 80 (real Route 50), and was once planned to be part of the first incarnation of I-305.

LRN 11 then continued E out of Sacramento along Folsom Blvd as US-50, and remained signed as US-50 to the Nevada state line. In 1963, there was an alternate routing for LRN 11 from Sacramento that approximated the future freeway routing.


State Shield

State Route 12



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Valley Ford to Route 121 near Sonoma via Santa Rosa.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    The segment was defined in 1963 by Chapter 385.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. This corresponds to what was all LRN 51 by 1959, although that was not always the case:

    • Between Valley Ford and Sebastopol, present-day Route 116 was signed as Route 12, and was LRN 104, defined in 1933. In the 1964 renumbering, Route 12 was realigned along an extension of LRN 51 defined in 1959 between Route 1 and Sebastopol.

    • Between Route 116 near Sebastopol and US 101, this was an extension of LRN 51, as defined in 1933. It was signed as Route 12.

    • Between US 101 and Route 121, this was the original portion of LRN 51, defined in 1919. This was signed as Route 12.

    From Schellville easterly to Napa, the route was cosigned as Route 12/Route 37 (now Route 12/Route 121), and was LRN 8. This is now technically part of Route 121; LRN 8 dates back to 1909.

    A new freeway route was adopted on January 24, 1957, by the California Highway Commission connecting Sebastopol through Santa Rosa to Kenwood. This 17.4-mile route follows the existing highway from the east city limits of Sebastopol to the vicinity of Wright Road, then runs just north of the present route and adjacent to the Petaluma and Santa Rosa Railroad to the vicinity of US 101 in Santa Rosa. The route then continues on a generally direct northeasterly course to rejoin the present highway near Los Alamos Road east of Melita and follows the present highway routing to south of Kenwood.

    012 ExtensionIn September 2013, a report was issued suggesting the state is willing to part with the two-mile ribbon of land that had been designated for the extension of the freeway routing of Route 12. The draft report on the future of the Route 12 corridor clearly states that the State Department of Transportation has no plans to extend the freeway east of Farmers Lane over Spring Lake and therefore doesn't need the 50 acres long set aside for the project. The report outlines long-range planning issues facing the stretch of highway between Sebastopol and Sonoma. But the state's formal acknowledgment that the project is dead is crucial because it allows CalTrans to declare the property surplus and transfer it for other uses. The 300-foot-wide strip of open space runs from Farmer's Lane, past Montgomery High School, crosses Yulupa Avenue and Summerfield Road before it turns northeast and climbs the hill to the edge of Spring Lake Regional Park.
    (Source: Press-Democrat, 9/3/2013)

    In May 2014, the CTC rescinded the freeway adoption near Santa Rosa. There is a lack of community support to construct a freeway on a new alignment by extending existing Route 12 through Spring Lake Park east of the city of Santa Rosa. This proposed freeway extension remains unconstructed. Consequently, the Department rescinded the freeway route adoption along the unconstructed portion of Route 12 from Farmers Lane to Melita Road. Once the route rescission is approved, the Department’s responsibility is to dispose of the excess land. The unconstructed route segment is not needed for route continuity. Currently, Route 12 is a fourlane conventional highway north along Farmers Lane and then east towards Kenwood. The Department’s Transportation Concept Report (TCR) for Route 12 was finalized and signed in January 2014. The 25-year corridor concept was developed by incorporating planning principles of Caltrans Smart Mobility Framework (SMF). SMF provides tools and strategies to meet the goals of Assembly Bill 32 and Senate Bill 375 on climate change and CO2 emissions reduction. The nominal 25-year facility concept for Route 12 remains a conventional highway. There is no local agency support for the proposed freeway extension of Route 12 east of Farmers lane in Santa Rosa. The proposed extension is not included as part of the Sonoma County General Plan and is no longer included as part of the city of Santa Rosa General Plan.

     

    Status

    Unconstructed *Route* Unconstructed from Route 1 to Route 116. Constructed to freeway standards for 2 miles in Santa Rosa. The traversable local routing is Valley Ford Road and and Bodega Highway. In 2002, it was noted that 1.3 mi were widened to 40' in 1975, and the remainder is inadequate.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Sonoma County that will replace the Laguna de Santa Rosa Bridge on Route 12 in the city of Sebastopol. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. Total estimated project cost is $19,213,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The project will require construction activities in sensitive riparian habitat including wetlands. Studies concluded that the project will not have impacts to any resources in the project area.

    Route 12/121 interchangeIn 2012, the intersection of Route 12 and Route 121 was reconfigured. Prior to 2012, the intersection had a number of angular junctions. After reconstruction, the intersection of Route 12 and Route 121 was a traditional T-interchange, with nearby Fremont road being turned into a westbound only spur. The changes were prompted by an higher-than-average accident rate at the intersection. The cost of the project is $2.4 million.


     

    Naming

    The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Sebastopol" Freeway. This is because the freeway goes through the community of Sebastopol.

    Historically, this route is close to the original "El Camino Real" (The Kings Road). A portion of this route has officially been designated as part of "El Camino Real by Assembly Bill 1707, Chapter 739, on October 11, 2001.

    The US 101 interchange at Route 12 in the City of Santa Rosa is named the "Deputy Frank Trejo Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Deputy Frank Trejo of the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. Deputy Trejo served the residents of Sonoma County faithfully as a deputy sheriff for 15 years, until March 29, 1995, when he was shot and killed in the line of duty while investigating a suspicious motor vehicle in his beat west of the City of Santa Rosa. Deputy Trejo was posthumously awarded the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office highest award, the Gold Medal of Valor, for his sacrifice. Deputy Trejo loved being a law enforcement officer, protecting the public, and serving his community. He was a career lawman with a career spanning 35 years, serving as a police officer for the Cities of Lompoc and Tiburon prior to joining the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. Deputy Trejo was affectionately known as the "old man" in the sheriff's office and is credited with mentoring many younger officers over the course of his 35-year career. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 34, Resolution Chapter 93, on September 15, 2011.

    The portion of this route running through Sonoma County is called the "Valley of the Moon Scenic Route". "Valley of the Moon" was the name Jack London, resident of Glen Ellen, coined for this area. The first such sign with this name is when the Farmers Lane portion ends in Santa Rosa. Another name for this portion if the Sonoma Highway.

    South of the town of Sonoma, Route 12 is called Broadway until it intersects Route 121 near Schellville. Route 12/Route 121 to Napa County is called alternately "Fremont Drive" or "Carneros Highway." The latter term continues into Napa County.

    Route 12 from Sebastopol to Santa Rosa is named the "Luther Burbank Memorial Highway". Luther Burbank (1849-1926) was a famous horticulturist who developed more than 800 strains and varieties of plants, including 113 varieties of plums and prunes, 10 varieties of berries, 50 varieties of lilies and the Freestone peach. Born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, Burbank was brought up on a farm and received only an elementary education. At age 21 he purchased a 17-acre tract near Lunenberg, Massachusetts, and began a 55-year plant breeding career. In 1871 he developed the Burbank potato, which was introduced in Ireland to help combat the blight epidemic. He sold the rights to the Burbank potato for $150, which he used to travel to Santa Rosa, California. In Santa Rosa, he established a nursery garden, greenhouse, and experimental farms that have become famous throughout the world. Burbank carried on his plant hybridization and selection on a huge scale. At any one time he maintained as many as 3,000 experiments involving millions of plants. In his work on plums, he tested about 30,000 new varieties. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 4, Chapter 11 in 1940.
    [Biographical information on Luther Burbank from the National Inventors Hall of Fame]

    In Suisun City, near Denverton Road off Route 12, there is an "Old Route 12".

     

    Named Structures

    In Santa Rosa is the "Parker B. Rice Memorial Bridge" (just east of Route 101). World War II veteran and newspaper production manager Parker B. Rice served as Commander of the California Department of the Disabled American Veterans from 1955 to 1956. He was an Army Air Corps Mechanic in World War II. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 68, Chapter 74 in 1996.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 1 near Valley Ford to Route 101 at Santa Rosa; from Route 101 near Santa Rosa to Melita Road near Santa Rosa. Note: the entire segment was defined as part of the F&E; system in 1959; in 1969, the portion from Melita Road to Route 29 was deleted from the F&E system by Chapter 726.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 101 near Santa Rosa to Route 121 near Sonoma.

     

    Classified Landcaped Freeway

    The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

    County Route Starting PM Ending PM
    Sonoma 12 R14.89 T17.10


  2. From Route 29 in the vicinity of Napa to Route 80 near Cordelia.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963 by Chapter 385.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Circa 1935, the first two segments of this routing were continuous.

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. Route 12 was dual-signed with Route 37 (now Route 121) between Sonoma and Napa, and with Route 29 from Napa for a short distance S of Napa. The portion that was cosigned with Route 29 is present-day Route 221.

    US Highway Shield From Napa, signed Route 12 continued southerly to Cordelia in two segments: one stretch signed as Route 12/Route 37 (now Route 12/Route 121, and another stretch signed only as Route 12. This was also LRN 8; defined in 1909. In 1931, this was signed as (temporary) US 40.

     

    Status

    The California Transportion Commission, in September 2000, considered a Traffic Congestion Relief Program proposal to reconstruct the I-80/I-680/Route 12 interchange; it would be a 12-interchange complex constructed in seven stages. The proposal was $1 million for stage 1; the total estimated cost was $13 million. As of December 2001, this was still on the agenda (TCRP 25.2/25.3). This is TCRP Project #25, requested by the Solano Transportation Authority.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Solano County that will rebuild and relocate the eastbound truck scales facility, build a four lane bridge across Suisun Creek, and construct braided ramps from the new truck scales facility to eastbound I-80 and eastbound Route 12 ramps. The project is programmed in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund and the Traffic Congestion Relief Program and includes local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. Total estimated project cost is $100,900,000 for capital and support. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the proposed project baseline agreement. Resources that may be impacted by the project include; water quality, paleontology, cultural resources, visual resources hazardous waste, air quality, and noise. Potential impacts associated with the project can all be mitigated to below significance through proposed mitigation measures. Because of the sensitivity of the resources in the project area, a Final Environmental Impact Report was prepared for the project.

    I-<a href=80/I-680/Route 12 Project" src="maps/080-680-012-project.jpg" STYLE="float: right" HSPACE="10" VSPACE="5" WIDTH="350" HEIGHT="279">In January 2013, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Solano County that will improve the I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange, including the relocation of the westbound truck scales facility on I-80. For the preferred full-build alternative, the current total estimated cost for capital and support is $1,348,400,000. The project is not fully funded and will be developed in phases. Only Phase One of the full-build alternative is included in the financially constrained Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). Within Phase One, the first construction contract's total estimated cost for capital and support is $100,400,000, which is funded by the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), the Trade Corridor Improvement Funds (TCIF) and local funding. The scope of the first construction contract includes the reconstruction of the I-80/Green Valley Interchange and construction of a two lane westbound I-80 to westbound Route 12 Connector with a new bridge over the I-80 Green Valley Road onramp. Construction is estimated to begin in fiscal year 2013-2014. The scope of the preferred alternative is consistent with the scope of the first construction contract that is programmed in the 2012 STIP and the TCIF.

    In May 2013, it was reported that the funding outlook for the updated I-80/I-680/Route 12 interchange was improving. The required permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was obtained, and the Solano Transportation Authority had done what it is supposed to do to get the project ready for construction. The project is designed to improve traffic flow near the I-80 / I-680 interchange. It involves renovating the nearby Green Valley interchange and building ramps to sort traffic entering westbound I-80 from the Green Valley interchange from traffic exiting I-80 for Route 12 in Jameson Canyon. Construction work is to cost $60 million. The $24 million at risk is to come from Proposition 1B, the transportation bond passed by voters in 2006. The potential obstacle stems from the Buy America provisions, which requires that projects that receive federal dollars be built with materials made in America. Revisions in the 2012 federal transportation bill extend these provisions to contracts, including utility agreements, associated with the projects.

    In August 2013, it was reported that Solano County and the state Department of Transportation are once again asking the California Transportation Commission for $24 million to help rebuild the Green Valley interchange. The $24 million has been tied up for several months because of problems stemming from new, federal Buy America provisions. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. has been unable to comply with the provisions for related utility relocations and that put the money and project at risk. The long-standing Buy America provision states that transportation projects involving federal money must use materials made in America. A 2012 addition to Buy America includes utilities doing relocation work for the projects. But PG&E officials have said that, though they want to, they cannot comply with Buy America for relocations needed for the Green Valley interchange project. A gas pipeline valve needed for the project is only manufactured outside the United States.

    PPNO 7350There is a project to construct passing lanes on Route 12 near Terminous from the Sacramento County line to Route 5. The environmental process for this project has increased in scope and complexity due to concerns that the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) had regarding independent utility, geotechnical issues of the Delta soil and a proposed reservoir in the project vicinity that could change environmental conditions. The FHWA concerns have been addressed by a corridor analysis that was recently completed. The corridor analysis resulted in a reevaluation of scope for the project to focus on improvements to Route 12 between Bouldin Island and Route 5. The reevaluation of the scope also addressed the geotechnical issues and the changes in environmental conditions of the proposed reservoir. Therefore, the environmental phase of this project needs to be completed and a preferred alternative selected before proceeding with subsequent phases of the project. These changes place construction beyond FY 2010-11, the last year of the 2006 STIP.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed constructing the I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange Complex, including HOV Connector Lanes. He also proposed widening the route to a 4-lane expressway in Napa.

    TCRP Project 157An EIR has been prepared regarding conversion of the existing two-lange highway known as Jameson Canyon Road into a four-lane divided expressway. (January 2002 CTC Agenda 2.2a.(2)). This is actually TCRP Project #157, which will do congestion relief improvements from Route 29 to I-80 through Jamison Canyon. In March 2006, it was reported that environmental studies and preliminary engineering have been delayed due to inability to hire a consultant to complete the technical studies. The United States Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS) is requiring additional surveys to determine the impacts on the Red Legged Frog and Fairy Shrimp within the project limits. The USFWS is now requiring that the survey of the Red Legged Frog be conducted over a two-year period, instead of the previous one-year requirement. For the Fairy Shrimp, a one-year survey during both wet and dry seasons must be conducted, when previously such a survey was not required. Estimated completion is now September 2010. In 2007, the CTC recommended using $73.99M from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) for phase 1 of the Jameson Canyon Widening. In October 2009, recieved information the Caltrans plans to:Redistribute environmental phase programming not attributable to the CMIA Phase 1 project to a new Phase 2 project (PPNO 0367H).Make minor adjustments to the project post miles of the CMIA Phase 1 project to more accurately reflect the actual project limits. Split the CMIA Phase 1 project into two roadway contracts and one follow-up landscape contract.The rationale is that the project environmental document, approved in January 2008, environmentally cleared the construction of the ultimate 4-lane conventional highway with a 3.6 meter median. This scope was found to be too large to fund and construct at once, so plans were made to phase implementation of the overall improvement project. Phase 1, the CMIA project, will construct two new lanes adjacent to the existing roadway. However, Phase 1 does not include funding to fully update all horizontal and vertical curve deficiencies of the existing roadway. Phase 2, therefore, will upgrade the existing facility to current standards when full funding becomes available. Since the environmental studies were initiated prior to identification of a phased project, and prior to selection of Phase 1 for CMIA funding, the full programmed budget and expenditures for environmental work were attributed to what has become Phase 1. The proposed redistribution of the costs for environmental between Phase 1 and Phase 2 will serve to better align budgets and expenditures attributable to each of the two projects. The outcome is the creation of a new project to represent Phase 2 (PPNO 0367H) and a shift of $2,190,000 from Phase 1 environmental to Phase 2 environmental. The specific segments under the redivision are:Segment 1 (PPNO 0367D): On Route 12 in Napa and Solano Counties, from 0.5 mile west of Napa/Solano County Line to Red Top Road in Solano County. Construct two lanes, add a median barrier and a median opening. Segment 2 (PPNO 0367I): On Route 12 in Napa County, from Route 29 junction to 0.1 mile west of Napa/Solano Line. Construct two lanes and add a median barrier.Segment 3 (PPNO 0367J): On Route 12 in Napa and Solano Counties, from Kelly Road (Napa) to Red Top Road (Solano). Construct replacement landscaping.

    In January 2007, the CTC considered a request to amend the funding plan for TCRP Project #157 on Route 12: Congestion relief improvements from Route 29 to I-80 through Jamison Canyon. The goal of the project is to widen Route 12 from a 2- lane highway to a 4- lane expressway. Estimated completion is FY 2012/2013. In July 2008, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding the Route 12 Widening and Route 29/Route 12 Interchange projects. The projects are being planned in three phases. Phase 1 consists of two new 12 foot-wide lanes for eastbound traffic on Route 12 for the entire limits of the existing facility, as well as the construction of retaining walls (PPNO 0367D). Phase 1 is programmed for $139,500,000 with corridor mobility improvement account (CMIA) funds, traffic congestion relief program (TCRP) funds, federal demonstration funds, regional surface transportation program funds, regional improvement program funds, and interregional improvement program funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10. Phase 2 will upgrade Route 12 to current standards and is estimated to cost $77,300,000. Phase 2 is not fully funded. Phase 3, the Route 29/Route 12 Interchange project (PPNO 0373) (PM 4.2/5.4), is also not fully funded. The project is programmed for environmental for $1,500,000 in regional improvement program funds in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project capital cost is $73,137,000.

    In January 2011, the CTC reviewed a proposal (approved in March 2011) to amend the CMIA baseline agreement and the 2010 STIP for the Segment 1 (PPNO 0367D) and Segment 2 (PPNO 0367I) of the Route 12 Jameson Canyon Widening — Phase 1 (TCRP 157) project as follows: 1. Reprogram $4,100,000 Interregional Improvement Program (IIP) funds from Construction Capital for Segment 1 to Construction Support for Segment 1 ($2,750,000) and Segment 2 ($1,350,000). 2. Update the project delivery schedule. The three segments are (1) Segment 1 (PPNO 0367D): On Route 12 in Napa and Solano Counties, from 0.5 mile west of the Napa/Solano County line to Red Top Road in Solano County. Construct two lanes and add a median barrier and a median opening; (2) Segment 2 (PPNO 0367I): On Route 12 in Napa County, from the State Route 29 junction to 0.1 mile west of the Napa/Solano County line. Construct two lanes and add a median barrier; (3) Segment 3 (PPNO 0367J): On Route 12 in Napa and Solano Counties, from Kelly Road (Napa) to Red Top Road (Solano). Construct replacement landscaping. In an effort to avoid approximately $20 million in potential utility relocation costs, the roadway alignment at selected locations was modified during the design phase. The design work has been completed for both segments. This shift in alignment, along with refinement of contract unit prices for structures items, has resulted in a reduction of approximately $8 million in the Construction Capital estimate for the Segment 1. Out of these savings, $4,100,000 is proposed to cover a shortfall in Construction Support for Segment 1 ($2,750,000) and Segment 2 ($1,350,000). The remaining savings are proposed to remain with Segment 1 at this time. This was approved in March 2011.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $130 million in funds left over from other highway projects to Jamieson Canyon. The project had come to a screeching halt in March 2011 when the state put off selling highway construction bonds because of California’s budget crisis. Caltrans is splitting the project into two contracts. Work in Napa County, where the terrain is mostly flat, is to take 18 months and cost $46 million. The Solano section, requiring nine retaining walls, including one almost 100 feet tall, is to take 30 months and cost nearly $90 million.
    (Source: Napa Valley Register)

    In December 2011, Caltrans received a number of lower-than-expected bids for the Jamieson Canyon widening. For the 3.1-mile Napa County segment, the apparent low bidder was Synergy Project Management of San Francisco, who bid $19.9 million or 23% below engineers— estimates. For the 3.2-mile stretch in Solano County, the apparent low bidder was Ghilotti Construction Inc. of San Rafael, bidding $35.6 million—nearly $12 million or 24% less than the Caltrans estimate. The California Transportation Commission is expected to award contracts for Jameson Canyon widening early next year, allowing for construction to begin in the spring 2012. The Napa County segment should be finished by late 2013, with the Solano half completed in 2014.
    (Source: Napa Valley Register)

    In February 2012, the CTC adjusted the project funding.

    In April 2012, it was reported that the ground-breaking for the Jamieson Canyon widening project had occurred. By 2015, the roadway will be expanded from two lanes to four and a center barrier will be installed to prevent the higher-than-average frequency of head-on collisions the roadway has seen in recent decades. The work is split into two parts. The first, on the Napa County side of the roadway, is expected to be completed by late 2013. Officials hope the Solano County work, complicated by excavation through hillsides and construction of a retaining wall, will be complete by 2015 (note that this is a year later than the December 2011 estimate).

    In April 2013, it was reported that construction was progressing well. In Jamieson Canyon, Caltrans is transforming this major link between Solano and Napa counties from a narrow, two-lane road to a four-lane road with wide shoulders and a median barrier. A mile-long section of new lanes east of the Solano/Napa line should be ready for traffic by late April 2013. Eastbound and westbound motorists will use these two new lanes while workers start doing work on the existing two lanes of Route 12. Meanwhile, workers continue to carve away the massive hill just west of the truck scale lanes and I-80. They are working from the point of the future retaining wall and moving toward the highway, with huge amounts of earth over time just appearing to melt away. The entire four-lane version of Route 12 could be finished by mid-2014. The section in Napa County could be finished by then end of 2013. Additionally, cars exiting I-80 for eastbound Route 12 leading to Suisun City will have a new off-ramp, an elevated route that will ultimately let them pass over trucks leaving the new scales. These new truck scales could open to trucks as early as late June or early July 2013. Then such work as adding landscaping and demolishing the existing eastbound truck scales will take place. The entire project could wrap up by October 2013.
    (Source: Daily Republic, 4/14/13)

    In May 2013, the CTC allocated an additional $2,000,000 in State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funds and amend the Proposition 1B Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) baseline agreement to update the project funding plan for Segment 2 (Napa County contract) of the Route 12 Jameson Canyon Widening – Phase 1 project in Napa and Solano Counties. As of May 2013, construction is about 50 percent complete and is expected to be finished by December 2013. However, an additional $2,000,000 is needed to complete construction. This increase is proposed to be proportionally funded with IIP and RIP (Napa and Solano County) funds. The cost increase was due to design inconsistencies (design risk due to aerial surveys vs. ground surveys), waterline conflicts (the project plans provided to the City mistakenly omitted the waterline location on the roadway cross section plans), and construction delays and work inefficiencies.

    In January 2014, it was reported that work was progressing well on the Jameson Canyon project for Route 12: the Napa County side is 90 percent finished and the Solano County side is 70 percent finished. Over 2013, workers on the Solano County side have carved away a large chunk of a hill that stood in the way of the widening. They’ve put two new lanes on a terrace along what’s left of this hill, some 20 feet above the existing two lanes at the highest point and extending for about a half-mile. Some of the new lanes were scheduled to open in January 2014. It was estimated that the final project completion could be as early as August 2014.

    In May 2012, it was reported that Caltrans has started the $20.5 million Route 12 Operational Improvements Project, which will create a “Smart Corridor” using Intelligent Transportation System elements in Solano, Sacramento and San Joaquin Counties on Route 12, and on I-5 in San Joaquin County. These elements include: Changeable Message Signs, Highway Advisory Radio, Extinguishable Message Signs, Closed Circuit Televisions and Traffic Monitoring Stations. The project will improve operations by realigning Tower Park Way; add and extend existing turn lanes and acceleration lanes at various intersections between I-5 and Tower Park Way; and expand the existing Park and Ride at Thornton Road. The contractor for this project is De Silva Gates Construction and is currently in construction.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #1081: Widen Route 12 to four lanes through Jamieson Canyon (between I-80 and Route 29) for safety concerns and economic growth. $6,400,000.

    • High Priority Project #1812: Upgrade and reconstruct the I-80/I-680/Route 12 Interchange, Solano County. $17,480,000.

     

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E system in 1959.


  3. From Route 80 near Fairfield to Route 99 near Lodi via Rio Vista.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined by Chapter 385 to be "(c) Route 80 near Fairfield to Route 84 at Rio Vista. (d) Route 84 near Rio Vista to Route 99 near Lodi."

    In 1976, Chapter 1384 made sections (c) and (d) contiguous, and the definition read "Route 80 near Fairfield to Route 99 near Lodi via Rio Vista." The portion from Route 84 at Rio Vista to Route 84 [Former Route 160] near Rio Vista was transferred from Route 84.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. This segment was LRN 53. The portion between I-80 near Fairfield and Rio Vista was defined in 1919; the remainder (Rio Vista to Route 99 near Lodi) was defined in 1921.

    County12At some point, this may have been a county route -- a photo at CalTrafficSigns.com clearly shows a (temporary) County Highway 12. It could also have been an error by the Auto Club of Northern California. This picture was supposedly taken at the intersection of Route 12 and Route 24 (now Route 160) near Rio Vista.

     

    Status

    There was once a project to close a gap in this route near Kettleman Lane. This was removed from the STIP in early 2004.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route: High Priority Project #1414: Rio Vista Bridge Realignment Study & Street Sign Safety Program. $560,000.

    During the period from 1997 to 2007, the collision and fatality rate on Route 12 has increased from 60% to over 100% of the statewide average for similar routes. Since 2001, there have been 802 collisions, 494 injuries, and 21 fatalities on Route 12, including three fatal accidents in 2006 and already three fatal accidents in 2007. The California Highway Patrol has prioritized Route 12 as one of its top requests for safety corridor project funding for 2007-08. Caltrans is in the process of constructing 12.7 miles of horizontal and vertical curve corrections, shoulder widening, median and shoulder rumble strips, and pavement rehabilitation along Route 12. In addition, the Solano Transportation Authority, in partnership with the Department of Transportation, is evaluating the long-term need for a concrete median barrier along that route.

    The state is currently exploring several proposals to alleviate the traffic backups that result whenever the Rio Vista Bridge is raised to allow boat traffic to pass. The long-term project would involve moving or replacing the drawbridge that spans the Sacramento River and widening Route 12. The source of funding will determine whether the approaches under consideration move forward. The problem is that because the lift bridge is so close to the surface of the water, the operator must raise its spans nearly every time a vessel needs to get to the other side, which can be as often as 10 times a day. Raising and lowering the spans takes about 10 to 25 minutes depending on the size of the craft, causing vehicles to back up in each direction: As many as 440 vehicles have been stopped when a large boat is passing through. In June, an engineering firm that Rio Vista hired to delve into the matter presented its findings in a report that also outlined alternatives to the status quo. The possibilities include widening the section of Route 12 that transects the city and replacing the Rio Vista Bridge with a taller, wider one, to bore a four-lane tunnel under the Sacramento River or build an equally broad bridge that's 50 feet above the water's surface, to divert Route 12 to Airport Road, widen that route, and construct a bridge where it currently dead ends at the river—that bridge would be 145 feet tall, providing sufficient clearance for any oceangoing tanker. Based on public comments received, the preference was a four-lane tunnel along the path of the existing Route 12—a project that estimates peg at $1.8 billion.

    Click image for larger mapIn July 2011, it was reported that two projects were planned to improve safety in this section of the route. One is roughly $25 million in improvements from Potato Slough Bridge to I-5. Among other things, it would install left-turn pockets and acceleration lanes for vehicles entering the highway. Cameras would also be used to monitor traffic conditions and provide real-time information on new electronic signs along Route 12. A roughly $50 million project would add shoulders to the road and a permanent concrete barrier in the median along the four-and-a-half mile stretch from Mokelumne River to the Potato Slough bridges.
    (Source: Recordnet.Com)

    In September 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on Route 12 in San Joaquin County that will rehabilitate the existing Mokelumne River Bridge and control house near the town of Rio Vista. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $5,425,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to cultural resources to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to cultural resources in the project area will be mitigated by compliance with the Secretary of the Interiors Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties. A record of the bridge’s historic features will also be developed. As a result, a MND was completed for this project.

    In September 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to rehabilitate the Little Potato Slough Bridge on Route 12 near the city of Lodi and the Route 120 Connector Overhead at I-5 near the town of Mossdale. The project will replace bearing pads and joint seals. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated cost is $4,585,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to wetlands and other biological habitat to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to existing wetlands in the project area will be mitigated by restoration to pre-construction conditions. In addition 36 willow trees will be planted in the project area. Preconstruction surveys will be conducted for active nests with work windows being adjusted as necessary. As a result, an MND was completed for this project.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $11.5 million toward improvements of a section of Route 12 west of I-5 that has long been notorious for deadly accidents. A key improvement will reroute Tower Park Way under Potato Slough Bridge to connect with Glasscock Road. That will allow cars traveling to and from Tower Park Marina to enter and exit the highway without crossing traffic. New cameras and sensors monitor the area and will signal problems and alert motorists using signs posted in locations along Route 12, including to the east of I-5. The project also will expand a park-and-ride lot that already exists at Route 12 and the interstate.

    Rio VistaAccording to the CTC minutes, another project near the town of Rio Vista approved for future funding will widen shoulders on Route 12 from Azevedo Road to Liberty Island Road, and construct left turn pockets at Currie, McCloskey and Azevedo Roads. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. Total estimated project cost is $16,821,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14.

    In March 2013, it was reported that there were concerns that a long-planned, $12 million project west of Rio Vista to widen the shoulders of the narrow highway from Azevedo Road to Summerset Road, a distance of a mile, and to add left turn lanes at Currie, McCloskey and Azevedo roads doesn’t go far enough. Caltrans needs right of way from a rural industrial park owned and operated by Robert Cattey and his brother to move forward. Cattey wants the project modified to ease what he sees as safety and flooding issues affecting his property. Specifically, Cattey wants a left-turn lane on westbound Route 12 at Cattey Lane leading into the industrial park. The park is home to a variety of tenants, ranging from a crane and rigging company to an equipment yard to a heating and air conditioning business. Large cranes turn left from westbound Route 12 into the industrial park daily. They wait for a gap in eastbound traffic and back up traffic, creating a safety hazard. The problem is that Cattey Lane is a private road. Public funds are not typically used to pay for left-turn lanes into private property. Also, a September 2012 traffic assessment showed no congestion or operational problems there. Cattey would also like a culvert enlarged or a new culvert created to ease flooding problems. Caltrans responded that the project won’t make flooding worse and is designed to address safety, not flooding issues. This project is the last of a series of Route 12 safety projects. Others included the widening the highway and smoothing out of “roller coaster” hills near the Western Railway Museum in 2009 and 2010.

    In March 2013, the CTC authorized $32,589,000 to replace 8.6 lane miles of existing roadway near Terminous on Bouldin Island, from Mokelumne River Bridge to Potato Slough Bridge with a new structural section to the south including wider shoulders and concrete median barrier in order to reduce pavement maintenance cost and frequency, and improve traffic safety.

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between the intersection of Walters Road in Suisun and the intersection with Lower Sacramento Road in Lodi. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.

    Between I-80 and I-5. Authorized by Assembly Bill 112, Chapter 258, on October 1, 2007.

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 12 between Olsen Road is named the "Officer David Lamoree Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Officer David Frank Lamoree, who, while driving to his Fairfield home on October 21, 2005, was hit head-on by a car on Route 12, west of Route 113, on a portion of Route 12 that is only two lanes and that has become increasingly congested and dangerous. He was taken off of life support on Octber 23, 2005 (his 26th birthday). Officer David Lamoree was born in Vallejo, California, on October 23, 1979, and decided on a police career at 10 years of age. He graduated from Will C. Wood High School, and earned criminal justice degrees from Solano Community College. He attended the police academy in Contra Costa County. A police officer for six months at Solano Community College, Officer Lamoree served on the San Pablo Police Department for a few years before relocating to the Rio Vista police force. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 7, Resolution Chapter 121, on 9/12/2007.

    The portion of Route 12, between Route 160 (milepost marker .57) and Brannan Island Road (milepost marker 5.84) in the County of Sacramento is named the "CHP Officer Charles “Chuck” Sorenson Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of Officer Charles H. Sorenson, who was born September 6, 1930, to Earl and RoseMae, in Petaluma, California. In 1957, Officer Sorenson, badge number 2341, graduated from the CHP Academy. He was assigned to the El Centro area and later transferred to the Sacramento area. Officer Sorenson was a hard-working, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people he worked with. He was known for his honesty, fairness, and dedication, and for being a loyal father and family man. In his spare time, he enjoyed spending time with his family, playing golf, and building his 18-foot inboard jet boat named “10-4”. On March 15, 1963, Officer Sorenson was killed in the line of duty while pursuing a suspect in his vehicle. During the chase, the suspect lost control of his vehicle, crashed, and continued to flee on foot. When Officer Sorenson got out of his car to continue pursuit, a second suspect, of whom he was unaware, ambushed Officer Sorenson and fired two shots with a stolen handgun at point blank range.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Resolution Chapter 109, on September 4, 2012.

    The portion of Route 12 between Potato Slough Bridge and Route 5, in the County of San Joaquin, is named the "Dana Cowell Memorial Highway". Named in memory of Dana Cowell, who passed away on January 21, 2012. Cowell was a distinguished California resident and devoted civic leader, whose good deeds earned him the respect and admiration of his colleagues and the countless individuals whose lives he touched, brought immense sorrow and loss to people throughout the State. Dana Cowell, who brought credit and distinction to himself as Deputy Director of the San Joaquin Council of Governments (SJCOG), enjoyed a lifetime of remarkable success in every avenue of his endeavors, inspiring others through his professional achievements, support of the community, and strong devotion to family. Dana Cowell joined SJCOG in 2006 after serving in a number of key transportation posts over the course of 26 years with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). In 2011, Cowell was named Transportation Manager of the Year by the California Transportation Foundation for his dedication to overcoming obstacles to transportation projects. Among Dana Cowell's recent notable accomplishments are critical safety improvements and construction along Route 12 through San Joaquin County that began construction in 2012. Dana Cowell led a partnership with Caltrans to develop intersection upgrades between Route 5 and Potato Slough Bridge highlighted by the complete redesign of the Route 12 Tower Parkway Glasscock Road intersection, and the construction contract for this $20 million project was awarded in early January 2012. Projects on Route 5, Route 99, Route 205, and Arch Road in Stockton all benefitted from Dana Cowell's commitment to transportation. Dana Cowell also worked with Sacramento and Bay Area transportation leaders to craft the Northern California Trade Corridor Projects, directed SJCOG's organization of the Valley Wide State Transportation Improvement Program, and initiated SJCOG efforts to advance modeling techniques and planning tools in response to Senate Bill No. 375 of the 2007-08 Regular Session (Ch. 728, Stats. 2008), which requires reductions of greenhouse gas emissions. Dana Cowell was well known and respected by transportation planners throughout the state, and his significant knowledge and contributions, dedication, and warm friendship will be missed in the profession. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 85, Resolution Chapter 103, on August 29, 2012.

     

    Named Structures

    The Rio Vista Bridge is officially named the "Helen Madere Memorial Bridge". Ms. Madere was a former vice-mayor of Rio Vista, who was a key force behind the safety improvements that established a safety enhancement-double fine zone between Lodi and Suisun City on Route 12. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Chapter 124, in 1998.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Entire portion; constructed to freeway standards from Route 80 to Fairfield.


  4. From Route 99 near Lodi to Route 88 near Lockford.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. This segment was LRN 24 between US 99 and Route 88. It was defined in 1909.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E system in 1959.

     

    Double Fine Zones

    Between I-80 and I-5. Authorized by Assembly Bill 112, Chapter 258, on October 1, 2007.


  5. From Route 88 near Clements to Route 49 near San Andreas.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined to be "Route 88 near Clements to Route 49 at San Andreas."

    In 1965, the definition was relaxed to be "near San Andreas".

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 12 was signed along the route from Jct. Route 1 near Jenner to San Andreas, via Santa Rosa, Rio Vista, and Lodi. This segment was LRN 24. It was defined in 1909.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E system in 1959.

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Interstate Submissions

Route 12 was not submitted to the Interstate system. The designation I-12 was proposed in December 1957 for what is now I-10, based on a recommendation from Arizona, but this was rejected by AASHTO. Sometime prior to that, the designation I-12 was proposed for what is now I-210.

 


Overall statistics for Route 12:

  • Total Length (1995): 116 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 5,300 to 55,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 94; Sm. Urban 6; Urbanized: 25.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 116 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 75 mi; Minor Arterial: 41 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Sonoma, Napa, Solano, San Joaquin, and Calaveras.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.11] Entire route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that would become LRN 12 was first defined in the 1909 First Bond Act to run from San Diego to El Centro. It wasn't extended again until 1933, when the segment "[LRN 2], Atlantic Street, San Diego to old Spanish Lighthouse, Point Loma" was added. By 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as being from:

  1. San Diego to El Centro
  2. [LRN 2] on Atlantic Street, San Diego to Old Spanish Lighthouse, Point Loma

The portion from San Diego to El Centro was considered a primary highway.

In 1953, Chapter 1856 combined these two sections into one, making the definition “Point Loma to El Centro via San Diego.”

There were two segments:

  1. Starting at Cabrillo National Monument in Point Loma, the routing, signed as US 80 (now Route 209) ran northerly to US 101 (LRN 2).
  2. From US 101, LRN 12 turned easterly, and continued signed as US 80 to El Centro. The present day signage for this route is approximately I-8.

At El Centro, LRN 12 ended, but US 80 continued easterly as LRN 27.


State Shield

State Route 13



Routing

From Route 61 near the Oakland International Airport to Route 61 near Emeryville via the vicinity of Lake Temescal.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

This route is as defined in 1963.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 13 was signed along the route from Santa Cruz to Jct. US 101 at San Rafael, via San Jose, Mt. Eden, and Oakland. This appears to be the route of present-day Route 17 and I-880. The renumbering as Route 17 likely occurred in the mid-to-late 1930s. Given the dates of the segments below, it is likely the Route 13 number was not reused until at least 1947, which was when LRN 227 was defined (the segment between Route 24 and former US 40, defined in 1935, was signed as Route 24).

Between I-580 and the current Route 61 routing (Doolittle Dr., LRN 226 and LRN 258), present-day Route 13 was unsigned prior to 1964, but was LRN 258 (added to the state highway system in 1959).

Between Warren Blvd and US 50 (now I-580) and Ashby Ave (Route 24, LRN 206), Broadway (unsigned, LRN 75), Route 13 was partially constructed as of 1963 (it was only constructed between Route 24 and Joaquin Miller Road). The routing of present Route 13 (then unsigned) was along Warren Blvd and then an upspecified routing to US 50 (LRN 5). This was LRN 227, added to the state highway system in 1947.

Construction for this freeway occurred mostly in the late 1950s. The Park Boulevard interchange was designed and designated as a future connection to the Shephard Canyon Freeday (then LRN 235, present-day unconstructed Route 77) through the Oakland Hills toward Moraga.

Between Route 24 and I-80 (former US 40), present-day Route 13 was LRN 206, but was signed as Route 24. This segment was added to the state highway system in 1935.

Between I-80 (former US 40) and present-day Route 61, the routing (unconstructed) was also LRN 206. This portion of LRN 206 was added to the state highway system in 1959.

 

Status

Unconstructed State Shield Unconstructed for 4 miles from Route 61 to Route 580. This section would have paralelled Hegenberger Road and 73rd Avenue. However, no local roads adequately fit the definition of a traversable highway. The 4.3 miles that were in the freeway and expressway system were deleted effective 1/1/1982.

Constructed as freeway from I-580 to Route 24. Route 61 was a planned freeway that paralleled I-80 near Berkeley.

Sean Tongson notes that a short stub of concrete at the on-ramp from northbound Route 13 to eastbound Route 24 seems to suggest a possible flyover/under ramp may have been planned from southbound Route 13 to eastbound Route 24.

 

Naming

Route 13 from Interstate 580 to Route 24 in Oakland is named the "Warren Freeway". Earl Warren, California Governor for 11 years and Attorney General for four years, was appointed Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1953. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 96, Chapt 166 in 1957.

This is also "Tunnel" Road and "Ashby" Avenue.

 

Interstate Submissions

The portion from Route 580 to Route 24 was submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1945; it was not accepted.

The designation I-13 was proposed in November 1957 for what is now I-605. This was rejected by AASHTO. The I-605 routing was later proposed as I-105, before the number I-605 was chosen.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.2] From Route 61 near the Oakland International Airport to Route 24; from Route 80 to Route 61 near Emeryville. Constructed to freeway standards from Route 580 to Route 24. The entire route was added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959; the portion from Route 24 to Route 80 was deleted in 1981 by Chapter 292.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.3] From Route 24 to Route 580. Designated by Senate Bill 1036, Chaptered 7/21/2005, Chapter 101.

 

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Alameda 13 5.29 5.57
Alameda 13 8.09 8.49
Alameda 13 9.05 9.50

 

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Overall statistics for Route 13:

  • Total Length (1995): 10 miles traversable; 4 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 20,800 to 58,000
  • Milage Classification: Urbanized: 14.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 10 mi
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 10 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 13 was first defined in Chapter 111 of the 1901 statutes: “That portion of the Sonora and Mono wagon road, commencing E of Sonora and at a point commonly known as Long Barn in Tuolumne Cty and running thence across the summit of the Sierra Nevada mountains to Bridgeport in Mono County is hereby declared a state highway.” This route was also referenced by Chapter 150 in the 1905 statutes. It was first funded in the 1909 First Bond Act as a route “From Salida to Sonora”. In May 1919, Chapter 510 re-declared this routing to be a state highway, “All that portion of the public highway commencing at the end of the Sonora and Mono state highway at Long Barn in Tuolumne county and leading therefrom to the eastern boundary of the city of Sonora and known as the Sonora and Mono Road is hereby declared to be a state highway...”. Thus, in 1935, the routing was codified into the highway code as:

From [LRN 4] at Salida to [LRN 23] at Long Barn

The portion from Salida to Sonora was considered a primary highway.

This route had the following pieces:

  • From US 99, this route was unsigned (it is presently Route 219) to the junction with Route 108.
  • From the Route 219/Route 108 junction to Route 120.
  • Between the Route 120/Route 108 junction and Route 49. This was originally part of Route 120, but was transferred to Route 108 in 1965. It is cosigned as Route 108/Route 120.
  • Between Route 49 and Sonora. It was signed only as Route 108.
  • Between Sonora and Long Barn. It was signed as Route 108.
  • Between Long Barn and US 395. It was signed as Route 108.


State Shield

State Route 14



Routing
  1. From Route 1 north of the intersection of Sunset Boulevard northwest of Santa Monica to Route 5 near Tunnel Station.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "(a) Route 1 northwest of Santa Monica to Route 5 near Tunnel Station."

    In 1965, Chapter 2007 changed this to read "(a) Route 1 north of the intersection of Sunset Boulevard northwest of Santa Monica to Route 5 near Tunnel Station."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Unconstructed By 1963, this segment was LRN 290. It was defined in 1959, but was never constructed. See below for the pre-1964 routing signed as Route 14.

     

    Naming

    If constructed, this segment would have been named the "Reseda Freeway". This is because the freeway would have traversed the community of Reseda in the City of Los Angeles. Reseda itself was named for mignonette (a herb).

     

    Status

    Unconstructed Unconstructed (22 miles). There is no documented traversable local routing between US 101 and Route 1, although you can read the plans below (and note that as of 1953, Reseda Blvd actually was shown as intersecting Sunset near Will Rogers Park along Rustic Canyon, although it didn't make it all the way over the hills). The traversable local routing between US 101 and Route 118 is Reseda Blvd. There is no traversable local routing between Route 118 and I-5. There are no plans for improvement.

    The freeway and expressway system plans, both in the mid 1950's and 1960's, were that this route would be constructed to freeway standards down Reseda Blvd and across the Santa Monica Mountains to intersect with the Pacific Coast Freeway, Route 1. Currently, the only clue of this plan is that the milepost for Route 14 does not go to 0.00 at the I-5 junction.

    It is interesting to note that, at one time, Reseda (at least on paper) continued to Sunset Blvd (although not continguously), meeting Sunset at what is now Sullivan Canyon Road.

    The cross mountain roadway was first proposed in the early 1920s. By 1928, various San Fernando Valley Chambers of Commerce were showing a potential "Reseda to the Sea", that meandered through Temescal Canyon to Pacific Coast Highway. The road continued to be proposed through the 1930s and 1940s as a vital 25-mile roadway. By the 1950s, it was listed as a potential freeway, as evidenced by its definition as LRN 290.

    It became controversial in the 1960s. San Fernando Valley leaders, in the 1960s, persuaded the Los Angeles City Council to study the feasibility of building it as a toll road, but that never happened.

    It should be noted that the intersection of Temescal Canyon Road and Pacific Coast Highway was designed large enough to handle traffic at the beach end, but the construction of Palisades High School in 1961 scuttled that route. However, the planning maps make it clear that Temescal and Pacific Coast Highway was the intended terminus (creating difficulty with the "north of Sunset" in the definition).

    Opposition to the route grew in the 1970s and 1980s. In 1998, Los Angeles gave up the city's easement between Winford and Mulholland drives in Tarzana. However, the route still shows up on a few city maps. The fact that this will never be constructed is reflected in the exit numbers on the Route 14 freeway segment, which go to 0 at I-5.

    The unconstructed segment left I-5 around Balboa Blvd. It crossed Route 118 just W of Balboa, and then continued W until approximately Lassen and Wilbur, at which time it ran due S along Wilbur, crossing Mullholland, intersecting Sunset at Temescal Canyon, and continuing down the Canyon to Route 1.


  2. From Route 5 at Los Angeles near Tunnel Station to Route 58.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield Circa 1935, this portion of the route was numbered as Route 7. When state routes began to be shielded as US highways, this was resigned as US 6.

    The segment between Route 5 near Tunnel Station (former US 99) and Route 126 near Solemint was originally LRN 4, defined in 1910. In 1935, this segment was renumbered as an extension of LRN 23. The remainder of the segment (to Route 58) was part of the 1911 definition of LRN 23.

    On March 21, 1956, the Highway Comission adopted the segment of Route 14 (LRN 23) from 1/2 mi N of the junction with Angeles Forest Highway near the SP Railroad Vincent Y to Neeach Road as a freeway. This was locally called the "Palmdale-Lancaster Freeway". On June 21, 1955, the Highway Commission declared existing LRN 23 (future Route 14, US 6) between US 99 and Solemint to be a freeway.

    Here is some history of Route 14, courtesy of a misc.transport.road posting from Mike Ballard.

    The original non-freeway routing, Sierra Highway, was a four-lane divided highway its junction with US 99 at Tunnel Station to San Fernando Road. From there to Soledad Canyon Road, it was a three-lane highway (until 1968, then four lane divided). North of Solemint Junction (Soledad Canyon Road) to Palmdale it was two-lanes. Palmdale to Lancaster - Four lanes undivided. North of Lancaster to Mojave, two-lanes.

    The Antelope Valley Freeway was built in stages on a new alignment. The first was from 1/2 mi E of Solemint Junction to Red Rover Mine Road in 1963. In 1965, the freeway was constructed from Red Rover Mine Road (Ward Road OC) to Pearblossom Highway; and in 1966 from Pearblossom Highway to Ave P-8 (with a temporary connection to Sierra Highway). In 1968, the route was extended from near Ave H to about 1 mile N of Rosamond. The segment from Ave P-8 to Ave H opened in 1972 or 1970.

    In 1972, the freeway was constructed from North of Rosamond to Mojave, with the full freeway ending at Silver Queen Road. Also in 1972, the route was constructed from South of Solemint Junction to San Fernando Road. Between 1973 and 1975, the remaning portion from San Fernando Road to I-5 (quake delayed) was opened.

     

    Status

    Constructed to freeway standards. The first segment opened in 1963; the last segment opened in 1974.

    Construction should start in winter 2008 on a $156 million project to elevate a two-lane car-pool lane to connect car-pool lanes on I-5 and Route 14. The project should be done by 2012. The project appears to have gone to bid in November 2007, with an estimate of $120M for the connectors in Los Angeles County (Santa Clarita) on I-5 from 0.2 Km South of the Balboa Boulevard overcrossing to 0.9 Km South of Weldon Canyon and on Route 14 from the I-5/Route 14 separation to 2.0 Km North of the Sierra Highway undercrossing.

    In March 2013, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Santa Clarita along Route 14 at Newhall Avenue, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $46,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Santa Clarita, from north of the Santa Clara River Bridge to north of Sierra Highway, that will rehabilitate 120 lane miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality. Project will replace damaged roadway slabs, place dowel bars between new and old slabs, replace approach and departure slabs at structures, grind and overlay auxiliary lane, place concrete termini at eight ramps, replace guardrail, grind and groove pavement, and seal joints and cracks. They also approved $13,000,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Palmdale, from north of Sierra Highway to Rayburn Road, that will rehabilitate 37 lane miles of pavement to improve safety and ride quality.

    It appears that a portion of the route has been vacated: PM R27.0 in the City of Santa Clarita. It is signed as Route 14U (Unrelinquished) from just north of the 14 freeway undercrossing to the on ramp at Placerita Canyon Rd. Another unrelinquished portion was relinquished in September 2002 (near PM T26.8); this is the segment that was related to the Route 126 and Route 14 junction.

    In June 2013, it was reported that interchange improvements with Avenue I were completed in Lancaster. A collaborative effort between the Los Angeles County Metro, the City of Lancaster, and Caltrans, the $12 million project involved the widening of Avenue I to three lanes in each direction, while providing dual left turn lanes onto Route 14 from both the eastbound and westbound directions. The project also replaced the problematic stop-sign controlled southbound off ramp with a new loop ramp which now intersects with Avenue I at 23rd Street West.

    An interchange is being built at the south end of the Mojave Bypass for WB Route 58 to SB Route 14 and NB Route 14 to EB Route 58 movements. This will create a single stop light for those most common movements at the existing Route 14/Route 58 intersection. For other movements, you will travel north on Route 14 all the way to Route 58 through Mojave. There are currently insufficient traffic volumes aren't high enough for a Route 14 freeway to the Route 58 freeway. However, according to Joe Rouse at Caltrans, there were originally plans for Route 14 to bypass Mojave on the east. A new freeway spur would have connected with the east segment of Route 58. At the north end of the town, the mainline of the freeway would become Route 58 west and a new freeway spur would have connected with Route 14 north. These would have been large interchanges and faced community opposition. Additional funding for this interchange was considered in September 2005.

    There were once plans to build a bypass in the Mojave area to the west of town. Now, if this ever gets built, it will be to the east of town. A four-lane expressway has been completed from Mojave through Red Rock Canyon, with a full grade-separated interchange at California City Blvd, and frontage roads extending from several miles north of that down almost to the town. The 16 miles north of Red Rock Canyon remain as two-lane road.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved $350K to install 9.3 miles of metal beam guardrail to reduce the number and severity of collisions in Palmdale and Lancaster from north of Palmdale Boulevard to north of Avenue I.

    In August 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will remove and replace the existing Red Rock Canyon Bridge (Bridge Number 50-0178) on Route 14 within Red Rock Canyon State Park (between Mojave and Inyokern). The project is programmed in the 2012 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). The total estimated cost is $19,485,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2013-14. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the 2012 SHOPP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to biological and aesthetic resources to a less than significant level. Proposed mitigation measures include protective fencing and best management practices for the desert tortoise, a special status species. Color and texture features incorporated into the final design will mitigate aesthetic issues.

    In March 2013, the CTC provided advance approval of $9,970,000 to replace the existing Red Rock Canyon Bridge (Bridge #50-0178) near Ridgecrest with a new longer, wider, and scour resistant bridge to reduce future bridge repair frequency and cost, and improve traffic operations and safety.

    In August 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of California City along Route 14, on Pesche Boulevard, California City Boulevard, and Leiman Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

    In January 2011, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of Kern along Route 14 between 4.2 miles south and 2.3 miles north of California City Boulevard, consisting of superseded highway right of way and collateral facilities.

    2007 CMIA. One project was submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding: expansion of the route to 4 lanes between Redrock Inyokern and Route 178( $129,278K requested). It was not recommended for funding.

     

    Naming

    Route 14 from Route 5 to Avenue D, North of Lancaster, is officially named the "Antelope Valley Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 57, Chapter 196, in 1957. The name comes from the fact that the freeway traverses the Antelope Valley. Antelope Valley was named for the graceful animal once found throughout California.

    The interchange on Route 14 with the Angeles Forest Highway (Los Angeles County Route N3) in the County of Los Angeles is officially named the "Captain Ted Hall and Engineer Arnie Quinones Memorial Interchange". It was named in memory of Fire Captain Ted Hall and Fire Figher Specialist Arnie Quinones. Fire Captain Tedmund D. "Ted" Hall first joined the Los Angeles County Fire Department in 1981 as a student worker, and graduated from the fire academy in 1983, serving as a firefighter in Lakewood, Whittier, and La Puente. In 1987, Mr. Hall joined the department's command and control team of fire dispatchers, and was promoted to Fire Fighter Specialist in 1988, serving as an engineer at various locations. He was promoted to captain in 2001, with his final assignment at Camp 16 in the Palmdale region. Fire Fighter Specialist Arnaldo "Arnie" Quinones first joined the Los Angeles County Fire Department in 1998, as a member of the department's call fire fighter program, and graduated from the fire academy in 2001, serving as a firefighter in Palmdale, Covina, and La Canada-Flintridge. In 2005, Mr. Quinones was promoted to Fire Fighter Specialist, with his final assignment as an engineer at Camp 16 in the Palmdale region. Captain Hall and Fire Fighter Specialist Quinones were both tragically killed in the line of duty on Sunday, August 30, 2009, during the Station Fire, when their emergency response vehicle went over the side and fell 800 feet into a steep canyon during fire suppression activities. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 58, Resolution Chapter 108, on September 28, 2011.

    The portion of Route 14 in the City of Palmdale from the south junction of Route 14 and Route 138 to West Avenue O8 is named the Lance Corporal Javier Olvera Memorial Highway. It was named in memory of Javier Olvera, born in 1988 in the Sylmar, California. Mr. Olvera attended R. Rex Parris High School in the Antelope Valley, during which he participated and excelled in the Police Explorer program. While watching military programs on the History Channel, Mr. Olvera became interested in the United States Marine Corps. Hoping to take his life in a positive direction, in 2006 Mr. Olvera enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and was sent to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego, California. Mr. Olvera graduated from Marine Corps boot camp with his platoon on February 23, 2007. Mr. Olvera was then sent to Camp Lejeune in North Carolina for training as a 0311 Infantryman, where his specialty was as a radio operator, a highly dangerous job, often targeted in battle by the enemy. On August 1, 2007, Mr. Olvera was promoted to the rank of Lance Corporal. In September 2007, Lance Corporal Olvera deployed to Iraq, where he stayed until February 2008, when he returned to the United States. Lance Corporal Olvera was again called to service in May 2009, and subsequently deployed with 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines with a contingent of 21,000 other Marines to Afghanistan. On August 8, 2009, Lance Corporal Olvera was killed in action by an improvised explosive device (IED). Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 60, chaptered 2/3/2014, Resolution Chapter 6.

    The portion of Route 14 in the County of Los Angeles, between Avenue M and Avenue L in the City of Lancaster is named the "Marine Corporal Christopher D. Leon Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Marine Corporal Christopher D. Leon, born on November 5, 1985, in Thousand Oaks, California. Corporal Leon was a 2004 graduate of Lancaster High School, and left for boot camp in the Marine Corps in San Diego shortly after graduating. Corporal Christopher D. Leon was described by fellow members of the Marine Corps as having a heart of a lion and this characteristic was displayed on many occasions, including when he broke his foot during a boot camp exercise called "the crucible" but still managed to courageously finish 10 miles of hiking and more miles of running with that broken foot. Leon made rank quickly and obtained his corporal's stripes before two years in service. He was assigned to the 5th Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company (ANGLICO), III Marine Expeditionary Force, in Okinawa, Japan and excelled in ANGLICO training and in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program. As a liaison company member, Corporal Leon was trained to quickly pinpoint the source of enemy fire from ground troops, helicopters, or attack plans and then to direct counter-fire. On June 20, 2006, at 20 years of age, Corporal Leon died from injuries suffered in combat in the western province of Al Anbar, Iraq. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 5, Resolution Chapter 70, on 7/14/2009.

    The Route 5/Route 14 interchange is officially designated the "Clarence Wayne Dean Memorial Interchange". Clarence Wayne Dean was a Los Angeles Police Officer. After being awakened on January 17, 1994, by the Northridge earthquake, Mr. Dean was proceeding, in the early morning darkness on his police motorcycle, to his division for assignment in the damaged area fell to his demise at the collapsed interchange of Route 5 and Route 14 in Los Angeles County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 111, Chapter 64, in 1994.

    The portion from Pearblossom Highway to US 395 is officially designated the "Aerospace Highway". This is because the importance of this area to the aerospace industry, which includes the area being the home to Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), the home of the Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC). Additionally, NASA Dryden Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) at EAFB has contributed to the defense of our country since 1954 through the development of virtually all the nation's rocket propulsion technology, including the initiation of the development and testing of several rocket engines, including the first ATLAS Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) in 1956; the first full-scale Minuteman solid propellant ICBM in 1959; the Pratt & Whitney XLR-129 Rocket Engine, which served as the precursor to the Rocketdyne "Space Shuttle Main Engine" in 1964; and the Titan 34 Solid Rocket Booster from the nozzle down to return Titan 34 to the nation's launch service after the Challenger tragedy. The Edwards Rocket Site also played a role in President John F. Kennedy's "Race to the Moon" when in 1961 Rocketdyne performed the first test firing of the 1,500,000 pound thrust F-1 Engine for the Manned Lunar Launch Program; subsequently, it was used as the location for over 7,000 development and acceptance test firings of the F-1 Engine, including every engine used to launch men to the moon. The AFRPL has continued to play a role in developing space technology, helping to develop the nation's largest hydrogen rocket engine for the Boeing Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) and "Attitude Control Thrusters Systems" for satellite and space maneuvering applications. The former Palmdale Airport was converted in 1953 into Air Force Plant 42, which has supported facilities for the production, engineering, final assembly, and flight testing of many notable high-performance aircraft from Boeing, Lockheed-Martin, and Northrop Grumman, including the F-100 Super Sabre, F-104 Starfighter, SR-71 Blackbird, B-1 Lancer, Space Shuttle, F-117 Nighthawk, B-2 Spirit, and U-2S reconnaissance plane. Some of the numerous milestones in flight have taken place at the AFFTC in its 50-year history, including the following:

    Air Force Captain Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager piloting the rocket-powered Bell X-1 became the first man to penetrate the so-called "sound barrier" in 1947, and in 1949, he completed the first, and to this day, only ground takeoff of an experimental rocket plane in the Bell X-1.

    The XB-70, conceived in the 1950s as a high-altitude bomber that could fly three times the speed of sound (Mach 3) and considered one of the world's most exotic airplanes, was used as a research aircraft for the advanced study of aerodynamics, propulsion, and other subjects related to large supersonic aircraft. It had its first flight at the AFFTC.

    In 1953, Jacqueline Cochran, flying a Canadian-built (Canadair) F-86 Sabre, became the first woman to exceed the speed of sound and established a new women's absolute speed record of 652.337 mph over a low-level course at Edwards Air Force Base.

    In 1953, the prototype North American YF-100A Super Sabre became the first aircraft in history to fly supersonic in level flight on its maiden flight from Edwards Air Force Base.

    In 1954, test pilot Major Arthur "Kit" Murray piloted the Bell X-1A from Edwards AFB to a new altitude record of 90,440 feet and became the first man to actually see the curvature of the earth.

    In 1958, test pilot Captain Walter Irwin set a new official world absolute speed record from Edwards AFB when he piloted a Lockheed F-104A Starfighter to an average speed of 1,404.09 mph.

    In 1959, with test pilot Major Joe Jordan at the controls, a Lockheed F-104C became the first jet-powered (air-breathing) aircraft to climb above 100,000 feet.

    In 1962, Major Bob White became the first man to fly an airplane above 300,000 feet, to 314,750 feet, and the first to fly an airplane in near space (above 50 miles) and was the first of eight X-15 test pilots at Edwards Air Force Base to earn their astronaut's wings by flying an airplane above 50 miles.

    In 1967, Air Force test pilot Major William J. "Pete" Knight piloted the modified X-15A-2 to a speed of Mach 6.7 (4,520 mph) and thereby recorded the fastest speed anyone has ever flown in an airplane.

    In 1976, Air Force Captain Eldon Joersz set a new official world absolute speed record when he piloted a Lockheed SR-71A to an average speed of 2,193.64 mph at Edwards Air Force Base.

    In 1977, the nonorbiting Space Shuttle Enterprise demonstrated the soundness of the shuttle design and confirmed the approach and landing techniques after being launched from a 747 and landing on Rogers Dry Lake 5 minutes and 21 seconds later.

    In 1979, at a remote location, test pilot Lieutenant Colonel N.K. "Ken" Dyson completed the final flight of Lockheed's classified Have Blue low-observables concept demonstrator flight test program, and convincingly demonstrated low observability against a wide array of the most sophisticated air- and ground-based air defense systems, and the successful conduct of these tests led to the development of the F-117A Nighthawk in the early 1980s and the beginning of the stealth revolution.

    In 1981, the Space Shuttle Columbia landed safely on Rogers Dry Lake following its first orbital mission, and marked the first time in history an orbital vehicle had left earth under rocket power and returned on the wings of an aircraft.

    In 1986, Dick Rutan and Jeanna Yeager piloted the experimental Voyager, and nine days, three minutes and 44 seconds after taking off from Edwards Air Force Base, the aircraft touched down on Rogers Dry Lake after completing the first-ever nonstop, unrefueled flight around the world.

    The Aerospace Highway was designated by ACR 119, Chapter 83, 6/20/2002. Additionally, an encroachment permit authorizing a specified historical monument and plaque dedicated to commemorate the major milestones in the aerospace industry that have taken place in the Antelope Valley was authorized to be erected on the vista point overlooking Palmdale Lake on Route 14 by ACR 120, Chapter 84, 6/20/2002.

    The Rosamond Boulevard Interchange of Route 14 in the City of Rosamond is named the "Lance Corporal Joseph C. Lopez Memorial Interchange". Named in memory of Joseph C. Lopez, who enlisted in the Marine Corps in March 2009, and was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force at Camp Pendleton. Lance Corporal Lopez was a strong Marine, physically and mentally, who made a conscious decision to let his faith in God lead him through whatever might happen. Lance Corporal Lopez was a mentor to many younger Marines from his life experiences and helped his fellow Marine brothers simply by being a good listener. Lance Corporal Lopez was deployed to the Sangin district of the Helmand province of Afghanistan in late September 2010, with his unit. On October 14th, 2010, Lance Corporal Lopez had returned safely to his Marine camp, after successfully patrolling an area of responsibility for more than 20 hours on foot. Lance Corporal Lopez's team was then dispatched to a nearby location to assist a Marine unit taking heavy fire. The then 26-year-old Lance Corporal Lopez was killed by an improvised explosive device during that combat operation in Helmand province. In 2011, Lance Corporal Lopez's family and church established an inaugural annual five kilometer run in remembrance of him, in which members of his Marine unit participated, all proceeds of which are donated to the Wounded Warriors Project and church youth programs. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 80, Resolution Chapter 89, on August 24, 2012.

    The portion of this route that was cosigned with US 6 (i.e., this entire segment) was named the "Grand Army of the Republic Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943. The GAR is a membership organization founded in Decatur, Illinois on April 6, 1866 by Benjamin F. Stephenson. It's membership was limited to honorably discharged veterans of the Union Army, Navy, Marine Corps or the Revenue Cutter Service who had served between April 12, 1861 and April 9, 1865. The GAR is responsible for the establishment of Memorial Day, which began in 1868 when GAR Commander-in-Chief John A. Logan issued General Order No. 11 calling for all Departments and Posts to set aside the 30th of May as a day for remembering the sacrifices of fallen comrades. The final Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic was held in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1949 and the last member, Albert Woolson died in 1956 at the age of 109 years.
    [Information on the GAR excerpted from the pages of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War].

     

    Named Structures

    On February 26, 2002, Caltrans unveiled its first-ever "Don't Drink and Drive" freeway sign near Acton, in memory of Callie "Joel" Buser, a Caltrans surveyor who was killed while performing survey work by a drugged driver.

     

    National Trails

    Midland Trail Sign This segment was part of the "Midland Trail".

     

    Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes are under construction or opened as follows:

    • I-5 to San Fernando Road. Construction starts in January 2001.

    • San Fernando Road/Route 26 to Sand Canyon Road.

    • Sand Canyon Road to Escondido.

    • Escondido to Pearblossom. Opened August 2, 2002.

    • Pearblossom to Avenue P-8.

     

    exitinfo.gif

    Note: As the first segment of this route will never be constructed, exit numbering begins at the start of the second segment.


  3. From Route 58 to Route 395 near Little Lake via the vicinity of Antelope Valley.


    Pre 1964 Signage History

    State Shield In the 1934 initial state signage, this portion of the route was numbered as Route 7. When state routes began to be shielded as US highways, this was resigned as US 6. This was also part of the 1911 extension of LRN 23.

     

    Status

    Freeman Gulch ProjectIn April 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Kern County near the community of Freeman that will convert the existing two-lane conventional highway into a four-lane divided controlled-access expressway on Route 14 from 0.8 mile north of Redrock Inyokern Road to 2.2 miles south of the junction with US 395. The "Freeman Gulch Four-Lane Project," consisting of a conversion to a four-lane expressway with a wide median, has been planned with the approval of a Project Study Report in 2001. The Project Report was approved on October 29, 2007 and the Initial Study with Mitigated Negative Declaration/Environmental Assessment with Finding of No Significance Impact was approved on October 3, 2007. A Supplemental Project Report that split the project into three segments was approved on April 12, 2010. The northern segment of this project, which includes the proposed route adoption and extends from 0.5 mile north of the Route 178 West junction to 1.7 miles north of Route 178 East junction (PM 58.3 to 62.3), is the first segment proposed to be constructed and programmed for construction capital.The project will be phased into three segments. Segment 1 is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and is fully funded, at a cost of $44,888,000. Segment 2 is partially programmed in the 2012 STIP; the cost for this segment is $47,687,000, of which $10,860,000 is programmed. Segment 3 is not currently programmed nor funded; the cost for this segment is $31,544,000. The total estimated project cost for all three phases is $124,119,000 for capital and support. Construction for Segment 1 is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2016-17. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the STIP.

    In relation to this project, in April 2012, the CTC adopted a portion of Route 14 as a controlled access highway from 0.1 mile north of Route 178 West junction, south of the unincorporated rural community of Indian Wells, to 1.4 miles north of Route 178 East junction. A Project Report was approved on October 29, 2007. A Supplemental Project Report was approved on April 12, 2010 to phase the project into three segments to fully fund each segment. An Initial Study with Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared for California Environmental Quality Act and the document was approved on October 3, 2007. The purpose of the adoption was to designate the remaining segment of conventional highway for Route 14 as a controlled access highway (expressway). The proposed route adoption was prepared by the Department with support from Kern County and Kern Council of Governments (KernCOG). This route adoption corresponds to the northern segment of the project referred to as the Freeman Gulch Four-Lane Project (PM 45.9 to 62.3) and runs through the unincorporated rural community of Indian Wells. The ultimate facility will be a four-lane divided controlled access highway with increased capacity and will improve traffic safety and operations of Route 14. The portion of Route 14 proposed for route adoption is a two-lane conventional highway, where as the portions directly south and north of the proposed route adoption are two-lane expressways. Just south of the proposed adoption segment, Route 14 was adopted by the California Highway Commission as a freeway in 1956 and denominated as a controlled access highway on March 30, 2012. Just north of the proposed adoption segment, Route 14 was adopted by the Commission as a controlled access highway on June 28, 1989. Following the completion of this project, Route 14 will be a continuous 4-lane facility along its entire length from its beginning at I-5 in Los Angeles County to US 395 in Kern County. It should be noted that the portion of ROute 14 covered by this project is the last segment of the route that has not been converted to a 4-lane facility. This project will greatly enhance the continuity of this route and provide a continuous 4-lane expressway from I-5 through Kern County and along US 395 up to near Olancha in Inyo County (a distance of 150 miles).

    014 Freeman Gulch ConnectionsIn May 2013, the CTC authorized public road connections in the county of Kern at approximate PM 48.9, 50.2, 53.5, 58.9 and 61.2. These new connections are located between 1.1 miles north of Redrock Inyokern Road and 1.4 miles north of the Route 178 East Junction in Kern County. This is part of the Freeman Gulch Four-Lane project, which includes construction of frontage roads and new connections to Route 14 at five locations. These new public road connections are needed to provide access to clusters of private parcels on both sides of Route 14 at each location. The ultimate facility will be a four-lane divided controlled access highway with increased capacity and improved operations and safety. Route 14 within the project limits is an undivided two-lane conventional highway, whereas the portions directly south and north are four-lane controlled access highways (expressways). The Department is proposing to convert the existing Route 14 within the project limits to a multilane expressway and provide route continuity with the existing expressway at each end of the project limits. The proposed highway improvements also include construction of frontage roads and new connections to Route 14 at five locations. These new connections are required to provide access to clusters of private parcels and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) public dirt roads. Currently, there are many private parcels connecting directly to the highway via driveways. These private parcels do not have access to any other local roads. Additionally, there are a number of BLM public dirt roads, used for recreational purposes, which also have direct access to both directions of the highway. As a result of the controlled access highway project proposal, the BLM roads will be modified to connect to the frontage roads and this way continue to have access to Route 14. The proposed reduced number of access points to the highway would improve traffic operations and enhance traffic safety along Route 14 and at the Route 178 east and west junctions.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route that was cosigned with US 6 (i.e., the entire segment) was named the "Grand Army of the Republic Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943.

    Historically, this segment was part of "El Camino Sierra" (Road to the Mountains).

     

    National Trails

    Midland Trail Sign This segment was part of the "Midland Trail".

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] Entire portion.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
Los Angeles 14 R66.19 67.60

 

Interstate Submissions

In December 1957, the designation I-14 was proposed for what is now I-210. This was a side-effect of California accepting an Arizona proposal to number I-10 as I-12, and I-8 as I-10. This forced a renumbering of I-12 (the proposal for current I-210), and the number I-14 was chosen. The numbering was rejected by AASHTO.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 14:

  • Total Length (1995): 117 miles traversable; 22 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 3,200 to 127,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 86; Sm. Urban 6; Urbanized: 46.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 116 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 117 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, Kern.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Defined as part of the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.11] Entire route.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 14 was signed along the route from Hermosa Beach to Jct. Route 18 near Olive, via Artesia Ave. Specifically, this routing ran from Route 18 (present day Route 91 near Yorba Linda) to US 101A in Hermosa Beach, along Orangethorpe Avenue, Grand Avenue, Artesia Blvd, 174th Street, Redondo Beach Blvd, and Gould Avenue. It ended at Gould Avenue and Sepulveda Blvd, at the junction with US 101A. The routing was LRN 175, and was added to the state highway system in 1933. Originally, it began near Imperial Highway (Route 90), but by 1959, the start had shifted S to near Jefferson St. in preparation for the new Route 91 Freeway routing.With the completion of the Riverside Freeway between I-5/US 101 (the Santa Ana Freeway) and Cypress Street, Route 14 was cut back to begin at Cypress Street at then US 91/Route 18, 4 miles west of the Route 55/US 91 junction in Placentia. The multiplex of Route 14 with I-5 and US 101 through Buena Park was still present. By the late 1950s, it was cosigned as Route 14/US 91 between the US 91/Route 55 junction and and the Orangethorpe/US 101 (I-5) junction (although at one point, it was pre-1964 Route 18 that was US 91). It was renumbered as Route 91 on July 1, 1964. This routing is longer than the 1935 routing, which only went E as far as Artesia and Firestone, where it joined what was then numbered as Route 10. The 1935 routing also had a discontinuity between Normandie Ave and Alameda St, where Artesia Blvd did not cross. Until Artesia was complete between Hawthorne and Alameda, the routing used a detour than ran N on Alameda to Compton, W on Compton, a S job at Avalon, then W across Redondo Beach Blvd to Hawthorne Blvd.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 14 was first defined in the 1909 First Bond Act as running from Albany to Martinez. It probably was the original routing of US 40, and included portions of I-80 and perhaps Route 4. It remained unchanged until 1935, when it was codified into the highway code as:

[LRN 14] is from Oakland to Martinez

It was considered a primary highway from Martinez to the junction of San Pablo Avenue and Thirty-eighth Street in Emeryville.

In 1953, Chapter 1787 truncated the routing from Martinez to “[LRN 7] near Crockett”. It was further truncated in 1957 by Chapter 36 to end in Richmond, leaving the definition as “from Oakland to [LRN 7] in Richmond at Cutting Blvd”.

LRN 14 is the former US 40 when it ran to Martinez, then, via ferry, to Benicia briefly before the opening of the Carquinez Bridge in 1927. That would have been (in modern street names), from W to E, San Pablo Ave, Pomona St, Carquinez Scenic Drive, running along the shore through Oleum, Vallejo Junction, Selby, Tormey, Valona, Crockett, Eckley, Port Costa and into Martinez.

LRN 14 started near LRN 5 (US 50, now I-580) near San Pablo and Peralta and ran to US 40 (LRN 7) near Cutting. Before US 40's rerouting onto Eastshore Highway, this was US 40. After the rerouting, this route was signed as Business US 40. This is present-day Route 123.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 15



Routing
  1. From Route 5 in San Diego to Route 8.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    State Shield This segment was added to Route 15 in 1969 by Chapter 294; it was previously Route 103. See below for the pre-1964 routing of Route 15.

    The segment between I-8 and I-805 (the 40th Street segment) is in the process of conversion to freeway standards. As soon as this conversion to freeway is completed, this will be resigned as I-15. Presently, it is 139(b) non-chargable interstate milage.

    The segment between I-805 and I-5 is already freeway standard. Route 15 ends just south of the I-5 interchange at 32nd Street and Harbor Drive, in the community of Barrio Logan in San Diego. The portion connecting Harbor Drive is a ramp and not part of the route itself.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1969, Route 103 (LRN 283, defined in 1959) was renumbered as Route 15, and former Route 15 was renumbered as Route 163. The Route 103 number was released for reused; it was reused in the Los Angeles are in 1983.

     

    Status

    Caltrans currently has a project to upgrade this segment to an eight-lane freeway basically following the 40th Street alignment through the Mid-City community of the City of San Diego. This is now open to traffic. From Landis Street to Adams Avenue, the freeway will generally be located between 40th Street and Central Avenue/Terrace Drive about 25 feet below ground. All but three city streets - Polk and Monroe avenues, and Landis Street - crossing 40th Street will stay open. Bridges will be constructed at Wightman Street, Univeristy Avenue, Orange Avenue, El Cajon Boulevard and Meade Avenue. Traffic will be able to get on and off the freeway within this segment of Route 15 through interchanges at University Avenue, El Cajon Boulevard and Adams Avenue. One city block of the freeway, between Polk and Orange avenues, will be covered with a community park. Pedestrian bridges will be provided at Monroe Avenue and near Landis Street. Pedestrians along Polk Street may cross through the park on the block of freeway cover.

    In September 2011, it was reported that the CTC had approved $5,883,000 to rehabilitate 23 lane miles of I-15, from north of Main Street to south of Landis Road in San Diego.

    Route 15 cannot be currently signed as Interstate 15 because Route 15 is still not Interstate-standard between Route 94 and I-5, especially near Market Street. There are some on/off ramps that do not have adequate deceleration/acceleration lanes. This is currently being reconstructed. Note that Route 15/40th Street Fwy was not funded using conventional Interstate Highway funding. The primary concern is the Route 15/Route 94 interchange. The blind ramps, left exits, and narrowing of Route 15 to two lanes each way make this a substandard interchange. Howerver, reconstruction of this interchange to Interstate standards may occur as soon as 2006, pending funding identification and acceleration of this reconstruction in the planning documents. This is also related to the Route 94 corridor study, which is likely to result in additional improvements to that freeway corridor as well.

    The small segment in San Diego at PM 4.1 was up for relinquishment in September 2002.

    In May 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of San Diego, along 36th Street, between Imperial Avenue and K Street, consisting of a reconstructed and relocated city street. In July 2005, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the City of San Diego, between Dwight Street and 0.05 mile north of Adams Avenue, consisting of superseded highway right of way, reconstructed and relocated city streets, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved relinquishement of right of way in the city of San Diego along Route 15 on 40th Street between Madison and Adams Avenues, consisting of a relocated and reconstructed city street.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #618: Grade Separation at 32nd Street between I-15 and Harbor Drive in San Diego. $800,000.

     

     

    Naming

    The portion of Route 15 between I-805 and I-8 is named "Escondido Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission in 1957. The name arises from the fact the route goes through the City of Escondido.

    The segment between Route 5 and Route 805 is called Wabash". It was named by location, because the freeway approximates the old route of Wabash Boulevard.

    The section of this route between the Home Avenue exit and the Ocean View Boulevard exit is named the "Archie Moore Memorial Freeway". Archie Moore was a legendary boxer whose outstanding career endured through four decades and a record 143 knockouts and who won the light-heavyweight championship when he was nearly 39 years old. After winning his title, he defined it nine times. He served as a trainer in the 1976 Olympics in Montreal and was elected to the Boxing Hall of Fame. He served in the Dept. of Housing and Urban Development during the Reagan administration. He lived in a home on E street in San Diego where he operated a restaurant known as Archie Moore's Chicken Shack. He also ran the "Any Boy Can" program that taught at-risk youth how to box, and about competition, sportsmanship, self-reliance, self-discipline, confidence, and courage. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 90, Chapter 141, on September 27, 1999.

    Route 15 between Route 163 and Miramar Road in the County of San Diego is named the "Semper Fi Highway". It was named in recognition of the service provided by the Marine Corps Air Station Miramar to Americans. The Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in southern California, which has military roots dating back to 1917, is home to three commands that include the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, the Marine Corps Air Bases Western Area, and the Marine Aircraft Group 46, each serving their own specific function with their own subordinate units. The Marine Corps Air Station Miramar and the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing are dedicated to supporting West Coast Marine aviation missions, Marine Aircraft Group 46, and other Naval aviation support units as designated by the Commandant of the Marine Corps in coordination with the Chief of Naval Operations. The Marine Corps Air Station Miramar employs approximately 12,500 Marines, Sailors, and Civilians. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 121, Chapter 40, May 3, 2004.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    State Shield Approved as 139(b) non-chargeable milage in 1984. Constructed to interstate standards from Route 5 to 1 mi N of Route 805. May be signed as state route until upgraded to interstate standards.


  2. From Route 8 to the Nevada state line near Primm (formerly Stateline), Nevada via the vicinity of Temecula, Corona, Ontario, Victorville, and Barstow.


    Suffixed Routings

    This route has a complicated numbering history, described below. The original (1947) plan was to have I-15 terminate at I-10, using the present-day I-215 alignment. US 395 would then continue to San Diego. In 1965, the US 395 segment was renumbered as TEMP I-15/US 395. In 1969, that corridor became I-215, and a new western alignment was created for I-15 that used existing Route 71 between US 395 and Route 91, and a new alignment (approximating former Route 31 in portions) between Route 91 and Devore. "I-215" and I-15 rejoined near Temecula. In 1974, I-215 was resigned as I-15E (with a real route number of Route 194), with the expressway portion signed as TEMP I-15E. In 1983, the I-15E signage was changed back to I-215; Route 194 was deleted, and Route 215 was created as non-chargable interstate.

    There were also Temporary I-15 signs from the San Diego County line south through Escondido on two-lane old US 395, until it was replaced by four-lane (then quickly expanded to eight-lane) I-15. Note that, for a time, "Temporary I-15" was the only route signage on that road. I-15 was completed through northern San Diego County around 1986.

    There may have been Temporary I-15 shields in San Diego, on Murphy Canyon Road between I-8 and Route 163 (former US 395), before it was upgraded to a substandard freeway around 1985, and possibly thereafter until it was completely rebuilt.

     

    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, Route 15 was defined as "Route 15 is from Route 10 in San Bernardino to the Nevada state line near Calada via Barstow."

    In 1968, Chapter 282 relaxed the definition to be "Route 15 is from Route 10 near San Bernardino to the Nevada state line near Calada via Barstow."

    In December 1968, the 1968 Federal Aid Highway act provided $201.2 million for construction of a new routing for I-15 from San Diego to Colton, a distance of 102.5 miles. As a result of this, in 1969, Chapter 294 transferred the portion of former US 395 from the I-5/US 395 (present-day I-5/Route 163) junction to I-10 in San Bernardino to Route 15 as an initial routing. Section (a) of the routing was added by transfer from Route 103, and this segment was redefined to be "Route 8 to the Nevada state line near Calada via Temecula, San Bernardino, and Barstow and passing near Riverside."

    In 1974, Chapter 537 redefined the route to the west as "Route 8 to the Nevada state line near Calada via the vicinity of Temecula, Corona, and Barstow." The portion of previous Route 15 from Route 71 (present-day I-15) near Temecula to Route 31 (present-day I-15) near Devore was transferred to Route 194, which was renumbered as Route 215. The portion of Route 71 from Route 15 (present-day I-215) to Route 91 and former Route 31, from Route 15 (present-day I-215) to Route 91, was transferred to Route 15.

    In 1994, Chapter 1220 further tightened the definition to be "Route 8 to the Nevada state line near Stateline, Nevada via the vicinity of Temecula, Corona, Ontario, Victorville, and Barstow."

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    See below for the pre-1964 routing of Route 15.

    State Shield US Highway Shield Before the 1974 renumbering (yes, 1974!), everything is all confused. The routing can be broken up into the following segments:

    1. Pre-1969 Route 15 between I-8 in San Diego and a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station: The former route of US 395 was present-day Route 163; LRN 77 defined in 1931.

    2. Post-1969 Route 15 between I-8 in San Diego and a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station: This is I-15, and was LRN 283, defined in 1959.

    3. 1969 Route 15 from a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station and 2 mi N of Temecula: The route was originally signed as Route 71, it was co-signed as US 395 in 1939, and was LRN 77 (defined in 1931).

    4. 1969 Route 15 between 2 mi N of Temecula and Riverside: The route was signed as US 395 since 1931 between Perris and Riverside. The direct segment between Temecula and Perris was constructed 1952-1952; upon completion, the US 395 designation was moved to the direct route. This segment was LRN 78 (defined in 1931). This is now I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.

    5. 1969 Route 15 through Riverside (between jct US 60/US 91 and jct US 60/US 395): The route was cosigned as US 60/US 395, and was LRN 19 (defined in 1909). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.

    6. 1969 Route 15 between Riverside and San Bernardino: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 395, and was LRN 43 (defined in 1931). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.

    7. 1969 Route 15 between San Bernardino and Devore: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66/US 395, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1915). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.

    8. 1974 Route 15 between 2 mi N of Temecula and Corona: The route was signed as Route 71, and was LRN 77 (defined in 1931). Until 1952-1953, the portion between Temecula and Route 74 was signed as part of US 395.

    9. 1974 Route 15 between Route 91 near Corona and Route 60 near Ontario: The route was unsigned in 1963 but was LRN 193 (defined in 1933). It was signed as Route 31 between 1964 and 1974. Between 1974 and the construction of the I-15 freeway, it was signed as Temporary I-15.

    10. 1974 Route 15 between Route 60 near Ontario and Devore: This route was unconstructed, but was LRN 193 (defined in 1959). Note that it had been LRN 193 defined in 1993 S of Route 66 until 1935. It was also LRN 30 N of US 70 (I-10) in 1959. For a time it was numbered as Route 31.

    11. Between Devore and 7 mi SW of Victorville: The route was cosigned as US 66/US 91/US 395, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1915). US 395 (LRN 145) diverged and headed N at this point. Note that a portion of the pre-freeway expressway version of this route over Cajon Pass proper is still partially there but has been regraded and used for SB I-15. From Cleghorn to I-215, there is a lasting and paved segment of the 1951-52 expressway. Only one side is used to reduce costs on maintenance. It isn't always the same side though as there are a couple of crossovers along the route. Between Devore and the divergence of US 395, this was originally state signed Route 95 before the definition of US 395.

    12. Between 7 mi SW of Victorville and Barstow: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1915). At Barstow, US 66 (LRN 58) diverged and headed E.

    13. Between Barstow and the Nevada state line: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 466, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1925).

    A good article on the history of the Cajon Pass may be found here. The old Indian trail followed by later Spanish explorers crossed the San Bernardino Mountains east of the Cajon Pass on the ridge between Devil and Cable Canyon through present day Cedar Springs, and followed the Mojave River into the desert. This was the route taken by the first American to push into San Bernardino from the east. In 1861, John Brown Sr., built a toll road from Devore to the Cajon Pass Summit under a state franchise good for 20 years. Tolls ranged from 3 cents per head of sheep to $1 for a wagon and pair of animals. At about the time that the franchise on Brown's Turnpike expired and it became a county road, the railroads were engaged in a struggle to put tracks through the pass. The Southern Pacific ended up purchasing the right to build through the Cajon when it took over the bankrupt Los Angeles and Independence Railroad. Meanwhile, Santa Fe officials were informed of the lower pass through the East Cajon and under the name "California Southern Extension Railway," tracks were laid from San Bernardino to Barstow, causing the Southern Pacific to run its line to Los Angeles. In 1953, construction of a freeway through the pass was completed, at a cost in excess of $2,100,000 for the southerly 9.3 miles of the pass between Devore and Gish Underpass about four miles south of the summit. About half of the old two lanes built in 1932 were converted to use for one-way traffic, with two additional lanes constructed for traffic in the opposite direction. Four new lanes of pavement have been constructed for about five miles.

     

    Status

    Portions of this route are currently undergoing a Nevada Dept. of Transportation (NDOT) funded widening. There is also a CalTrans project to add a southbound truck climbing lane at two locations in San Bernardino County (CTC January 2001 Agenda, item 2.1c.(1) item 60). Additionally, in April 2002, the CTC (Agenda Item 2.5b.(1)) considered STIP Project #7, which would add a NB truck climbing lane near Cajon Pass from 0.1 km S of Route 138 to 0.1 km S of Oak Hill Road. This was still on the agenda in 2006: Project #60 is to construct the two separate truck-climbing lanes on Route 15 in San Bernardino County. This project has been segmented into two sub-projects for implementation. The original plan was to fully fund Project #60.1 (lanes just N of Barstow) solely with TCRP funds and Project #60.2 (lanes S of Baker) solely with STIP-IIP funds. However, due to the previous temporary suspension of allocating new TCRP funds, Project #60.1 is currently under construction utilizing a portion of the TCRP funds ($860,000) combined with SHOPP funds. As a result, $9,140,000 in TCRP funds are now available for Project #60.2. Project #60.2 is ready to be advertised for construction in March 2006. All project development costs have been completed using STIP-IIP funds. With Construction Support being funded with STIP-IIP funds, the Department proposes to fund Construction Capital with the now available TCRP funds.

    In the Mountain Pass area, rather than let traffic back up in the two southbound lanes that remained open, the NB lanes have been restriped to eliminate the shoulder, and Jersey Barriers have been installed in order to squeeze in a SB lane in addition to the two NB lanes on the NB side of the freeway. Two of the three SB lanes remain open on the SB side. SB cars leaving Nevada have the choice to use the Autos Only Express Lane, or share the two regular lanes with (slow) trucks.

    In March 2011, the CTC approved a new public road connection at Ranchero Road to I-15 in the city of Hesperia in San Bernardino County. This is approximately 1.8 miles north of the existing Oak Hill Road interchange. The proposed project is needed to provide access to future development along Ranchero Road and reduce congestion at the Main Street interchange, the Joshua Street interchange, and the Oak Hill Road interchange by adding a new interchange at Ranchero Road. In addition to reducing congestion, the project is expected to enhance traffic operations and provide a Level of Service that is consistent with the goals of the City’s Congestion Management Plan. In May 2012, the CTC approved $33.1 million to rebuild the Ranchero Road intersection with I-15 in Hesperia.

    In December 2012, the CTC relinquished right of way in the city of Hesperia along Route 15 on Main Street and Mariposa Road, consisting of collateral facilities.

    There are also plans to add northbound and southbound mixed flow lanes between Victorville and Barstow at Mojave Drive (CTC December 2001 Agenda items 2.5b(1) Projects 2 and 3).

    In 2007, two projects were submitted for funding from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account; neither were recommended for funding. These projects were widening of the route between Victorville to Barstow ($46,432K requested, total costs $136,481K) and construction of 2 new interchanges in Victorville ($44,352K requested, total cost $134,096K).

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $9,765,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in and near Barstow, from Route 58 to Main Street, that will resurface pavement on 21.2 lane miles to improve safety and ride quality.

    In July 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct roadway improvements including intersection improvements at three locations on Route 15 in the city of Victorville. The project is programmed in the 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes federal and local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2012-13. Total estimated project cost is $146,676,000 for capital and support.

    In January 2012, the CTC approved reducing the original CMIA allocation for construction for the Route 15/La Mesa Road/Nisquali Road Interchange project (PPNO 0172T) in San Bernardino County by $5,118,000, from $21,324,000 to $16,206,000. The contract was awarded on December 7, 2011. This project is in Victorville, on Route 15 at La Mesa Road/Nisquali Road between Bear Valley Road and Palmdale Road (Route 18); it will construct an interchange at La Mesa/Nisquali Road and realign frontage roads.

    In May 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will construct a new interchange at the intersection of Route 15 and Ranchero Road in the city of Hesperia. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes local funds. Total estimated project cost is $98,200,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. The project will involve construction activities in the habitat of the Cooper’s hawk, a State listed species of special concern. In addition, the project has the potential for growth inducement and impacts to visual resources.

    In February 2009, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the town of Apple Valley along Route 15 on East Frontage Road from the town limit line to Stoddard Wells Road, consisting of a frontage road and adjacent drainage facilities.

    In September 2010, the CTC approved relinquishment of right of way in the city of Victorville along Route 15 from the city limits with Apple Valley to 0.1 mile southerly, consisting of frontage road and adjacent drainage easement.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed widening this route for HOV lanes, and the addition of Managed Lanes in San Bernardino. In San Diego, he proposed construction of Managed Lanes - North/South Segments.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #954: Construct a new interchange where I-15 meets Cajalco Road in Corona, CA. $8,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #1237: I-15/Base Line Road Interchange Project, Rancho Cucamonga, Calfornia. $4,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #1342: Construction of new freeway between I-15 and US 395, including new interchange at I-15. This is the last part of the High Desert Corridor (see Route 138). This will provide new highway access to the Southern California Logistics Airport. $4,000,000.

    • High Priority Project #1590: I-15 and Route 79 South Freeway Interchange and Ramp Improvement Project. $1,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #2233: I-15 and Winchester Road interchange Project. $1,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #2402: I-15, California Oaks Road Interchange Project. $1,600,000.

    • High Priority Project #2805: Establish I-15 Interchange at Nisqualli and Mojave River crossing in San Bernardino County. $1,200,000.

    • High Priority Project #3783: Construct 20 miles of managed lanes on I-15, between Route 163 and Route 78 in and near San Diego. $5,000,000.

    In June 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will reconstruct the I-15/I-215 Interchange adjacent to the unincorporated Community of Devore in southwestern San Bernardino County. The project will include the widening of I-15, constructing truck bypass lanes through the I-15/I-215 Interchange, reconstructing adjacent local interchanges, and reconnecting Cajon Boulevard between Devore Road and Kenwood Avenue. The project is programmed in the 2012 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and 2010 State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP). Total estimated project cost is $324,163,000 for capital and support. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed in the 2012 STIP and 2010 SHOPP. The project has been approved by the Commission to be included in the Design Build Demonstration Program. The project will receive an allocation in Fiscal Year 12-13, and will utilize the designbuild method of procurement consistent with the applicable provisions under Public Contract Code, Section 6800.

    In August 2012, the CTC approved $137,608,000 in SHOPP funding for projects on I-15 and I-215, near Devore Heights, on Route 15 from south of Glen Helen Parkway to north of Kenwood Avenue and on Route 215 from 1.8 mi south of Route 15 to Route 15. Outcome/Output: Reconfigure connectors from Route 15 to Route 215 to reduce traffic weave movements and improve the operational performance for the interchange.

    In December 2012, the CTC approved up to $137,608,000 $53,743,000 for the multi-funded I-15 Widening and Devore Interchange Reconstruction project (PPNO 0170M) in San Bernardino County, on the State Highway System.

    According to Chris Powell, there are also plans to widen the freeway between I-210 and the Mojave River in Apple Valley. This won't happen for another 10-12 years, but in the plans there are also plans to redesign the I-15/I-215 interchange in Devore. The redesign would make it so that the I-15 becomes the mainline instead of the I-215 like it does now. In other words the I-215 would merge with the I-15 in the slow lane rather then having the I-15 merge with the I-215 in the slow lane like it does now. There were five alternatives: a no build alternative, a TSM/TDM alternative, adding HOV lanes, dedicated truck lanes from the 210 to the Mojave River, and a managed lanes alternative that would put reversible lanes in the median of the I-15 for rush hour traffic going both directions. Out of the five there were two alternatives that are going to be studied further. One of the ideas is a mix of the 3rd and 5th alternative that would put reverisible lanes from north of US 395 to I-210, which would include also adding mixed flow lanes from I-210 to US 395. The other alternative is the dedicated truck lanes that would run in the median of I-15. Also this alternative has two different possibilities that are going to be looked at: (1) to have just exclusive truck lanes with no tolls for the trucks, or (2) to have a toll lane for LCV's (which would require extending the lanes into Nevada to work).

    In December 2012, it was reported that the CTC allocated $53.7 million for the Devore interchange and I-15 Freeway widening project. The project will reconfigure the area where I-15 and I-215 split, add north and southbound lanes and truck bypass lanes.

    In 2007, the CTC did not recommend funding two requests from the Corridor Movement Improvement Account (CMIA): widening I-15 between Bundy Canyon Rd and I-215 ($109,801K) and constructing a new interchange at French Valley Pkwy ($31,545K).

    There are plans to add a southbound truck climbing lane at two locations in San Bernardino County. This is TCRP Project #60. This project will be delayed, the August 2004 CTC agenda has a request for an amendment to deprogram $95,000 in TCR funds, update funding plan and project schedule previously approved.

    Near Rancho Cucamonga and Ontario, there are a series of signs that read things like "BLUE AND ORANGE PASS USE I-210" then "TAN AND GREEN PASS USE I-10" and "RED PASS USE 4th ST EXIT." These refer to parking directions for the California Speedway.

    In August 2011, the CTC approved $108,745,000 in SHOPP funding for repairs in Rancho Cucamonga, Fontana and Rialto from 7th Street to Sierra Avenue that will rehabilitate 41 lane miles of pavement, replace barriers on five bridges, remove and replace approach and departure slabs on 11 bridges and seal decks on three bridges to improve safety and ride quality.

    Duncan Cyn InterchangeIn March 2012, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a new interchange on I-15 at the existing Duncan Canyon Road overcrossing in the City of Fontana. The project is programmed in the State-Local Partnership Program (SLPP). The project is fully funded with SLPP and local funds. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The total estimated project cost is $31,752,000 for capital and support. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the SLPP.

    In June 2012, the CTC approved a new interchange on I-15 within the City of Fontana. The interchange is to be located at the existing Duncan Canyon Road Overcrossing. The new interchange is between the existing Summit Avenue Interchange (PM 9.60) to the south and Sierra Avenue Interchange (PM 12.84) to the north. The Duncan Canyon Road Interchange has been initiated by the City to address the need for additional access to I-15. The project is necessitated in response to the traffic volume increases which will result from the rapid growth in both population and industrial development projected over the next 25 years. This project proposes providing a freeway access ramp at the four quadrants of the interchange. The exit ramp termini would be designed for three lanes to ensure a satisfactory Level of Service. The northbound entrance ramp would have a single mixed flow lane and an HOV lane and the southbound entrance ramp would have two mixed flow lanes and an HOV lane. The entrance ramps would be metered. Deceleration and acceleration lanes would be provided on the northbound exit ramp and southbound entrance ramp respectively. Duncan Canyon Road, including the existing overcrossing structure, is proposed to be widened to the north to match the standard cross section in the City's General Plan. This standard cross section for Duncan Canyon Road is classified by the City as a modified primary highway. The existing twolane Duncan Canyon Road to the west of the overcrossing would be widened to four lanes which match recent improvements. At the overcrossing structure, aside from the proposed four through lanes, there would be two dedicated left turn lanes for westbound Duncan Canyon Road traffic turning onto the southbound I-15 entrance ramp. A single left turn lane will be used for eastbound Duncan Canyon Road to the southbound I-15 entrance ramp. A six-foot sidewalk is proposed along the north and south sides of the overcrossing along with an eight-foot Class II bike lane/shoulder. In December 2012, the CTC updated the funding plan for this project.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in San Bernardino County that will improve the I-15/Base Line Road Interchange in Rancho Cucamonga, including widening Base Line Road from four to six lanes, widening East Avenue from two to four lanes, adding right and left turn lanes on Base Line Road and on East Avenue, realigning and widening the southbound and northbound diamond ramps from one to two lanes, adding a southbound loop on-ramp, and adding I-15 acceleration/deceleration lanes. The project is programmed in the Proposition 1B State-Local Partnership Program (SLPP) and includes local funds. The total estimated project cost is $43,100,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011- 12. The scope, as described for the preferred alternative, is consistent with the project scope programmed by the Commission in the SLPP. A copy of the MND has been provided to Commission staff. The project will mitigate potential impacts to wetlands and other waters to a less than significant level. Potential impacts to wetlands will be mitigated through the purchase of mitigation credits from an off-site mitigation bank or participation in an in-lieu fee program.

    There are plans to add HOT lanes to I-15 once the HOT construction on Route 91 completes. The Riverside County Transportation Commission has decided to build four toll lanes -- two in each direction -- on I-15. Commissioners gave the $415 million follow-up project the green light in February 2013 at an annual desert retreat. The I-15 toll lanes would run from Cajalco Road on the south to Route 60 on the north. Work on the I-15 toll lanes could begin in 2018 and be completed in 2020.
    (UT San Diego, 2/8/2013)

    In March 2011, the CTC approved a public road connection at French Valley Parkway on I-15 in the city of Temecula in Riverside County near the city of Temecula, at Post Mile (PM) 7.3. The construction of the French Valley Parkway Interchange would help reduce travel delays by providing increased opportunities for access to and from the mainline facility, thereby alleviating congestion on the adjacent Winchester ramps and traffic that backs up onto the I-15 mainline. However, with the construction of a new interchange and the limited distance between Winchester Road and the I-15/I-215 junction, standard spacing between interchanges is not possible. Without the addition of a collector/distributor (C/D) system, the new interchange would contribute to an increase in weaving movements. To alleviate increased and conflicting weaving movements, a C/D system was incorporated into the project design. To ensure the project meets the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) criteria for logical termini and independent utility, the effect of the project on the adjacent interchanges and freeway-to-freeway junction was evaluated. The goal was to ensure that the project would not result in adverse operational effects on the mainline or ramps and that the improvements were sufficient to accommodate and safely integrate the traffic volumes being introduced to the mainline facility. Therefore, the improvements were extended to south of the Winchester Road Interchange and north of the I-15/I-215 junction.

    A September 2012 article provided more information on the French Valley Parkway. It reported on the purchase of land in late September by the City of Temecula: five separate parcels purchased from Murrieta. The parcels were for the French Valley Parkway project. The total bill for the land is $1.09 million, which includes roughly $15,000 in escrow fees.The $200-million French Valley Parkway interchange project kicked off in June 2012. Split in two phases, the project will add a new exit-only freeway lane at Winchester Road and a westbound off-ramp on southbound I-15, which will take drivers from the freeway to Jefferson Avenue at the Murrieta/Temecula border. The work is expected to take between 12 and 18 months and will cost Temecula $13.8 million, with the bulk of the funds coming from fees developers pay toward capital improvement projects. The second phase will include the construction of the actual parkway stretching over I-15 to Date Street on the east side. Included will be on- and off-ramps, plus new lanes to the outside of the freeway in both directions. The is no start date for the second phase, though the work will take up to 30 months to complete. Murrieta is routing the money from the land purchase toward a project to build a bridge and four-lane road from Ynez Road in Temecula to Jackson Avenue in Murrieta, offering drivers an alternative to the freeway. The thoroughfare will also connect to the later phase of the French Valley Parkway project.

    In January 2013, the CTC authorized $3,500,000 to the RCTC for the I-15/Los Alamos Road Overcrossing Replacement. This project, in the City of Murrieta, at the intersection of I-15 and the Los Alamos Road overcrossing will replace the existing 2-lane overcrossing with a 4-lane structure.

    In February 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project on I-15 in Riverside County to reconfigure the existing California Oaks Road interchange, and construct roadway improvements in the city of Murrieta. (PPNO 9991). Specifically the project will construct roadway improvements that include modifications to an existing diamond interchange on I-15 at California Oaks Road in the city of Murrieta. A Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) has been completed, because the project will involve construction activities resulting in both visual effects and biological resource impacts in the form of disturbance of burrowing owl habitat.. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. The total estimated project cost is $36,208,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2009-10.

    In November 2011, the first workshop for the "Historic Highway 395 Corridor Study" project, also known as the Jefferson Avenue Corridor project, was held in Murrieta. The 16-mile arterial corridor is proposed to parallel the west side of I-15 where old US 395 used to travel. It would extend from Rancho California Road along Jefferson Avenue through the cities of Temecula and Murrieta, continuing along Palomar Street and Mission Trail through the cities of Wildomar and Lake Elsinore, and continuing along East Lakeshore Drive to Main Street in Lake Elsinore. Additional information may be found at http://www.highway395corridorstudy.org/.

    There are plans to construct new Direct Access Ramps (DAR), also known as drop ramps, at Del Lago Boulevard and Hale Avenue to I-15 in the City of Escondido. Access to I-15 at Del Lago Boulevard and Hale Avenue has been identified by the City of Escondido to facilitate the implementation of the I-15 Managed Lane Project and is consistent with the region’s desire to accommodate “smart growth.” This project is tentatively scheduled for construction in 2008 to 2010.
    CTC November 2005 Agenda.

    [TCRP Project 83]There are plans to add a high-tech managed lane on I-15 N of San Diego from Route 163 to Route 78 (see map to the right). This is TCRP Project #83. There are two subprojects: Project #83.1 — adds the transit elements to support the high-tech managed lane (i.e., acquisition of buses and construction of bus rapid transit centers along the I-15 freeway to implement a bus rapid transit system, with preferential access provided to buses and carpools via direct access ramps). This phase is scheduled to be completed in July 2008. Project #83.2 add the freeway elements for the high-tech managed lane. In April 2006, the CTC considered a proposal to amend the project application to TCRP Project application amendment to: (1) transfer $23,100,000 in TCRP funding from #83.1 to #83.2; (2) update project schedule and funding plan for both projects; (3) redistribute $3,663,000 from Right of Way on #83.2 to Construction. Project #83.1 has the following completion dates as of April 2006: Phase 1: FY 2003/2004; Phase 2: FY 2005/2006; Phase 3: FY 2005/2006; Phase 4: FY 2008/2009. Project #83.2 has the following completion dates as of April 2006: Phase 1: FY 2003/2004; Phase 2: FY 2005/2006; Phase 3: FY 2005/2006; Phase 4: FY 2008/2009. In August 2008, Caltrans released for bid the project to construct the north segment of the managed lanes in San Diego County in and near Escondido at various locations from 0.1 KM south of the Highland Road overcrossing to 0.2 KM North of the Ninth Avenue undercrossing.

    In 2008, Chapter 421 (AB 1954, 9/27/2008) authorized a value pricing and transit program involving HOT lanes to be developed and operated on Route 15 in Riverside County by the Riverside County Transportation Commission. The bill required the Riverside County Transportation Commission and the Department of Transportation to implement the program pursuant to a cooperative agreement that addresses specified matters in connection with the program and to establish appropriate traffic flow guidelines, as specified. The bill authorized the Riverside County Transportation Commission to impose tolls and issue revenue bonds for the HOT lane project. The bill also authorized toll revenues to be used for specified purposes related to the project and to Route 15. The bill noted that the commission is not entitled to compensation for the adverse effects on toll revenues due to construction of competing facilities by the department or local agencies.

    As of December 2008, field reports provided more details on the project, which runs from the merge with Route 163 (Cabrillo Freeway) northward to the junction with Route 78. The report noted that, when complete, I-15 will vary between 12 and 14 overall lanes. The work is being done in two stages. Between Route 163 and Route 56 (Ted Williams Freeway) [known as "Stage South"], initial work is underway involving the expansion of the present two reversible roadways into four overall lanes that flow in both directions. Between Route 56 and West Bernardo Drive, work is further along on the building of the dual direction HOT lanes in the I-15 median; in face, the project is already finished between Route 56 and a point just north of the soon-to-be opened Rancho Bernardo Transit Station. Work further north will continue through 2009 to Centre City Parkway. The last stage is from Exit 28 northward to Route 78 at Escondido.

    In February 2009, the CTC approved combining both managed lanes projects into a single project. In March 2009, the CTC amended this to delete revising the scope to include the North Segment as the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) approval was not obtained. The funding plans for the three roadway elements (Unit 1 [PPNO 0661A], Unit 2 [PPNO 0661B] and Unit 3 [PPNO 0661C]) were replaced in their entirety to document the financial plans of the three south segment units funded from the CMIA Program.

    Related to this project is the widening of I-15. As of January 2006, the middle portion of the estimated $1 billion widening of I-15 between Escondido and Route 163 in San Diego is about half done. Motorists who drive the route now see a long ribbon of concrete separating the freeway's north- and southbound lanes, concrete that will eventually be part of the "managed lanes" portion of the project. "We should have the middle segment ... lanes opened around late 2007 or early 2008," said Gustavo Dallarda, the California Department of Transportation's manager for the I-15 project. "When we finish the middle segment, we'll start on the north and south segments simultaneously." Ever since late 2003, I-15 commuters have seen constant work along the freeway between Lake Hodges and the Miramar area as workers construct what eventually will be a 14-lane freeway. The managed lanes are essentially reversible lanes that will allow the four lanes separating today's north and south lanes to absorb peak commute traffic. Monitors will use a movable concrete barrier to decide how many lanes are needed in the southbound direction in the morning and how many during the late-afternoon drive home. The extra lanes will help alleviate and possibly end the backups motorists now experience. About 300,000 vehicles use that stretch of I-15 each day with peak commute times between San Diego and Escondido taking 30 to 45 minutes, according to the latest data from the San Diego Association of Governments, the region's primary transportation planning and funding agency. The initial work involved construction of one additional lane in each direction. Much of the work now is centered at interchanges, overpasses and bridges that span the 21-mile project. [Information from the North County Times]

    In September 2011, it was reported that additional HOT lane entrances and exits have been opened. The new entrance and exit just south of Poway Road/Rancho Peñasquitos Boulevard will be available to southbound I-15 drivers. Drivers who enter I-15 from Carmel Mountain Road, Camino del Norte, Bernardo Center Drive and farther north can access the entrance, while motorists can exit there to access Mira Mesa Boulevard and destinations farther south. The new Express Lanes entrance north of Mira Mesa Boulevard is for I-15 northbound drivers and will be available for motorists who enter I-15 from Carroll Canyon Road, Miramar Road/Pomerado Road or farther south.

    In late September 2011, it was reported that the $1.3 billion Interstate 15 Express Lanes project should be complete by mid-December 2011. Once finished, the four-lane "freeway within a freeway" will span 20 miles from Route 78 in Escondido to Route 163 near Mira Mesa. As of September 2011, all that remained was:

    1. Pouring and paving concrete on some sections from Centre City Parkway to 9th Avenue in Escondido. Excavated dirt covers some of the already formed express lanes, giving the false appearance that large stretches of them still need concrete pouring. Caltrans officials say the vast majority of the 28,700 cubic yards of concrete has already been poured on the final 4-mile leg.

    2. Construction of a concrete barrier separating the northbound and southbound express lanes, from south of Valley Parkway to Centre City. Unlike the express lanes now open, the last stretch of lanes won't be separated from the regular lanes by a moveable barrier. Only yellow striping will separate the two types of lanes.

    3. Installation of overhead express lane message signs across the freeway.

    The 2007 Corridor Mobility Improvement Account also received a request regarding this segment. Approved for funding was $350 million for managed lanes from Route 163 to Route 56. Also submitted were managed lanes on the Mira Mesa access ramp ($50 million), but this wasn't approved for funding.

    In September 2011, the CTC approved $5,883,000 for a project in the city of San Diego, from north of Main Street to south of Landis Street pedestrian overcrossing. to rehabilitate 23 roadway lane miles to extend pavement service life and improve ride quality.

    [Mira Mesa]In August 2007, the CTC received notice of the preparation of an EIR for a project between PM 14.8 and 16.3 in the Mira Mesa area. in San Diego County. The proposed project would construct roadway improvements including a Direct Access Ramp (DAR) on State Route 15 near San Diego in San Diego County. The project is fully funded from the 2006 State Transportation Improvement Program, Congestion Mitigation Air Quality Program, and San Diego’s Transnet Program. The total estimated project cost is $56 million. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2010-11. There were four alternatives being considered in addition to "No Build":

    • (1) Hillery Drive Alternative: elevated ramp structure that would extend from the Hillery Drive/Westview Parkway intersection along the existing alignment of Hillery Drive and would continue eastward from the Hillery Drive terminus to connect with a new bridge structure within the I-15 Managed Lanes facility.

    • (2) Galvin Avenue Alternative: elevated ramp structure extending from the Galvin Avenue/Westview Parkway intersection eastward to a new bridge structure within the I-15 Managed Lanes facility.

    • (3) Maya Linda Road Alternative: elevated ramp structure extending eastward from the vicinity of the Maya Linda Road cul-de-sac to a new bridge structure within the I-15 Managed Lanes facility.

    • (4) Eastern Connection Alternative: elevated ramp structure extending westward from the east side of I-15 to a new bridge structure within the I-15 Managed Lanes facility.

    In late 2007, a request for construction bid was advertised for managed lanes SB on I-15 from Mira Mesa Boulevard to 0.3 Kilometers South of the Route 56/I-15 Separation Overcrossing.

    In June 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project that will construct a direct access ramp on Route 15 from just south of Carroll Canyon Road Overcrossing to just north of Mira Mesa Boulevard Undercrossing. The project is programmed in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program and includes Congestion Mitigation Air Quality funds, as well as local transportation funds. The estimated cost of the project is $75 million, capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12.

    In December 2011, the CTC approved $40.2 million for an access ramp from Mira Mesa Boulevard directly onto I-15 express lanes for car pools, transit buses and FasTrak users.

    In September 2012, Caltrans approved signage directing motorists to the Miramar National Cemetary. Caltrans will install signs in both the north and south directions on both freeways near Nobel Drive and Miramar Road. The agency also is working with the city of San Diego to place signs on Miramar Road to steer motorists in the right direction. Caltrans had originally rejected the signs, believing motorists could follow the exits leading to the base. It was unaware that doing that would force motorists to backtrack as the cemetery and base are on two different roads separated by some distance. In approving the signs, Caltrans indicated that “Upon a more detailed review, Caltrans misunderstood the proximity of the Miramar National Cemetery and the Marine Corps Air Station Miramar” base.
    (Source: UT San Diego, 9/24/2012)

    In January 2014, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way in the county of San Diego along Route 15 on Dulin Road, consisting of a reconstructed city street. The County, by freeway agreement dated May 19, 1971, and by letter dated September 24, 2013, agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State.

     

    Business Routes

    Norco: Hammer Avenue (some portions are former Route 31)

    Escondido: Along City Center.

     

    Naming

    The portion of I-15 from the northern I-215 junction to the Nevada state line is also named the "Mojave Freeway", as it traverses the Mojave Desert. It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 47, Chapter 117, in 1987. Mojave is a word derived from the language of the populous and warlike Yuman tribe, and refers both to the name of the desert the route traverses, as well as a city off of Route 58.

    Prior to the 1987 definition, this segment was named the "Barstow Freeway" (State Highway Commission, November 1958). This was named for the city of Barstow. Barstow refers to the city of Barstow, which was named in 1886 by the Santa Fe Railroad for its president, William Barstow Strong.

    The portion of I-15 between Wild Rash Road and Hodge Road from Wild Wash Road at milepost 55.957 to Hodge Road at milepost 60.159 in the County of San Bernardino is officially designated the "CHP Officer Justin W. McGrory Memorial Highway" It was named in memory of CHP Officer Justin Wayne McGrory. McGrory was born June 4, 1982, in Beaufort, South Carolina. He graduated from Silverado High School in Victorville, California, in 2000 and attended American River College in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining the California Highway Patrol (CHP), CHP Officer McGrory served in the United States Air Force in Little Rock, Arkansas. Upon discharge, he joined the Air Force Reserves at Travis Air Force Base in Fairfield, California, and was activated for a four-month tour of duty in Afghanistan in 2006. In 2007, CHP Officer McGrory, badge number 18606, graduated from the CHP Academy and was assigned to the Baldwin Park Area Office. After 18 months, McGrory was voluntarily transferred to the Barstow Area where he spent the remainder of his career. CHP Officer McGrory had only been a CHP Officer for a few years and did not have any collateral duties; however, because of his exceptional skills as a CHP Officer, he was scheduled to attend a field training evaluation program class to become a field training officer to train new cadets. On June 27, 2010, at approximately 3:38 a.m., CHP Officer McGrory was issuing a field sobriety test on the shoulder of the I-15 freeway when a red Pontiac G6 veered onto the shoulder and struck him. CHP Officer McGrory's partner broadcast an 11-99 (officer down) and immediately began CPR. Two other CHP officers and a sergeant arrived on the scene minutes later and assisted with CPR. CHP Officer McGrory was airlifted to Saint Mary's Regional Medical Center in Apple Valley, California, but unfortunately succumbed to his injuries at approximately 4:55 a.m. He was admired for his sense of humor, his ability to "write a citation without managing to ruin the violator's day," devotion to his family and career, confidence, charm, poise, and for being an all around great man. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 37, Resolution Chapter 49, on July 11, 2011.

    The portion of I-15 (formerly known as Route 66) in the City of Victorville between the exit of D Street and the US 395 interchange is named the “CHP Officer Richard D. Duvall Memorial Highway”. This segment was named in memory of California Highway Patrol (CHP) Officer Richard D. Duvall, who died on February 23, 1960, on a remote stretch of what was then US 66. Officer Duvall was shot and killed during a routine traffic stop by an escaped convict from the California State Prison at San Quentin who, unbeknownst to Officer Duvall, had also just fled the scene of a robbery. Born on June 19, 1933, in San Leandro, Duvall was a football star in high school and served two years in the United States Marine Corps. He attended Armstrong College of Business, and then attended the CHP Academy and took his first assignment at the Victorville substation. Officer Duvall served with the CHP in Victorville for two years prior to his tragic death. Officer Duvall's death is a reminder of the dangers that our men and women in uniform face on a daily basis, and his sacrifice for the people of the State of California should not be forgotten. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 69, Resolution Chapter 65, on 8/4/2010.

    The portion of this route from Barstow to the Nevada state line (i.e., former US 91/466) was once named the "Barstow-Jean Highway" (Resolution Chapter 369, 1925). This name comes from the principle cites at the time of naming: Barstow CA and Jean NV (Stateline was nothing back in 1925, which was before the legalization of gambling).

    The segment of I-15 between its junction with Route 138 and Oak Hill Road, in the County of San Bernardino, is named the “CHP Officer Larry L. Wetterling and San Bernardino County Sheriff's Lieutenant Alfred E. Stewart Memorial Highway”. This segment was named in honor of California Highway Patrol (CHP) Officer Larry L. Wetterling and San Bernardino County Sheriff's Lieutenant Alfred E. Stewart, who were killed in the line of duty on March 9, 1973. On that date, CHP Officer Wetterling stopped to assist a driver along the southbound side of I-15. The driver, who was a recently paroled convict, killed Officer Wetterling and stole his patrol car. Having been notified that there was a paroled convict out on a killing rampage, Lieutenant Stewart answered the call and found the criminal but, unfortunately, Lieutenant Stewart was also killed. CHP Officer Larry L. Wetterling was born in Monmouth, IL on March 9, 1942 and had a childhood dream to serve as a California Highway Patrol Officer. He graduated from San Bernardino High School in 1960 and attended San Bernardino Valley College. He graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy in Sacramento on March 1, 1968, and his first assignment was in the Riverside area until he transferred to the San Bernardino area on March 12, 1970. Sheriff's Lieutenant Alfred E. Stewart was born in Jersey City, NJ on May 24, 1933. He was the oldest of eight children. He attended Henry Snyder High School. He left school at 16 years of age and joined the United States Marine Corps and served in the Korean War. Stewart was wounded in both legs in 1950 and he received an honorable discharge from the Marine Corps on January 4, 1954. He worked for Columbia Southern Chemical Corporation. While there, he held various union offices, including that of Union Local President and attended the Industrial Labor School for Union Officials at Saint Peter's Prep, in Jersey City. He received an honorable discharge from the Marine Reserve as Staff Sergeant in 1965 after 14 years of service. He joined the North Bergen Police Force in North Bergen, NJ in 1960. He became a detective and was a member of the Vice Squad. In the Police Detective Bureau, he worked in criminal investigation and arrests. Lieutenant Stewart and his family moved to California in 1964, and he was hired by the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department, where he was one of the founding members of the California Narcotics Officer's Association, serving as the eighth president in 1972. In 1973, the California Narcotics Officer's Association created the Alfred E. Stewart Memorial Award to memorialize Lieutenant Stewart by honoring individual achievement of working narcotic officers. Named by Assembly Concurrant Resolution (ACR) 127, 8/30/2010, Resolution Chapter 110.

    The I-15/Route 210 interchange is named the "William Leonard" interchange. William E. Leonard served as Chairman for both the California Highway Commission and the California Transportation Commission (1973-1974).

    This portion of this route from I-40 to the northern I-15/I-215 junction is part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

    Route 15 from Limonite Avenue exit to the the northerly I-15/I-215 junction is named the "Ontario Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 10, Chapter 136, in 1989. This is because this segment goes through the City of Ontario. Ontario was named in 1882 by George B. Chaffey, who came from Ontario, Canada.

    The northbound and southbound portions of Route 15, between Kenwood Avenue and Sierra Avenue, San Bernardino County, are named the "CHP Officer Reuben F. Rios, Sr., Memorial Freeway". California Highway Patrol Officer Reuben F. Rios, Sr. died while protecting and serving the people of California on October 26, 1996. He was directing traffic departing the Blockbuster Pavillion, a concert venue in Glen Helen by Route 15, when an intoxicated motorist accelerated for a lane change and struck Officer Rios. He was thrown onto the hood of the vehicle, then into the windshield, and fell to the pavement with major head trauma and internal injuries. Fellow officers immediately rushed to Officer Rios' aid and he was transported by ambulance to the hospital, but was pronounced dead upon his arrival. The person responsible for Officer Rios' death, was arrested, sentenced, and convicted of vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence supported by previous drunk driving convictions. Officer Reuben F. Rios, Sr. had been named Officer of the Year in 1996, and had been honored by the Latino Peace Officers Association, the San Bernardino Chamber of Commerce, the VFW, and others. His son, Reuben, Jr., graduated from the CHP Academy in April 1998. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 110, Chapter 93, July 12, 2000.

    Unofficially, Route 15 from Route 60 to the northern I-15/I-215 junction is named the "Devore Freeway". This is because this segment goes through the community of Devore.

    The portion of Route 15 from Second Street in Norco to Limonite Avenue in Eastvale is named the Sergeant Gilbert Cortez and K-9 Mattie Memorial Highway. It was nameed in memory of Sergeant Gilbert Cortez and his K-9 partner, Mattie. Cortez was born in 1966 and raised in the City of Corona. On September 17, 1990, Mr. Cortez began his career with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Mr. Cortez was first assigned to the California Institution for Men in Chino and then transferred to Calipatria State Prison on October 29, 1992, where he became part of the Investigative Services Unit. While at Calipatria State Prison, Mr. Cortez was promoted to the rank of sergeant. Sergeant Cortez then transferred to the California Rehabilitation Center on October 29, 2001, to return to his hometown of Corona. Sergeant Cortez held various positions at the California Rehabilitation Center and was able to join the Investigative Services Unit once again as an investigator. In 2011, Sergeant Cortez became a part of the Southern Regional K-9 Unit, partnering with K-9 Mattie, who was certified to search for contraband and narcotics. Mattie was a Belgian Malinois who was donated by a private citizen in the San Diego area; it is not stated when Mattie was born. Sergeant Cortez and K-9 Mattie were killed in an automobile accident on Route 79 near San Felipe Road in the County of San Diego on March 25, 2013. K-9 Mattie died at the scene of the accident, while Sergeant Cortez succumbed to his injuries at a local fire station before an emergency services helicopter could transport him to a trauma center. At the time of the accident, Sergeant Cortez was part of a convoy of state corrections K-9 officers that was en route to inspect the La Cima Conservation Fire Camp, an inmate-staffed firefighting outpost in a rural part of the County of San Diego. Sergeant Cortez is survived by his wife, two children, and parents. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 65 on 2/6/2014, Resolution Chapter 7.

    The interchange at I-15 and Route 91 within the City of Corona in the County of Riverside is named the Officer Shannon Distel Memorial Interchange. It was named in memory of CHP Officer Shannon Distel of the California Highway Patrol, who was killed in the line of duty on August 27, 2003. Officer Distel was patrolling on surface streets at 4:15 pm on August 27, 2003, when his motorcycle collided with a pickup truck pulling a trailer. This naming is in recognition of the hazardous work, serious responsibilities, and strong commitment that Officer Distel willingly accepted during his six years as a law enforcement officer. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 163, August 19, 2004, Chapter 151.

    The 4.3 mile portion of I-15 from the I-215 interchange to the South Route 79 Exit at Route 79 in Temecula is named the "Deputy Kent Hintergardt Memorial Highway" It was named in memory of Deputy Kent Alan Hintergardt, born in Whittier on December 14, 1959. Deputy Hintergardt graduated from California High School in Whittier, and earned an Associates Degree in Police Science from Rio Hondo College. He Deputy Hintergardt worked as an Assistant Manager for Vons grocery store for 10 years prior to joining the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department on March 22, 1989, and graduated from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Academy on August 31, 1989. Deputy Hintergardt's first assignment was in the Los Angeles County Central Jail until he joined the Riverside County Sheriff's Department on February 7, 1991, and was assigned to the Lake Elsinore Station. Deputy Hintergardt was reassigned to the Southwest Station and eventually was assigned to the City of Temecula, where he served the last few months before his untimely death, when he was shot and killed in the line of duty on Mother's Day, May 9, 1993, in Temecula, when he responded to a domestic violence call. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 33, Resolution Chapter 89, on 9/1/2009.

    Between Route 91 and the southerly I-15/I-215 junction, I-15 is named the "Corona Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission in 1958, and follows former LRN 77. It was named because the route traverses the community of Corona (Latin: Circle), which was named in 1896 because of the circular drive around the city; this was the scene of spectacular auto races 1913-1916.

    The segment of Route 15 from the San Diego County Line to Bundy Canyon Road near Lake Elsinore is named the "Temecula Valley Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 125, Chapter 78, in 1990. This naming supersedes portions of the Escondido and Coronado Freeways.

    The segment of this route between I-805 and Route 91 is officially named the "Escondido" Freeway. The segment between I-805 and Route 91 was named by the State Highway Commission in 1957. The segment between I-8 and Route 215 also received this name officially from Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 34, Chapter 67, in 1979.

    The portion of Route 15 between Gopher Canyon Road milepost marker 40.84 and the Old Highway 395 overcrossing milepost marker 43.28 in the County of San Diego is named the "CHP Officer Dan N. Benavides Memorial Highway". It was named in memory of CHP Officer Daniel Nava Benavides, who was born on November 27, 1970, in Monterrey, Mexico. His mother, Consuelo, a resident of San Jose, California, went to Mexico to be with family for the birth and shortly there after returned to San Jose. Officer Benavides graduated from Andrew Hill High School in San Jose in 1989 and attended Cuesta College in San Luis Obispo. In 1997, Officer Benavides, badge number 15193, graduated from the California Highway Patrol Academy as a pilot officer and was assigned to the Monterey area. After 33 months of service in the Monterey area, Officer Benavides served in San Jose from 1999 to 2000, in San Diego from 2000 to 2003, in Oceanside from 2003 to 2005, and in the Border Division Thermal Air Operations Unit from 2005 to 2010. On May 7, 2010, Officer Benavides began his shift at 7:30 a.m. working speed enforcement for the air operations unit. Approximately two hours later, Officer Benavides was in route to Route 8 to work speed enforcement in the El Centro area, when his Cessna 206 airplane crashed in a remote area of the Anza-Borrego Desert in Borrego Springs, California. Officer Benavides was a hard-working, dedicated officer who loved his job and enjoyed the people he worked with. He was known for being a loyal family man and a wonderful father and husband. His greatest joys were his wife and daughter and spending time with friends and family. He had an incredible sense of humor and a keen sense of knowledge of music and computers. In his spare time, Officer Benavides enjoyed camping, scuba diving, barbequing, and anything to do with sports. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 30, Resolution Chapter 92, on September 15, 2011.

    In San Diego County, I-15 is called the "Cabrillo" Freeway (until the junction with Route 163, which continues as the Cabrillo freeway). Juan Rodríquez Cabrillo was the leader of one of the first European expeditions to California. In 1542, Cabrillo led the first European expedition to explore what is now the west coast of the United States. Cabrillo was commissioned by Pedro de Alvarado, Governor of Guatemala, for a voyage up the California coast under the flag of Spain. Cabrillo hoped to find the fabulously wealthy cities known as Cibola, believed to be somewhere on the Pacific coast beyond New Spain, and a route connecting the North Pacific to the North Atlantic. Cabrillo reached "a very good enclosed port" which is now San Diego bay, on September 28, 1542, naming it "San Miguel". He probably anchored his flagship, the San Salvador at Ballast Point on Point Loma's east shore. Six days later, he departed San Diego sailing northward and exploring the uncharted coast line of California. The expedition reached San Pedro on October 6, Santa Monica on the 9th, San Buenaventura on the 10th, Santa Barbara on the 13th and Pt. Concepcion on the 17th. Because of adverse winds Cabrillo turned back, harboring at San Miguel Island, and did not progress beyond Santa Maria until November 11. With a favorable wind later that day they reach the "Sierra de San Martin," probably Cape San Martin and the Santa Lucia Mountains in southern Monterey County. Struck by a storm and blown out to sea, the two vessels are separated and do not rejoin until the 15th, probably near Año Nuevo north of Santa Cruz. The next day they drifted southward, discovering "Bahía de los Pinos" and "Cabo de Pinos." These are most likely Monterey Bay and Point Pinos. On the 18th they turned south, passing snow-capped mountains (the Santa Lucias), and on November 23 returned to their harbor at San Miguel Island, where they remained for nearly three months. Cabrillo died January 3, 1543, on San Miguel Island, and may have been buried on Catalina Island. He died from complications of a broken leg incurred from a fall during a brief skirmish with natives. It was named by Assembly Bill 1769, Chapter 569, in 1959.

    The section of I-15 between Route 78 and the City of Temecula is designated the "Avocado" Highway. This is in recognition of the fact that nearly 50 percent of the avocados consumed in the US are grown in San Diego County. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 9, Chapter 62, in 1997.

    The portion of I-15 between I-10 and I-210, in the City of Rancho Cucamonga and the County of San Bernardino, is named the “CHP Officer John Bailey Memorial Freeway”. This segment was named in memory of CHP Officer John Bailey, born on June 17, 1969, in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He graduated from Catoctin High School in Thurmont, Maryland, in 1987. Prior to beginning his career with the Department of the California Highway Patrol, CHP Officer Bailey enlisted in the United States Army while a senior in high school. He honorably served his country in the United States Army and then in the California Air National Guard. CHP Officer Bailey served in various missions during his military career, the most recent during Operation Iraqi Freedom, for one year in Tikrit, Iraq. CHP Officer Bailey was a Sergeant First Class and was classified as active duty at the time of his death. CHP Officer Bailey, badge number 14664, joined the Department of the California Highway Patrol on November 6, 1995. On May 10, 1996, after successfully completing academy training, he reported to the Barstow area as an officer. Officer Bailey made significant contributions to traffic safety and assisting the motoring public while assigned to the Barstow and Rancho Cucamonga area offices. Officer John Bailey was killed in the line of duty during the evening hours of February 25, 2006. He was on a traffic stop on I-15 near US 395 in the City of Hesperia, when a drunk driver collided into his patrol motorcycle; he tragically succumbed to his injuries as a result of the collision. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 119, Resolution Chapter 113, on 8/18/2008.

    The portion of I-15 between Miramar Road (milepost marker 14.285) and Mercy Road (milepost marker 17.311), in the County of San Diego, is named the "Tuskegee Airmen Highway". Named in honor of the Tuskegee Airmen. The United States Army Air Corps formed the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Medium Bombardment Group at Tuskegee Institute to train African American fighter pilots who, until that time, had not been accepted into pilot training programs in the military. The Tuskegee Airmen were sent to the European Theatre in 1943 and served in combat in North Africa, Sicily, and Europe. At the end of World War II, the Tuskegee Airmen were credited with destroying 261 enemy aircraft, damaging 148 enemy aircraft, destroying or damaging 940 units of enemy ground transportation, flying 15,553 combat sorties in 1,578 missions over North Africa, Sicily, and Europe, and conducting more than 200 bomber escort missions. The Tuskegee Airmen unit, including its officers and enlisted personnel, received three Presidential Unit Citations, 150 Distinguished Flying Cross and Legion of Merit awards, the Red Star of Yugoslavia, nine Purple Hearts, 14 Bronze Stars, and more than 700 Air Medals and Oak Leaf Cluster awards. Sixty-six of the Tuskegee Airmen were killed in combat, and another 33 were shot down and held as prisoners of war. The unqualified success of the Tuskegee Airmen helped lead to the eventual integration of the United States Armed Forces. The record of the Tuskegee Airmen in World War II was accomplished by individuals who bravely accepted the challenge and proudly displayed their skill and patriotism in spite of great adversity at home and abroad. The Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. is an education and community service organization dedicated to maintaining the traditions of the Tuskegee Airmen and preserving the legacy of the first generation of African American military aviators of World War II with 42 chapters throughout the United States, and has consistently provided inspiration, motivation, mentoring, and role models for elementary, middle, and high school students in this country. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 90, Resolution Chapter 104, on August 31, 2012. This stretch was dedicated and signed in February 2013. In attendance at the dedication were several Tuskegee airmen who now live in San Diego.

    This portion of this route that was part of US 395 is part of "Historic US Highway 395", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 98, Chapter 79, 7/8/2008.

     

    Named Structures

    Bridge 57-106, the Penasquitos Creek Bridge is officially named the "Knott Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1964, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 13, Chapter 75, in 1995. Cara Knott was a 20-year-old San Diego State University student. On the night of Dec. 27, 1986, she was pulled over by a veteran CHP officer in San Diego, forced to drive down a secluded road and was murdered by the CHP officer. Her parents later sought help from the CHP when their daughter was late in returning to their El Cajon home from visiting her sick boyfriend in Escondido. Her father was there when her body was found below what is now called the Cara Knott Memorial Bridge. In an odd coincidence, Sam Knott, who became a victims' rights crusader after his daughter Cara's murder, died in December 2000 near the spot where she was beaten and strangled by a California Highway Patrol officer Craig Peyer. Knott had been picking up trash in the area where his daughter was killed. He turned that site near Interstate 15 off Mercy Road and north of Scripps Poway Parkway into a memorial dedicated to victims of violence. This is just N of where Route 163 and I-15 intersect.

    Bridge 57-870, at the W. Lilac Road overcrossing in San Diego county, is named the "Walter F. Maxwell Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1978, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 14, Chapter 68, in 1981. Walter F. Maxwell, (1909-1980), civil engineer, built over 750 bridges and overpasses in southern California.

    The I-15 bridge over Lake Hodges in San Diego County is named the "Chelsea King Memorial Bridge". Named in memory of Chelsea King, a 17-year-old Poway High School student, who disappeared after going for a run in Rancho Bernardo Park in San Diego County on February 25, 2010. After a search by law enforcement and thousands of citizen search volunteers, Chelsea King’s body was found near Lake Hodges, and it was determined her life had been tragically taken by a violent sex offender. A man who was convicted of violently molesting a 13-year-old in 2000, but was freed after only five years in prison, has pled guilty to the crime. Chelsea King will always be remembered by her community for her compassionate heart and positive spirit, whether for helping plan a prom for developmentally disabled youth, packing relief boxes for those in need in Africa, or serving as a peer counselor at her school. Chelsea King was an avid cross country runner, a gifted student, and a loving daughter and sister, whose life was untimely and tragically ended.Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 165, Resolution Chapter 134, on September 18, 2012.

    Bridge 57-919, in San Diego county at Claremont Mesa Blvd., is named the "Richard T. Silberman Bridge". It was built in 1985, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 67, Chapter 107, in 1987. Richard Silberman was once a state Director of Finance, a Secretary of Business, Transportation and Housing and the Governor’s Chief of Staff. Silberman helped Jerry Brown get elected governor. Silberman was once one of San Diego’s biggest movers and shakers. He bought and sold banks, chaired the downtown redevelopment agency and helped found Old Town’s Bazaar del Mundo. He was one of the founding partners in Jack-in the Box, and was associated with Ralston Purina in executive capacities after their acquisition of Foodmaker. He was also associated with the California First Bank (subsequently acquired by the Bank of Tokyo) as President. In 1989 (after the bridge was named), Silberman (who was at one time married to ex-San Diego Mayer Susan Golding) was busted in an FBI sting for laundering $300,000 in what he believed was Colombian drug money. He was convicted a year later and sentenced to 46 months in prison. Since his release from federal prison three years ago, he divorced Golding and moved to San Francisco. He has been involved in consulting for the Mountain Mike’s Pizza chain. But while in prison, he and Golding quietly divorced. He is currently president of Operating Advisors Inc., where he provides strategic planning, financial and acquisition advisory services.

    Bridge 54-909, the I-15/I-10 separation in San Bernadino county near Ontario, is named the "Daniel D. Mikesell Interchange". It was built in 1975, and was named in Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, Chapter 84, in 1980. San Bernardino County Supervisor Daniel D. Mikesell exerted exceptional effort beginning in 1955 to have the Devore Cutoff included in the California Freeway and Expressway System.

    As I-15 crosses the desert, one of the exits is for Zzyzx Road. The history behind this road and the area is fascinating. The road leads to Zzyzx Springs, which was started in 1944 on illegally appropriate government land by Curtis Howe Springer who erected a 60-room hotel, a church, a health spa with mineral baths in the shape of a cross, a castle, a radio station and several other buildings. For thirty years Springer broadcast a daily religious and health program from a radio studio at Zzyzx Springs. In 1974, federal marshals finally arrested Springer for alleged violations of food and drug laws and unauthorized use of federal land. Since 1976 Zzyzx Springs, now simply known as Zzyzx, has functioned as the Desert Studies Center, a teaching and research station administered by the California State University system. The name Zzyzx was made up by Springer.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas and Scenic Overlooks:

    • Clyde V. Kane (Midway), in San Bernardino County, 30 mi E of Barstow. It was named after Clyde V. Kane, who joined the Division of Highways in 1928 as a draftsman, spent 24 years in District 8 (San Bernardino and Riverside) counties, advancing through the ranks to become Assistant District Engineer in 1947. In 1952, he was assigned as District 1 Engineer, and then moved back to District 8 as District Engineer in March 1953, continuing until his retirement on January 30, 1970, after 42 years of service. He was one of the top designers for I-15 and I-40. He was very supportive and was behind landscaping our highways, thus the trees planted along I-15. He was born in Albuquerque NM and attended grade and high school in Lakeport CA. He graduated from UC Berkeley in 1927 with a BS in Civil Engineering. In 1922, he did surveys for the SP Railroad in Imperial County and the State of Oregon. During WWII, he served for a year as chief of the engineering division for the construction of a portion of the Pan American Highway. He was responsible for early projects such as widening Foothill Blvd and the paving of S "E" Street. He led the work to complete most of the major freeway routes in the district.
      [Thanks to Shirleigh Brannon and Terri Kasinga, Public Affairs, Caltrans District 8, for this information]

      Note: In January 2013, the CTC authorized $11,273,000 to upgrade the aging and heavily used northbound and southbound Kane Rest Area. This work will reconstruct, expand, and modernize comfort stations, walkways, parking, and utilities.

    • Valley Wells, in San Bernardino County, 26 mi W of the Nevada State Line.

     

    National Trails

    De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

    Arrowhead Trail Sign The portion of this route from the northern I-15/I-215 junction to the Nevada state line (former US 91) is part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

    National Old Trails Road Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-15 (i.e., old US 66) was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

    New Santa Fe Trail Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-15 (i.e., old US 66) was part of the "New Santa Fe Trail".

    National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-15 (i.e., old US 66) appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

    All of original US 395 (i.e., the portion of I-15 from US 395 to the northern I-15/I-215 junction, and the portion of I-15 from the southern I-15/I-215 junction to Route 163) was part of the "Three Flags Highway".

     

    Business Routes
    • Escondido: Centre City Parkway. This is marked at the connection with Route 78.
    • Lake Elsinore: Main Street, but poorly signed. This is old Route 71.
    • Victorville: Seventh Street, D Street (Route 18), Historic US 66.
    • Barstow: Main Street, Historic US 66.
    • Baker: Old US 91.

     

    Commuter Lanes

    There is a 2-land reversable HOV lane, about 7.5 miles, between the Route 163 interchange and North City Parkway. These lanes opened in October 1988, require two or more occupants, and operate 6:00am-9:00am (SB), 3:00pm-6:30pm (NB).

    Assembly Bill 713, Chapter 962 in 1993 authorized congestion pricing for the lanes in San Diego County, allowing the lanes to be used as toll lanes for single-passenger vehicles. The program was continued by Senate Bill 252, Chapter 481, on 9/27/1999. This program allows fee-based travel of the HOV lane by single-occupant vehicles during peak periods as long as a predefined level of service is maintained. The program was continued indefinately by Senate Bill 313, Chapter 275, 9/10/2001 and Assembly Bill 574, Chapter 498, 10/11/2007. Individual drivers use a FasTrak transponder, and must open an account with the San Diego Association of Governments, which administers the program. The California Highway Patrol enforces the tolls, inspecting cars to see if transponders are visibly displayed. Drivers can be cited if the removable equipment isn't in the right place. Tolls are 50 cents when the lanes are nearly empty. During peak commute periods, they are likely to be between $2.50 and $4, topping out between 7 and 8 AM for the southbound commute and 4:30 to 5:30 PM northbound. Occasionally, tolls have reached as high as $8. According to SANDAG in October 2003, the managed lanes carry about 22,000 vehicles daily, more than three times the volume seen when they first opened. Roughly three-quarters are high-occupancy vehicles. The rest are FasTrak users.

    There is currently work to extend the lanes north from Rancho Peñasquitos. This segment will have the first direct-access ramps in the corridor, serving a Bus Rapid Transit project that is being developed to attract commuters who don't normally use public transportation. An additional extension north comes later, and the existing segment will be reconfigured, ultimately creating a 20-mile, four-lane corridor with multiple on-and off-ramps.

    HOV lanes are planned as follows:

    • From 1.6 mi S of Carmel Mountain Road to N Co. Fair overcrossing. Construction starts after 2000.
    • From Route 163 to I-10. Planned to open in 2011.
    • From Route 94 to I-805. Planned to open in 2011.
    • From I-10 to 0.6 mi S of Devore Road. Construction was originally planned to start in November 1997.
    • From 0.6 mi S of Devore Road to Route 215. Construction was originally planned to start in September 1999.
    • From Route 215 to US 395. Construction was originally planned to start in August 2000.
    • From US 395 to Route 18. Construction was originally planned to start in February 1999.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 76 near the San Luis Rey River to Route 91 near Corona; and from Route 138 near Cajon Pass to Route 138 near Cajon Pass; and from Route 58 near Barstow to Route 127 near Baker.

     

    Interstate Submissions

    The portion from Route 10 to the Nevada State line was approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947; Route 8 to Route 10 was approved as chargeable interstate in December 1968 using the Route 215 routing; this was changed to a western routing in February 1972, and there was a correction around Lake Elsinore in July 1978. The designation I-15 was proposed in 1957, and suprisingly, the California Department of Highways never proposed anything else.

Classified Landcaped Freeway

The following segments are designated as Classified Landscaped Freeway:

County Route Starting PM Ending PM
San Diego 15 R0.14 1.50
San Diego 15 1.50 1.65
San Diego 15 1.65 2.25
San Diego 15 2.25 2.33
San Diego 15 R3.20 R6.27
San Diego 15 R6.44 M12.15
San Diego 15 M14.51 M16.19
San Diego 15 M17.99 M18.36
San Diego 15 M18.53 M19.51
San Diego 15 M19.51 M21.92
San Diego 15 M21.92 M22.75
San Diego 15 M22.75 M25.06
San Diego 15 M25.11 M26.20
San Diego 15 M26.32 M32.08
San Diego 15 R32.66 R33.09
Riverside 15 3.02 5.40
Riverside 15 5.65 7.77
Riverside 15 7.82 8.18
Riverside 15 20.65 21.26
Riverside 15 40.09 42.05
Riverside 15 42.23 46.14
San Bernardino 15 5.27 5.99
San Bernardino 15 7.56 10.11
San Bernardino 15 40.30 41.09
San Bernardino 15 41.89 42.83
San Bernardino 15 43.21 43.48
San Bernardino 15 71.38 71.88
San Bernardino 15 73.34 73.70
San Bernardino 15 74.15 75.02

 

Historical Route

As of March 2008, the California Transportation Committee unanimously approved the designation of former US 395 as a historic route from San Diego to the Oregon border. It is still pending approval by the legislature and the governor. However, anticipating approval, San Diego County Supervisor Bill Horn approved $4,000 for the 31 signs that now mark old 395 in his district -- from Vista to the Bonsall Bridge, through downtown Fallbrook, to Rainbow.

On July 8, 2008, Resolution Chapter 79 officially designated specified sections of former US Highway Route 395 as Historic US Highway 395. The resolution noted that former US 395 was a scenic stretch of highway that ran through historic areas of the County of Riverside and provided the only direct route from San Diego to the Lake Tahoe region and northern Nevada, before heading back into California on its way north to Oregon and all the way into Canada. While former US 395 remains largely intact through the Counties of Inyo, Mono, Sierra, Lassen, and Modoc, only sections of former US 395 still exist in portions of the County of San Diego and the high desert area of the County of San Bernardino; most of the former highway route has been replaced by I-15 and I-215 in the Counties of San Diego, Riverside, and San Bernardino. US 395, which remains as I-15 and I-215, was the major and most significant connection between San Diego, the Inland Empire, and the eastern Sierra Nevada region. US 395 was known as the Cabrillo Parkway (and later the Cabrillo Freeway) in San Diego, now Route 163, it was the first freeway to be constructed in San Diego and opened to traffic in 1948. Part of the original routing of former US 395 in northern San Diego County includes the old Bonsall Bridge, one of the earliest automotive crossings over the San Luis Rey River, later becoming part of Route 76. The portion of former US 395 between Temecula and Lake Elsinore was part of the Butterfield Overland Mail route, the first major overland delivery service to southern California, established September 16, 1858. After its realignment eastward, former US 395 became the first major expressway and freeway system in the southern portion of the County of Riverside in the early 1950s, servicing the Cities of Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Sun City, and Perris. Today this is I-215. The portion of former US 395 between the Cities of San Bernardino and Hesperia, near modern US 395, traverses the Cajon Pass with old US 66 and old US 91, most famously used by the Mormons in 1851 in their crossing into the valley where they subsequently founded the modern Cities of San Bernardino and Riverside. The heritage in the regions through which former US 395 passed was greatly diminished when the former highway was replaced by suburban streets and I-15 and I-215.The Legislature hereby recognizes the remaining segments of US 395 for their historical significance and importance in the development of California, and designates those segments as Historic State Highway Route 395. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 98, Resolution Chapter 79, on 7/3/2008.

 


Overall statistics for Route 15:

  • Total Length (1995): 294 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 8,500 to 227,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 184; Sm. Urban 31; Urbanized: 79.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 288 mi; FAP: 6 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 294 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 15 was signed along the route from Long Beach to Jct. US 99 near Monterey Park via Atlantic Blvd. This was renumbered as Route 7 in 1964, and was later renumbered again as I-710. It was LRN 167 (defined in 1933 and extended in 1947). Until the construction of the freeway, Route 15 ran between Pacific Coast Highway and US 99 along Atlantic Blvd. By 1957, Route 15 ("Long Beach Freeway") had been constructed between Anaheim Ave and Atlantic Ave. In 1964, the freeway routing was renumbered as Route 7, and was later renumbered as I-710. See Route 710 and Route 7 for additional details. Note that the portion N of I-10 was not part of 1934 Route 15.

 

exitinfo.gif

 

Other WWW Links

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Defined as part of the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.11] Entire route.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 15 was first defined in the 1909 First Highway Bond act as running “From Williams to Colusa”. In the 1919 Third Bond Issue, the route was extended further, from Ukiah to Emigrant Gap. By 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as:

[LRN 15] is from [LRN 1] near Ukiah to [LRN 37] near Emigrant Gap via Williams and Colusa.

The bridge across the Sacramento River in the vicinity of the town of Meridian, Sutter County, and connecting the counties of Sutter and Colusa, of such portion thereof as is used for highway purposes for the extent provided in this section, is a part of [LRN 15] and is under the supervision and control of the department for maintenance purposes. The State assumes only that obligation of maintenance of this bridge, or highway portion thereof, imposed upon or assumed by the counties of Sutter and Colusa under any contract or agreement existing on August 21, 1933, with any railroad company for the joint use or maintenance thereof. At any time in its discretion the department may relinquish any interest of the State in this bridge to the counties of Sutter and Colusa, and thereupon the supervision and control of this bridge shall revert to and be vested in those counties.

The portion from Williams to Colusa was considered a primary route.

In 1953, Chapter 1408 changed the origin of this route to “[LRN 56] near Fort Bragg”, and added non-substantive language about Section 600. In 1955, Chapter 1488 removed the language relating to Section 600. In 1957, Chapter 36 relaxed the description, by indicating "via Willits, Williams, and Colusa.". In 1961, Chapter 1146 in 1961 deleted the paragraph about the bridge between Sutter and Colusa counties. This left the description as “From [LRN 56] near Fort Bragg to [LRN 37] near Emigrant Gap via Willits, Williams, and Colusa.”

This route had the following segments, all signed as Route 20 (and are still signed as Route 20):

  1. from Route 1 (LRN 56) near Fort Bragg to US 101 near Willits (LRN 1).

  2. from US 101 (LRN 1) near Calpella to Route 45 (LRN 88) near Colusa, passing through Upper Lakes (jct Route 29 (LRN 89)), Clearlake (jct Route 53 (LRN 49)), a jct with Route 16 (LRN 50), and Williams (jct US 99W (LRN 7)).

  3. from Route 45 (LRN 88) 4 mi S of Colusa through Yuba City, Marysville, and Grass Valley to join up with US 50 (LRN 37) near Emigrant Gap.


State Shield

State Route 16



Routing
  1. Route 20 to Route 5 near Woodland via Rumsey and Woodland.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    In 1934, Route 16 was signed from Jct. Route 20 near Wilbur Springs to Jackson via Sacramento. It was LRN 50. It ran between Route 20 (LRN 15) and US 99W (LRN 7). Circa 1935, Route 16 was under construction between Route 20 and Rumsey. The portion between Route 20 and Rumsey was added in the third bond issue in 1919; the portion between Rumsey and Woodland was added in 1933.

     

    Status

    [Project map]In February 2010, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project in Yolo County that would reconstruct a portion of Route 16 from County Road 78 near the town of Brooks to the South Fork Willow Slough Bridge near the town of Madison. Reconstruction will bring this portion of Route 16 to current design standards resulting in improved safety. The project is fully funded in the 2008 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated project cost is $77,392,000 for capital and support. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2011-12. The project required a Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR), for it will involve construction activities resulting in potential impacts to cultural and biological impacts, including removal of 317 native trees and as many as 1763 orchard trees. To address this removal, there is a revegitation plan. The removal of 21 elderberry bushes also impacts the Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle, and it would permanantly impact about 38 acres of Swainson's Hawk foraging habitat (Caltrans is planning to replant bushes and buy credits to offset these). There is also community opposition to the project.

    In August 2011, a Sacramento judge requested that Caltrans rework the Capay project. Caltrans contends the narrow, twisting road is a danger and needs major upgrades to prevent accidents and ease emergency response. The department also wants to raise low-lying sections of roadway prone to flooding. The changes would affect an approximately 12-mile stretch of highway between I-505, near Madison, and the casino, near Brooks. Residents and farmers argue the project would destroy farmland and damage the valley's rural character. They say accidents have decreased in recent years and insist small-scale changes will help. They filed a lawsuit in January 2010 challenging Caltrans' December 2009 final environmental impact report on the Route 16 project. Sacramento Superior Court Judge Michael Kenny sided partly with the residents in a 42-page ruling issued in late July 2011. Kenny wrote that Caltrans had failed to provide sufficient accident data, including a breakdown of collisions by location, to show a need for the project. He also said the department had failed to adequately weigh options, such as the "spot improvements" and narrower shoulders favored by some residents. He directed Caltrans to rescind the project. Caltrans will likely draft a revised report, and obtain more public comment.
    (Source: Sacramento Bee)

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route from Route 20 to Rumsey was named the "Yolo and Lake Highway" by Resolution Chapter 283 in 1915.

    The section of Route 16 in Yolo County between County Road 98 and I-505 is named the “CHP Officer Andrew "Andy" Stevens Memorial Highway”. It was named in memory of California Highway Patrol (CHP) Officer Andrew "Andy" Todd Stevens, born February 25, 1968, in Sacramento, California. Andy Stevens attended Kohler Elementary School in North Highlands. He then attended Carmichael Baptist Academy where he graduated from high school in 1986. Following high school, he attended American River College and Sacramento City College where he studied criminal justice. Law enforcement was his career of choice. In May 1994, Andy Stevens was selected for the position of Cadet at the CHP Academy. Upon graduation, CHP Officer Stevens was assigned to road patrol in Baldwin Park. Later, he worked in San Jose, Golden Gate Communications Center, Golden Gate Division, and the Woodland area. In May 2002, he found his true calling and was assigned as a Commercial Officer in Valley Division, serving the Sacramento area. While working in Woodland, CHP Officer Stevens met an Emergency Medical Technician named Michelle, who was working for American Medical Response Ambulance Company. They were married on October 20, 2002, at Lake Tahoe. CHP Officer Stevens' life was packed with achievements. He was the Director of the Auburn Chapter of the Harley Owners Group and was instrumental in organizing and coordinating numerous charitable events. He was in his second year of organizing the Annual Toy Run in Auburn, which raises toys for over 1,000 disadvantaged children in the community. CHP Officer Stevens was killed on November 17, 2005, in a felonious assault while working road patrol near Route 16 in rural Yolo County. CHP Officer Stevens had initiated a traffic stop for a Vehicle Code violation and approached the violator's vehicle when he was suddenly and ruthlessly shot by the driver. The driver fled the scene and was apprehended less than 12 hours later. CHP Officer Stevens was laid to rest in Sacramento County after a ceremony attended by thousands of mourners, including his fellow officers, friends, and family. CHP Officer Stevens is survived by his beloved wife Michelle, his parents John and Patricia Stevens, mother-in-law Kathleen, his brother Mark and sister-in-law Nahrain, brother-in-law Ezaria, nieces Jessica and Alyssa, and nephew Michael, and his bassett hounds, Abby and Rocky. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 141, Resolution Chapter 137, on 9/5/2008.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.3] From Route 20 to Capay.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 505 to Route 5 near Woodland. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  2. From Route 50 near Perkins to Route 49 near Drytown.

    The vehicle code explicitly permits (21115.5) a golf cart or a low-speed vehicle to cross Route 16 at Murieta Drive and at Murieta South Parkway if the crossing is controlled by an official traffic control device and is at an angle of approximately 90 degrees to the direction of the highway. The Rancho Murieta Community Services District is permitted to take any reasonable measures within its jurisdiction that are necessary to ensure that golf carts and low-speed vehicles may cross safely and that highway traffic is not unreasonably impeded thereby. This is permitted only until January 1, 2007. (Permitted until 1/1/2006 by SB 612, Chapter 16, 6/24/2003; extended by AB 188, 6/30/2006, Chapter 26).


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, segment (b) was defined as "(b) Route 5 near Woodland to Sacramento", and there was a segment (c): "(c) Route 50 near Perkins to Route 49 near Drytown."

    In 1984, the original segment (b) was deleted by Chapter 409. The deleted segment was Level Road and Sacramento Avenue, and ran past the Yolo County offices. That segment was still LRN 50 (defined in 1933), and continued into downtown Sacramento. It was cosigned with Route 24. There was also a small portion between Route 160 and Route 99 near Sacramento via Broadway. This was defined in 1910 as part of LRN 4, and appears to have been removed from the system by 1975, although it was formally removed in 1984.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    Pre-1964 State Shield In 1934, Route 16 was signed from Jct. Route 20 near Wilbur Springs to Jackson via Sacramento. Route 16 may have been signed along the portion of present-day Route 49 between Drytown and Jackson.

    In downtown Sacramento, Route 16 (LRN 50) came in around I Street, and then down 3rd/5th Streets to N Street. As of 2007, there was still a Route 16 postmile on the I Street bridge at the Yolo-Sacramento county line, facing eastbound into Sacramento. Route 16 the ran across N Street to 15th Street signed as Route 16. Route 16 continued along Capitol Avenue as LRN 11, joining US 50 at 29th/30th Street. It continued as LRN 11, signed as US 50, along Folsom Blvd to Perkins, where it diverged from US 50.

    Actually, the N Street/Capitol Avenue (originally M Street in the 1940s) routing had been the following highways, in progression: US 40/US 99W and Route 16 in 1942, and just Route 16 by 1963. Sometime in the mid-1960s, Route 16 ran co-signed with US 99W and US 40 via P and Q Streets and returned to Capitol Avenue via 15th and 16th Streets (former US 40, current Route 160)—whether they were cosigned is unknown. After the construction of the WX Freeway (the unsigned I-305 segment), signage for Route 16 was removed from downtown Sacramento and may have followed I-5 south of the I Street Bridge and east via the Topple Alley ramp on current Business Route 80 to Perkins, which is now indistinguishable from the rest of Sacramento (but still retains mention in the legislative definition of Route 16). According to a late-1960s map of the Sacramento Valley present in UC Davis's Storer Hall, Route 16 was co-signed with I-5 from future Exit 537 (Main Street, former Route 16) to future exit 531 (County Road 22), where Route 16 then split off to follow the Sacramento River into West Sacramento and Bryte. Thus, County Road 22 was de-designated as part of Route 16 after the construction of I-5 in the area; but the route to I Street would not be removed immediately after I-5's arrival. From 1981 (when I-80 was moved off the WX and 29/30 routings that make up the Capital City Freeway/Business Route 80), Route 16's implied multiplex east of Topple Alley would be with US 50/Route 99/Business Route 80/I-305.
    [Thanks to Chris Sampang for this information.]

    The specific chronology, according to Chris Sampang, is as follows:

    • 1911. I Street Bridge constructed. Articles: here.

    • 1919. LRN 50 commissioned from Woodland to Sacramento. This would eventually be Route 16.

    • 1930s. US 99 and US 40 are routed west on the I Street Bridge into West Sacramento, before connecting via surface streets to West Capitol Avenue to Davis via the Yolo Causeway.

    • 1934. Route 16 commissioned; routing includes Main Street in Woodland, County Road 22 through Conaway, Old River Road from the site of the current I-5 Elkhorn Viaduct to Bryte, Harbor Boulevard in Bryte, Sacramento Avenue through Broderick, 6th Street and C Street through downtown West Sacramento over the I Street Bridge into Sacramento itself.

    • 1935. Tower Bridge completed (replacing the old M Street Bridge; more information on Joel Windmiller's page); US 99 and US 40 moved to the new connection to West Capitol Avenue.

    • Late 1930s. Route 24 extended to Sacramento on Route 16's path from Woodland via West Sacramento and Bryte.

    • Late 1950s. Route 24 rerouted to Jiboom Street, Garden Highway, and El Centro Avenue north of Sacramento; this is now Route 99 and Route 70. A short multiplex of Route 16 and 24 still existed in downtown.

    • 1964. Route 84 definition extended north along Jefferson Boulevard into West Sacramento; terminus is at I-80/ US 40/ US 99W (now US 50/ Business Route 80/I-305). As a temporary routing, Route 16 was rerouted from the Capitol Avenue corridor to the former routing of Route 24 via 3rd/5th Streets and Broadway.

    • 1965. Route 84 definition extended along Jefferson Boulevard north of current US 50, then west on Sacramento Avenue and Reed Avenue to I-880 (now I-80). As no changes to Route 16's definition are made at this time, an unacknowledged overlap is now present on Sacramento Avenue between Harbor Boulevard and Jefferson Boulevard for northbound Route 84 and westbound Route 16 (and vice versa).

    • 1967. US 99W removed on co-signed portion with Route 16 in Woodland (from East Street (former US 40A/US 99W, later former Route 113 which has now been bypassed by the freeway) west on Main Street to County Road 98).

    • 1968. I-5 completed from Sacramento County line northwest to East Main Street and from County Road 18 north to Colusa County line. Route 16 may have been placed on the freeway from Old River Road west to East Main Street (bypassing County Road 22 in Conaway). Also, the I-5/Route 16 interchange in downtown Sacramento is constructed; this forces the removal of several original ramps to the I Street Bridge but is functionally a freeway-to-freeway junction between Route 16 and I-5 for access to Old Town Sacramento.

    • Early 1970s. Due to the completion of I-5 in Sacramento, Jiboom Street and Garden Highway (as well as the portion of El Centro Avenue between Garden Highway and I-5) are all removed from the state highway system; post-1964 this routing had been Route 70 and Route 99. Thus, Route 70 and Route 99 had a small co-signage on I Street in Sacramento with Route 16 from 1964 to the early 70s. Also, a 1975 Caltrans map shows Route 16 being routed concurrent with I-5 between the I Street Bridge and Power Inn Road.

    • 1973. Woodland bypass completed; Business Route 5 may have been established at this point, co-signed with Route 16 on Main Street.

    • Mid-1970s. Due to a tough railroad grade crossing on Harbor Boulevard north of Sacramento Avenue, a new bypass for Route 16 is constructed from Harbor to Sacramento. It is current Sunset Avenue; which has a much gentler approach than Harbor; it is also still signed for Woodland.

    • 1984. As I-5 is now the primary route to Woodland, Route 16 is decommissioned between east of Conaway and Sacramento, removing the I Street Bridge from the state system. Route 16 references may have been removed from sign gantries at this time (evidence of this is at the junction of I and 4th where several sign gantries have greenout, and more notably at Capitol Avenue eastbound after I-5, where a shield-out is evident next to Route 70 and Route 99 markers on an assembly.) Milemarkers are also removed; the existance of any on the old Woodland-Sacramento portion of Route 16 is highly unlikely - except for one on the I Street Bridge, as the photo at http://www.angelfire.com/stars4/streetlights/old_postmile_sr16.jpg demonstrates. However, Route 84 milemarkers are retained on Sacramento Avenue and Jefferson Boulevard. As for Woodland, around this time, Route 16 was rerouted to bypass downtown entirely by following the northern third of Business Route 5 (see http://www.interstate-guide.com/business-routes/bus05.html for details), which is County Road 98, Yolo County Route E7, and former US 99/99W. The portion of former Route 16 in downtown Woodland is now solely Business Route 5, although it is not very well-signed at all.

    • Late 1980s/Early 1990s. Route 84 shield (with END sign) past the I-80 bypass on Reed Avenue westbound replaced with bike lane sign.

    • 2003. Route 84 up for relinquishment in West Sacramento; once approved, this would remove Sacramento Avenue from the state system entirely after 84 years.

    Nathan Edgars looked at traffic counts, and came up with the following:

    • 1964: Route 16: I Street Bridge, down 3rd-5th and over Broadway to Route 160, then a break until the split from US 50

      Route 80: Tower Bridge, over Capitol/N to 29th-30th, then a break to Broadway at 29th-30th and up 29th-30th

      Route 99: from the south to Broadway, then west on Broadway, then a break to the east end of the I Street Bridge and up Jibboom Street

    • By 1966: Another piece of Route 99 added along P and Q Streets between Route 160 and Route 16. The changes to Route 80 are unclear.

    • By 1968: Route 80 moved to the new route, with the west part becoming Route 275

      Route 16 cut back to I-5 at the east end of the I Street Bridge

      Route 99 removed from P and Q Streets and instead routed back west on Broadway, replacing Route 16, but only to Route 275, where it broke until Jibboom Street

    • By 1970: Route 99 removed from Jibboom Street etc.

    State Shield At this point, the current routing resumed. It was signed as Route 16, but was LRN 54, between the junction with US 50 (LRN 11) and Route 49 (LRN 65) near Drytown. The portion of LRN 54 between US 50 and the county line near Michigan Bar was defined in 1933; the remainder of the route between the county line and Route 49 near Drytown was defined in 1919.

    It appears that a proposal existed through the 1970s in which Route 16 would be taken off of the surface roads west of Watt Avenue (Jackson Road, Folsom Boulevard (former US 50) and Power Inn Road) and given its own short freeway bypass connecting the Manlove district (where Watt Avenue and the El Dorado Freeway meet up) with the current junction of Watt and Jackson Road. This seems to approximate the county-constructed expressway on the Watt Avenue corridor.

     

    Status

    According to the Sacramento Bee, Caltrans plans to raise a section of Route 16 near Madison, west of Woodland. It's part of a $48 million improvement project to Route 16 between I-505 and the Capay Valley. The project, to begin in 2008, includes a handful of safety measures, including widening the shoulders and adding a 20-foot "recovery zone" beyond the shoulders. Caltrans' Jan Mendoza said the agency also plans to add some turn lanes to cut down on the number of rear-ender collisions and to smooth out some sharp curves.

    In May 2008, the CTC considered relinquishment of right of way in the city of Rancho Cordova, at Grant Line Road, consisting of a reconstructed city street.

    In August 2008, the CTC authorized relinquishment of right of way along Route 16 in the county of Sacramento near Sloughhouse, from 100 feet west of Sunrise Boulevard to 300 feet east of Murieta Parkway, consisting of reconstructed county road connections. The CTC also vacated right of way along Route 16 in the county of Sacramento near Sloughhouse, between 0.1 miles west and 0.2 miles east of the intersection with Latrobe Road, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

    In December 2009, the CTC relinquished right of way in the county of Sacramento along Route 16 at Michigan Bar Road and Ione Road, consisting of reconstructed county road connections. The CTC also vacated right of way in the county of Sacramento along Route 16 from 0.1 mile west of Michigan Bar Road to the Amador County line, consisting of highway right of way no longer needed for State highway purposes.

     

    Naming

    The portion of this route from Dillard Road in Sacramento County and the Amador County line is named the "Stanley L. Van Vleck Memorial Highway". Stanley L. Van Vleck was born in 1920 near Placerville, California. A third-generation Californian, he grew up on his family's homestead that was established about 1850. He later moved to a rance in Sloughhouse, California. He had a long and distinguished career as a rancher in the Sacramento region, and served in many leadership positions in agricultural organizations at the local, state, and national level, including the California Cattlemen's Association, the California Farm Bureau, the National Flying Farmers, and the National Cattlemen's Association. He also allowed the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the California Air National Guard, the California Department of Forestry, the Sacramento County Sheriff's Department, the Sacramento City Police Department, and the Sacramento Life Flight Unit to train on his ranch. He spearheaded the creation of the Cosumnes River School District and served as the President of that district's governing board for many years. He also shared his ranch with the entire community by allowing tens of thousands of Boy Scouts, 4-H'ers, Future Farmers of America, local students, California Operating Engineers, recreationists, and families a chance to experience agriculture and open space on his ranch. He lost his life in an accident while working at his beloved Sloughhouse ranch on September 7, 2000. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 4, Resolution Chapter 61, filed June 7, 2001.

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.2] From Route 50 near Perkins to Route 49 near Drytown. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

     

    Interregional Route

    [SHC 164.11] Between the east urban limits of Sacramento and Route 49.


Overall statistics for Route 16:

  • Total Length (1995): 82 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 740 to 48,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 76; Sm. Urban 1; Urbanized: 5.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 82 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 20 mi; Minor Arterial: 62 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Colusa, Yolo, Sacramento, Amador.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 16 was numbered as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The routing that would become LRN 16 was defined in the 1909 First Bond Act as running from Hopland to Lakeport. It remained unchanged, and was codified into the 1935 codes as:

[LRN 16] is from Hopland to Lakeport

It was considered a primary route in its entirety.

In 1939, Chapter 473 changed the reference from "Hopland" to "[LRN 1]". In 1961, Chapter 1146 relaxed the description by changing the terminus to "[LRN 89] near Lakeport", making the final wording “From [LRN 1] (US 101) to [LRN 89] (Route 29) near Lakeport.”

This segment was believed to be unsigned in 1963; it is presently signed as Route 175.



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Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin <webmaster@cahighways.org>.